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Full text of "Official Automobile Blue Book"

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^ sv How to Use 
The Blue Book 



First: Turn to the General Index oj Towns in the back of 
book and find your starting point and destination, noting 
2^2/ Number and Letter in column "under "Location Gen- 
eral Index Map. ' ' (Second pac# of General Index of Towns 
explains how to locate .a town on the map by key and num- 
ber.) 

Second: Turn to the Folded General Index Map in back 
of book and, after locating your starting point *and destina- 
tion on this map, note the black line or lines connecting 
them ; these are Route lines. 

The number or numbers with arrow pointing in the direc- 
tion of your travel is your route number. 

Third: Turn to the corresponding Route Number (not 
page number) in the book, where you will find complete 
running directions, and set your speedometer to correspond 
with the mileage at your starting point. 

There are two columns of figures with the running direc- 
tions: the first column gives the accumulated or total mile- 
age from the start of the route, and the second gives distance 
between turns or prominent points on road. 

The asterisk (*) found after certain towns in the running 
directions has reference to the Points of Interest at the 
bottom of the page. 

Fourth: The Route Chart on back of the Folded General 
Index Map gives route numbers and mileage between ter- 
minals and is used for quick reference ; it also indicates by 
heavy lines the preferable option between distant points. 

Fifth: The Long Distance Itineraries, in back of book, 
show the best way between important objectives, with Route 
Numbers and Mileages. 

Sixth: The General Index of Towns (in back of book) 
gives a complete list of towns, with key to their location on 
the General Index Map ; a list of City Maps and Points of 
Interest; a list of Accommodations (hotels, garages, service 
stations, restaurants, tea rooms, etc.) under their respective 
towns, and the page numbers, on which Advertisements ap- 
pear. The last page of the Index gives a list of General 
Advertisers. 

Seventh: The Table of Contents, page 5, gives the 
location of maps and the variQus other subjects included in 
this volume. 



r U TTTTTTTTT I TIIi m i lllUlllJTTHmHUM I HTI l 



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— docs away with that "death grip." 

A staunchly built leather holder with a transparent face that protects your 
book at any speed or in any weather. May be hung on robe rail or carried in 
the driver's lap. Pages can be turned without removing the book from 
holder. The most convenient way to carry or pack the Blue Book. 

Royal Blue finish to match the Blue Book 

Genuine Leather $3.50 each Imitation Leather $2.50 each 

For sale by all Blue Book Dealers or sent postpaid on receipt of price 

The Automobile Blue Book Pub. Co. 

• 910 So. Michigan Ave. 243 Wert 39th Street 

CHICAGO NEW YORK 



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1024 

ft?! Your Ancestor 

led With A Map Like This 



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j He traveled slowly with danger and inconvenience, 

probably carrying his funds in a money belt. 

To-Day 

: you can travel almost anywhere with speed and 

comfort, especially with your funds in the form of 

" X T\ X M American /^t 

A'JJ'A *£& Cheques 

which are well known and well received wherever 



Through the Bankers Trust Company's 
Foreign Service travelers upon their 
arrival in Europe may exchange the 
"A'B'A" Cheques taken with them for 
other "A'B'A" Cheques payable in 
pounds, francs, lire, etc., at the rate 
current on day of exchange. 

of $10, $20, $50 and $100 
vallets by banks everywhere. 

Bankers Trust Company 

New York Paris 



Page 5 



Table of Contents 

All indexes are combined into one index so that you 

will find everything pertaining to any town under 

that town, beginning on page 899. 



Pages 

How to Use the Blue Book.. . , . 1 

(Read Carefully) 



Maps 

General Index Map (folded) Back of Book 

General Index Map Reproduced in Sections 8-21 

. Skeleton Chart of Main Routes (folded) . Back of Book 

Index Map of Long Island (folded) Back of Book 

Detail Map of Staten Island. . .. 90-91 

Detail Map of New York City and Newark 100-101 

Detail Map of Brooklyn and Queens 144-145 

New York City (Manhattan) Points of Interest. . . Bet. 98-99 
Map of New York City, showing location of hotels 

* Bet 98-Q9 

Key Map to Pilot Maps 674-675 

Pilot Detail Maps of All Roads • 676-869 

Index Section 

Index of Cities and Towns, National P.arks, etc., with 
City Map and Points of Interest Page Numbers, 

etc 899 

Index of Hotels and Garages (Under Towns) 899 

List of General Advertisers Last Page of General Index 

Special Information 

What to Take on the Tour and How to Prepare for It 22-30 
Brief General Description of States Covered by this 

Volume 870 

Abstracts of State Motor Laws< 871-873 

Canadian and U. S. Customs Regulations 873-874* 

Principal Ferry Connections 874-876 

Principal Steamship Lines (Rates on Autos) 876-877 

Long Distance Itineraries , 878-898 

List of Special Inserts 

New York City , Bet. 98-99 

National Touring Objectives. . . >\. Bet 482^3 



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Page 6 

SAFEGUARD YOUR MONEY 
On Your Motor Trip 

The Travelers Cheque system was originated, in 1891, by the Ameri- 
can Express Company, to protect the money of travelers at home 
and abroad. The success of the plan to provide a safe, convenient, 
and universally-accepted form in which to carry travel funds, is 
attested by the fact that Travelers Cheques are now known and 
used the world around. Travelers by railroad, steamship or motor 
have come to regard them as indispensable. 

Banks, tourists' agencies and express offices sell these sky-blue 
Travelers Cheques, bound in neat leather folders. The Cheques are 
in denominations of $10, $20, $50, $100, $200. 

You sign them when you buy them. Then, wherever you are, at any 
time of day or night, on banking days or Sundays, whenever you 
wish to pay a bill or make a purchase, you tear out a Cheque and 
sign it again in the presence of the person accepting it. The two 
signatures identify you, immediately, without question and without 
the embarrassment sometimes incidental to cashing a personal 
check. 

American Express Travelers Cheques protect you against loss. 
Thieves do not seek them, for the Cheques can be cashed only by 
your signature, and the penalty for forgery is a heavy one. 

Should the Cheques be lost or destroyed, the filing of certain pro- 
tective papers with the American Express Company restores you 
the amount of the uncountersigned Cheques. 

They are negotiable at express offices and banks throughout the 
United States, Canada and abroad. Hotels prefer them, good ga- 
rages, service stations, stores, shops, and restaurants readily accept 
them in payment. 



-SPENDABLE EVERYWHERE" 

American Express Travelers Cheques 



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IVytt* tike wlk tour 



cate with the editor of the Blue Books and ask him for the particular 
equipment advice you seek. There is neither charge nor obligation 
for this special service. 

Whatever preparatory measures you take depend considerably on 
your attitude toward motoring. If you think of your automobile 
merely as a means of transportation, a loose bearing or worn piston 
will mean little and a poorly adjusted carburetor will have small sig- 
nificance so long as the car keeps working. But if you are of that 
larger clan who love a quiet car, to whom a smoothly pulling, instantly 
responding engine and perfectly adjusted running gear furnish half 
the pleasures of the trip, you will make certain of a number of things 
before you venture into strange country. 

Tune Up First go over the engine carefully. See that the com- 

the Engine pression is good and that it is even in all cylinders. 
If they need it, have the valves ground and while this 
is being done, have the carbon removed if it is necessary. Fresh oil 
in the crank case goes without saying. Look over the water connec- 
tions and replace any hose that may be worn or rotted. See that the 
radiator is leak-tight. Be sure that the pump is functioning properly 
and that the fan also is in good condition. Oil the fan bearings and 
put on a new belt if the old one shows signs of letting go. 

If there is a heat indicator on the radiator cap and it isn't locked 
on, a lock for it is not expensive. If you haven't such an indicator-— 
which shows you the temperature of the engine from your position in 
back of the wheel — by all means purchase one. 

Examine the Clean out the strainer in the gasoline line if your 
Fuel System car * s so equipped. If not, such a strainer, installed 
between the tank and the carburetor, will eliminate 
much trouble should you happen to get some dirty gasoline — which 
isn't at all unlikely. If your carburetor has been giving trouble, have 
the carburetor dealer examine it, or if your car happens to be an old 
model, a new and more efficient type of carburetor may be just the 
thing to give a good engine the pep that it has been lacking. The at- 
tachment of a mixture neater or primer is not without its advantages, 
even though your touring be in the warm months. Especially is this 
so if you expect to run into sudden low temperatures such as touring in 
mountainous country will imply. 

Ignition and Go over the ignition system. See that all platinum 

Starting Units contacts are in good condition and not so badly 
worn that they may give trouble during your trip. 
Put in new wires if any need replacement or there are bad spots in the 
insulation. Clean the spark plugs, set the gaps — 1/32 of an inch — 
and inspect them carefully for cracked porcelains. Go over the start- 
ing motor and generator carefully. Clean all contacts, and while you 
are at it. see that the generator brushes are in good shape. 

Extra spark plugs should be provided with gaskets and carried in 
a container which will protect and keep them clean. 

The Storage Give particular attention to the storage battery. 
Battery Remember that while twenty years ago it was con- 

sidered perfectly proper to drive at night by the 



Page 25 

IWwtt t> tbtktonik tour 

light of a farmer's lantern tied to the radiator cap, it is not being done 
to-day. See your battery man and let him test out the battery. Have 
him fill it with water and give it a "boost" if necessary and if yon 
haven't one now, have an ammeter or battery indicator installed on 
the cowl board because it is the reporter, the announcer of battery 
trouble. 

The Lighting Examine your headlamps. See that the brackets 
System are tight and that they have not been bent. Focus 

the lamps properly. Put in new bulbs if the old 
ones have been in use for a long time, as you get more light and use 
less current with new bulbs. Most cars are equipped with dimmers 
or some device to eliminate headlight glare. New dimmers or lenses 
that comply with the law are cheaper than fines. If your car. is not 
equipped with a dimming switch that can be conveniently reached 
while driving, install one of the many steering column controls. Put 
it on and use it every time you meet another car. You'll be surprised 
how much easier your night driving will be, and you will feel much 
more like a gentleman if you are able to reciprocate when the other 
fellow courteously "dims" as he approaches. 

One of the worst things that can happen to the tourist at night is 
lamp trouble. Hence it is good advice to carry spare bulbs^pr, better 
yet, one of the standard Automobile Lamp Kits offered by lamp manu- 
facturers. • These kits usually contain a complete duplicate set of lamp 
bulbs and are designed to protect the bulbs against breakage. 

Clutch and The clutch and transmission must be gone over and 

Transmission P ut mto P ro P er condition, and the first aid of all 
clutches and transmissions before touring is new 
lubricant. Universals, differentials and wheel bearings too, should be 
examined and relubricated. All grease cups should be cleaned, re- 
filled, screwed down and then filled again. Springs should be piled, or, 
as many motorists have discovered to be better yet, fitted with spring 
oilers or spring covers. Spring clips should be tightened. And; Inci- 
dentally, a spring repair clamp in the tool box may prove a boon. 
Buy one. You may have need for it before you get back. 

Other Vital Brakes should be looked over and tested. If the 

Adjustments lining is worn it should be replaced without fail. 

When it is considered how important an element, of 



Keep a record of your expenses 



Know, when you've finished 

your trip, exactly what were 

your car costs. 

p p * It leads to greater efficiency 

L«U* VuOSt an d lower operating expense. 

Records Provides a permanent record. 

Leather binder and pads, com- 
plete $2.00 

MOTOR LIFE 

243 West 39th Street* New York City 



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Page 26 

r Wktf'ti> tttkm ik tour 

safety enters into the proper adjustment and lining of brakes, the 
man who starts oh a motor tour might almost make this his first matter 
for preparation. 

The steering gear should be lubricated and lost motion taken up. 

If you are not expert in automobile technology, let the service sta- 
tion attend to the more difficult of the foregoing operations and adjust- 
ments. In some instances, it is not merely the specialized training that 
the motorist lacks, but the various service station devices are not at 
his command, 

Rough Roads The use of shock absorbers cannot be recommended 
and Rain t0 ° n U5hty- They not only relieve the jarring in- 

cident to driving over rough roads, but save your 
springs from breaking and constitute an investment that pays divi- 
dends in greater comfort and longer life of the car. 

During inclement weather you will derive much benefit from the 
use of a windshield cleaner, either the mechanical sort fastened to the 
shield and operated by hand, or the cleaner that comes in the form 
of a liquid preparation, which, when wiped over the windshield^ keeps 
the glass clearly transparent even in the heaviest rainstorm. 

Waterproof the Under careless handling even the best of 

Top and Curtains automobile tops will in time develop leaks. 

During town and city driving these small 
openings cause comparatively slight discomfort. It is different when 
a storm hits you in open country and you are confronted with the un- 
happy prospect of spending many hours under a leaky automobile roof 
during a drenching rain. Do what is necessary before you start. 
There are preparations on .the market by which the motorist himself 
may renovate top and side curtains and make them wind and wetproof. 

For Safety Much comfort is also derived through the use of a 

and Comfort sunshield, glare-stop, auxiliary windshields or wind- 

shield wings; from extension pedals, gear-shift 
lever extentions, non-slip pedal pads and accelerator foot-rests which 
relieve the tedium of long-continued driving. Rear-view mirrors con- 
tribute to the safety of driving and bumpers to the car's security. , ; 

Ounces of A can of radiator repair cement occupies little space, 

Precaution hut like the spring repair clamp may meet emergency 
with great helpfulness. The fire extinguisher is so ob- 
viously a safety device that it needs no commendation here. 

Since it will be necessary while on the tour for you to leave your 
car unguarded now and then, do not neglect the precaution of installing 
one of the locking arrangements, of which the market affords a number. 
The cost of such a lock is cheap theft insurance. Indeed, as in the 
case of bumpers and fire extinguishers, it reduces insurance. 

What to Do I* * s a g° 0( i pl fln — an d this practice is generally 

About Tires adopted by the seasoned cross-country tourist — to 

begin a long trip with a full set of new tires. Worn 

isings and tubes can later be put to good use in running about home 

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Page 27 

territory, but on the tour the knowledge that your wheels are shod 
with new and sound tires adds immeasurably to your sense of security 
and the precaution certainly eliminates delays and what might be 
perspiring roadside exertion. 

Tubes and While few really careful tourists venture far 

Tire Accessories from home without at least one complete tire 
change — preferably on the rim and inflated ready 
for mounting — for a long tour, two complete tire changes are wise. 
Since the majority of cars are provided only with means for carrying 
one spare tire, it often becomes advisable to attach to the car a carrier 
for a second spare. These carriers come in several models and are 
designed to become a part of the original carrier; they avoid the bother 
incident to using leather straps and certainly appear more sightly. 
Two or more extra inner tubes should be carried in strong bags into 
which a little talc has been shaken. Finally, remember that tire steal- 
ing and the peddling of stolen tires are regular industries. Consequent- 
ly, don't start without some reliable device for securely locking your 
spare tires. A complement of blow-out and inner tube patches, tire 
pressure gauge, tire valve insides, and Valve caps are necessary, while 
a portable vulcanizer is at least advisable. 



Reserves of Unless the car is fitted with a reserve fuel tank a 
GflS and Oil gallon can of gasoline should always be carried; like- 
wise a can of lubricating oil. Neither container 
should be ODened excent in case of emererencv. and when emntv each 



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Page 28 

should be refilled at the first fuel station. It is a good plan to start 
with a full gasoline tank each morning, particularly in parts where 
the wayside pump is a somewhat unfamiliar sight, or the fuel, as 
indicated earlier in this story, is likely to be of doubtful quality. 

One accessory that should have considerable interest for the tourist 
16 a gasoline gauge, preferably of the dashboard pattern. Gasoline 
consumption may be checked with a gauge of this discription and it 
will prevent you from running out of fuel in places where it is impos- 
sible to take on a new supply. Also, it shows you just how much 
gasoline you are getting when you fill up enroute. 

Be Sure When traveling through regions in which water is either 
of Water scarce or so alkaline in nature as to be unsuitable for use 
in the radiator, a bag or tank for holding the precious 
liquid to be used for the cooling system or for washing (or cooking) 
might well be carried. There are special types of containers made 
for this particular purpose, which may be carried where they will be in 
no one's way yet always be accessible when needed. 

A most important item is the tow line — either hempen rope, chain, 
or steel-wire cable. The tow rope or cable has many uses other than 
those for which it was designed. Stretched between two trees it will 
support a sheet of shading canvas under which the party may picnic; 

Chains, Jacks thrown across a small stream it becomes a safety 
and Towlines ' me f° r bathing youngsters; fastened to a post or 
tree and wound around a wheel hub it will drag 
the tourist out of difficult places. Tire chains should always be 
carried; likewise some single chains or mud hooks. There are also 
several automatic "pull-out" devices which enable one to drive 
through places that otherwise might be impassable. Many motorists 
accustomed to long-distance traveling make it a point to carry two 
jacks. In addition they carry several wooden blocks. These blocks 
make an excellent bed for the jack when tires need to be changed 
on uneven ground. They also increase the lifting capacity of the jack. 

Spots and A spotlight is a valuable accessory when it i^ 

Trouble Lights necessary to read sign posts and follow crooked, 
unfamiliar roads after dark. Further, if focused 
on the side of the road it will help you \o drive through the thickest 
fog you may encounter. Ten or fifteen feet of electric lamp cable fitted 
with suitable connectors at each end will enable you to remove the 
headlight bulb or spotlight and use it as a trouble-lamp anywhere 
around the car. Still more commendable is the use of a combination 
spot and trouble-lamp or a separate trouble-lamp. Many motorists 
also carry a pocket flash lamp which becomes a great convenience in 
reading road signs and in illuminating parts of the car that remain in- 
accessible to the trouble-lamp. Carry along a hand tire pump of re- 
liable make, and if it is not new make sure that it is in good working 
order. 

The tool kit — which never should be slighted at any time — should be 
overhauled and made complete for a long trip. 

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Page 29 

IVhat ti> bike on ik tour 

Some Friends There are a number of highly meritorious touring 
in Need accessories whose use depends on the country 

you will traverse. Where mountain roads, sandy 
stretches, and muddy places are met with, or where the condition 
of the road depends on the weather, a shovel with collapsible handle 
and a good camp axe often repay a hundred-fold the trouble of carry- 
ing them. To some, a compass may appear superfluous, but the sea- 
soned tourist commends it. On dull days when the sun cannot be 
relied on to furnish guidance, the compass points the direction without 
error. A device well known in pther fields but somewhat new for 
automobiles is a dashboard instrument which not only gives the 
altitude but by indicating, barometric pressure foretells impending 
weather changes. 

If You Go I n discussing camping equipment, so much depends on 

Camping ^ e individual's outdoor taste and enthusiasm, and in- 

cidentally on the car's carrying capacity, that only the 
merest hints can here be offered. If the party limits itself to outdoor 
sleeping, compact lightweight, insect-and-weather-proof camp beds 



Locks 



BACKUS UTILITY LOCK 

The lock of 101 uses. It will lock your 
Robes to the Robe Rail; Gloves, Cap, 
etc., to the Steering Wheel; Suit Cases 
to the Foot Rail; Robe to the Radiator 
Cap. Also it locks a Ford the best of 
any lock made. 

The BACKUS is the cheapest kind of 
insurance against the loss of loose ar- 
ticles left in the car. It is very strong, 
"Grips like a Bulldog," and will not 
damage any articles. 

Buy it, use It before you lose articles worth many times its 
cost. At all dealers or mailed on receipt of price, $1.50. 



BACKUS NOVELTY WORKS 



Smethport, Pa. 



Tire Locks 

and 
Towlines 



EDSTROM KANT KINK TOWLINE 

The first Towline offered to tourists that 
carries a guarantee against kinking or 
snagging. Made of Special Steel Cable, 
light but enormously strong. The sling 
is of manila rope. Touring 
car size, X-inch, 36.50. 
Truck size, fi-inch, #9.50 # 

EDSTROM TIRE LOCK 

Made of the same steel cable as the Edstrora Kant Kink 

Towline. Covered with chrome-tanned leather. Will give 

protection to from one to three spare tires. Price 31 .75 

at dealers' or direct by mail. 

EDSTROM MACHINERY COMPANY, CARY, ILL. 




Travelers 
Cheques 



AMERICAN EXPRESS 
TRAVELERS CHEQUES 

Should be carried by every motorist, 
because they are spendable every- 
where, at any time, they are self- 
identifying and they guard travel 
funds against loss in any way. 

See Page 6 




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Page 30 

IVhat t> lixk an 1k tbwr 

may be had. If you intend to live close to nature, "roughing it," 
you will find your cooking problems solved in admirable fashion by 
camp cooking outfits, combining lightness with an operating simplicity 
enabling even the veriest tyro in the culinary arts to prepare palatable 
and wholesome meals out-of-doors. 

But — whether you take your meals at hotels and restaurants or 
prefer to be your own cook and caterer, the vacuum bottle will in 
either case make a useful addition to your outfit Vacuum bottle 
outfits may be had in many combinations, from the single bottle to 
complete assortments in compact cases in which food may be carried 
hot or cold, ready to eat, for a half dozen travelers. 

The Camera To tour without a camera is to lose one of the keenest 
Goes Along pleasures of the trip. Without it, the joys of sight- 

seeing live only as long as the tour lasts or at best 
until its memory fades. Through the camera they live on in picture 
form as records of things seen and experienced, as scenes of peculiar 
beauty, as photographic stories by which the motorist retraces the 
journey and with which he entertains his friends years afterward. 
Fortunately, the modern camera has taken from amateur photography 
all guessing and uncertainty. Picture taking is easy. The instrument 
itself occupies so little space in the car, and supplies for it are so 
easily obtained enroute that the camera deserves especial consideration. 

The Man's For th e man, even when the plan of the tour indicates 
Clothing a P art °f tne country in which cold or damp is a remote 

possibility, a light overcoat, or a raincoat, is the first 
item to think about. 

A leather or woolen sleeveless jacket is an agreeable addition to 
one's limited outfit, more so if much of the touring is to be done 
in northern states or in the higher altitudes. 

The cap always goes along, and driving gloves. The latter, of light 
material or leather, should really be part of every tourist's ward- 
robe. Goggles — and there are innumerable styles, some of them made 
of tinted glass which counters much of the glare of the sun — are 
highly to be recommended. 

Clothing of F° r tne woman a good wool jersey is ideal as material 

the Woman f° r touring clothes. It is just right in weight for the 

average summer day and is not too light for night 
driving or sudden changes in temperature. Furthermore, it does not 
wrinkle easily. The tan and mustard colors do not show the dust so 
much and for this reason are more serviceable. As in the case of the 
man, a good medium weight coat should not be omitted. 

Toilet preparations should be carried where there is easiest access — , 
say, in a handbag. The lady's favorite face cream, a cleansing cream, 
and some sort of emollient that will soothe a sun or windburned skin, 
are necessary to her comfort. 

The equipment and accessories indicated in this section are recom- 
mended as reliable; they are standard products and may be purchased 
at good garages and supply shops along the way. If your dealer, 
should be unable to serve you with exactly what you wish, write direct 
to the manufacturer. 

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NW York City Sec. Page 31 



Route 1 



Route 1— New York City, N. Y., to New Haven, Conn. — 

75.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 



Crete. 

This route follows the general shore line of Long Island sound thru a thickly settled 
country. 

Note (a) furnishes an optional inland route to New Rochelle. 

Note (b) furnishes an option between Milford and New Haven via Savin Reek. 

r-MILEAGE-^ 

DtttiStt 
Total Bstwtte 
Miles** Prists 



For this and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 



0.0 



0.1 
0.8 

1.3 
2.4 

2.9 
8.0 

4.8 

6.4 

5.6 

8.9 



10.8 



0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus Circle, Broadway, 59th St. and 
Central Park West, Maine monument ahead on right. Enter- 
ing Central park go northeast on West Drive. 

0.1 Fork, monument in center; bear left 

0.7 Fork, Webster monument in center; bear left. Pass lake on 
right 0.9. 

0.5 Fork; bear right. Pass reservoir 1.6. 

1.1 8-corners; bear left across stone bridge, following the main 
drive. 

0.5 Fork; bear right downgrade. 

0.1 Left-hand road; turn left out of park across 110th St. onto 
7th Ave. (double drive). 

1.8 145th St., end of double drive; meeting trolley, turn right. 
Cross iron bridge over Harlem river 5.1, now on 149th St. 

0.6 Mott Ave., subway entrance on right; turn left, leaving 
trolley. 

0.2 Fork, just beyond RR bridge; bear left, coming onto Grand 
Blvd. and Concourse* 6.2. 

8.8 East Fordham road; meeting trolley, turn right. Bear right 
across Webster Ave. trolley 9.1. Cross Southern Blvd. 9.8. 
Pass entrance to Zoological park* 10.1. 

1.4 Fork of three roads ; take right-hand road. Cross trolley at 
diagonal 4-corners 10.5, going under elevated. 

Left with trolley on Boston Post Road* 10.5 is Note (a) to New 
Rochelle. 



'Concourse. On the east side of the Con- 
course, near the corner of 192nd St., may be 
seen the Edgar Allan Poe cottage (now a 
museum) in which the poet lived from 1846 
to 1849. The cottage does not stand on its 
original site, but very close to it. Here Poe 
wrote many of his poems, including "Anna- 
bel Lee," "Ulalume" and "Eureka," and it 
was here that his invalid wife, Virginia, died. 

'Zoological Gardens. The New York Zoo- 
logical society maintains a splendid collection 
of animals in these gardens. On the noith 
side of Pelham parkway are the New York 



City botanic gardens and the Lorillard man- 
sion and snuff mill. It was here that the 
fortune of this old New York family made 
its start. 

•The Old Boston Post Road intersects White 
Plains Road just north of the Shore Road 
and runs practically parallel with the latter 
to New Rochelle. This was the route used 
by the first Boston-New York stage coaches 
and was originally an Indian trail, opened 
up in 1672. It was over the Boston end of 
the Old Post Road that Paul Revere carried 

r news of Lexington. 



LIBERTY HALL 

16-20 MECHANIC STREET 

ft Block North from Main Street 
NEW ROCHELLE NEW YORK 



An excellent dining place. 

Prices reasonable. 

A la Carte Service at all hours. 

LOBSTERS, CLAMS, ETC. 



Brown Lodge 

Corner Centre Avenue and Prospect Street 

New Rochelle New York 



American Plan, $3.50 and 
$4.00 per day. Home cook- 
ing. Rooms with and with- 
out bath. Garage. 



r 



Route 1 



Page 32 



New York 



12.2 


1.9 


13.0 


0.8 


14.4 


1.4 


16.2 


1.8 


17.6 


1.4 


17.8 


0.2 


18.1 


0.3 


19.7 


1.6 


21.5 


1.8 



End of road; bear right over RR bridge onto Pelham Parkway. 

Irregular 4-corners; turn left with travel. Cross long stone 

bridge over East Chester Bay 13.4. 

8-corners ; bear right with travel. 

Pelham Manor. Straight thru. Avoid left-hand road 17.1. 

5-corners; bear slightly left across trolley. 

Caution, for sharp left turn onto Echo Ave. 

New Rochelle,* Main St. & Echo Ave., meeting trolley, turn 

right onto Main St. 

Larchmont,* Post Road & Larchmont Ave. Straight thru. 

Mamaroneck,* Post Road & Mamaroneck Ave. Bear right 

across stone bridge, away from trolley. 

Right at 23.7 leads to Rye-Sea Cliff Ferry. 



•New Kochelle, N. Y. (pop. 37,63&, alt. u 
ft.). Settled in 1687 by Huguenot immigrants, 
and named after La Rochelle, France, from 
which many of them came. In Hudson park, 
close to Echo bay, an indentation of Long 
Island sound, is a large boulder with tablet, 
commemorative of the arrival of the Hugue- 
nots. It was erected by their descendants on 
or near the original landing place. 

One of the houses dating back to .Huguenot 
days still remains on North Ave. A tablet 
erected at Main and Huguenot Sts., north of 
the business center, indicates the old post 
road, extending from New York to Boston, 
originally an Indian trail. *>oened by royal 
commission in 1672 as the road tr New Eng- 
land. It was known in colonial da~s as the 
King's highway. On that portion called 
Huguenot St. within this city are located the 
sites of the first church, scb ol and tavern 
and dwellings of the ancient village of New 
Rochelle. Over this road Paul Revere carried 
the news of the battle of Lexington, and 
General Washington hastened to take com- 
mand of the American army at Cambridge in 
1775. It was one of the first recognized mail 
routes in the colonies. Its dust was hal- 
lowed by the tread of patriots' feet all thru 
the war of the revolution. To the memory 
of those unfaltering men it is dedicated by 
the Huguenot chapter of the daughters of 
the revolution, State of New York, May 31, 
1909. During the revolution there was much 
travel thru here; a small old stone building 
on North Ave., long since put to common 
uses, is still known as "Washington's 
Headquarters." The Jacob Leisler statue, on 
North Ave., was erected in 1913. 

Thomas Paine lived here for many years. 
His home, some distance up North Ave., 
presented to him in 1784 by the state of New 
York in recognition of his services during 
the revolution, has been preserved and a 
monument erected to his memory by the 
roadside near the homestead. The latter is 
now the Paine museum, and has a large 
collection of relics. 



New Rochelle is largely a suburb of homes 
and has several residential parks, both along 
the shore and in other parts of the city. 
Among nearby points of interest are Travers 
Island, country home of New York athletic 
club; Fort Slocum, New Rochelle yacht club, 
a rowing club, Wykagyl country club, New 
Rochelle tennis club, public library, Masonic 
Temple and the Soldiers' monument in the 
angle of Main and Huguenot Sts., "south of 
the business center, now known as Roosevelt 
Sq., on which is inscribed: "Tribute of New 
Rochelle to her loyal sons. Erected 1895." 
The Rosehill nurseries, with their 68 green- 
houses, are also of interest. The college of . 
New Rochelle, established 1893, is a college 
for women, conducted by the Ursuline order 
of nuns. There are several fine school build- 
ings and churches in the city. Among other 
things that have gone to make New Rochelle 
famous is the fact, given publicity by George 
Cohan, that it is' "forty -five minutes from 
Broadway." 

'Larchmont, N. Y. (pop. 2,500, alt. 42 ft.), 
named from row of larch trees in front of 
old-time estate, is .headquarters of the Larch- 
mont yacht club. James Fenimore Cooper, 
novelist, lived here for a while; and nearby 
is laid the scene of the "Spy." 

♦Mamaroneck, N. Y. (pop. 9,000 alt. 47 ft.). 
In the fall of 1661, John Richbell purchased 
the surrounding land from the Indians, the 
compact being made, it is said, on a spot 
overlooking a little waterfall "where the 
fresh water met the salt"; probably in the 
vicinity ef the stone bridge across the Mama- 
roneck river on the Post road here. On a 
small building near the westerly side of this 
bridge, a tablet has been erected giving 
historical points about the purchase of the 
town from the Indians. Just before the 
battle of White Plains there was a skirmish 
between English and American troops, on 
"Heathcote Hill," which overlooks the harbor 
just west of the village. Nearby James Fett- 
imore Cooper, the novelist, lived for awhile, 
and laid the scene of 'The Spy" in this 
vicinity. 



RYE 

\ 137 Post Road, Rye, N. 


GARAGE 

\ ways Open 

Y. J. H. HALSTED, 


Owner 



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City Section 



Page 33 



Route 1 



"i 



24.1 
25.1 
25.8 
26.6 
26.8 
27.0 



80.0 



84.2 



2.6 Fork; bear right downgrade with travel. 

1.0 End of road; meeting trolley, bear left. 

0.2 Rye,* fork, flagpole in center. Bear right, leaving trolley. 

1.3 Fork; bear right on Post Road, under RR. 

0.2 North Main St. ; meeting trolley, turn left. 

0.2 Port Chester,* N. Y., Main, King & West Chester Sts., bank 

ahead. Bear right with trolley onto Main St. 

Cross New York-Connecticut state line at stone bridge over 

Byram river 27.9. 
3.0 Greenwich, Conn.,* Putnam and Greenwich Aves. Straight 

thru with trolley and follow same, keeping right 30.4-30.7. 

Thru Cos Cob 31.6. Thru diagonal 4-corners 32.9. 
4.2 Fork, green in center; bear left with trolley on Greenwich 

Ave. 

Right at 34.2 leads to Southfield Point. 



•Rye, N. Y. (pop. 6,000, alt. 49 ft.), was set 
tied in 1664 by a company of planters who 
moved up from Manursing Island, in Long 
Island east of Rye; named after Rye, Sussex 
Co., England. Christ Episcopal church, in- 
stituted in 1695, still has a silver chalice and 
cover presented to the society by Queen 
Anne. Municipal hall was once a tavern, in 
which Washington, Lafayette and other 
notables of colonial days were entertained. 

Homestead of John Jay, U. S. diplomat, 
who concluded the celebrated treaty of peace 
with Great Britain in 1794, settling the final 
issues of the revolution, and was afterwards 
governor of New York state, is in this town, 
on south side of Post road, about half-way 
between Rye Center and Mamaroneck. It 
is now the home of Edgar Palmer. The Jay 
cemetery is maintained in excelled shape 
by Mr. Palmer. 

Points of local interest include Rye beach 
and Oakland beach, on the sound; Osborn 
memorial home for aged women; Apawamis 
golf club; American yacht club; United 
hospital, located on the line between Rye 
village and Port Chester, and supported by 
the towns of Rye and Harrison, and St. 
Benedict's home for colored children. Rye 
Seminary, a high- class, long established day 
school for children and young women, has 
pupils from many countries. The Manursing 
Island club, and the summer homes of many 
people of wealth, are on Manursing Island, 
'is a prosperous residence suburb, with con- 
siderable manufacturing. The hills just north 
of the town rise rather abruptly, affording 



many views of Long Island sound and sev- 
eral nearby villages. 

•Port Chester, N. Y. (pop. 17,000, alt. 34 ft.), 
is a prosperous residence suburb, with con- 
siderable manufacturing. The hills just north 
of the town rise rather abruptly, affording 
many views of Long Island sound and sev- 
eral nearby villages. 

•Greenwich, Conn. (pop. 22,000, alt. 28 ft.). 
Founded in 1640, as part of the Province of 
New York, remaining with tha\ jurisdiction 
from 1642 to 1650, when it became a part of 
Connecticut. A point of revolutionary inter- 
est is Put's Hill, at the top of which a monu- 
ment marks the spot when Gen. Israel Put- 
nam escaped from Tyron's British cavalry 
by galloping down the rocky cliffs "where not 
one of many hundred foes dared to follow." 
Putnam cottage, once Knapp tavern, opposite 
Christ church on the Post road, now head- 
quarters of the D. A. R., is open to visitors 
during certain hours. 

Other points of interest are Bruce me- 
morial park and art museum, the home of 
Commodore E. C. Benedict, the Indian Harbor 
yacht club, and the Greenwich country club. 
The new Greenwich hospital, presented to the 
town by Commodore Benedict, was opened in 
the fall of 1917. Y. M. C. A. building on Put- 
nam Ave. is said to be the finest in the world. 

Greenwich is noted for its private schools, 
among them the Brunswick school for boys, 
on Maher Ave., the Ely school for girls, on 
North St., Rosemary hall, in Rock Ridge, near 
Lake Ave., and several others. Along the 
shore of Long Island sound in the vicinity 
Are several fine residence subdivisions. 



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Google 



Route 1 

84.7 



Page 34 



New YorKU 



35.2 
85.5 

38.2 
39.7 
43.7 
44.0 
44.2 



44.4 
46.7 

47.3 
61.5 
51.8 



0.5 Irregular 4-corners; turn right with trolley across iron bridge r 
onto Main St. \ 

0.5 Stamford, Main & Atlantic Sts. Bear slightly left thru open ' 
square, keeping to right of flag pole. 

0.3 Fork; small park in center; bear left with trolley. 

Left at 35.5 leads to Shlppen Point. 
Left-hand road 38.1 is Route 3 to Danbury. 



Straight thru with trolley. Go under 
Meeting trolley, bear left onto West 
Bear right on 



2.7 Noroton, P. 0. on right. 

railroad 39.6. 
1.5 Darien, town hall on left. 

Ave. 
4.0 Irregular 4-corners, iron water trough ahead. 

West Ave., coming onto Wall St. 
0.3 Norwalk, Wall & Main Sts. Keep ahead with trolley. 

Left on Main St. is Route 5 to Danbury. 

0.2 Fork; water trough in center. Bear left with branch trolley 

onto East Ave. 
0.2 Westport Ave.; turn right with branch trolley upgrade. 
2.3 Fork; bear right with trolley. Cross long concrete bridge 

47.1. 
0.6 Westport, 5-corners. Bear slightly right with trolley. 
4.2 Southport, 5-corners. Turn left with trolley. 
0.3 Right-hand diagonal road; turn right with trolley. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 
Stamford (pop. 40,000, alt. 17 ft.). Here has 
grown up primarily a large residence com- 
munity, with many fine homes in the center 
of the city, and on the higher grounds in the 
outlying sections. A number of writers, art- 
ists, actors and other professional men and 
women have their homes in or about Stam- 
ford. The considerable manufacturing in- 
terests are localized along the water front in 
the vicinity of the railroad. 

In addition to a complete public school sys- 
tem, Stamford has several private schools of 



STAMFORD, CONN. 

established reputation. The city hall, public 
library, hospital and the "green," with 
mounted cannon and pyramids of cannon 
balls, are points of interest. Yale & Towne 
Mfg. Co. and the Atlantic Insulated Wire & 
Cable Co. are the largest of the local indus- 
tries. Shippan Point, a tongue of land be- 
tween Stamford bay and L. I. sound, is a 
popular summer residence and boating re- 
sort; from here the Benjamin Tallmadge ex- 
pedition against the British on Long Island 
was dispatched during the revolutionary war. 



For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 




City Section Page 35 Bridgeport City Map 



(For Points of Interest, see next page) 



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Route 1 



Page 36 



63.0 1.2 

58.2 0.2 

64.1 0.9 

57.1 3.0 
57.8 0.7 

58.6 0.8 

61.1 2.5 
61.5 0.4 

63.3 1.8 

•Fairfield, Conn. (pop. 4,500, alt. 20 ft.), 
was settled in 1639 by a band of pioneers 
under the leadership of John^Burr, many of 
whose descendants, of the same name, still 
reside here. East of the village green, facing 
it, is the Hobart house, which escaped burn- 
ing when the town was destroyed by the 
British in 1779. The brown stone Congrega- 
tional church on the Post road, opposite the 
green, stands on the site of the old log meet- 
ing house built in 1639. This is the seventh 
building erected n this spot since that time. 
East of the church is the large white Sher- 
man parsonage, former home of Judge Roger 
Sherman, a noted pe sonage in the years 
immediately following the revolution. In 
Pequot swamp, also along the Post road, was 
fought the battle which terminated the power 
of the Pequot Indians under King Philip. A 
monument marking the site may be seen 

POINTS OF INTEREST, 

Bridgeport (pop. 143,200, alt. 829 ft.), first 
settled in 1639. Principally a manufactur- 
ing center, with many long established and 
substantial plants, such as the Wheeler & 
Wilson and Singer Sewing Machine com- 
panies, and a number of less well-known but 
prosperous enterprises in various lines, doing 
normally a large domestic and considerable 
export business. In addition to these, there 
was a rapid development of establishments 
producing arms and ammunition during the 
"European war. 

A fine harbor, an estuary of a small tidal 
river, the Pequennock, brings shipping well 
up onto the lower business district, so that 



New York 



Turn 



Fairfield,* irregular 4-corners, water trough on left, 
right with trolley. 

End of street; turn left with trolley. 

Fork; bear right with trolley onto Fairfield Ave. Thru diag- 
onal 4-corners 56.2. 

Irregular 4-corners, stone fountain ahead; bear slightly left 
with trolley on Fairfield Ave. 

Bridgeport, Fairfield Ave. & Main St. Straight thru. 
Go under RR and cross long concrete bridge 57.9 onto Strat- 
ford Ave. 

Connecticut Ave.; bear left away from trolley. Bear left 
onto Main St. 59.8, joining trolley. 
End of street ; turn left with trolley onto Main St. 
Stratford,* end of street. Turn right with trolley. 

Left is Route 7 to Waterbury. 

Cross long iron bridge over Housatonic river 62.7. 
Devon. Straight thru, leaving trolley. 

just south of the road in the swamp. The 
old Thaddeus Burr homestead, also on the 
south side of the Post road, quickly recog- 
nized by its tall white columns, was the home 
of a famous Revolutionary patriot. At Gras- 
mere, on the north side of the Post road, is 
the Gould homestead, left by Miss Julia 
Gould and her sister as a vacation home for 
the working girls of Fairfield county. It ac- 
commodates about 20 guests. Bordering Fair- 
field on the west, along the shore road, are 
the sunken flower gardens of E. T. Bedford, 
covering three or more acres. The stone 
powder house, north of the R.R., was used in 
the war of 1812 to store powder. 

'Stratford, Conn. (pop. 12,000, alt. 21 ft.), is 
notable as the place where the first church 
of England in the Connecticut colony was 
established in 1706; in 1722, the first mis- 
sionary of that denomination settled here. 
Christ church, founded 1723, still remains. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

summer resorts. Seaside, Beardsley and 
Washington parks are all conveniently 
reached from the residence districts. Black 
Rock is a fine resort on an island -guarded 
harbor, a short distance southwest of the 
city. Seaside park, extending a considerable • 
distance along the south, south of the busi- 
ness center, was largely a donation of the 
late P. T. Barnum, a resident here for many 
years; statues of Barnum and Elias Howe, 
inventor of the sewing machine, are along 
the boulevard in that park. Beardsley park, 
in the northern part of the city, is one of 
Bridgeport's scenic attractions. 

Golden Hill commands a fine view of the 
city and its long waterfront line. The Bridge- 



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City Section Page 37 Route 1 

64.7 1.4 Pork; bear right with travel. 
65.4 0.7 Fork, water trough in center; bear right. 
66.1 0.7 Milford,* left-hand road beyond park and library. Turn left 
under RR. 

Straight .ahead at 66.1 is Note (b) to New Haven via Savin Rock. 

66.6 0.5 Fork; bear right, leaving trolley. Thru diagonal 4-cornen 
73.4. 

Left leads to Yale Field. 

74.0 7.4 Fork of three streets; keep the middle street with trolley 

(Congress Ave.). 

New Haven City Map and Points of Interest, page 38. 

74.9 0.9 Left-hand diagonal street; bear left with one line of trolley 
onto Temple St.' 

75.1 0.2 Crown St. Turn left. 

If going to New London keep ahead to Chapel St. and turn right. 
If going to Hartford keep ahead on Temple St Thru green to 
Whitney Ave. 

75.2 0.1 College St., meeting trolley line right. 

75.3 0.1 NEW HAVEN, College & Chapel Sts., Yale College buildings 

ahead on left. 

Note (a) Route 1— New York City to New Rochelle, N. Y.— 16.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Inland Route. Asphalt, macadam and brick road all the way. 
This is one mile shorter than Route 1 and offers a popular option to it. 

For this and other exits see City Map, between pages 98-99. 
0.0 0.0 COLUMBUS CIRCLE, Broadway, 59th St & Central Park West. Maine 
Monument ahead on right. Entering Central Park go northeast on West 
drive. 
0.1 0.1 Fork, monument in center; bear left. 
0.8 0.7 Fork, Webster Monument in center; bear left. Pass lake on right 0.9. 

1.3 0.5 Fork; bear right. Pass reservoir 1.6. 

2.4 1.1 3 -corners; bear left across etone bridge, following the main drive. 
2.9 0.5 Fork; bear right downgrade. 

8.0 0.1 Left-hand road; turn left out of park across 110th St., onto 7th Ave. (double 
drive). 

4.8 1.8 145th St., end of double drive; meeting trolley, turn right. Cross iron bridge 

over Harlem river 5.1, now on 149th St. 
6.4 0.6 Mott Ave., subway entrance on right; turn left leaving trolley. 
5.6 0.2 Fork, just beyond RR bridge; bear left, coming onto Grand Blvd. 6.2. 

8.9 8.8 East Fordham Road* meeting trolley, turn right. Bear right across Webster 

Ave., trolley 9.1. Cross Southern Blvd. 9.8. Pass entrance to Zoological 
park 10.1. 
10.8 1.4 Fork of three roads; take middle road. • 

'Milford, Conn. (pop. 9,000, alt. 37 ft.). Set- The first three presidents of Yale college 

tied August, 1639, by company of planters, came directly or indirectly from this place; 

mostly from New Haven, who purchased land and it is said that that institution was more 

from the Indians then living along the banks indebted to Rev. Samuel Andrews of Mil- 

of the Wopowaug river. Probably the first ford, one-time college rector, than to any 

mill in New Haven colony was built here in one else except its chief benefactor, Elihu 

1640; George Hare Ford, the town historian, Yale. 

says that this fact may have led to the name Washington passed thru here on June 28, 
of the place (the "mill by the ford"); or 1775, on his way to assume command of the 
perhaps it was taken from the English town continental forces at Cambridge. Fort Trum- 
of Milford. A church was organized in New bull, named after the revolutionary governor 
Haven before the settlement here; the first of Connecticut, was built in 1776 to defend the 
meeting house was erected in 1641, and the settlement. On January 1, 1777, about 200 
first schoolhouse built and used in 1645. American prisoners were brought here and 
Wh alley and Golfe, two of the regicide judges landed by a British prison ship; though cared 
who signed the death warrant of Charles I for by the inhabitants, 46 of them died in one 
of England, and afterward fled to America, month, and were buried in the same grave, 
were hidden *in or about Milford most of the For about 200 years after its settlement, Mil- 
time during the years 1661-64. ford had a considerable marine commerce, 

The most famous man of the early days in some of its ships making voyages as far as 
this locality was Robert Treat, who though Europe and the West Indies, 
more widely known as the founder of New* The most conspicuous and interesting land- 
ark, N. J., was identified nearly his whole mark in the town is the widely known memo- 
life with Connecticut. He was a magistrate, rial bridge, with large stone tower, across 
commander-in-chief of the forces of the the Wopowaug river, erected in 1889 to com- 
colony in King Philip's war, and either gov- memorate the 250th anniversary of the settle* 
ernor or deputy- governor of the colony fur ment here. Simon Lake, the submarine in- 
30 years. He retired from office at the age ventor, is a resident of the town. The Taylor 
of 86, and died at Milford in 1710. Rev. John library, the gift of and memorial to the late 
Sherman, a teacher associated with the first Henry A. -Taylor, of Milford, located at the 
pastor of the first church, was the ancestor corner of Broad and River streets, is one of 
of several of that name, including Roger the best of its sire in New England. There 
Sherman, member of the first congress and is considerable diversified industry in tb- 
signer of the Declaration of Independence. town. 



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New Haven City Map Page 38 



New York 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 
New Haven (pop. 162,500, alt. 30 ft.), the 
most populous city in Connecticut, is built 
on*a sandy plain around New Haven harbor, 
which opens into Long Island sound. East 
Rock and West Rock, like two sentinels, look 
down upon the city. These basaltic cliffs are 
a part of its park system. 

Before the advent of the white man, the 
Quinnipiac Indians occupied this region. The 
Quinnipiac river, which flows into the harbor, 
perpetuates the tribal name. In 1637 The- 
ophilus Eaton, with a small band of men, 
made a settlement; but the main body of 
colonists came in 1638 under the leadership 
of John Davenport. A town was laid off one- 
half mile square, subdivided into nine 
squares, the central one being the Common 
or Green. This picturesque and historic 
"Green" is to New Haven what Boston Com- 
mon is to Boston. In early times here were 
found the stocks, gallows, whipping post, 
watch house and goal. The first public build- 
ing was the "meeting house," which formerly 
stood on the Green near the present flagpole. 
Center church, successor of the original 
"meeting house," is built over a portion of 
the graveyard of the early settlers. 
Perhaps the most interesting episode of 
lonial days was the advent of the three 
icides, Whalley, Goffo and Dixwell. At 
o time they hid in a group of huge boulders, 
still called "Judges' Cave," on the top of the 
West Rock. Dixwell's monument may be 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

found on the Green in the rear of Center 
church, and nearby is the original grave- 
stone. In 1779 the British invaded the town 
but did little damage. A monument at the 
junction of Congress and Columbus avenues 
marks the spot where the citizens met them. 

The charm of the Elm City lies in the fact 
that one of the great universities of the 
world is here surrounded by a modern city 
having a colonial atmosphere. Many of the 
famous elms have been decimated by age 
and disease, but enough of them still remain 
to make distinctive many of the city streets. 
The old-time riots of town and gown are but 
memories and the activities of college and 
city peacefully intermingle. 

Yale university, founded by ten ministers 
at Branford in 1701, held its first commence- 
ment at S'aybrook in 1702. It was then known 
as the Collegiate school. Removed to New 
Haven in 1716, it took the name "Yale" in 
honor of its chief benefactor, Elihu Yale. 
The grounds of the university are located 
west of the Green and extend northward 
nearly a mile. The oldest college building, 
and the only one remaining of the "old brick 
row," is Connecticut hall, erected in 1750. In 
front of it is a statue of Nathan Hale, who 
as a student once occupied a room in this 
dormitory. 

A century ago New Haven had a thriving 

trade with the West Indies, but that has 

vanished. Now the chief occupation of its 

(Continued on opposite page) 

— — 



City Section Page 39 Route 3 

10.4 0.1 Diagonal 4 -corners; meeting trolley, turn left. Go under elevated 10.6. 

13.8 S.4 Caution for left turn across long: wooden bridge. 

14.8 1.0 Pelham Manor, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

16.1 1.3 Fork, monument, green in center; bear right with trolley onto Main St. 

16.8 0.7 NEW ROCHELLE, Main St. & Echo Ave. 

Note (b) Rolite 1 — Milford to New Haven, Conn^— 11.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Woodmont, Savin Rock and West Haven. Macadam all the way, except one 
short stretch of concrete. 
0.0 0.0 MILFORD, library on left. Go east Cross Robert Treat Memorial bridge, 

bearing right immediately beyond. 
0.4 0.4 Fork; bear left on winding road. 
3.4 8.0 Woodmont, 4-corners. Turn left. 
4.3 0.9 8-cornera, beyond small iron bridge; turn right along shore of Long "Island 

Sound. 
7.1 2.8 Savin Rock, amusement park on right. Straight thru on Savfn Ave. 

8.0 0.9 4-corners; turn right onto Main St. 

8.1 0.1 West Haven, Main St. & Campbell Ave. Straight thru across trolley. 
8.7 0.6 1st Ave.; turn left. 

8.9 0.2 Elm St ; meeting trolley, turn right. 

9.0 0.1 Kimberly Ave.: bear left with trolley across iron bridge. 

10.0 1.0 Howard Ave.; bear left with trolley, which leaves to right just beyond. Thru 

irregular 4-corners 10.6. 
10.8 0.8 Davenport Ave., hospital on right; turn right. 

11.0 0.2 Oak St.; jog right and left onto Broad St. 

11.1 0.1 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto George St., one block. 

11.2 0.1 College St.; turn left with branch trolley. 

11.3 0.1 NEW HAVEN, College & Chapel Sts. Yale College buildings ahead on left. 

Route 3 — Stamford to Danbury, Conn.— 30.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Norton, New Canaan and Rldgefleld. All macadam and concrete except 2.8 
miles of state gravel. Thru a hilly farming country. 

r-MILEAGE-^ 

Total BetwM? For this and other exits see City Map, page 34. 

M ileal* f*o»»t» 

0.0 0.0 STAMFORD, Main & Atlantic Sts., flagpole in green on left. 

Go east with trolley on Main St. 
0.3 0.3 Fork, small green in center; bear left with trolley. 
2.9 2.6 Noroton, left-hand road, small stone church on right. Turn 

left, leaving trolley. Go over RR 3.6. 

4.1 1.2 End of road; turn right with concrete. 
4.7 0.6 Fork; bear left on concrete. 

5.9 1.2 3-corners; turn right on concrete. 

6.1 0.2 8-corners, small green on right; turn left. 

7.7 1.6 Left-hand road; turn left onto South Ave. 

9.5 1.8 End of avenue; turn right onto Railroad Ave. 

9.6 0.1 Main street; turn left. 

9.7 0.1 New Canaan, Main St., East & Forest Aves. 

Turn right onto East Ave., and immediately left onto Forest 
Ave. Avoid left-hand road 10.3. 

11.3 1.6 3-corners; turn left with poles. 

12.5 1.2 Left-hand road ; turn left with poles. 

12.6 0.1 Right-hand road; turn right. 

15.4 2.8 Fork, brick church on right, cemetery on left; bear left. 

Avoid right-hand road 17.2, sign — "Ridgefield 2 miles." 

18.3 2.9 End of road ; turn right onto Bedford St. Bear left onto West 

Lane Ave. 20.2. 

20.4 2.1 End of street, large stone church on right; turn left onto 

Main St. 

(New Haven Points of Interest, continued from opposite page) 

citizens is the manufacture and sale of many ster, our first great lexicographer, whose 

articles — among them munition, clocks, hard- graves may be found in Grove street ceme- 

ware, rubber goods and corsets. The Win- tery. 

Chester Repeating Arms Co. and the New Among the objects of interest to the visitor 

Haven Clock Co. are located here. New are the university buildings and grounds; the 

Haven is the railway center of the state. "green" with its three churches, and the 

As may be expected of a town whose his- public buildings surrounding it; old Grove 

tory reaches back to colonial times, New street cemetery; "Judges' Cave" on West 

Haven has produced many men of eminence, Rock, the crypt under Center church; the 

among them Roger Sherman, a signer of the Historical society's collection of colonial 

Declaration of Independence; Eli Whitney, revolutionary relics, and the unir 

inventor of the cotton gin, and Noah Web- bowl, a part of the famous athletic 



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Google 



Routes 5-6 Page 40 New York 

21.0 0.6 Ridgefield,* 4-corners, bank on right. Straight thru. 
21.6 0.6 Right-hand road, store ahead on right; turn right. 

Danbury City Map and Points of Interest, page 53. 

28.1 6.5 Fork; turn left onto Park Ave. 

30.0 1.9 End of avenue ; meeting trolley, turn left onto Division St. 

30.2 0.2 West St.; turn right -with trolley. 

80.6 0.4 DANBURY, West, Liberty & Main Sts., city hall on right. 

Route 5 — Norwalk to Danbury, Conn. — 22.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via South Wilton, Wilton and Branch viUe. All tar macadam except 3 miles of state 
gravel. 

Thru a hilly farming: country; no steep grades. 
This is the best way between the two cities. 

^-MILEAGE-, 

Total b!S5<mii For this and other exits see City Map, page 44. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 NORWALK, Main & Wall Sts. Go northwest on Main St. 

0.2 0.2 3-corners ; bear left with trolley. 

0.3 0.1 Fork; bear right with trolley. 

0.4 0.1 Fork; bear left with trolley. 

0.8 0.4 Fork; bear right with trolley. Thru South Wilton 3.5. 

5.7 4,9 Wilton,* large stone church on right. Straight ahead along 
RR. 

Left-hand road just before this church is Route 12 to Carmel. 

6.7 1.0 Left-hand road; turn left over RR bridge. 
10.9 4.2 End of road; bear left. Cross RR 11.1. Thru Branchville* 
11.5. Cross RR 11.7. 

13.4 2.6 Fork, cemetery on right; bear left. Bear right 16.0. 

19.5 6.1 End of road, store on left; turn right. 

19.7 0.2 Left-hand road ; turn left with one line of poles. 

Danbury City Map and Points of Interest, page 53. 

20.3 0.6 Fork; bear right with trolley, onto Park Ave. 

21.6 1.3 End of avenue; meeting trolley, turn left onto Division St. 

21.7 0.1 West St.; turn right with trolley. 

22.0 0.3 DANBURY, West, Main & Liberty Sts., city hall on right. 

Route 6— Danbury, Conn., to Poughkeepsie, N. Y. — 57.0 m. 

Eor Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via New Milford, Dover Plains and S. Millbrook. Macadam to New Milford; gravel 
to Dover Plains; then 70 miles of dirt; balance macadam. 

Route 33 to Flshkill and Route 48 to Poughkeepsie offer and all macadam option. 

In wet weather use Route 38 from Dover Plains to Amenla and Route 371 to Pough- 
keepsie (all macadam). 



'Ridgefield, Conn. (pop. 2,500, alt. 800 ft.). people have chosen Ridgefield or the immedi- 

An historic village, deeded by Catoonah and ately surrounding country for a permanent or 

other Indian proprietors in 1708 to settlers summer home; and have erected handsome 

mostly from Norwalk, Conn. The immediate residences. Four miles from the village, on 

locality was the scene of much fighting dur- the North Salem road, is the Ridgefield school 

ing the revolutionary war; in the battle of for boys, which has a beautiful site on the 

Ridgefield, September, 1777, Gen. Wooster Was hillside overlooking Lake Mamanasco. 

mortally wounded. •Wilton, Conn. (pop. 2,000), has much of 

Many of the houses of the village are colonial and revolutionary history. Parts of 

very old; chief among these is the old the statue of George III, torn down in New 

Keeler tavern, now owned by the distin- York City, were brought here to be run into 

guished architect, Cass Gilbert, who has en* bullets. Some were hidden in a house op- 

deavored to retain the building so far as posite St. Matthew's church, and other pieces 

feasible in its original form. A cannon ball, in the Sloan house. 

which was fired into the tavern, is still pre- •Branchville, Conn. (pop. 2,503). Notable 

served Mid gives it the name, "Cannon Ball as location of "farm" left by the late Edwin 

House." Gilbert, where about 1,000 children are sent 

Ridgefield is exclusively a residential vil- by the publishers of New York "Life" during 

conceded to be one of the most attrac- each summer. Large feldspar quarry in vicin- 

the east. Many wealthy and noted ity, once considerably worked. 



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City Section 



Page 41 



Route 6 



For this and other exits see City Map, page 53. 



^-MILEAGE-. 

Distance 

Total Between 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 DANBURY, Main & West Sts., at monument. Go north on 

Main St. with trolley. 
0.2 0.2 4-corners, water-trough on left; turn right with cross-trolley 

on White St. Cross RR at station 0.5. Go over RR bridge 1.8. 
1.4 1.2 Irregular 4-corners where trolley ends; turn left. 
2.1 0.7 Fork; bear left. Go under RR 2.4. 

3.0 0.9 Left-hand road; turn left. 
4.7 1.7 Fork; bear left. 

Right leads to Brookfieid Center. 

8.1 3.4 Brookfieid. Straight thru. 

14.7 6.6 End of road on bank of Housatonic river; turn right across 

bridge and RR onto Bridge St. Cross RR 14.8. 
14.9 0.2 New Mil ford,* Conn., Bridge & Main Sts., monument in green 
on left. Turn left onto Main St. 

15.2 0.3 Irregular 4-corners; bear left. Go under RR 15.4, bearing 

right just beyond. Caution for right curve 16.8 and RR under- 
pass 16.5. Cross RR 17.4. 
17.6 2.4 End of road beyond long iron bridge; turn right. Past 
Boardman P. O., Comu, on right 17.8. 

18.0 0.4 Fork; bear right across small bridge. 

21.8 3.8 End of road; turn right— sign "Kent." 

22.1 0.3 Fork, large tree on right; bear left. 
22.4 0.3 S-corners; turn left. 

22.6 0.2 Fork; bear left upgrade across 3 small bridges. 

24.0 1.4 End of road; bear left. 

24.4 0.4 Fork; bear right— sign "Dover Plains." Cross State line 24.9. 

26.0 1.6 Webatuck, N. Y., straight thru. 

27.3 1.3 End of road, meeting trolley; turn right. 

27.9 0.6 S. Dover; straight thru, leaving trolley. 
81.8 3.9 S-corners; turn left. Go under RR 33.8. 

34.1 2.3 Dover Plains.* Straight thru. 

35.1 1.0 Fork; bear left — sign "Poughkeepsie." 

Right Is Route 38 to Amenla, Mlllerton and the Berkshire*. 

35.3 0.2 End of road ; turn left upgrade. 

38.3 3.0 Left-hand road; turn left — sign "Poughkeepsie.' 
39.1 0.8 Fork; bear right. 

41.4 2.3 Fork at cemetery; bear left. Cross RR 41.9. 



•New Milford, Conn. (pop. 5,200, alt. 275 ft.). 
Settled in 1703, Jirgely by people from Mil- 
ford. Conn., who had purchased lands from 
the Indians. This district was the principal 
aucient scat of the Indians of what is now 
Litchfield county; the castle of their sachem 
was at the Great Falls of the Housa- 
tonic. There are many beautiful lakes and 
streams in New Milford, and it is but a few 
miles over state road to Lake Waramang, 
largest lake in the state. 

New Milford is a manufacturing commu- 
nity and leading center of agricultural pro- 
duction, notably tobacco. A silver mine in 
the neighborhood was worked as early as 
1790. Considerable granite and slate are 
quarried. Other industries include the man- 
ufacture of hats, lime, silicia and silverware. 

•Dover Plains, N. Y. (pop. 800). The Schag- 
ticoke Indians, a branch of the Algonquin* 
of Long Island, settled here in 1672. First 
white settlers were probably Dutch from the 
Hudson valley, who came early in the 18th 
century. Was originally part of Pawling, 
and called Pawlingstown; made separate 
township and named Dover in 1807. 



In 1774 a local Society of Friends, a branch 
of the larger society at Quaker Hill, was or- 
ganized here, but became extinct a number 
of years ago. On Chestnut Ridge, 3 miles 
west of Dover Plains, was the farm and 
home of Benson J. Lossing, the historian, 
who died in 1889. His fireproof library con- 
tained a large number of historic works and 
other collections of great interest and value, 
since removed. 

There are many natural curiosities in the 
vicinity, particularly the "stone church." a 
spacious cavern, ribbed and walled by mas- 
sive rocks, whose arched opening resembles 
that of some old-time place of worship. It 
was probably formed by the action of the 
water taking an unusual course down the 
ravine of which it is a part. This cavern is 
said to have been the hiding place of Sas- 
sacus, chief of the Pequois, and a few of his 
followers after the defeat and practical anni- 
hilation of his people by Capt. Mason in the 
Pequot war. Several deep wells, worn into 
the rock by the waters, supply Dover Plains 
with water. The building of the Ptvr 
inn was the former home of Gen. 
Ketcham. Digitize d by VjOC 



Route 7 Page 42 New York 

42.0 0.6 S. Millbrook, P. 0. on left. Straight thru. 
45.2 8.2 Washington Hollow. Straight thru. 

49.7 4.5 Fork; keep right across concrete bridge. 

50.1 0.4 Pleasant Valley, irregular 4-cornera, cemetery on left Turn 

left along RR. 
53.9 3.8 Fork; bear right. Go over RR bridge 54.7. 

Poughkeepsle City Map and Points of Interest, page 182. 

55.2 1.3 3-oorners, store on left; bear right onto Main St. 

Left hand road 55.5 where trolley comes In leads to Vassar Colleoe. 

57.0 1.8 POUGHKEEPSIE, Main & Market Sts., court house on left 



Route 7 — Bridgeport to Waterbuiy, Conn. — 32.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Stratford, Shelton, Derby, Seymour, Beacon Falls and Naugatuck. Asphalt, 
concrete, macadam and gravel roads. 

This is a very pretty trip thru a hilly country, following the Naugatuck river valley 
nearly all the way. 

.-MILEAGE-, 
DlttMSS 

Total Between 
Mileage Points 



For this and other exits see City Map, page 35. 



0.0 



0.8 

3.3 
3.6 

4.7 

13.9 



14.1 
14.2 



18.8 
19.5 
19.8 

23.6 
27.5 



32.4 



0.0 BRIDGEPORT, Fairfield Ave. & Main St. Go east with trol- 
ley on Fairfield Ave. Under RR and cross long concrete 
bridge 0.1. 

0.8 Connecticut Ave. just beyond long iron bridge; turn left, 
leaving trolley. Bear left, joining trolley 2.0. 

2.5 4-corners; turn left with trolley onto Main St. 

0.3 Stratford,* end of street, bank ahead. Turn left with trolley. 

1.1 Fork, small green in center; bear right with trolley, coming 
onto Howe Ave. 

9.2 Shelton, Howe Ave. & Bridge St. Turn right with branch 
trolley onto Bridge St., under RR and across long stone bridge 
over Housatonic river. 

0.2 Main St. ; meeting trolley, turn right. 

0.1 Derby,* Main & Elizabeth Sts. Turn left with branch trolley 
onto Elizabeth St. 

Bear left 14.8 onto Seymour St. and avoid right-hand road 
where trolley leaves 15.0, coming onto Wakelee Ave. 

4.6 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right onto Derby Ave. 
0.7 Broad St. ; turn right across two iron bridges. 

0.3 Seymour,* P. O. on left. Straight thru, passing sta. on right. 
Turn right with road under RR 20.0. 

3.8 Beacon Falls, large brick factory on right. Straight thru. 

3.9 Naugatuck, Main & Maple Sts. Straight thru with trolley, 
coming onto S. Main St. 

Waterbury City Map and Points of Interest, page 55. 

4.9 WATERBURY, Center square, park ahead on left. 



*Strfctford, Conn. (pop. 12,000, alt. 21 ft.), is 
notable as the place where the first church 
of England in the Connecticut colony was 
established in 1706; in 1722, the first mis- 
sionary of that denomination settled here. 
Christ church, founded 1723, still remains. 

♦Derby, Conn. (pop. 12,000, alt. 16 ft.). Old- 
time residence and manufacturing city at the 
junction of the Naugatuck and Housatonic 
rivers. Once had considerable shipbuilding, 
and carried on extensive trade with the West 
Indies. 



•Seymour, Conn. (pop. 7,211, alt. 100 ft.). 
Primitive industry started here shortly 
after the revolution; in 1803 Gen. David 
Humphreys introduced merino wool into the 
United States and began its manufacture. 
Place was known as Humphreysville until 
1850, when it was renamed Seymour. Its 
factories excel in small metal specialties, 
bits, augers, chisels, edge tools and other 
products of Yankee ingenuity, well known 
and widely sold in this and foreign countries. 
The Waterman fountain pen is manufactured 
in Seymour. 




For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 



ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



"1 



City Section 



Page 43 



Route 9 



Route 9— New Haven, Conn., to New York City, N. Y. — 

75.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Milford, Stratford, Bridgeport, Fairfield, Southport, Westport, Norwalk, Darien, 
Stamford, Greenwich, Port Chester, Rye, Mamaroneck, Larchmont and New Rochelle. 
Alternating stretches of asphalt, wood block, tarred macadam, brick and concrete. 

This route follows the general shore line of Long Island sound thru thickly settled 
country* 

Note (a) offers an option to Milford via Savia Rock. 

Note (b) furnishes New Rochelle to New York City via the Inland route. 

^-MILEAGE-. 

Distance 

Total Between 

Mileage Points 



For this and other exits see City Map, page 38. 



0.0 

0.1 
0.4 



9.2 

9.7 

12.7 
13.8 
14.2 
15.5 



16.7 



0.0 NEW HAVEN, College & Chapel Sts. Go east with trolley on 
Chapel St. one block. 

0.1 Temple St., turn right with branch trolley. 

0.3 End of street; meeting cross-trolley, turn right on Congress 
St. Cross bridge 1.7. Thru irregular 4-corners, leaving trol- 
ley 1.9. 

8.8 Milford,* end of road, library on right. Turn right with 
trolley. 

0.5 Fork; bear right— sign "Bridgeport." Thru Devon 12.0. Cross 
iron bridge over Housatonic river. 

3.0 Fork; bear left with trolley. 

1.1 Main St.; bank on right; turn left with trolley. 

0.4 Stratford,* irregular 4-corners. Turn right with trolley. 
1.3 Right-hand diagonal road beyond cemetery; bear right away 
from trolley onto Connecticut Ave. 

Bridgeport City Map and Points of Interest, page .95. 

1.2 End of avenue; meeting trolley bear right onto Stratford Ave. 
Cross long concrete bridge 17.2. 



'Milford, Conn. (pop. 9,000, alt. 37 ft.). Set- 
tled August, 1639, by company of planters, 
mostly from New Haven, who purchased land 
from the Indians then living along the banks 
of the Wopowaug river. Probably the first 
mill in New Haven colony was built here in 
1640; George Hare Ford, the town historian, 
says that this fact may have led to the name 
of the place (the "mill by the ford"); or 
perhaps it was taken from the English town 
of Milford. A church was organized in New 
Haven before the settlement here; the first 
meeting house was erected in 1641, and the 
first achoolhouse built and used in 1645. 
Whalley and Golfe, two of the regicide judges 
who signed the death warrant of Charles I 
of England, and afterward fled to America, 
were hidden in or about Milford most of the 
time during the years 1661-64. 

The most famous man of the early days in 
this locality was Robert Treat, who though 
more widely known as the founder of New- 
ark, N. J., was identified nearly his whole 
life with Connecticut. He was a magistrate, 
commander-in-chief of the forces of the 
colony in King Philip's war, and either gov- 
ernor or deputy -governor of the colony for 
30 years. He retired from office at -the age 
of 86, and died at Milford in 1710. Rev. John 
Sherman, a teacher associated with the first 
pastor of the first church, was the ancestor 
of several of that name, including Roger 
Sherman, member of the first congress and 
signer - of the Declaration of Independence. 
The first three presidents of Yale college^ 
came directly or indirectly from this place f 



and it is said that that institution was more 
indebted to Rev. Samuel Andrews of Mil- 
ford, one-time college rector, than to any 
one else except its chief benefactor, Elihu 
Yale. 

Washington passed thru here on June 28, 
1775, on his way to assume command of. the 
continental forces at Cambridge. Fort Trum- 
bull, named .after the revolutionary governor 
of Connecticut,- was built in 1776 to defend the 
settlement. On January 1, 1777, about 200 
American prisoners were brought here and 
landed by a British prison ship; though cared 
for by the inhabitants, 46 of them died in one 
month, and were buried in the same grave. 
For about 200 years after its settlement, Mil- 
ford had a considerable marine commerce, 
some of its ships making voyages as far as 
Europe and the West Indies. 

The most conspicuous and interesting land- 
mark in the town is the widely known memo- 
rial bridge, with large stone tower, across 
the Wopowaug river, erected in 1889 to com- 
memorate the 250th anniversary of the settle- 
ment here. Simon Lake, the submarine in- 
ventor, is a resident of the town. The Taylor 
library, the gift of and memorial to the late 
Henry A. Taylor, of Milford, located at the 
corner of Broad and River streets, is one of 
the best of its size in New England. There 
is considerable diversified industry in the 
town. 

'Stratford, Conn. (pop. 12,000, alt. 21 ft.), is 
notable as the place where the first church 
of England in the Connecticut colony was 
established in 1706; in 1722, the first mis- 
sionary of that denomination settled here 
Christ church, founded 1723, still remains. 
y g 



V 



Route 9 Page 44 

0.8 Bridgeport, Fairfield Ave. & Main St. 



New York 

Straight thru with 



17.6 

trolley. 

22.1 4.6 Right-hand road; turn right with trolley. 
22.3 0.2 Fairfield,* irregular 4-corners. Turn left with trolley. 

23.8 1.5 Southport, 5-corners. Turn right with trolley. 

28.0 4.2 Westport, 5-corners. Straight thru with trolley across long 

concrete bridge. 

30.9 2.9 End of avenue ; turn left with trolley onto East Ave. 

31.1 0.2 Fork, green in center; bear right with trolley. 

31.3 0.2 Norwalk, Wall & Main Sts. Bear slightly left with trolley. 

'Fairfield, Conn. (pop. 4,500, alt. 20 ft.), 
was settled in 1639 by a band of pioneers 
under the leadership of John Burr, many of 
whose descendants, of the same name, still 
rsside here. East of the village green, facing 
it, is the Hobart house, which escaped burn- 
ing when the town was destroyed by the 
British in 1779. The brown stone Congrega- 
tional church on the Post road, opposite the 
green, stands on the site of the old log meet- 
ing house built in 1639. This is the seventh 
building erected on this spot since that time. 
East of the church is the large white Sher- 
man parsonage, former home of Judge Roger 
Sherman, a noted personage in the years 
-immediately following the revolution. In 
Pequot swamp, also along the Post road, was 



fought the battle which terminated the power 
of the Pequot Indians under King Philip. A 
monument marking the site may be seen 
just south of the road in the swamp. The 
old Thaddeus Burr homestead, also on the 
south side of the Post road, quickly recog- 
nized by its tall white columns, was the home 
of a famous Revolutionary patriot. At Gras- 
mere, on the north side of the Post road, is 
the Gould homestead, left by Miss Julia 
Gould and her sister as a vacation home for 
the working girls of Fairfield county. It ac- 
commodates about 20 guests. Bordering Fair- 
field on the west, along the shore road, are 
the sunken flower gardens of E. T. Bedford, 
covering three or more acres. The stone 
powder house, north of the R.R., was used in 
the war of 1812 to store powder. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, NORWALK, CONN. 



Norwalk (pop. 6,954, alt. 17 ft.). Land pur- 
chased in 1640 by Roger Ludlowe of Fairfield 
from "Norwalke" Indians, which fact prob- 
ably gave the place its name. 

Among points of interest are the Nathan 
Hale drinking fountain, with descriptive tab- 
lets, a fine armory of the Connecticut national 
guard, and the Norwalk hospital, on a com- 
manding site from which fine views may be 
1. The section east of the bridge is noted 
its old-fashioned "green," quaint Town 
nail and typical old New England churches. 



The industrial interests center at. South 
Norwalk, through which passes the main line 
of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Iron works, 
a large corset factory and other commercial 
enterprises are located there. 

The house of Col. Thomas Fitch, to whom 
is sometimes credited the incident out of 
which "Yankee Doodle" originated, is a point 
of interest near East avenue. 

In 1779 the British General Tryoa raided 
South Norwalk, burning about seven houses; 
some of those left still stand. 
Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



City Section 



Page 45 



Route 9 



32.0 
35.6 
37.1 

39.7 

40.1 

40.3 
40.6 

45.3 

48.3 

48.5 
50.2 

60.6 



53.3 
53.8 



0.7 Fork; water-trough in center; bear right on Connecticut Ave. 
3.6 Darien, town hall on right. Straight thru. 

1.5 Noroton, P. O. on left. Keep ahead with trolley. 

Right at 37.2 is Route 3 to Danbury. 

Stamford City Map and Points of Interest, page 34. 

2.6 Fork, green ahead on right; bear right with trolley onto Main 
St. Keep left of flag pole 40.0. 

Left at 39.7 leads to Shlppen Point. 

0.4 Stamford, Main & Atlantic Sts., city hall on left. Bear slightly 

right with trolley. 
0.2 Fork, water-trough in center; bear left with trolley. 
0.3 Irregular 4-corners; bear left with trolley onto Greenwich 

Ave. Thru Cos Cob 43.7. 

4.7 Greenwich, Conn.,* Putnam & Greenwich Aves. Straight thru, 
leaving trolley. Cross Connecticut-New York State line at 
stone bridge over Bryam river 47.4. 

3.0 Port Chester, N. Y.,* Main & Westchester Sts. Bear slightly 

left with trolley onto Main St. 
0.2 4-corners; turn right onto Post Road, leaving trolley. 
1.7 Rye,* fork, water-trough in center. Bear right away from 

trolley. 
0.4 Fork, stone church on left; bear right across small stont 

bridge. 

Left fork leads to Rye-8ea Cliff Ferry. 

2.7 Fork; bear left^-sign "New York." 

0.5 Mamaroneck,* Post Road & Mamaroneck Ave. Bear left with 
trolley. 



'Greenwich, Conn. (pop. 22,000, alt. 28 ft.). 
Founded in 1640, as part of the Province of 
New York, remaining with that jurisdiction 
from 1642 to 1650, when it became a part of 
Connecticut. A point of revolutionary inter- 
est is Put's Hill, at the top of which a monu- 
ment marks the spot where Gen. Israel Put- 
nam escaped from Tyron's British cavalry 
by galloping down the rocky cliffs "where not 
one of many hundred foes dared to follow." 
Putnam cottage, once Knapp tavern, opposite 
Christ church on the Post road, now head- 
quarters of the D. A. R., is open to visitors 
during certain hours. 

Other points of interest are Bruce me- 
morial park and art museum, the home of 
Commodore E. C Benedict, the Indian Harbor 
yacht club, and the Greenwich country club. 
The new Greenwich hospital, presented to the 
town by Commodore Benedict, was opened in 
the fall of 1917. Y. M. C. A. building on Put- 
nam Ave. is said to be the finest in the world. 

Greenwich is noted for its private schools, 
among them the Brunswick school for boys, 
on Maher Ave., the Ely school for girls, on 
North St., Rosemary hall, in Rock Ridge, near 
Lake Ave., and several others. Along the 
shore of Long Island sound in the vicinity 
are several fine residence subdivisions. 

•Port Chester, N. Y. (pop. 17,000, alt. 34 ft.). 
is a prosperous residence suburb, with con- 
siderable manufacturing. The hills just north 
of the town rise rather abruptly, affording 
many views of Lorffcr Island sound and sev- 
eral nearby villages. 

•Rye, N. Y. (pop. 6,000, alt. 49 ft.), was set- 
tied in 1664 by a company of planters who 
moved up from Manursing Island, in Long 
Island east of Rye; named after Rye, Sussex 
Co., England. Christ Episcopal church, in- 
stituted in 1695, still has a silver chalice and 
cover presented to the society by Queen 
Anne. Ifanlcioal hall was once a tavern, in 



which Washington, Lafayette and other 
notables of colonial days were entertained. 

Homestead of John Jay, U. S. diplomat, 
who concluded the celebrated treaty of peace 
with Great Britain in 1794, settling the final 
issues of the revolution, and was afterwards 
governor of New York state, is in this town, 
on south side of Post road, about half-way 
between Rye Center and Mamaroneck. It 
is now the home of Edgar Palmer. The Jay 
cemetery is maintained in excellent shape 
by Mr. Palmer. 

Points of local interest include Rye beach 
and Oakland beach, on the sound; Osborn 
memorial home for aged women; Apawamis 
golf club; American yacht club; United 
hospital, located on the line between Rye 
village and Port Chester, and supported by 
the towns of Rye and Harrison, and St. 
Benedict's home for colored children. Rye 
Seminary, a high-class, long established day 
school for children and young women, has 
pupils from many countries. The Manursing 
Island club, and the summer homes of many 
people of wealth, are on Manursing Island. 

•Mamaroneck, N. Y. (pop. 9,000, alt. 47 ft.). 
In the fall of 1661, John Richbell purchased 
the surrounding land from the Indians, the 
compact being made, it is said, on a spot 
overlooking a little waterfall "where the 
fresh water met the salt"; probably in the 
vicinity of the stone bridge across the Mamar- 
oneck river on the Post road here. On a 
small building near the westerly side of this 
bridge, a tablet has been erected giving 
historical points about the purchase of the 
town from the Indians. Just before the 
battle of White Plains there was a skirmish 
between English and American troops, on 
"Heathcote Hill," which overlooks the harb 
just west of the village. Nearby James 
imore Cooper, the novelist, lived for 
and laid the scene of "The Spy" 

* ld,lity - Digitized by G00gk 



Route 9 Page 46 New York 

65.6. 1.8 Larchmont,* Post Road & Larchmont Ave.; straight thru with 

trolley. 
66.6 1.0 Fork; bear left with trolley onto Main St. 

67.2 0.6 New Rochelle,* Echo Ave. & Main St. Turn left onto Echo 

Ave. 

Straight ahead on Main St. la option to New York, mo Note (b). 

67.5 0.3 Caution, sharp right turn onto Cedar Road. Go thru 5-cor- 

ners 67.7. Avoid left-hand road 68.9 where trolley leaves to 

left 
69.1 1.6 Pelham Manor. Straight thru on Pelham road. 
60.9 1.8 8-corners; bear left with travel. Cross long stone bridge 

over E. Chester Bay 61.7. 

62.8 1.4 Irregular 4-corners ; bear right onto Pelham Parkway. 

63.1 0.8 Left-hand diagonal road beyond RR bridge; bear left. Go 
under elevated 64.7. Pass entrance to Zoological Park 65.2.* 
Cross Webster Ave. trolley 66.2, bearing left with trolley up- 
grade on E. Fordham Rd. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

66.4 3.3 Grand Blvd., double drive, turn left. 

69.1 2.7 Fosk, monument in center; keep left onto Mott Ave. 

69.9 0.8 149th St. ; meeting trolley, turn right down grade. Cross iron 

draw-bridge over Harlem river 70.2, now on 145th St. 

70.6 0.6 7th Ave., double drive; turn left. 

72.3 1.8 End of avenue; enter Central Park immediately; turn right 

upgrade on West Drive. 



♦Larchmont, N. Y. (pop. 2,500, alt. 42 ft.), 
named from row of larch trees in front of 
old-time estate, is headquarters of the Larch- 
mont yacht club. James Fenimore Cooper, 
novelist, lived here for a while; and nearby 
is laid the scene of •The Spy." 

•New Rochelle, N. Y. (pop. 37,638, alt. 72 
ft.). Settled in 1687 by Huguenot immigrants, 
and named after La Rochelle, France, from 
which many of them came. In Hudson park, 
close to Echo bay,, an indentation of Long 
Island sound, is a large boulder with tablet, 
commemorative of the arrival of the Hugue- 
nots. It was erected by their descendants on 
or near the original landing place. 

One of the houses dating back to Huguenot 
days still remains on North Ave. A tablet 
erected at Main and Huguenot Sts., north of 
the business center, indicates the old post 
road, extending from New York to Boston, 
originally an Indian trail, opened by royal 
commission in 1672 as the road to New Eng- 
land. It was known in colonial days as the 
King's highway. On that portion called 
Huguenot St. within this city are located the 
sites of the first church, school and tavern 
and dwellings of the ancient village of New 
Rochelle. Over this road Paul Revere carried 
the news of the battle of Lexington, and 
General Washington hastened to take com. 
mand of the American army at Cambridge in 
1775. It was one of the first recognized mail 
routes in the colonies. Its dust was hal- 
lowed by the tread of patriots' feet all thru 
the war of the revolution. To the memory 
of those unfaltering men it is dedicated by 
the Huguenot chapter of the daughters of 
the revolution, State of New York, May 31, 
1909. During the revolution there was much 
*! thru here; a small old stone building 
'". Ave., long since put to common 
still known as "Washington's 



Headquarters." The Jacob Leisler statue, on 
North Ave., was erected in 1913. 

Thomas Paine lived here for many years. 
His home, some distance up North Ave., 
presented to him in 1784 by the state of New 
York in recognition of his services during 
the revolution, has been preserved and a 
monument erected to his memory by the 
roadside near the homestead. The latter is 
now the Paine museum, and has a large 
collection of relics. 

•New Rochelle is largely a suburb of homes 
and has several residential parks, both along 
the shore and in other parts of the city. 
Among nearby points of interest are Travers 
Island, country home of New York athletic 
club; Fort Slocum, New Rochelle yacht club, 
a rowing club, Wykagyl country club, New 
Rochelle tennis club, public library, Masonic 
Temple and the Soldiers' monument in the 
angle of Main and Huguenot Sts., south of 
the business center, now known as Roosevelt 
Sq., on which is inscribed: "Tribute of New 
Rochelle to her loyal sons. Erected 1895." 
The Rosehill nurseries, with their 68 green- 
houses, are also of interest. The college of 
New Rochelle, established 1893, is a college 
for women, conducted by the Ursuline order 
of nuns. There are several fine school build- 
ings and churches in the city. Among other 
things that have gone to make New Rochelle 
famous is the fact, given publicity by George 
Cohan, that it is "forty- five minutes from 
Broadway.' r , 

'Zoological Gardens. The New York Zoo- 
logical society maintains a splendid collection 
of animals in these gardens. On the north 
side of Pelham parkway are the New York 
City botanic gardens and the Lorillard man* 
sion and snuff mill. It was here that the 
fortune of this old New York family made its 
start. -s~^ t 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



City Section Page 47 Route 12 

72.6 0.8 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

72.7 0.1 Fork; bear left on main drive. 

72.9 0.2 3-corners beyond stone bridge; bear right. 

78.0 0.1 Fork; keep left. Past reservoir on left 73.7. 

74.0 1.0 Fork; bear left across iron bridge. 

74.4 0.4 Fork, lake on left; bear left. 

74.6 0.1 3-corners, Webster Monument in center; bear right, 

76.2 0.7 Fork, monument in center; bear right. 

75.3 0.1 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, Broadway, 69th St. & 

Central Park W. 

Note (a) Route 9 — New Haven to Milford, Conib — 114 bl 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
For this and other exits see City Map, page 38. 

Via West Haven, Savin Rock and Woodmont. Macadam all the way, except one 
short stretch of concrete. 

0.0 0.0 NEW HAVEN, College & Chapel Sts. Go southwest on College St. 
0.1 0.1 George St.; meeting trolley, turn right, one block. % 
0.2 0.1 Broad St.; turn left, leaving trolley. 

0.8 0.1 Oak St.; jog left and immediately right onto Davenport Ave. 
0.6 0.2 Howard Ave.; hospital on left; meeting trolley, turn left 
1.8 0.8 Kimberly Ave.; bear right with branch trolley. 
2.4 1.1 Elm St.; turn right with trolley. 

2.6 0.1 1st Ave.; turn left, leaving trolley. 

2.7 0.2 Main St; turn right 

3.3 0.6 West Haven, Main St. & Campbell Ave. Straight thru across trolley. 

3.4 0.1 Savin Ave., park on left; turn left. 

4.3 0.9 Savin Rock, amusement park on left. Straight thru. 

4.8 0.6 Fork; bear right 

7.1 2.3 3-corners; turn left across small Iron bridge. 

8.0 0.9 Woodmont, 4-corners, just beyond church. Turn right Cross Robert Treat 
Memorial Bridge. 

11.3 3.3 MILFORD, library on right 

Straight ahead is Route to New York City. 

Note (b) Route 9— New Rochelle to New York City, N. Y.— 16.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Inland Route. Macadam and brick all the way. 
This is one mile shorter than Route 9 and offers a popular option to it 
0.0 0.0 NEW ROCHELLE, Main St. & Echo Ave. Go southwest with trolley en 

Main St 
2.0 2.0 Pelham Manor, 4-corners. Straight thru, leaving trolley. Cross long wooden 
bridge 3.0. Caution for right turn just beyond. 

6.4 4.4 4-corners, beyond elevated underpass; turn right. Pass entrance to zoological 

park 6 8. Cross Southern Blvd. 7.0. 
7.7 1.3 Fork; bear left with trolley onto E. Fordham road. 

7.9 0.2 Grand Blvd. (double drive); turn left 

10.5 2.6 Fork, monument in center; keep left coming onto Mott Ave. 

11.4 0.2 149th St: meeting trolley, turn right downgrade. Cross iron bridge over 

Harlem river 11.7, now on 145th St. 

12.0 0.6 7th Ave. (double drive); turn left. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

18.8 1.8 End of Ave., enter Central park; immediately turning right upgrade. 

13.9 0.1 3-corners; bear left 

14.1 0.2 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

14.2 0.1 Fork; bear left, 

14.4 0.2 3-corners, beyond stone bridge; bear right. 

14.5 0.1 Fork; bear left Pass reservoir on left 15.2. 
15.5 1.0 Fork; bear left across iron bridge. 

15.9 0.4 Fork, lake on left; bear left. 

16.0 0.1 3-corners, Webster monument in center; bear right 

16.1 0.1 3-corners, at monument; bear right 

16.8 0.7 COLUMBUS CIRCLE, Broadway, 59th St & Central Park West. 

Route 12— Norwalk, Coniu, to Carmel, N. Y. — 30.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via South Wilton, Wilton, North Wilton, Ridgefield and Brewster. First 23.3 miles 
macadam and brick; 7.3 miles dirt and gravel. 

This route traverses a hilly farming country, and, while somewhat shorter, is not as 
good as Route 5 to Danbury combined with Route 31 to Brewster. 

Connects at Carmel with Route 38 to Pittsfleld. 

r-MILEAGE-^ 

Toui BetwMt For this and other exits see City Map, page 44. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 NORWALK, Main & Wall Sts. Go northwest with trolley on 
Main St. 

0.2 0.2 3-corners ; bear left with trolley and follow same. Avoid left- 
hand road 0.3 and right-hand road 0.4. 

0.8 0.6 Fork; bear right with trolley. Thru South Wilton 3.6. 

Digitized by VjQOglC 



^ 



Route 15 Page 48 New York 

5.7 4.9 Wilton,* left-hand road, stone church on right. Turn left. 

Straight ahead before this turn la Route 5 to Danbury. 

Cross RR 5.8. 
6.1 0.4 3-corners, store on left; bear left upgrade. Thru 4-corners 

6.3. Thru North Wilton 9.9. 
11.6 5.5 Fork; bear left away from poles. Bear left onto Main St. 13.0. 
Avoid left-hand road 13.4. 

Left at 13.4 is Route 15 at mileage 13.4 to Peek ski II. 

13.9 2.3 Ridgefield, water-trough on left. Keep ahead. 

Right at 14.5 is Route 22 to Danbury. 

14.6 0.7 Fork, cemetery ahead ; bear left. 

14.9 0.3 Titicus, Conn., fv^k, water-trough in center. Bear right. 
15.8 0.9 Fork; bear right away from poles. 

Left leads to The Port of Missing Men. 

16.8 1.0 Fork; bear left. Pass Titicus reservoir on left 17.0. 

17.7 0.9 Fork; bear left. Cross Conn.-N. Y. state line 18.8. 

19.9 2.2 End of road ; turn right upgrade. 

23.7 3.8 End of road, at foot of grade, turn left. Under RR 24.5. 

Right-hand road 24.8 is Route 33 to Pawling. 

Under RR and across RR 25.0. 
25.2 1.5 Right-hand road; turn right across iron bridge. 

26.0 0.8 Brewster, N. Y., end of road, bank on left. Turn right onto 

- Railroad Ave. 

26.2 0.2 Left-hand road; turn left over RR bridge. 

26.3 0.1 Left-hand road, at top of grade ; turn left. 
28.2 1.9 Fork; bear right. Cross causeway 28.4. 

28.5 0.3 Left-hand road, at end of causeway; turn left. 

29.1 0.6 End of road, beyond RR bridge; bear right. 

30.6 1.5 CARMEL, end of road, small concrete church on left. 

Route 15 — Norwalk, Conn., to Peekskill, N. Y. — 41.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Wilton, Ridgefield, South Salem, Cross River, Katonah and Yorktown. Tar 
macadam all the way. Thru hilly farming country. 

^MiLEAGE-^ This route connects at Ridgefield with Route 12 to Brewster and 

_ . , 2™ nM Carmel; Route 22 to Danbury and at Peekskill with Route 48 to Pough- 

itiStfpSR keepsie - 
0.0 0.0 NORWALK, See Route 12 for directions to 

13.4 13.4 Ridgefield, Conn., left-hand road at outskirts, large stone 

church on left. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 22 to Danbury and Route 12 
to Brewster and Carmel. 

Turn left onto West lane. Avoid right-hand road 13.6. 

13.8 0.4 Fork; bear right onto Olmsted Lane. 

14.1 0.3 Fork, school in center; bear right onto Bedford St. Cross 
Connecticut-New York State line 15.0. Avoid left-hand road 
15.2. 

15.7 1.6 Fork; bear right with poles. 

17.1 1.4 South Salem, N. Y., left-hand diagonal road. 

Bear left thru Cross River 21.0. Avoid left-hand road 21.1. 

22.1 5.0 Left-hand road; turn left with poles. Bear left along reser- 
voir 23.1. 

24.7 2.6 End of road ; turn left across iron bridge. 

24.9 0.2 Right-hand road; sign "Peekskill"; turn right. Cross stone 

bridge 25.3. Cross RR 25.5. 

25.8 0.9 Katonah, 4-corners, at flag-pole. Turn right on double-drive. 
26.4 0.6 End of road ; turn left. 

26.6 0.2 3-corners ; bear right along reservoir. 
27.1 0.5 Right-hand road ; turn right across long iron bridge. 
30.8 3.7 Fork; large dam ahead; bear left across small stone bridge. 
Cross RR at Amawalk Sta. 31.7. 



'Wilton, Conn. (pop. 2,000), has much of York City, were brought here to be run into 

, . .. ... « * * bullets. Some were hidden in a house op- 

and revolutionary history. Parts of . A e * »# **t » u t j ^ • 

posite St. Matthew s church, and other pieces 

ie of George III, torn down in New in the Sloan house. 



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City Section Page 49 Routes 17-19 

32.8 2.0 End of road; turn sharp right. 

Left at 32.8 is Route 363 to New York City. 

35.0 2.2 Yorktown, P. 0. on left. Straight thru. 

Pcekskill City Map and Points of Interest, page 84. 

Bear right, downgrade, onto S. Division St. 41.1. 

41.4 6.4 PEEKSKILL, Division & Main Sts. 

Route 17— Port Chester to Peekskill, N. Y.— 41.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Purchase Armonk, New Castle, ML Kisco and Yorktown. Macadam all the way. 
This is a very beautiful trip thru the heart of the reservoir district of Westchester 
county. 

r-NlLEAQE-N Via Purchase, Armonk, New Castle, Mt. Kisco and Yorktown. Ma- 

t«*«i b!22!2 cadam all the way. This is a very beautiful trip thru the heart of the 

HileSe Paint! reservoir district of Westchester county. 

0.0 0.0 PORT CHESTER, Westchester Ave., Main & King Sts. Go 
northwest with trolley on Westchester Ave. Thru irregular 
4-corners 0.6. 

0.8 0.8 Fork; bear right with Westchester Ave. Avoid right-hand 
diagonal road 0.9. Thru diagonal 4-corners 1.1. 

1.5 0.7 Fork; keep left onto Westchester Ave. Bear right onto Pur- 

chase St. 2.0. 
2.4 0.9 Fork; bear right — still on Purchase St. 

4.6 2.2 Purchase, fork, church on left. Bear left. 
6.8 2.2 Fork; bear left. Cross concrete bridge 10.0. 

10.1 3.3 Fork; bear right. Thru Armonk 11.6. 

Right at church 11.6 is Route 22 to Dan bury. 

12.2 2.1 Fork; bear left. 

16.9 4.7 Fork; bear right. 

17.5 0.6 Fork, park in center; bear left. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 

18.1. 

18.4 &9 Mt. Kisco, Main St. & Moger Ave., at fountain. 

Right on Moger Ave. is Route 36 to Pawling. 

Straight thru on Main St. across RR. 

18.5 0.1 Right-hand road, just beyond RR; turn square right. 

19.4 0.9 Left-hand road; turn left. 

21.0 1.6 End of road; turn left across small bridge. 

22.5 1.5 Irregular 4-corners ; turn right across Pine bridge. 

Left at 22.5 leads into Kltchawan, % mile. , 

22.9 0.4 Fork; bear right— sign "Katonah." 

25.0 2.1 Right-hand road; turn right. Cross iron bridge over reser- 

voir 27.0. 
27.8 2.8 Prominent 4-corners ; turn left— sign "Peekskill." 

30.6 2.8 Fork; bear left across small bridge over reservoir. Cross RR 

at Amawalk Sta. 31.6. 

32.8 2.2 End of road ; turn right. Avoid left-hand road 33.2. 

Left at 33.2 leads to Lake Mohanslc. 

34.9 2.1 Yorktown, P. O. on left. Straight thru descending grade onto 

Croton aqueduct, Crompond St. 

Peekskill City Map and Points of interest, page 84. 

41.1 6.2 5-corners ; bear right onto Division St. 

41.3 0.2 PEEKSKILL, Main & Division Sts. 

Route 19— Port Chester to Tarrytown, N. Y.— 13.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via White Plains and Elmsford. Macadam, wood-block, brick and concrete roads. 
Thru a hilly country, passing many fine estates. 

/-NILEAQE^ This is a good connection from the shore routes to Tarrytown, con- 

».*-■ S2?A^ necting there with Route 48 to Poughkeepsie and Route 54 to Nyack 

MttS^rUSi and Suffern. 

0.0 PORT CHESTER, Westchester Ave., Main & King Sts. Go 
northwest with trolley on Westchester Ave. Thru irregular 
4-corners 0.6. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



/" 



Route 22 Page 50 New York 

0.8 0.8 Pork; bear right with Westchester Ave. Avoid right-hand 
diagonal road 0.9. Thru diagonal 4-corners 1.1. 

1.5 0.7 Fork; keep left on Westchester Ave. Bear right onto Pur- 
chase St. 2.0. 

2.4 0.9 Fork; bear left with concrete onto Westchester road. 

6.8 3.9 White Plains, Westchester Ave., Broadway and Main Sts. 9 
soldiers 9 monument on right. 
Turn right with trolley on N. Broadway one block. 

6.4 0.1 Hamilton Ave. ; turn left. 

7.1 0.7 End of road ; meeting trolley, turn right onto Central Ave. 

7.4 0.3 Fork at water trough ; bear right with trolley onto Tarrytown 
road. 

8.8 0.9 Fork; bear right with trolley. 

10.0 1.7 Elmsford,* sta. on left. Straight thru across RR. 
11.2 1.2 Fork; bear left away from trolley. 

Tarrytown City Map and Points of Interest, page 81. 

12.6 1.8 End of road ; turn right onto Broadway. 

13.5 1.0 TARRYTOWN, Broadway & Main St., bank on right. 

Route 22— New York City, N. Y., to Danbury, Conn.— 

63.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Central Ave., White Plains, Armonk, Bedford, South Salem and Ridgefleld. Prac- 
tically all macadam. 

Thru a thickly settled country to White Plains; then winding thru a hilly farming 
country, passing several of the reservoirs of the Kensico system, from which New 
York City gets its water supply. 

A good option Is Route 1 to Norwalk combined with Route 5 to Danbury. 

,- MILEAGE^ 

Total b«iwmI For this and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus Circle, Broadway, 59th St. and 
Central Park W., Maine monument ahead on right. Entering 
Central park go northeast on west drive. 

0.1 0.1 Fork, monument in center; bear left. 

0.8 0.7 Fork, Webster monument in center; bear left. Pass lake 0.9. 

1.3 0.5 Fork; bear right. Pass reservoir 1.6. 

2.4 1.1 3-corners; bear left across stone bridge, following the main 

drive. 

2.9 0.5 Fork; bear right downgrade. 

3.0 0.1 Left-hand road; turn left out of park and cross 110th St. onto 
7th Ave. (double drive). 

•Elmsford, N. Y. (pop. 2,000, alt. 173 ft.). included among the treasures of this home. 

Here is located the beautiful home of Col. The memory of Isaac Van Wart, one of the 

J. C. L. Hamilton, great grandson of Alexan- captors of Major Andre, is perpetuated by a 

der Hamilton and Cornelius Van Tassell. A monument located in the old Dutch church - 

most worthy collection of historic relics are yard. 



Hotel Gramat^n 

HENRI PAUCHEY & S 

Lawrence Park 
Bronxville, New York 
15 Miles From New York City 

Accommodates 400. Grill 
— Golf — Tennis — Daily- 
Concerts — Dancing. De- 
scriptive booklet on request. 



Open 



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City Section 



Page 51 White Plains City Map 



POINTS OF INTEREST, WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. 



White Plains (pop. 23,000, alt. 200 ft.), 
county seat of Westchester County, is one of 
the historic spots of the Revolution. The 
provincial congress of New York met in the 



courthouse here on July 9, 1776, having come 
from New York City on horseback. The Dec- 
laration of Independence was received by 
them on that day and read to the public, who 
(Continued on next page) 



Gedney Farm Hotel 



400 acres of Chateau, Cottages 
and Country Club Sports and 
an established individuality of 
Atmosphere. Appointments. 
Service and Cuisine which are 
distinctly and delightfully its 



own. Road map and illus- 
trated leaflet sent on request. 

Open All the Year 
GEDNEY FARM HOTEL 

Edward H. Crandall, White Plains, N.Y 



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Route 22 



Page 52 



New York 



4.8 1.8 

5.4 0.6 

6.6 0.2 

10.3 4.7 




21.6 6.4 



23.3 1.7 

23.6 0.3 
24.2 0.6 

25.7 1.5 

30.4 4.7 
30.7 0.3 
32.2 1.5 



40.1 7.9 
40.4 0.3 

45.2 4.8 

49.1 3.9 



145th St., end of double drive; meeting trolley turn right 

Cross iron bridge over Harlem river 5.1. Now on 149th St. 

Mott Ave., subway entrance on right; turn left leaving trolley. 

Fork, just beyond RR bridge; bear left coming onto Grand 

Blvd. 6.2. Cross Fordham road trolley 9.0. 

End of boulevard ; turn square left and next right onto Jerome 

Ave., joining trolley under elevated RR. 

End of avenue, cemetery ahead ; bear left with trolley. Coming 

onto Central Ave. 12.6. 

Bronxville (outskirts), 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Thru outskirts of Scarsdale* 19.5. 

Harts Corners, 4-corners. Straight thru. Avoid right-hand 

road 22.8. 

Left at 21.6 is Route 36 to Pawling. 

End of road ; meeting trolley turn right. 

Hamilton Ave. ; turn left across concrete bridge and under RR. 

White Plains, Hamilton Ave. & N. Broadway, end of avenue. 

Turn left onto N. Broadway. 

Fork; bear right with macadam. Cross long concrete bridge 

over reservoir 28.8. 

4-corners ; turn left. 

Fork, beyond small concrete bridge; bear right. 

Armonk, right-hand road, wooden church on right. Turn 

right. 

Straight ahead at 32.2 is Route 17 to Peeksklli. 

Fork; green in center; bear left. 

Bedford, irregular 4-corners ; at grass plot, turn square right. 
Avoid left-hand road 42.6. 

Cross River, end of road; P. O. ahead on right. Turn right. 
South Salem, end of road. Turn right past church. Cross 
New York and Connecticut State Line 51.0. Now on Bed- 
ford St. 



•Scarsdale, N. Y. (pop. 3,500, alt. 200 to 500 ft.), 
was part of the "neutral ground" during the 
revolution and was chosen as the scene of 
'The Spy" by J. Fenimore Cooper, who then 
lived there. There are several historic houses, 
the most interesting being the "Major Pop- 
ham" house, where Washington, Lafayette, 
Hamilton and many of the early leaders of 
the nation were often entertained by Major 
Popham, a member of Washington's staff. 
During the revolution, Howe's army lay in 
camp here several days preparatory to the 



battle of White Plains, which took place 
Oct. 28, 1776. 

Scarsdale has become a popular residential 
section. At Upper Scarsdale (Hartsdale Sta- 
tion) is located the Scarsdale golf and coun- 
try club, whose links are considered the 
finest in that vicinity. The Westchester 
Tennis club is a popular rendezvous for de- 
votees of this sport. 

David D. Tompkins was born here, and it 
is to his work while governor of the state 
that much credit is due for the successful 
issue of the war of 1812. 



(White Plains Points of Interest, continued from page 51) 



were gathered around the front of the court- 
house. The battle of White Plains took place 
Oct. 28, 1776. 

One of the mortars used in that battle may 
be seen on Broadway. One mile further north 
is the house which was used by George 



Washington as headquarters in 1776 and again 
in 1778, now maintained as a museum. Among 
otjier points of interest in White Plains are 
the armory and monument, statue of Colum- 
bus and the civil war soldiers' monument. 
On Chatterton Hill is the "Maine Gun," 
marking the battleground of the Revolution. 



Lake Waccabuc Inn £" Y {S^ p m «£ ^am^JmI £* 

. ftU , XT v . ., . XT ., „ . n „. rort. ueiicious meals. All rooms with bath. 
50 M. from N.Y., | M. to North Bet. Cross River /~ // /\ „ t i d *• n Ls 
and S. Salem in the Norhern Westchester Hills °° l J bourse— J ennis— Boating — Fishing 
NEW YORK PHONE: South Salem 4 1 



| SDCDNY 

fl| reg. us. pat. off. 

1 MOTOR GASOLINE 






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City Section 



Page 53 



Route 22 



52.1 3.0 Fork, wooden school on right; bear left onto Olmstead lane. 

52.4 0.3 End of street; bear left onto West lane. 

52.8 0.4 End of street, stone church on right; turn left onto Main St. 

53.4 0.6 Ridgefield, Conn.,* 4-corners, bank on right. Keep ahead. 
54.0 0.6 Right-hand road, store ahead on right; turn right. 

60.5 6.5 Fork; bear left with poles and travel. Trolley comes in from 

left 61.3. Avoid right-hand road 61.7, where trolley leaves to 
right. Now on Park Ave. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, DANBURY, CONN. 



Danbury (pop. 23,000, alt. 371 ft.). During 
the early part of the revolution large quan- 
tities of provisions for the continental armies 
were stored at Danbury, supposing that its 
distance from the sea coast and main lines of 
travel of these days would insure their 
safety. But in 1777 about 2,000 British troops 
under Gen. Tryon came up from New York, 
landed at Fairfield, Conn., marched to Dan- 
bury and burned the greater part of the town, 
including the military stores. 

With about 70 factories, 30 of them making 
hats, Oanbury is the leading hat manufactur- 
ing city of the United States. The great legal 



battle between certain of the manufacturers 
and the Hatters' Union, known as the "Dan- 
bury Hat Case/' in litigation for several 
years, attracted national attention. 

One of the Connecticut state normal schools 
is located here. In the center of the city 
is a fine soldiers' monument. The great 
"Danbury fair," held the first week in Oc- 
tober, often attracts 100,000 visitors at one 
time, including thousands from distant places. 
James M. Bailey, the "Danbury News Man," 
a Yankee humorist whose writings made his 
paper among the most quoted a generation 
ago, lived here. 



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Route 23 Page 54 New York 

62.4 1.9 End of avenue; meeting trolley, turn left onto Division St. 
62.6 0.2 West St., green ahead on right; turn right with trolley. 
68.0 0.4 DANBURY, CONN., West, Main & Liberty Sts., city hall on 
right d ^ 

Route 23 — Danbury to Waterbury, Conn.— 32.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Newtown. Sandy Hook, Southbury, Woodbury and Middlebury. Alternate 
stretches of macadam and state gravel. 

This is one of the attractive trips of southern New England, winding thru the Housa- 
tonic hills. Principally farming country. 

Trfai bKwIm For this and other exits see City Map, page 53. 

Mileage Points _ 

0.0 0.0 DANBURY, Main, West & Liberty Sts., city hall on left. Go 
north on Main St. with trolley. 

0.3 0.3 White St. ; turn right with branch trolley. Cross RR at sta- 
tion 0.6. 

1.5 1.2 Diagonal 4-corners, small green ahead. Bear left. 

2.1 0.6 Fork; bear right on macadam. Cross iron bridge 2.2. 
6.4 4.3 Fork; bear right across small concrete bridge. 

9.2 2.8 Newtown,* 4-corners at flag pole. Turn left. 

10.8 1.6 Sandy Hook, 4-corners, just beyond concrete bridge. Turn 

left. Go under RR at station 12.1. 
12.6 1.7 End of road beyond long iron bridge; turn right. 

•Newtown, Comb (pop. 3,012, alt. 950 ft.). The late Pierre Lorillard Ronalds, who built 

In 1910 the Congregational church here ecle- the fine "castle" on a hill a short distance 



brated its 200th anniversary. A golden rooster 
which has served as an unique weather vane 
on top of the steeple of that church for a 
generation is still doing duty. Newtown has 
a country club and fine golf grounds. Bishop 
Frederick Johnson of the P. E. church, and 
the late Marcus Hawley, long head of the 
Hawley Hardware Co., New York and San 
Francisco, were natives of this town. 



west of the main street was accustomed to 
say that he had traveled extensively in many 
countries, but had never found a spot sur- 
passing the scenery in this locality. The 
sham battle during the war maneuvers be- 
tween the "Reds" and "Blues" of the U. S. 
national guard took place in 1912 north of 
"Castle Hill." 



ON THE IDEAL TOUR 



HOTEL ELTON 

THE AL.MON C. JUDD COMPANY, OWNERS, WATERBURY. CONN'. 
"THE MOST ATTRACTIVE HOTEL IN NEW ENGLAND" 

The Scenio Naugatuck Valley Boulevard, Bouth of Waterbury, completed 1919. The widest, 

finest. Concrete Road in Connecticut, through New England's most picturesque valley. 

A Modern Fireproof Hotel. Every comfort is included in its' appointments. 

Waterbury, the Gateway to All New England. Golf, Splendid Drives, and Automobile Trips 

through fiflg'H* 1 """* scenery. Send for the Ideal Tour Boute Book. 

EUROPEAN PLAN 



City Section 



Page 55 



Waterbury, Conn. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 

Waterbury (pop. 106,000, alt. 300 ft.), "the 
brass city of the world," is a manufacturing 
city devoted largely to the production of 
watches and clocks, buttons, brass goods, 
silver-plated ware, and a great variety of 
other articles. A history of the city, pub- 
lished 25 years ago, stated that seven-tenths 
of the brass articles then manufactured in 
the. United States were, made in Waterbury. 

Brass rolling and brass wire drawing were 
early industries; the manufacture of hooks 
and eyes, fasteners, pins, and almost every 
conceivable brass article in use has grown to 
enormous proportions. Nickel planchets for 
coins have been furnished for the U. S. Mint; 
and coins or planchets have been made for 
South America and other countries. 

Waterbury and Ingersoll watches and a 
variety of clocks for general and special use 
are made here. The original "Waterbury 
Watch," has been named as one of the 
greatest "educational devices of any age." 

During the revolution, Rochambeau camped 
here with his army while en route to join 
Washington's forces, in June, 1781; and again 
in October, 1782, when returning to Newport 
for embarkation after the surrender of Corn- 
wajlis. A monument marks the site of the 
encampments. 



WATERBURY, CONN. ' 

Metal working was begun about 1750 to 
1760 by Joseph Hopkins, a silversmith, who 
made shoe and garter buckles, and sometimes 
silver buttons. A set of silver vest buttons, 
presented by him to a friend in 1760, is still 
a treasured relic. Pewter buttons were made 
in 1800-1802, and machine for covering 

cloth buttons was put in operation about 1823 
to 1830. 

In 1824 a set of gold buttons was presented 
to Lafayette; as the general was unable to 
come to Waterbury, presentation was made 
in New York with appropriate ceremonies. 
The dies from which the buttons were made 
are now in the treasury department at Wash- 
ington. 

Among the local points of interest is the 
Silas Bronson library, the million dollar city 
hall, the magnificent office building of the 
Chase Companies, Inc., valued at over a 
million dollars, situated directly opposite the 
city hall, and Waterbury's unique railroad 
station, modeled after the campanile of Italy. 
Born here, Mr. Bronson made a fortune as a 
New York merchant; at his death he left an 
endowment for the library. An old-time, 
well-kept "Green" at the center adds to the 
attraction of the city. 



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Route 24 Page 56 New York^ 

13.4 0.9 Fork beyond iron bridge; bear left. 

14.3 0.9 Caution, sharp left turn under RR. 

17.2 2.9 Southbury, fork, green ahead. Bear left, passing P. O. on 

right. 

20.4 3.2 Woodbury* (outskirts), irregular 4-corners. Turn right. 

20.8 0.4 3-corners ; bear right upgrade. Cross trolley 21.9. "* 

24.9 4.1 4-corners at trolley station; turn right with trolley. 

26.3 1.4 Middlebury, wooden church on right. Straight thru. 

Waterbury City Map and Points of Interest, page 55. 

30.6 4.3 Fork; bear right away from trolley. Cross iron bridge over 
Naugatuck river 31.3, coming onto W. Main St. 

32.0 1.4 WATERBURY, public square on right. 

Route 24 — Waterbury to Danbury, Conn. — 32.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Middlebury, Woodbury, Southbury, Sandy Hook and Newtown. Alternating 
stretches of macadam and state gravel. This is one of the attractive trips of Southern 
New England, traversing the Housatonic hills thru a fine farming section. This route, 
used in conjunction with Route 26, forms the best connection between Waterbury and 
New York City. 
,- MILEAGE-^ 

T«tai Brtwiwii For this and other exits see City Map, page 55. 

MiUao« Points 

0.0 0.0 WATERBURY, Hubbard Sq., park on left, bank on right. Go 

northwest on W. Main St. Go under RR 1.4. 
1.8 1.8 Fork; bear right with trolley. 

4.5 2.7 Fork just beyond trolley under-pass; bear left. 

5.6 1.1 Middlebury, fork, green in center. Bear left. Cross bridge 

over trolley at P. O. on right 5.9. Keep straight ahead with 
trolley. 
7.1 1.5 Irregular 4-corners, trolley station ahead; bear left with 

trolley. 
11.2 4.1 3-corners; bear left. Cross trolley 11.4. 

11.6 0.4 Woodbury* (outskirts), 4-corners. Turn left upgrade. 

14.7 3.1 Southbury, 3-corners, small green ahead. Bear right. 

17.7 3.0 Caution, sharp left turn under RR. Cross iron bridge 18.6. 

19.5 1.8 Left-hand road just beyond RR trestle; turn left across iron 

bridge over Housatonic river. Go under RR at station 19.9. 

21.2 1.7 Sandy Hook, 4-corners, store on right. Turn right across con- 
crete bridge up long winding road. Go under RR at station 
22.0. 

22.5 1.3 3-corners, water-trough in center; bear right upgrade. 

22.8 0.3 Newtown,* 4-corners at flag pole. Turn right. 

23.1 0.3 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

25.9 2.8 Fork; bear right. Avoid road to right 29.9. 

Danbury City Map and Points of Interest, page 53. 

30»5 4.6 Irregular 4-corners, small green ahead on right; bear right 

onto White St. Cross RR at station 31.5. 
81.7 1.2 Main St.; meeting trolley, turn left. 
32.0 0.3 DANBURY, Main, West & Liberty Sts., city hall ahead on 

right. 

•Woodbury, Conn. (pop. 1,600, alt. 150 ft.). which has served as an unique weather vans 

Settled 1674 by minister and congregation, on top of the steeple of that church for a 

said to have left Stratford as a result of re- generation is still doing duty. Newtown has 

ligious controversy. An interesting feature a country club and fine golf grounds. Bishop 



is the Masonic temple, owned by King Solo- 



Frederick Johnson of the P. £. church, and 

. r * ™ . * *, • * »r t. . j the ,ate Marcus Hawley, long head of the 

mon's Lodge, No. 7, A. F. & A. M., chartered rfawJcy Hardware ^ New York and ^ 

July 17, 1765. Building, which is on top of Francisc0f werc nativc8 of thi8 town . 

high rock by the roadside, and ascended by The late Pierre Lorillard Ronalds, who built 

winding stairs, Was dedicated in 1839. Joel the fine "castle" on a hill a short distance 

Clark, first master of the American Union west of the main street was accustomed to 

lodge (the old Continental Army lodge), and say that he had traveled extensively in many 

lieutenant-colonel in the continental army, countries, but had never found a spot sur- 

was a charter member of King Solomon's passing the scenery in this locality. The 

lodge, sham battle during the war maneuvers be- 

Newtown, Conn. (pop. 3,012, alt. 950 ft.). tween the "Reds" and "Blues" of the U. S'. 

910 the Congregational church here cele* national guard took place in 1912 north of 

ed its 200th anniversary. A golden rooster "Castle Hill." 

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City Section Page 57 Routes 25-26 

Route 25 — Waterbirty to Bridgeport, Conn. — 32.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Naugatuck, Beacon Falls, Seymour, Derby, Shelton and Stratford. Asphalt, 
macadam, concrete and gravel roads. 

Thru a hilly country, following the Naugatuck river valley nearly all the way. A very 
pretty trip. 

^- MILEAGE-^ 

Total BttwMiT For this and other exits see City Map, page 55. 

4ltl«ag0 Polnjs 

0.0 0.0 WATERBURY, Center Square. Go south with trolley on S. 

Main St. 

1.3 1.3 Fork; bear right with trolley. 

4.9 3.6 Naugatuck, Main & Maple Sts. Straight thru with trolley. 

5.2 0.3 Fork, store in center; bear right with trolley. 

8.8 3.6 Beacon Falls, large brick factory on left. Straight thru. 

10.1 1.3 Fork; bear left with travel. 

11.9 1.8 Fork; bear right with trolley. Under RR 12.4, curving left 

immediately beyond. 
12.6 0.7 Seymour,* P. O. on right. Straight thru with trolley. Curve 

right across two iron bridges 12.7. Now on Broad St. 
12.9 0.3 End of street; turn left onto Derby Ave. 
15.9 3.0 Fork; bear right, joining trolley. 
17.6 1.7. Fork; bear right with trolley onto Elizabeth St. 

18.2 0.6 Derby,* Main & Elizabeth Sts. Meeting trolley, turn right 

onto Main St. 

18.3 0.1 Irregular 4-corners ; turn left with branch trolley onto Bridge 

St., across long iron bridge over Housatonic river. 
18.5 0.2 Shelton, Bridge St. & Howe Ave. Turn left onto Howe Ave. 

26.5 8.0 Fork; bear right with trolley. 

28.8 2.3 Stratford,* right-hand street, bank on left. Turn right onto 

Main St. with branch trolley. 
29.1 0.3 4-corners ; turn right with trolley. 

Bridgeport City Map, page 35; Points of Interest, page 36. 

30.4 1.3 Fork, just beyond cemetery; bear right onto Connecticut Ave., 

leaving trolley. 

31.6 1.2 End of avenue; meeting trolley, turn right onto Stratford 

Ave. Cross long concrete bridge 32.2. Under RR 32.3. 
32.4 0.8 BRIDGEPORT, Fairfield Ave. & Main St. 

Route 26— Danbury, Conn., to New York, N. Y.— 63.0 m. 

For ^Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Rldgefield, -South Salem, Bedford, Armonk, White Plains and Central Ave. 
Practically all macadam. 

This route runs thru a hilly farming country, passing several reservoirs of the New 
York City water works system. From White Plains it follows Central Ave. thru the 
outskirts of Scarsdale, Hartsdale and Bronxville. 

A good option is Route 192 to Norwalk combined with Route 9 to New York. 
,-MILEAGE-^ 

t»ui bISwSJ For this and other exits see City Map, page 53. 

M Urate Points 

0.0 0.0 DANBURY, W. Main & Liberty Sts., city hall on left. Go 
west on West St. with trolley. 



(pop. 6,000, alt. 100 It.). 'Derby, Conn. (pop. 12,000, alt. 16 ft.). Old- 

Primitive industry started here shortly time residence and manufacturing city at the 

after the revolution; in 1803 Gen. David junction of the Naugatuck and Housatonic 

Humphreys introduced merino wool into the rivcr8 Qnce faad con8 j dcrablc shipbuilding, 

United States and began it. manufacture and carried on extensive tra(U with thc Wes , 
Place was known as Humphreysville until 

1850, when it was renamed Seymour. Its n J 'f 8 / . 

factories excel in small metal specialties, •Stratford, Conn. (pop. 12,000, alt. 21 ft.), is 

bits, augers, chisels, edge tools and other notable as the place where the first church 

products of Yankee ingenuity, well known of England in the Connecticut colony vr 

and widely sold. in this and foreign countries. established in 1706; in 1722, the first 

The Waterman fountain pen is manufactured sionary of that denomination settle 

in Seymour. „ Chrirt church, founded 1723. still rem 



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Route 26 Page 58 New York 

0.8 0.3 Fork; green in center; bear right and turn next left onto Di- 
vision St. 
0.6 0.3 Park Ave. ; turn right upgrade, away from trolley. Bear right 

2.5. 
2.7 2.1 Fork; bear left with poles. Avoid left-hand road 6.2. 
9.0 6.3 End of road; turn left. 
9.6 0.6 Ridgefield, Conn., 41 4-corners, bank on left. Keep ahead on 

' Main St. 
10.2 0.6 West Lane, stone church ahead on right; turn right. Avoid 

right-hand road 10.3. 
10.6 0.4 Fork; bear right onto Olmsted Lane, with poles. 
10.9 0.3 Fork, school ahead ; bear right onto Bedford St. 

Left is Route 194 to Stamford. 

12.2 1.3 3-corners; bear right with poles. 

13.9 1.7 So. Salem, N. Y., left-hand diagonal road. Bear left. 

17.8 3.9 Cross River, left-hand road, P. O. on right. Turn left. 

22.6 4.8 Bedford, diagonal 4-corners at grass plot. Bear left. 

22.8 0.2 Fork, green ahead; bear right. 

Right-hand road 24.0 is Route 28 to Tarrytown. 

30.8 8.0 Armenk, end of road, wooden church on left. Turn left. 

32.3 1.5 End of road; turn left across concrete bridge. 

32.6 0.3 4-corners ; turn right along reservoir. 

Straight ahead at 32.6 is Route 174 to Port Chester. 

Cross long concrete bridge over reservoir 34.0. Bear left onto 
N. Broadway 37.3. 

White Plains City Map and Points of Interest, page 51. 

88.8 6.2 White Plains, Broadway & Hamilton Ave., green on left. Turn 
right onto Hamilton Ave. 

39.4 0.6 End of avenue just beyond concrete bridge; meeting trolley 

turn right onto Central Ave. 

39.7 0.3 Left-hand road, water-trough ahead on left; turn left. Still 

on Central Ave. Thru Harts Corners 41.4. 

43.5 3.8 Scarsdale* (outskirts), 4-corners. Straight thru. 

47.8 4.3 Bronxville (outskirts), Central & Palmer Aves. 

Left leads to Bronxville. 
Bear slightly right upgrade. Cross Yonkers Ave. 49.2, coming 
onto Jerome Ave. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99, 

61.9 4.1 Right-hand diagonal road, cemetery on left; bear right with 

trolley under elevated RR ; still on Jerome Ave. 

'Ridgefield, Conn. (pop. 2,300, alt. 800 ft.). hillside overlooking Lake Mamanasco. 
An historic village, deeded by Catoonah and 'Scarsdale, N. Y. (pop. 3,500, alt. 200 to 500 ft.>, 
other Indian proprietors in 1706 to settlers, was part of the "neutral ground" during the 
mostly from Norwalk, Conn. The immediate revolution and was chosen as the scene of 
locality was the scene of much fighting dur- "The Spy" by J. Fenimore Cooper, who then 
ing the revolutionary war; in the battle of lived there. There are several historic houses, 
Ridgefield, September, 1777, Gen. Wooster was the most interesting being the "Major Pop- 
mortally wounded. ham" house, where Washington, Lafayette, 

Many of the houses of the village are Hamilton and many of the early leaders of 

very old; chief among these is the old the nation were often entertained by Major 

Keeler tavern, now owned by the distin- Popham, a member of Washington's staff, 

guished architect, Cass Gilbert, who has en- During the revolution, Howe's army lay in* 

deavored to retain the building so far as camp here several days preparatory to the 

feasible in its original form. A cannon ball, battle of White Plains, which took place 

which was fired into the tavern, is still pre- Oct. 28, 1776. 

served and gives it the name, "Cannon- Ball Scarsdale has become a popular residential 

House." section. At Upper Scarsdale (Hartsdale Sta- 

Ridgefield is exclusively a residential vil- tion) is located the Scarsdale golf and coun- 

lage, conceded to be one of the most attrac- try club, whose links are considered the 

tive in the east. Many wealthy and noted finest in that vicinity. The Westchester 

people have chosen Ridgefield or the immedi- Tennis club is a popular rendezvous for dev- 

ately surrounding coutry for a permanent or otees of this sport. 

summer home; and have erected handsome David D. Tompkins was born here, and 

residences. Four miles from the village, on it is his work while governor of the state 

he North Salem road, is the Ridgefield school that much credit is due for the successful 

boys, which has a beautiful site on the issue of the war of 1812. 



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City Section Page 59 Routes 28-30 

52.6 0.7 4-corners, at end of elevated sta. ; turn left away from trolley. 

52.7 0.1 Grand Blvd. & Concourse, double drive; turn right Cross 

Fordham Road trolley 54.0. Bear left at monument onto Mott 
Ave. 56.7. 
57.5 4.8 149th St. ; meeting trolley turn right downgrade. 

Cross iron draw-bridge over Harlem river 57.8. Now on 
145th St. 

58.1 0.6 7th Ave. (double drive) ; turn left. Cross 110th St. to 
59.9 1.8 Entrance to Central Park; turn right upgrade. 

60.2 0.3 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

60.3 0.1 Fork; bear left on Main drive. 

60.5 0.2 3-corners, beyond stone bridge; bear right. 

60.6 0.1 Fork; keep left. Pass reservoir on left 61.3. 

61.6 1.0 Fork; bear left across iron, bridge. 

62.0 0.4 Fork, lake on left; bear left. 

62.1 0.1 3-corners, Webster monument in center; bear right. 
62.9 0.8 3-corners, monument in center; bear right. 

68.0 0.1 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, Broadway, 59th St. & 

Central Park W. 

Route 28— Danbury, Conn., to Tarrytown, N. Y. — 40.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via So. Salem, Cross River, Bedford, Chappaqua, Pleasantville and Pocantico Hills. 
Tar macadam all the way. 

Thru hilly farming country, passing a few of the New York City reservoirs and the 
<— mileage-^ John D. Rockefeller estate. 

t-a-i £5£f£ This route connects at Tarrytown with Route 54 to Nyack and Suf- 

MiStae pSinS fern and Ro u <* 171 to New York City. 

0.0 0.0 DANBURY. See route 26 for directions to Bedford, 22.6 

miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 Bedford, diagonal 4-corners at grass plot. Bear left. 

0.2 0.2 Fork, green ahead on right; bear right. 

1.3 1.1 Right-hand road; turn right. 
1.8 0.5 3-corners; bear left with poles. 
2.7 0.9 4-corners ; turn left on macadam. 

5.4 2.7 Mt. Kisco (outskirts), fork, green in center. Bear left onto 

Main St. 

Avoid left-hand macadam roads 5.7-6.0. 
7.4 2.0 Left-hand road at small green; turn left. 
9.1 1.7 Chappaqua, large concrete school on right. Straight thru. 

10.7 1.6 3-corners, water-trough on left; bear right. 

Left is Route 372 to New York City. 

11.5 0.8 Pleasantville,* Bedford road & Wheeler Ave. 

Straight thru across RR. 

11.6 0.1 3-corners, bear left. Thru 4-corners 12.7. 

13.1 1.5 Fork; be^r left. Thru 4-corners 15.3. 

15.4 2.3 Pocantico Hills, 4-corners. Turn right across RR, passing the 

John D. Rockefeller estate on left. 

Tarrytown City Map and Points of Interest, page 81. 

16.9 1.5 Broadway, large brick church on far right; turn left. 

Sharp right downgrade 16.9 is Route 48 to Poughkeepsle. 

17.6 0.7 TARRYTOWN, Broadway & Main Sts. 

Route 30— Danbury, Conn., to Peekskill, N. Y.^33.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Mill Plain, Brewster, Somers and Yorktown. Practically all tar macadam and 
,-MILEAGE-^ concrete. 

T . . «iJ2??5 Thru a hilly farming- country, passing some of the New York City 

Mileage ^Points reservoirs. This is the best route between the above terminals. 

•Pleasantville, N. Y. (pop. 2,207, alt. 420 ft.), a farm home here, which was known as 
is an old settlement renowned for its splendid "Greeley Swamp." The original house was 

destroyed by fire, but another was shortly 
production of apples and cucumbers. Horace ere cted on the same site and occupied by hi 
Greeley, editor of the New York Tribune, had daughter. 

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Route 31 Page 60 New York 

0.0 0.0 DANBURY, CONN. See route 31 for directions to 
10.2 10.2 Brewster, N. Y., Main St. & Railroad Ave., sta. ahead. Turn 
left downgrade onto Railroad Ave. Cross concrete bridge 10.5. 

14.2 4.0 Right-hand road beyond RR under-pass; turn right across 

iron bridge and left immediately beyond. Cross iron bridge 
14.6. 

15.4 1.2 Fork; bear right. Bear right 15.9. 

16.3 0.9 Somers,* 3-corners, Elephant monument ahead. Bear right. 

17.7 1.4 Fork; bear right. 

18.3 0.6 End of road; turn left. Cross RR at Lincolndale Sta. 18.5. 

18.8 0.5 3-corners; bear right. 

19.5 0.7 Right-hand road at end of reservoir; turn sharp right with 

poles, curving left along shore of reservoir 19.7. 
20.7 1.2 End of road; turn left. 

23.7 3.0 End of road; turn right. Cross RR at Amawalk Sta. 24.0. 
25.1 1.4 End of road; turn sharp right. 

Left at 25.1 is Route 363 to New York City. 

Avoid left-hand macadam road 25.5. Thru Yorktown 27.3. 

28.1 3.0 3-corners; bear right downgrade, coming onto Crompond St. 

83.4 5.3 End of street; turn right downgrade onto S. Division St. 

Peeksklll City Map and Points of Interest, page 84. 

33.7 0.3 PEEKSKILL, Division & Main Sts. 

Route 31 — Danbury, Conn., to Cold Spring, N. Y.— 34.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of lWns, Back of Book. 

Via Mill Plain, Brewster and Carmel. First 3 miles gravel; dirt and sandy dirt 
to Carmel; balance macadam. Summary: 17.0 miles dirt and sandy dirt; 14.8 miles 
macadam; 3 miles gravel. 

A very picturesque drive over the Fishkill Mts„ skirting several of the reservoirs 
and winding thru some very wooded sections. 

This road should not be attempted early in the year or during wet weather as it 
is narrow (often with grades) and soft in many places. 

.-MILEAGE^ 

Total Setwwn For this and other exits see City Map, page 53. 

Mlleaoe Points 

0.0 0.0 DANBURY, West, Main & Liberty Sts., city hall on left. Go 
west on West St. with trolley. 

0.3 0.3 Fork, green in center; bear right, leaving trolley. 

0.5 0.2 3-corners, water-trough in center; meeting trolley, bear left. 

4.0 3.5 Mill Plain, Conn., fork, P. O. on left. Bear slightly left. 

4.2 0.2 3-corners beyond RR bridge; bear right. Cross Connecticut- 
New York state line 5.5. Thru outskirts of Sodom 9.0. Curve 
left under and across RR 9.2. 

9.4 5.2 Right-hand road ; turn right across iron bridge onto Main St. 

10.2 0.8 Brewster, N. Y., Railroad Ave. & Main St., station ahead. 

Turn right onto Railroad Ave. 

Left downgrade is Route 30 to Peekskill and Route 372 to New 
York City. 

10.4 0.2 Left-hand road; turn left over RR bridge. 

10.5 0.1 Left-hand road, at top of grade ; turn left. 
12.4 1.9 Fork; bear right. Cross causeway 12.6. 

12.7 0.3 Left-hand road, at end of causeway; turn left. 

13.3 0.6 End of road, beyond RR bridge; bear right. 

14.8 1.J End of road, concrete church on left; turn right. 

*Somers, N. Y. (pop. 102), breathes of circus this country, is kept alive thru the elephant 

days and menageries, the town originally monument erected here. Hachaliah Bailey, 

having been settled in 1736 as a winter home who was proprietor of the Elephant hotel, 

for circus performers The memory of "Old claims honor as being the originator of the 

Betsy," the first elephant transplanted to traveling menagerie. 




For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



City Section Page 61 Route 33 

14.9 0.1 Carmel,* left-hand road, court house on right. Turn left 

along shore of Glenida lake. 
15.9 1.0 3-corners ; turn right across causeway. 

16.2 0.3 3-corners; bear left along lake. 

18.1 1.9 3-corners; bear right. £void right-hand diagonal road 18.8. 
• Thru Kent Cliffs 20.1. 

21.3 3.2 End of road; turn left. 

21.7 0.4 3-corners, just beyond small wooden bridge; bear right. 

22.4 0.7 Mead Corners, irregular 4-corners. . Turn left. Avoid right- 

hand diagonal road 24.2. Follow winding road, wooded and 
rocky, with many steep grades thru Fishkill Mts. Thru 
McKeel's Corners 32.0. 

Right at 32.0 is Route 48 to Poughkeepsle. 
Left at 32.0 is Route 171 to New York City. 

34.0 11.6 Nelsonville, water-trough on left. Straight thru. 

34.8 0.8 COLD SPRING, Main & Fair Sts. 

Route 33— Banbury, Conn., to Poughkeepsie, N. Y. — 53.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Mill Plain, Patterson, Stonehouse, Poughquag, Stormville, East Fishkill, Hope- 
well Junction and New Hackensack. Hard surfaced road all the way, except 9 miles 
gravel. 

Thru a hilly farming country. 

This Route to mileage 18.8 — Route 38 to Amenia and 371 to Poughkeepsie offer an 
all macadam option but much longer. 

Total Betww! For this and other exits see City Map, page 53. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 DANBURY, West, Main & Liberty Sts., city hall on left. Go 

. northwest on West St. 
0.3 0.3 Fork, green in center; bear right away from trolley. 
0.5 0.2 3-corners ; meeting trolley bear left onto Lake Ave. Go under 

4.0 3.5 Mill Plain, Conn., P. O. on left. Bear slightly left. 

4.2 0.2 Fork beyond RR bridge ; bear right. Cross Connecticut-New 
York State line 5.5. Go over RR bridge 8.7. 

9.1 4.9 Sodom, N. Y. (outskirts), reverse fork, sign, "Pawling." Turn 

sharp right. 

Straight ahead at 9.1 is Route 31 to Cold Spring via Brewster and 
Carmel. 

18.8 9.7 Left-hand road; turn left. 

Straight ahead at 18.8 is Route 38 to Pawling and Plttsfield. 

Cross RR at Patterson Sta. 19.5. 

20.2 1.4 Fork; bear right. 

Left at 20.2 is Route 363 to New York. 

22.3 2.1 Holmes, fork at RR. Bear right. 

27.9 5.6 Stone House; end of road beyond RR at Sta. Turn left. 

30.0 2.1 Poughquag, 3-corners at small grass plot. Bear left with 
macadam. 4 

30.6 0.6 Right-hand road; turn right with macadam. Thru Green 
Haven 32.6. Bear left 34.4. 

35.0 4.4 Stormville (outskirts), end of road; turn right. Cross RR 
35.1. 

38.0 3.0 East Fishkill, townhall on right. Turn sharp right. 

Straight ahead is Route 34 to Newburgh. 

'Carmel, N. Y. (pop. 2,737, alt. 425 ft.). Rev. Nathan Cole, on the site of the present 

Located on the eastern shore of lake Glenida Sm alley Inn, when they were overtaken by 

is the county seat of Putnam county, and an a British captain and company of men. 
important point on the old highway between - Watching their opportunity, they emerged 

Danbury and Peekskill. from hiding and took their enemies prisoners. 

Enoch Crosby, who, while posing as a Crosby, who was the original of "Harvey 

Tory, was in fact in the confidential service Birch" in Cooper's "The Spy," died in Carmel 

of congress and acting under the general in 1838 and is buried in the churchyard here, 
direction of Washington, was a native of the Drew seminary for young women, founded 

town. At one time Gen. Israel Putnam, one by Daniel Drew, New York financier, is 

Jay, a member of the Committee of Safety, College Hill, in the southern part of Cat 

and Crosby had sought refuge at the house of village. 



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Route 34 Page 62 New York 

40.2 2.2 Hopewell Junction, left-hand road, store on far left. Turn 
left. Cross RR 40.4. 

40.5 0.3 Left-hand road, store on left; turn left. Cross RR 40.8. Cross 

RR at Fishkill Plains Sta. 43.2. 

43.6 3.1 Fork; bear right with travel. 

44.7 1.1 End of road; turn left. 

46.1 1.4 New Hackensack, 3-corners, store on left. Bear right. 

48.2 2.1 Fork; bear left. 

48.4 0.2 3-corners beyond bridge; bear left. 

48.5 0.1 End of road; turn right. Avoid right-hand diagonal road 

50.9. Now on Hooker Ave. 

Right at 49.3 leads to Vassar College. 

Poughkeepsie City Map and Points of Interest, page 182. 

52.9 4.4 Irregular 5-corners; bear slightly left with trolley, still on 
Hooker Ave., 

53.2 0.3 Market St. ; meeting trolley turn right. 

53.5 0.3 POUGHKEEPSIE, Market & Main Sts., city hall on left. 

Route 34— Pawling to Newburgh, N. Y.— 35.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Patterson, Poughquag, Stormville, East Fishkill, Fishkill, Beacon and Beacon- 
Newburgh Ferry. Hard surfaced road entire distance. 
/—MILEAGE-^ Thru hilly farming country, wooded on the mountain. 

▼^.i £?&!£ Connects at Fishkill with Route 48 to Poughkeepsie and Route 171 

lGRi. B iRhTfi to N « w Yor * City. 

0.0 0.0 PAWLING, 3-corners, stores on left. Go south on main road. 
3.7 3.7 Right-hand road; turn right. Cross RR at Patterson Sta. 4.4. 
Avoid left-hand road 5.1. 

Left at 5.1 is Route 363 to New York City. 

7.2 3.5 Holmes, fork at RR. Bear right. 

12.8 5.6 Stone House, end of road at sta. Turn left. 

14.9 2.1 Poughquag, 3-corners at small grass plot. Bear left on 

macadam. 

15.5 0.6 Right-hand road; turn right across small concrete bridge. 

Thru Green Haven 17.4. Bear left 19.2. 
19.8 4.3 Stormville (outskirts), end of road. Turn right. Avoid right- 
hand road 20.3. Cross RR 20.4. 

22.8 3.0 East Fishkill, town hall on left. Keep ahead. 

Sharp right is Route 33 to Poughkeepsie. 

22.9 0.1 3-corners; bear right. Thru Wiccopee 26.1. 

27.3 4.4 Right-hand road; turn right across iron bridge, on macadam. 

Cross RR 27.4. 

27.6 0.3 Brinckerhoff, end of road. Bear left. 

29.2 1.6 End of road; turn right. 

Sharp left at 29.2 is Route 171 to New York. 

29.4 0.2 Fishkill,* small wooden church on right. Meeting trolley, 

straight thru. 

Right at 29.4 is Route 48 to Poughkeepsie. 

33.3 3.9 Main St. ; turn left with trolley. 

33.4 0.1 End of street; turn left. 

Newburgh City Map and Points of Interest, page 205. 

33.5 0.1 End of street; turn right with trolley. Still Main St. 

34.6 1.1 Beacon, 5-corners, bank on left. Bear slightly left with trolley 

onto Ferry St., turning immediately right downgrade with 
trolley. 
35.1 0.5 3-corners; turn right with trolley over RR bridge; turning 
right immediately beyond. 

'Fishkill, N. Y. (pop. 525, alt. 8 ft.). Old continental army during most of revolution- 
Dutch church, erected here in 1731, housed ary war; also the house referred to in 
provincial convention of 1776; was used by Cooper's "Spy." Interesting bronze tablet in 
Americans as military prison during revolu- Wicopee Pass, 4 miles south of Fishkill vil- 
tion. Blacksmith who forged Washington's lage. Wicopee Pass was carefully guarded 
sword lived and worked here. during the revolutionary war to prevent the 

Wharton house, along roadside, just south British from turning the American works 

f Fishkill village, was local headquarters for waste beyond it. 



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Route 38 Page 68 New York 

63.1 5.9 Left-hand road, wooden school on far left; turn left. 

63.2 0.1 4-corners ; turn right with travel. Go under RR 63.6. Bear 

right 64.6. 

65.4 2.2 End of road; turn right Cross BR at Patterson Sta. 66.1. 
66.8 1.4 End of road; turn left. 

Right at 66.8 Is Route 190 to Dan bury. 

70.5 3.7 Pawling,* 3-corners, stores on left; bear right. 
72.1 2.2 End of road; turn left. 

77.1 4.4 3-corners ; meeting trolley, bear right. Thru So. Dover 78.2. 



•Pawling, N. Y. (pop. 1,000, alt. 600 ft.). The 
first anti-rent riots in America, led by 
V/iHiam Prenderghast, occurred here in 
1766. Considerable detachments of troops 
were stationed here during' 1778; a tablet on 
a large tree opposite the golf grounds, south- 
ern end of village, indicates "Washington's 
Headquarters." On October 1, 1778, the court 
martial demanded by Maj.-Gen. Philip Schuy- 
ler, to investigate charges of neglect of duty 
at Ticonderoga, met at Kirby house, Pawling, 
then headquarters of Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, 
president of the court, of which Gen. Anthony 
Wayne and other officers of the continental 
army were members. Schuyler was acquitted 
with "the highest honor." 

On the crest of the ridge three miles east, 
toward the Connecticut line, is Quaker Hill, 
or "The Oblong," settled in 1731 by the 
Hicksite branch of Quakers, hence the name. 
From its summit a considerable area of New 
York state, Connecticut and Massachusetts 
can be seen. Gen. Lew Wallace, who was a 
frequent visitor at the home of the late 
William B. Wheeler, one of the show places 
on Qualfer Hill, wrote most of "Ben Hur" 
on a little piazza on the north side of that 
house. 

Friends' meeting house on Quaker Hill, 



erected in 1764, and still in good repair, was 
the scene in 1767 of the first public protest 
in America against slavery. During the revo- 
lution it was used by continental troops as 
a hospital, particularly during the campaign 
of 1778; many soldiers are buried in its 
churchyard. Lafayette stopped at the church 
on his way from .Rhode Island to consult 
Washington; it is said that on the general's 
visit to the United States in 1824 he inquired 
about Quaker Hill and expressed a strong 
desire to visit it again. 

In the cemetery is a monument to Mehitabel 
Wing-Prenderghast, heroic wife of William 
Prenderghast, erected by the Wing family, 
one of the most prominent in the early 
history of this section. Admiral Worden of 
Monitor fame is buried here. The historical 
society museum in the library on the hill 
contains many old records and objects of his- 
toric interest. 

On the south end of "Purgatory," a hill 
east of the village, are still found the stone 
remains of ovens used by the soldiers who 
were encamped there during the revolution. 

A half mile north of the village, just beyond 
the cemetery, on the east side of the main 
north -and -south road, are the campus and 
buildings of the Pawling school for boys. 




Mizzen Top 
Hotel 

PAWLING N. Y. 

Golf Tennis 

41st season 

of largest hotel between 

White Plains and Lenox. 

Scenic beauty equal to any in 

the East. In the most beautfiul 

part of the Berkshires. 

AMERICAN PLAN 

'getables from our own farm 
P. H. NOLAN 



Opens June 25th. Closes September 15th 



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r 



Route 38 Page 70 New York 

98.6 2.8 Fork; bear right downgrade. 
100.7 2.1 Fork; bear right. Bear left 102.0. 

102.3 1.6 Right-hand road; turn right. Gross RR 102.4 onto Main St 

102.5 0.2 Millerton, N. Y., end of street. P. O. on left Turn right 

102.6 0.1 Irregular 4-corners, church ahead; jog left and immediately 

right. 
104.5 1.9 Ore Hill, Conn., fork at P. O. Bear left. Cross RR 104.6. 

106.4 1.9 Lakeville, end of road at foot of grade. Turn left. 
108.1 1.7 Salisbury, Conn., fork, monument in center. Bear left. 

112.5 4.4 End of road; bear left. Trolley comes in from left 121.8. 

Avoid left-hand road where trolley leaves 121.4. 
121.5 9.0 S. Egremont, Mass., left-hand road; beyond iron bridge, turn 
left 

121.7 0.2 Fork; bear right away from trolley. Cross trolley 122.5. 
122.9 1.2 Fork; bear right. 

124.4 1.5 Fork, monument in center; bear left onto Maple Ave. Cross 
RR 124.7. Bear left onto Main St. 125.0. 

125.3 0.9 Great Barrington,* Main, Bridge & Castle Sts., town hall on 

left. Straight thru with trolley. 
125.9 0.6 Right-hand road; turn right with branch trolley across iron 
bridge. 

126.4 0.5 Left-hand road; turn left with trolley. 

Straight ahead before this turn leads to Monterey. 

128.4 2.0 Fork; bear right upgrade. 

132.8 4.4 Stockbridge,* 4-corners, monument in green. Turn right 

"Great Barrlnfto*, Mas*, (pop. 7,000, alt. Great Barrington has been the birthplace 

725 ft.), is situated on both sides of the upper or home of sereral noted people. Here the 

Housatonic river. A large boulder with in- alternating current was first used for elec- 

scription, "Town Incorporated 1761/' stands trie lighting by William Stanley, who was 

oa the court house grounds. the inventor of means for its use. A point 

William Cullen Bryant practiced law in of interest is the newsboys' fountain at Sil- 

Great Barrington from 1815 to 1825; and warn ver and Maple avenues, erected by Col. W. L.. 

town clerk for several years. Here he ts*t» Brown. 



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City Section 



Page 7i 



Points of Interest 



the presidency of Princeton College in 1757. 
Here, in a house since removed to make way 
for a private residence, the eminent divine 
wrote his most famous work, "The Freedom 
of the Will." A sun-dial marks the founda- 
tion of the Sergeant and Edwards home. The 
Field Chimes Clock tower, the gift of the late 
David Dudley Field, now identifies the site 
of the original Indian mission church; nearby 
it the Jonathan Edwardt monument. 

Rev. David Dudley Field, D.D., minister 
of the First Congregational church from 1819 
to 1837, was the father of the celebrated Field' 
brothers, Cyrus W., who laid the first Atlan- 
tic cable; David Dudley, the eminent jurist; 
Henry M., clergyman, traveler and author, 
and Stephen J., chief justice of the Califor- 
nia supreme court and afterward associate 



justice of the United States supreme court. 
During the Field ministry the present church 
edifice at Stockbridge was erected. St.. Paul's 
Episcopal church, designed by McKim* the 
gift of the late Charles E. Butler, was' conse- 
crated in November, 1884. 

Monument mountain, south of the village, 
is the subject of Bryant's poem of that name, 
which charmingly recounts the old legend of 
the Indian maiden who leaped to her death 
from its summit;, the spot is marked by a 
cairn of stone placed by the Indians. Stock- 
bridge Bowl (Lake Mahkeenac), famed in song 
and story, is north of the village; Nathaniel 
Hawthorne lived for about 18 months near its 
shores. The village • and environs contain 
many of the finest homes in the country. 
Jackson library and Soldiers' monument are 
other points of interest. 



tf '.f 



NEW AMERICAN HOTEL 

PITTSFIELD MASSACHUSETTS 

Under Management of the NEW AMERICAN HOTEL COMPANY 

ARTHUR W. PLUMB, IWIdant GEORGE W. CLARK. Treasurer 

EUROPEAN PLAN 
Single Room $1.50 up Double $2.50 and up 



Single Room with Bath $2.50 up 



Double $4.00 and up 



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Page 72 

D 17 f| T BATHING & BOATING in the MOUNTAINS 

CreeZV IVnOll mil American Plan. $4.00 a Day 

GARAGE Phone 2718-W 

rittsfield Ukc Pontoo»uc MaSS. L. M. ROCKWELL, Proprietor 

Start WILLIAMSTOWN, MASS., for BOSTON 

and The Greylock Hotel Over the Mohawk Trail 

Rooms en suite, HO Baths, Swimming Pool. 

The favorite stopping place for motorists. The Most Wonderful Scenic Motor 
New fireproof garage. Send tor Booklet. . , 
HENRY N. TEAGUE, Lessee. Highway in the East. 

) ' 

PITTSFIELD, BERKSHIRE COUNTY, MASS. 

6k?MAPLEMX)D 

THIRTY-FOURTH SEASON 

Open May 26th to Nov. 1st American Plan 

Golf at Country Club. New 18-hole 6300 yards Grass Greens 

Entrance to office North Street and Maplewood Avenue 

Booklet and Road Map oH Application 
ARTHUR W. PLUMB 



HOTEL ASPINWALL 



LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS 

Altitude 1,460 feet. The "Hotel Beautiful" of the Berk- 
shires. Table and service of the highest standard. Fine 
motor roads, golf, tennis, saddle horses, driving, etc. 
Orchestral music and dancing. Accommodates four 
hundred guests. Our own fireproof garage adjoining. 
On the route of the Ideal Tour 

HOWE & TWOROGBR Managers 

Also Managers PRINCESS HOTEL, Bermuda 



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New York City Sec. Page 73 



Pittsfield City Map 



1 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 

Pittsfield (pop. 41,751, alt. 1,037 ft.), is the 
geographical and commercial center of the 
Berkshire country, and heart of the "Berk- 
shire Hills." Joseph Wendell, ancestor of 
Oliver Wendell Holmes, purchased much of 
the land in the vicinity from the Indians. 
The poet and philosopher was always very 
fond of this locality, and did a great deal of 
his writing here. The old Appleton mansion, 
girlhood home of the wife of Longfellow, is 
still standing on East street; it is now the 
Plunkett homestead. Longfellow spent sev- 
eral seasons at this house, writing there the 
"Old Dock on the Stairs" and other poems. 



PITTSFIELD, MASS. 

In the center of the park once stood the 
famous "Berkshire elm," 120 ft. high. On 
the site of the First church, just to the 
north, was the meeting house of "Fighting 
Parson Allen," who led the men of Berk- 
shire to the battle of Bennington. On this 
"common" was held in 1809 the first agri- 
cultural fair in America; here also General 
Lafayette was given a reception in 1825. A 
few rods east stood Fort Goodrich, erected 
1756. 

Among many points of interest is the for- 
mer rectory of St. Stephen's Episcopal church, 
built in 1773, and left to the society by will of 
(Continued on next page) 



ss 



HOTEL 
WENDELL 

European Plan 

PITTSFIELD, MASS. 



Fireproof— Modern 



In the Heart of 
The Berkshire Hills 



Beautifully Situated. 
Year 



Open All 



South and West Streets 
ARTHUR H. BRUNELLE, Mgr. 



Route 39 Page 74 New York 

188.1 0.3 Fork; bear left 

188.7 5.6 End of road; bear left. 

138,9 0.2 Lenox,* 4-corners, at monument Turn right. 

Avoid left-hand diagonal road 189.0. 

Pass Country Club on right 144.0. Now on Main St. 
145.5 6.6 PITTSFIELD, Main, West & East Sts., park on right. 

Note (a) Route 38— Amenia, N. Y„ to Lakevllle, Conn.— 11.7 m. 

Tor Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via 8haron. t miles gravelly dirt; 8.7 miles macadam. Thru a hiUy farming: sec- 
tion. One mile shorter than regular route, but not as good. 
0.0 0.0 AMENIA, N. Y., 4-corners, hank on left. Go east. Cross RR 1.2. 
2.1 2.1 Pork/ beyond small wooden bridge; bear left. ^ 

4.9 2.8 4-corners at large clock tower; turn left, keeping at right of park. 
6.1 0.2 Sharon, Conn., right-hand road at end of green. Turn right. 
10.0 4.9 Fork; boar right. 
11.7 1.7 LAKEVILLE, 8-corners at small green. 

Right is Route 88 to Plttsfleld. 

Route 39— Pittsfield, Mass., to Saratoga Springs, N, Y. — 

77.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, feack of Book. 

Via Wllliamstown, Pownal, N. Petersburg, Hoosick Falls, Cambridge, Greenwich 
• and Schuylerville. About one-half macadam; balance gravel. 
s-MILEAGE-^ Thru a hilly farming country. _ 

t^.i ^SSSSi Route 43 to Albany combined with 821 to Saratoga Springs offers 

M hSmi i pSSS an aH macadam option. 

0.0 0.0 PITTSFIELD. See Route 40 for directions to Williamstown, 
22.0 miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 Williamstown, Mass., Main & North Sts., park on left. 'Turn 
right (north) onto North St. Bear left 0.2. 

0.4 0.4 Pork; bear right. Under RR 1.1. Cross trolley 1.7. Paaa 
Massachusetts State line monument on left 2.4. 

4.6 4.2 Pork; bear right, keeping left at fork immediately beyond. 

4.8 0.2 Pownal, Vt, 4-corners, wooden church on left. Meeting trol- 
ley, turn right. 

•Lenox, Mast. (pop. 3.000. alt. 1,270 ft.), oc- height of the season at the seashore and the 

cupies a slightly elevated plateau in the mountains, is the favorite social rendezvous, 

midst of a scenic highland section, mostly Several decades ago it was the home or fre- 

covered with forests, sprinkled with attrac «£ nt •— ~fto» P la <* ** aatho » » nd ** 

tive lakes and traversed by several pictur- "^^ loca , 9fMa of bkfmgt are the 

esque streams. Trinity school for boys and girls, established 

In and about Lenox are some of the finest in 1803f thc l^o* Congregational church, 

and best-kept estates in the country. Dur- founded in 1805, Lenox library, founded in 

ing September and October, just after the 1855, and the Lenox and Brotherhood clubs. 

(Pittsfield Points of Interest, continued from page 73) 

Miss Emily Newton, daughter of Edward A. At Coltsville, that part of Pittsfield next 

Newton. The Berkshire athenaeum contains to the Dalton line, high-class paper has 

one of the finest libraries in the state. In been manufactured for over 100 years. All 

the museum of natural history and art are of the special paper marked with silk fiber 

remarkably valuable and comprehensive col- used by the United States for its currency 

lections, altogether one of the most notable has been made here by Crane & Co. under 

in New England. Fine, well-kept residences close government inspection for so long that 

and historic estates are found in the city one of the buildings is commonly and 

itself, and in considerable numbers thruout officially known as the "Government mill." 

the surrounding territory. This mill also manufactures the paper used 

Pontoosuc lake, Onota lake, Morewood lake, in printing government bonds, including all 

the country club, with its extensive grounds, the "Liberty bonds." 

excellent golf course and tennis courts, the The manufacturing industries of Pittsfield, 

boat club, Balance rock and South mountain mostly located away from the residence and 

are all within the city limits or easily acces- general business sections, include at least 

sible. "Balance rock/' one mile west of Pon* 26 separate lines of industry, and comprise 

toosuc lake, is of gigantic size, so evenly about 100 establishments. They employ more 

balanced on another rock that it seems as if a than 14.000 operatives, with total payrolls of 

n could push it over; the 100 acres about it nearly or quite $9,500,000 per year. Chief 

v a public park. An exceptionally fine among these is the plant of the General 

Pittsfield may be had from the great Electric Co.. covering 133% acres of land, 

the summit of Snake Hill, in the with a large output of electrical machines and 

section of the city. devices. 

. Digitized, by VjOOvIc 



City Section Page 75 Route 39 

6.6 1.7 Fork, beyond small stone bridge; bear left. Caution for 

sharp right curve 6.8. 
8.0 1.5 N. Pownal, Vt., fork. Bear left across iron bridge. Cross 

RRs 8.5-8.8-11.4. 
11.5 3.5 N. Petersburg, N. Y., irregular 4-corners. Turn right 
18.8 2.3 End of road; turn sharp right. Cross iron bridge 14.1. 
Left at 1S.8 to Route 464 to Troy and Albany. 

17.4 3.6 End of road; turn right onto River St. 

18.0 0.6 End of street; jog right and next left onto Williard St. 

18.1 0.1 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Main St. 

18.5 0.4 Hoosick Falls,* Main & Classic Sts., end of street. 

Turn right with trolley onto Classic St. 

18.6 0.1 Left-hand street at water-trough; turn left upgrade. Join 

trolley from left 18.7. 

20.5 1.9 Left-hand street; turn left with trolley across iron bridge and 

over RR. 

20.6 0.1 No. Hoosick, end of street. Turn left away from trolley. 
21.0 0.4 Left-hand road, beyond iron bridge; turn left. Avoid left- 
hand macadam road 23.8. 

29.0 8.0 Cambridge, 4-corners at hotel. Turn left. 

Straight ahead before thla turn is Route 316 to Rutland. 

Cross RR 29.3. Thru 4-corners 29.6. 

30.2 1.2 Right-hand road; turn right on concrete. 

30.4 0.2 4-corners; turn right with travel. Thru Coila 30.8. 

31.6 1.2 Fork; bear left with poles. 

32.2 0.6 Right-hand road, small wooden school on far right; turn 
right upgrade. 

36.1 3.9 End of road; turn right. 

37.8 1.7 End of road; beyond RR underpass; turn left across concrete 

bridge. 

37.9 0.1 5-corners; meeting trolley, turn right. 

38.1 0.2 Greenwich. Straight thru with trolley. Thru 5-corners 

with trolley 38.3. 
40.8 2.7 Fork; bear right onto macadam. Start winding descent 42.7. 

43.7 2.9 End of road; turn right across two long iron bridges over 

Hudson river onto Ferry St. 

44.2 0.5 Schuylerville,* Ferry & Broad Sts. Meeting trolley, turn 

right. 
44.4 0.2 4-corners ; turn left onto Spring St. 

Saratoga Springs City Map and Points of Interest, page 310. 

*Hoosick Falls, N. Y. (pop. 6,000, alt. 433 ft.). colonial forts. Clinton and Saratoga, and also 
is noted for Its great industry, the Walter A. the original village of Saratoga, wiped out in 
Wood Mowing & Reaping Machine Co., which the massacre of 1745. Five miles south of the 
originated here in 1852. In 1876, at the cent en- village by state road is the battle ground of 
nial exhibition^, Mr. Wood took the highest the two battles of Bemis Heights. The cele- 
awards for his harvesters. The total number brated Battle monument is up Burgoyae 
of gold medals and other important prizes street, on Prospect Hill. It has a square 
taken by him in competition with all the base, a shaft of 155 ft., and above each en- 
various makes of reapers, mowers and bind- trance is a niche, three of them containing 
ers in the world now exceed 1,200. A visit to statues of Gates, Schuyler and Morgan. The 
the Wood plant would no doubt prove of fourth one would have had a statue of Bene- 
much interest. The Hoosick river, which diet Arnold had he not forfeited his right by 
supplies valuable water power, runs thru the turning traitor. 

village in a serpentine manner, giving it a Burgoyne came down from Canada by the 

picturesque appearance from the hills. Lake George- Lake Champlain route with the 

*Schuyl«rvfllo, N. Y. (pop. 2,000, alt. 172 ft.), largest and best equipped British army ever 

on the north side of Fish creek, was named sent to America, expecting to join with two 

after Philip Schuyler, one of the wealthiest other divisions, converging at Albany, and 

men of the colonies at the time of the revolu- crush the revolution in the north. He was 

tion, and who more than once risked all his opposed upon the battlefield at Bemis Heights 

fortune in their cause. He was not only a by an army of about 17,000, made up mainly 

great general, but a high type of patriot.. of farmers, and was defeated. It was the 

His old home, known as the Schuyler man- turning point in the struggle for independ- 

sion, may be seen on the south end of the ence and has since been regarded as one of 

village* o* the old river road from Albany^ the sixteen decisive battles of histor 

A little south of the mansion 7 stood the Though Gates was in command, the r« 



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Route 40 Page 76 New York 

Cross RR 44.6. Thru Grangerville 46.5. Coming onto Lake 
Ave. 
55.2 10.8 SARATOGA SPRINGS, Lake Ave. & Broadway, city hall on 
right 

Route 40— Pittsfield, Mass., to Manchester, Vt.— 58.5 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Williamstown, Bennington and Arlington. Alternating stretches of macadam 
and gravel. 

Thru a rolling and hilly farming country following a valley some distance. 

t^si bSSuT ^ or ^" 8 an< ^ ot ^ er cx * ts see c**y ^*p» P a ^ e 73# 

MMmm Paints 

0.0 a.O PITTSFIELD, North, East, South & West Sts., park on right 

Go north with trolley on North St. 
0.7 0.7 Irregular 4-corners, car barns on left; bear left with one line 

of trolley onto Waconah St. 
'1.8 0.6 Fork; bear right with one line of trolley, still on Waconah St. 

2.0 0.7 End of street; bear left with trolley. Thru Lanesboro 5.3. 
6.9 4.9 Left-hand road — sign "Williamstown"; turn left. 

7.1 0.2 Right-hand road, cemetery on left; turn right. 
11.2 4.1 Fork; bear right with travel. 

14.2 3.0 Fork; bear left. 

16.7 2.5 South Williamstown, 4-corners, P. O. on right Turn right. 

21.5 4.8 End of road, large brick church on left; turn left onto 

Main St 
22.0 0.5 Williamstown, Mass^* North & Main Sts. 

Turn right onto North St. 
22*3 0.3 Fork— sign "Albany"; bear right 

22.8 0.5 3-corners; bear left with travel. Cross iron bridge and go 

under RR 23.2. Cross Massachusetts- Vermont state line 24.9. 

26.6 3.8 Fork— sign "Albany"; bear right 

26.7 0.1 Pownal, Vt,* fork just beyond small concrete bridge. Bear 

right upgrade. 

Left fork is Route 39 to Sara togs Springs. 

Pass cemetery on right 27.0. Thru Pownal Center 29.1. 

*Wttliamstown, Mass. (pop. 3,981, alt. 604 In Mission park is the famous Haystack 

ft.), grew up near Fort Massachusetts, one monument, marking the birthplace of for 

of the frontier defenses of the state, built eign missions, a spot risited by tourists from 

by the colony in 1745. The builder of that all over the world. A tablet on Main St., 

fort, Col. Ephraim Williams, lost his life near the western edge of the village, marks 

in the expedition against Crown Point. the site of Fort Hoosac. 

On the main street, which is more like 'Pownal, Vt. (pop. 1,900, alt. 909-1,000 ft.), 
a long narrow park, are the principal build* was the first permanent settlement in Ver- 
ings of Williams college, one of the most mont, settled in 1724 by people from New 
famous of the smaller New England insti- York, among whom were the Westinghouse, 
tutions, and the village churches. Thorn p- Fiske and Hogle families. George Westing- 
son memorial chapel is considered by archi- house, of electrical and manufacturing fame, 
tectural authorities one of the most bcauti- is a descendant, and James Fiske, Jr., the 
ful churches in this country. Grace Hall financier, was born here. Points of interest 
auditorium, costing over a million dollars, are the Gregor Rocks, a sheer cliff several 
is another building of note. The college ob- hundred feet high, with historic legends; and 
servatory is said to be the oldest one in "Snow Hole," a cave of perpetual snow and 
the United States. . ice. 

(Schuylerville Points of Interest, continued from page 75) 

honors were won by Benedict Arnold and *goyne's camp, from which he sent the de- 

Daniel Morgan. The men and materials had tachment to capture Bennington, Vt. 

been largely assembled by Schuyler before The plateau between the village and river 

•Gates took command. is known as the "field of the grounded arms," 

A mile and a half north of the village is as here the conquered British army laid down 

•"Starks Knob," where Gen. Stark took posi- their arms. 

tion after the battle of Bennington, which At the north end of the village stands the 

actually fought in the town of Hoosick, house, in the cellar of which Madam Reidesed 

thus cutting off completely the chances and children, with the wives of British offi- 

-goyne's retreat. The plateau at the cers, took refuge during the bombardment 

of the Batten Kill is the site of Bur- of Schuylerville. 



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City Section Page 77 Route 41 

34.6 7.9 End of road, cemetery on right; bear left onto South St. 
35.4 0.8 Bennington,* South & Main Sts., bank on right. 

Keep ahead across trolley on North St. Cross RR 35.8, now 
on Hunt St. Cross RR 36.3 and trolley 36.4. 
36.6.. 1.2 Fork of three roads; take right-hand road. 

36.7 0.1 Fork, just beyond covered wooden bridge; bear left. 

37.1 0.4 End of road ; meeting trolley, turn left 

37.4 0.3 Right-hand road, just beyond concrete bridge; turn right, 

leaving trolley. 

40.5 3.1 South Shaftsbury, 4-corners. Straight thru (north). Cross 

RR 40.6. Thru Shaftsbury Center 43.1. Cross RR at Shafts- 
bury Sta. 45.3. 

46.2 5.7 Fork; bear right with travel. 

50.3 4.1 Arlington,* 4-corners. Straight thru. 

58.5 8.2 MANCHESTER,* center of town at court house. 

Route 41— Pittsfield, Mass., to Troy, N. Y.— 39.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Shaker Village, New Lebanon Center, W. Lebanon* Sand Lake and Averill Park. 
First 19.5 miles macadam; then 6.0 miles gravel; balance 14.2 miles macadam. 

*— MILEAQE-^ Route 43 to B. Greenbush combined with Route 183 to Troy offers an 

Tstal BrfwMO all-macadam option. . 

Mllratt Prints 

0.0 0.0 PITTSFIELD. See Route 43 for directions to 
14.9 14.9 W. Lebanon, N. Y., P. O. on right. Straight thru. 

16.7 1.8 Fork— sign "Troy"; bear left. Cross RR 17.6. 

17.8 1.1 Right-hand road— sign "Troy"; turn sharp right. 

Cross RR 18.2. 

18.6 0.8 E. Nassau, end of road beyond bridge. Turn left. 

19.2 0.6 Right-hand road; turn right. Thru Hoags Corners 22.2 and 
Glass House 27.6. 

28.4 9.2 Sand Lake, diagonal 4-corners, P. O. ahead on left. Turn left 

29.2 0.8 Averill Park, 5-corners. Bear right. 

Troy City Map, page 267; Points of Interest, page 268. 

34.3 5.1 End of road; bear left. Avoid left-hand road 35.3. 

37.0 2.7 Diagonal 4-corners ; straight thru with trolley — now on Pawl- 
ing Ave. 
38.2 1.2 End of street; turn left with trolley onto Congress St. 

'Bennington, Vt. (pop. 10,000, sit. 682 ft.), situated, by reason of a break or gorge in 

derives its greatest fame from the battle of the mountains, that it has sunlight for si- 

Bennington, fought August 16, 1777, in which »° 8t »» n°« r l»*« r ***n points hslf s mile 

Gen. Stark, with the aid of reinforcements nort * °' 8 ° ut k ™ WC *!. fin « tf0Ut fi8hin * 

led by Col. Seth Warner, defeated two de- * n the B *'*° ki " ^'V: "5"? *T? thnl V* 

. , _ _ . town. Ethan Allen lived in Arlington for 

tachments of Gen. Burgoyne's army. ttwal ycarg . h|g fif8t wJfc and fwo chMrtn 

Campaign by British was for the capture are Dur j e <j y ktTt , 

of military supplies stored about where Ben- •Manchester, Vt. (pop. 2,100, alt. 1,600 ft.), 

nington Monument now stands, but most of is a summer residence and resort town, made 

the battleground was across the line in New notable by frequent visits in former years 

York state. Monument is 301 feet and 10J4 of Mrs. Abraham Lincoln and Mrs. TJ. S. 

inches high; designed by J. P. Rhiner of Grant. Robert T. Lincoln, son of Abraham 

Boston and erected in 1888-91 at a cost of Lincoln, and president of the Pullman Co., 

$155,000, paid by Vermont, New Hampshire, has a home here, as have many other per- 

Massachusetts and the federal government. sons of prominence. Mount Equinox, nearby, 

Many markers and monuments indicate rises to a height of 3,816 ft. 

location of historic battle sites. Among First session of Vermont legislature was 

other points of interest are the Walloon sac held at Manchester in 1788. In 1777 the 

inn, which has continued as a public house "Council of Safety" met here, and Ira Allen 

for more than 150 years; Vermont Soldiers' propounded the plan of confiscating the prop- 

tiome, on the grounds of which is Hunt's erty of Tories to pay Vermont's share of the 

fountain .with a single jet projection of 196 cost of the revolution. 

feet; tne old home of Gov. Isaac Tichenor, Points of particular interest include a 

and several other old houses. Bennington is "rocking stone" weighing 35 tons, and a 

a diversified and extensive manufacturing "disappearing stream," the outlet to whi 

center, using mostly water or hydro-electric has never been trsced. Hss one of the b 

power from adjacent mountains. and most widely known golf links in t 

- Vt. (pop. 1307, ah. m ft.), is so United States. Digitized byGoOQle 



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Route 43 Page 78 New York 

38.9 6.7 Fork; bear right, downgrade, leaving trolley. 

89.0 0.1 Diagonal 4-corners; bear slightly right, downgrade. 

89.1 0.1 5th Ave.; meeting trolley, turn right. 

89.2 0.1 4-corners; meeting trolley, turn left onto Broadway. 

39.5 0.3 TROY, Broadway & River St., monument on right. 

4 Route 43— Pittsfield, Mass., to Albany, N. Y.— 36.0 m. 

For Accommodations s*e Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via New Lebanon, West Lebanon, Nassau and Rensselaer. Macadam all the way. 

Thia is the best route between the above terminals. Thru a hilly farming country. 

with a long, easy ascent and descent over Taconic mountain. Some very fine views. 

T«t«i BetwM? For this and other exits see City Map, page 78. 

M Ileal* Points 

0.0 0.0 PITTSFIELD, South, North, East & West Sts., park m left 

Go southeast on South St with trolley. 

0.2 0.2 Housatonic St.; turn right away from trolley. 

0.3 0.1 5-corners; bear left with trolley, still on Housatonic St. 

0.8 0.5 Fork, jtist beyond RR underpass; bear right with trolley. 

8.4 2.6 End of road; turn right with trolley. 

4.5 1.1 Shaker Village, Mass. 41 Straight thru. Start long easy ascent 

over Taconic mountain 5.5, descending mountain 6.7. 
9.7 5.2 End of road, large concrete school ahead; turn left. 
9.9 0.2 Left-hand diagonal road just before RR; bear left with travel. 

10.8 0.9 New Lebanon, N. Y., 8-corners, large wooden church ahead. 

Bear right. Cross iron bridge 11.8. 
12.2 1.4 New Lebanon Center, 4-corners, P. O. on right. Straight 
thru. 

14.9 2.7 West Lebanon, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 
16.7 1.8 Fork; bear left on macadam. Cro&s RR 17.6. 

Sharp right at reverse fork 17.8 is Route 41 to Troy. 

18.6 1.9 Fork, beyond two iron bridges; bear left 

18.7 0.1: Fork, just before iron bridge; bear right, coming onto wind- 

ing hilly road. Caution for sharp left turn 21.8, 

23.5 4.8 Nassau, 5-corners, band stand on left Straight thru. Cross 

RR 23.6. Cross iron bridge 23.8. Avoid left-hand road 23.9. 

27.6 4.1 8-corners; bear slightly right 

Left at this 3-corners is Route 301 to Poughkeeptle. 

30.8 3.2 East Greenbush, P. O. on right. Straight thru; 

Right-hand macadam road at 32.0 is Route 183 at mileage 71.2 to 

Troy. 

Albany City Map, page 260; Points of interest, page 269. 

Cross RR 33.6. Over RR bridges 34.4-34.5. 

35.1 4.3 End of road; turn right onto Broadway. 

35.2 0.1 Rensselaer, 3d Ave. & Broadway. Turn left across long iron 

bridge over Hudson river. 
85.6 0.3 Broadway; turn right with trolley along river. 
36.0 0.5 ALBANY, Broadway & State St., P. O. on far right. 

For enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 

*3haker Village, Mass. Settled at an early there are few Quakers left, moit of the 

date by Quakers, who carried on farming on houses haring been sold or leased and culti- 

a large scale. The women made "Shaker ration of land is not maintained at former 

cloaks" and other fancy articles. There was high standard. It is understood that no new 

also a chair factory and a factory for wearing members are being receired, and as most of 

upholstery plush. Jellies, marmalades and the present members are adranced in years 

candies were also made for the market. Prop* the extinction of the society is a question 

erty was held by the community. At present of comparatirely short time. 

THE PREFERRED HOTEL OF ALBANY 

THE HAMPTON 

On the Empire Tours — On the Real Tour ' 
MODERN — CONVENIENT — H QM E L I K E 
200 Sleeping Rooms Roof Garden Beat Dining Service 

^ all with Bath D. M. PBPPBR, Mgr. European Plan 

J-1'U.U". 1 




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Route 48 Page 80 New York 

Route 48— New York City to Poughkeepsie, N. Y<— 74.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Riverside drive, Yonkers, Hastings, Dobbs Ferry. Irvington, Tarrytown, Ossin- 
lngr, Croton, Peekskill, Fishkill Village, wappingers Falls. Macadam, brick, concrete 
and wood block. 

This route starts from New York City by way of Riverside drive, affording fine 



view of the Hudson river and the Palisades, passing many large apartment houses 
and private residences. From Yonkers to Peekskill it passes many fine estates an " 
farms. Between Peekskill and Fishkill the road goes inland from the river thru 



wooded, hilly section, sparsely settled. From Fishkill to Poughkeepsie thru fine farm- 
ing section, following the east side of the Hudson river, of which very few views are 
obtainable after leaving Tarrytown. 

^MiLEAGE-^ 

t«ui BrtwMa For this and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

M Usage Prints 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, 59th St. & Broadway. 

Go north on Broadway with trolley. 
0.7 0.7 72d St., subway sta. on left; turn left. 
0.9 0.2 Riverside drive ; turn right along Hudson river. 
3.4 2.5 Fork, Grant's Tomb ahead; bear right with drive. 
3.6 0.2 Fork; keep left. 

Right downgrade leads to 130th St. Ferry. 

Cross long concrete viaduct 3.8. 

5.4 1.8 6-corners; turn left onto Riverside drive extension. 

8.1 2.7 Broadway; meeting trolley, bear left. Elevated section of 
subway comes in from right 9.0. Cross iron drawbridge over 
Harlem river 9.2. Pass Van Cortlandt park 10.5. 

13.2 5.1 Fork, in center; bear left with branch trolley onto Broadway. 

Caution for traffic regulations in Yonkers. 

13.7 0.5 Yonkers,* Getty square. Bear, left onto N. Broadway, one 

long block, leaving trolley. 

13.8 0.1 Dock St.; turn left. 

13.9 0.1 Warburton Ave.; meeting trolley, turn right along bank of 

Hudson river. Cross long concrete viaduct 18.0. 
18.1 4.2 Hastings-on-Hudson.* Keep ahead where trolley leaves to 
right. 

18.3 0.2 Irregular 4-corners ; turn left with travel. 

•Yonkers, N. Y. (pop. 100,306, alt. 10 ft.), kett hat added greatly to the prosperity of 

One of the earliest settlements along the the city. 

Hudson; name supposed to be derived from Among points of special interest are the 

the Dutch, "Yonkers." The Phillipse Manor Carnegie library, "Greystone," the former 



house, long known as the "Manor Hall,' 



residence of Samuel J. Tilden, now the home 

**. ' • i s. ^ -is. . . , . ,«,„ . At of Samuel J. Untermeyer, noted lawyer, and 

the original part built probably m 1682, with thc Co , Wm B Thompson estate on North 

an addition in 1745, is an excellent specimen Broadway. 

of Colonial architecture. It has a balus- "Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. (pop. 5,570). 

traded hip-roof, dormer windows, pillared Principally a residential suburb, consider- 

porticoes and solid wooden shutters. Its front ably elevated above the Hudson and opposite 

door opens in two halves after the old fash- the greatest heights reached by the Palisades 

ion of the Dutch. The beautiful winding stair- °" thc ** cw . Jersey side. Fine views up and 

way, the great fireplace and the fine old do e wn the " ver ; . 

,. A ... „,. A .,, a Surrounding lands were once part of the 

paneling still remain. There are still great .. « . *„. -. . .. . A . 

7 ... ... oId Post estate. During the revolution, a 

horse-chestnuts around the door of the house, troop of Sheldon's Light Horse cavalry and 

box bushes and a privet hedge, but the gar- a company of infantry belonging to Wasn- 

den that ran down to the Hudson river dis- ington's command at White Plains ambushed 

appeared long ago. In front of it is a hand- a force of Hessians at this point, killing, 

some soldiers' monument. Here Mary Phil- wounding or routing all but one. 

lipse, who is said to have refused an offer of Hastings was the residence of John Wil- 

marriage from George Washington, was born liam Dra Per» MD., LL.D., long time profes- 

and lived. During the revolution the prop- 8or ? f chemistry and physiology at the uni- 

erty was confiscated, as Frederick Phillipse, T 1 eri,t7 l . * *? ? ty f ° £ * CW York - Working 

.. ' . ... along lines similar to Daguerre, the French 

the owner was regarded as a loyalist. pionecr in photography , Draper ia 8aid to 

Yonkers has several important industries, have made and developed the first success- 
among them the Alex. Smith & Sons Carpet f u i portrait negative, and also the first photo- 
Co., said to be the largest in the world; the graph of the moon. 
Otis Elevator Co., Waring Hat Co., and huge The large manufacturing plant of the Na- 

mts of the American and Federal Sugar tional Conduit & Cable Co., Zinsser & Co. 

ining companies. There is also a great and the Hastings Pavement Co. are among 

il of general manufacturing on a smaller the manufacturers here who do a national 

ale. Nearness to the New York city mar- and international business. 



City Section 



Page 81 Tarrytown City Map 



POINTS OF INTEREST, NYACK, N. Y. 



Nyack (pop. 4,619, alt. 6B ft.) it situated 
near the north end of the Palisades on Tap- 
pan bay, Opposite Tarrytown, with which it 
is connected by steam ferry. It was estab- 
lished in the middle of the seventeenth cen- 
tury by a group from Long Island, who 
named their settlement after the Nyack In- 
dians, former neighbors. The Missionary al- 



liance and institute and the Christian Herald 
home are located here. 

Nyack for many years has been noted for 
its shoe manufactories. It also has two large 
shipbuilding Industries operating at the 
present time— the International Shipbuilding 
& Marine Engineering corporation and the 
Nyack Shipbuilding corporation. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 
Tarrytown (pop. 11,600, alt. 30 ft.). One of 
the earliest Dutch settlements on the Hudson, 
and an important point during colonial and 
revolutionary times. In September, 1780, 
while returning from an interview with Bene- 
dict Arnold, carrying to Sir Henry Clinton 
papers relating to the proposed surrender of 
West Point, Maj. John Andr£, the British 
spy, was captured by three sentries on a 
spot near the west side of Broadway, now 
marked by a monument to the memory of 
his captors. Shortly afterward he was hanged 
in Tappan. 

Much history, and many legends of the 
locality, have been preserved in the writ- 
ings of Washington Irving. The bridge 
over Pocantico brook, at North Tarrytown 
(over which the "Headless Horseman" of 
Sleepy Hollow rode), has been replaced by a 
stone memorial bridge to Irving, presented 
to the town by Wm. Rockefeller. A change 
in the location of the Post road has placed 
the new bridge a short distance west of the 
old one. 

The old Dutch church, built probably in 
1697, but possibly earlier, and no doubt the 
oldest church in New York state now hold- 
ing regular services, is on the east side of 
the road just north of the memorial bridge. 
In the olden days the highway passed on 
the other side; and the entrance faced it. 
Washington Irving is buried in the cemetery 



TARRYTOWN, N. Y. 

of this church, as is also Andrew Carnegie, 
Whitelaw Reid and other men of note. 
Its 200th anniversary was celebrated in 1897. 
Across Broadway from the church is the old 
Frederick Philip se house, now owned by Elsie 
Janis, actress. 

Many people of note in business and finance 
have their homes in Tarrytown or its en- 
v irons; among them John D. Rockefeller; 
his son, John D. f Jr., and Wm. Rockefeller. 
The late John D. Archbold, long-time presi- 
dent of the Standard Oil Co., was a resident, 
also Dr. Joseph Blake, noted surgeon. Mrs. 
Helen Gould Shepard owns a large and beau- 
tiful estate here on the west side of Broad- 
way. Among the several well-known educa- 
tional institutions are Miss Mason's school 
for girls and young women ("The Castle"), 
Knox's school for girls, the Irving school for 
boys, Hackley preparatory School for boys 
and the Highland Manor School for Jewish 
girls. 

According to Irving, Tarrytown owes its 
name to the fact that the farmers who used 
to bring their produce here found the kindly 
hospitality of its taverns so beguiling that 
they tarried in town until their wives gave 
it the name. 

The home of Washington Irving, located on 
the west side of Broadway in the southern 
part of the village, is still kept in its original 
form and visitors are welcome certain dayi 
in the week. 



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Route 48 Page 82 New York 

19.2 0.9 Dobbs Ferry 41 (outskirts), fork. Bear right upgrade. 

Left fork, downgrade, leads to center of town. 

19.9 0.7 Irregular 4-corners, water trough on right; turn left onto 
Broadway. 

21.5 1.6 Irvington.* Straight thru, passing many fine estates on right 
and left. 

24.2 2.7 Tarrytown, Broadway & Main St. Straight thru across 
trolley. 

24.8 0.6 Irregular 4-corners, large brick church ahead; turn left down- 
grade. Cross concrete bridge 25.2. Pass Sleepy Hollow 
Cemetery on right 25.3. Go under narrow stone arch 27.4. 

28.4 8.6 Scarboro,* large stone church on right. Straight thru. 

Right is Routs 38 to Plttsfield. 

30.4 2.0 Ossining,* diagonal 4-corners, bank on far right. Bear left 
across trolley downgrade onto Highland Ave. 



•Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. (pop. 3,500, alt. 12 ft.), 
wai named for a Swede who operated a ferry 
across the Hudson here as early as 1698. 
On the east side of the Post road, up from 
main part of the town, is the Washington- 
Rochambeau monument, marking the spot 
where, on July 9, 1781, the French allies under 
Rochambeau joined the continental army. 

Nearly back of the monument is the Liv- 
ingston house, used by Washington as head- 
quarters at times during the years 1781-83; 
but somewhat altered since that time. There, 
on August 14, 1781, the commander-in-chief 
planned the Yorktown campaign; and on May 
6, 1783, after the close of the revolution, 
Washington and Sir Guy Carleton arranged 
for the evacuation of American soil by the 
British forces. About opposite this point, on 
May 8, 1783, a British sloop of war fired 17 
guns in honor of the American commander- 
in-chief, the first salute by Great Britain to 
the United States of America. 

The Misses Masters school for girls is 
east of the Post road, somewhat north of 
Washington's headquarters. A trifle farther 
northeast is the "children's village," a vo- 
cational school for children sent here by New 
York city authorities. Close to the river a 
short distance north of Dobbs Ferry, is 
Ardsley-on-Hudson, a well-known and popu- 
lar country and golf club built on a portion 
of the former Cyrus W. Field estate. 

•Irvingtou, N. Y. (pop. 2,319, alt. 196 ft.). A 
high-class suburban community, consisting 
principally of two long lines of fine well-kept - 
estates facing Broadway, the old. Albany Post 
road, with scarcely a suggestion of any busi- 
ness district. Named for Washington Irving, 
the mostly widely read author of the first half 
of the 19th century. 



"Sunnyside," the home of Irving, Is an old- 
fashioned stone mansion at the end of Sun- 
nyside lane, which branches west from the 
Post road; open to visitors only on certain 
days. Its grounds command exceptionally 
fine views of the Tappan Zee, widest part of 
the Hudson. On the west side of the road, 
just north of Sunnyside lane, is "Lyndhurst," 
a large white-walled Gothic residence of 
stone, with square towers; this is the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Finley J. Shepard (Helen 
Gould). The estate includes many well-kept 
acres, extending from Broadway to and in- 
cluding a fine stretch of the Hudson. 

*Scarboro-on-Hudson, N. Y. (pop. 106). The 
church at the intersection of the Post road 
and the Briarcliff road was erected by Mrs. 
Elliott F. Shepard, daughter of Cornelius Van- 
derbilt, to the memory of her husband. On 
the west side of the Post road, opposite the 
church, is "Beech wood," the home of F. A. 
Vanderlip. The former Elliott F. Shepard 
residence, between the Sleepy Hollow and 
Briarcliff roads, to the east of the Post road, 
is now the Sleepy Hollow country club. 

•Ossining, N. Y. (pop. 12,000, alt. 8 ft.). An 
Indian name meaning "stone upon „stone." 
It was originally called Sing Sing until 1901 
when the people decided to change the name. 
Here is located the New York state prison. 
Off Tellers Point, which extends into the 
Hudson about V/i miles, the British man-of- 
war "Vulture" lay at anchor awaiting the 
return of Major Andre from a conference 
with Benedict Arnold; a party of Americans 
fired upon her and she dropped down the 
stream. Later Andre made an attempt. to 
cross the Hudson at Kings Ferry and reach 
New York by land, which resulted in his cap- 
ture. There is an Interesting civil war 
monument here. 



THE WESKORA "^52S££S£~ 

OSSINING NEW YORK Pk....32.nJ34 geo. eagle, iw 



SDCDNY 

RC6. US. P*T. OFF 

MOTOR GASOLINE 




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Section 



Page 83 



Route 48 



City 

S0.9 0.6 Fork; bear left. 

82.1 1.2 Left-hand road, brick house on left; turn left. Crois iron 

bridge over Croton river 32.5. Thru Harmon 41 38.1. 

84.2 2.1 Croton,* bank on left. Straight thru. 

Bear left at top of grade 34.7. 
86.9 2.7 Fork; bear left thru Montrose 38.6. 

89.8 2.4 Buchanan, 4-corners. Turn' right with trolley. 

89.9 0.6 Right-hand road just before RR; turn right with trolley. 

40.3 0.4 End of street; turn left with trolley onto Washington St. 



_ •HauTnon-on- Hudson, N. Y. (pop. 800, in- 
creased to about 2,500 in summer). A short 
distance west of the Post road here are the 
large yards of the N. Y. C R. R., where 
southbound trains change from steam to 
electricity, and northbound trains from elec- 
tricity to steam, providing Harmon station 
with the best through and local train service 
for any place of its size in the world. 

•Croton, N. Y. (pop. 2^43, alt. 289 ft.), 
situated on the eastern edge of Haverstraw 
bay, on the widest part of the Hudson river, 
was named for Chief Croton, of the Kitche- 
wan Indians, whose home and castle were 
on Croton Point, west of Harmon. This is 
the nearest point on the Post road to Croton 
lake and reservoir system, formerly the chief 
source of water supply for New York City. 
From Hessian Hill, immediately north of the 
village, fine views may be had of the Hudson, 
Croton Point, Haverstraw and the mountains 
across the river near that city. 

West of the railroad, Croton Point, also 
known as Tellers Point, projects into the 
Hudson between Croton bay and Haverstraw 
bay. Here an Indian castle or fort protected 



the Kitchewans from their more powerful 
enemies farther up the river; it was also the 
seat of Chief Croton, the last sachem of that 
tribe. 

A cannon mounted on this point in Sep- 
tember, 1780, compelled the British ship 
"Vulture," which was waiting for Major 
Andre to return from his secret meeting with 
Benedict Arnold, when the details for the 
surrender of West Point were arranged, to 
meanwhile leave its anchor and move farther 
downstream. As a result, Andre crossed the 
river to Verplanck's> Point, and continued 
down the river as far as Tarrytown, where 
his capture cost his life, and probably saved 
West Point. 

Croton Point is a part of the estate from 
which Harmon -on -Hudson was purchased for 
suburban development. Most of the summer 
population is located along or near the point, 
which has one of the best inland salt water 
bathing beaches along the river. There are 
unobstructed views of the picturesque sur- 
rounding country, and of the Hudson, wid- 
ened northward into Haverstraw bay and 
southward into the Tappan Zee. 



Newburgh- Beacon Ferry 



The best ferry service on the Hud- 
son, the only river ferry with mod- 
ern propeller boats, that operates 
two boats on its route when traffic 
warrants, or that runs regularly 
during the winter. 

In the height of the season, ap- 
proximately a 12-14 minute service 
is provided, the trips naturally de- 
creasing about middle of October. 



NCI SMI IMIISC fUOACC 



>n House 

UGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 

ill, Prop. E. P. Coughlan, Mgr. 
Member of the Empire and 



Maps and Booklet sent on request. 

Betas en suite or running water and 

telephones In all rooms. 

AMERICAN PLAN 

Headquarters for Automobile 
Tourists 

Just half-way between Lenox and New 

York and Albany and New York 

On Direct Boutes 



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Route 48 



Page 84 



New York 



41.6 1.3 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto South St. 
41.8 0.2 Peekskill, South & Division Sts., end of street. Turn left 

with trolley onto N. Division St. 
42.1 0.3 Fork; soldiers' monument in center; bear left away from 

trolley onto Highland Ave. 
43.0 0.9 3-corners, beyond iron bridge; bear left upgrade. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, PEEKSKILL, N. Y. 



Peekskill, N. Y. (pop. 17,500, alt. 14 ft.), was 
settled about 1664 by Dutch traders, on or 
near the site of an Indian village, named for 
Jans Peek, who, when navigating a boat 
about here, is said to have mistaken Peeks- 
kill creek or "kill" for the passage up the 
Hudson, and after running aground decided 
to locate at this spot. 

Peekskill was in the path of Continental 
and British armies operating in this section 
during the revolution. In the vicinity is 
Verplanck's Point, from which there was 
then a ferry to Stony Point, on the west 
side of the river; Fort Independence, guard- 
ing the lower gateway to the Hudson High- 
lands, and Continental Village. Here large 



quantities of supplies for the army were 
stored. 

Washington frequently stopped at the 
Birdsall residence, no longer standing. The 
town was partially burned by the British 
in September, 1777. Chauncey M. Depew was 
born here in 1834. Peekskill was for several 
years the summer home of Rev. Henry Ward 
Beecher. 

The city has several important manufac- 
turing interests, among them the large plant 
of the Fleischmann Yeast Co., the Union 
Stove Works, Standard Textile Products Co. 
and the Fredricks Pearl Mfg. Co. Peekskill 
military academy and the Mohegan Lake 
school are institutions of note. 



VANS GARAGE 



POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. Rr. 



Adjoining Windsor Hotel (formerly Morgan House) 

Also NEWBURGH, N. Y., 117 Broadway, Telephone 361 

and KINGSTON, N. Y„ 529 Broadway, Telephone 145 
VRMON, PEERLESS, STUDEBAKER, DODGE BROS. Motor Cars. MACK TRUCKS 



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Page 85 



Route 48 



46.7 3.7 Fork; bear right on macadam. 

Left fork Is Route 56 at mileage 4.7 to West Point. 

49.0 2.3 Garrison, 4-corners, straight thru. 

Cross iron bridge 60.8. Caution for blind RR crossing 60.9. 

61.0 12.0 3-corners; bear left. 

Right is Route 226 to Pawling. 

61.2 0.2 Fishkill,* wooden church on right. Turn right 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 34 to Newburgh vlr 
■ Newburgh -Beacon Ferry. 

66.1 4.9 S-corners, park ahead ; bear right downgrade. 

66.3 0.2 Wappingers Falls,* end of road just beyond concrete bridge. 

Meeting trolley, turn right onto Main St. 

68.4 2.1 4-corners ; turn left away from trolley. 

Poughkeepsle City Map and Points of Interest, page 182. 

Bear right at soldiers 9 monument onto Market St. 73.8. 
74.0 6.6 POUGHKEEPSIE, Main & Market Sts., city hall on left. 



•Fishkill, N. Y. (pop. 525, alt. 8 ft.). Old 
Dutch church, erected here in 1731, housed 
provincial convention of 1776; was used by 
Americans at military prison during revolu- 
tion. Blacksmith who forged Washington's 
sword lived and worked here. 

Wharton house, along roadside, just south 
of Fishkill village, was local headquarters for 
continental army during most of revolution* 
ary war; also the house referred to in 
Cooper's "Spy." Interesting bronze tablet in 
Wicopee Pass, 4 miles south of Fishkill vil- 
lage. Wicopee Pass was carefully guarded 
during the revolutionary war to prevent the 
British from turning the American works 
waste beyond it. 

•Wappingers Falls, N. Y. (pop. 3,820, alt. 
110 ft.), was named from the Wappingers or 
Wappingi Indians, a branch of the Mohicans 
who once lived among the highlands. Here 
Wappingers creeks goes over a series of high 
ledges, forming picturesque cascades and 
furnishing considerable waterpower. 

The Post road crosses the creek by a red 
sandstone bridge much admired by tourists. 



In plain sight, about an eighth of a mile 
north of the bridge, is the dam. The lower 
falls, where the water tumbles over the 
rocks for over eighty feet, are directly south 
of the bridge; during spring and fall freshets 
these falls are worth stopping to see. 

Zion P. E. church is a fine structure of 
stone set in the park at the top of the 
hill. The Meiser park and homestead, built 
in 1766, the residence of Peter Mesier, a 
New York merchant who settled here about 
the close of the revolution, has been pur- 
chased by the village for preservation in 
its original shape. 

Wappingers Falls is the home of Sweet, 
Orr & Co., Inc., originators and largest 
manufacturers of overalls in the world; also 
of the Garner Print Works and Bleachery, 
owning one of the most modern bleachery 
establishments in the country. The Wap- 
pingers branch of the National Aniline & 
Chemical Co. was one of the first to turn 
out dyes after the beginning of the European 
war; the local plant employed (1918) over 
500, and is the largest manufacturer of sul- 
phur colors in the United States. 



The Cusack House 

208-210-212 Main St., POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 

New European Hotel. Hot and Cold Running Water in 
Each Room. $1.50 per Day and up. Rooms with Pri- 
vate Bath, $2.00 per Day and up. 132 Rooms. Garage 
in Connection. Elevator Service. Telephone 1180. 

The House that Makes the A utoist Feel at Home 

ALSO CTJ8ACK HOUSE, NEWBUEGH 
"Welcome to Our City/* John H. Cusack, Prop. 




POUOHKEEPSIE, N.Y. 

* NEW HOTEL WINDSOR * 

COR. MAIN AND CAT/fER/NM S7S. 
MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT 
European Plan 120 Rooms 120 Baths Single $1.50 and up 

Double $2.50 and up A la Carte Service at all Hours 

KING & ROSEN 






Routes 50-52 Page 86 New York 

Route 50— Tarrytown, N. Y., to Danbury, Conn.— 40.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Pocantico Hills, Pleasantville, Chappaqua, Bedford, Cross River and S. Salem. 
Tar macadam all the way. 

Thru hilly farming- country, passing a few of the New York City reservoirs, con- 
necting In Ridgefleld with routes to Danbury and Stamford. 
,-MILEA6E-> 

t«ui mw!m For this and other exits see City Map, page 81. 

Milttge Polnte 

0.0 0.0 TARRYTOWN, Broadway & Main St. Go northeast on Broad- 
way. 

0.7 0.7 Irregular 4-corners, large brick church ahead on left; turn 
right upgrade onto Bedford Road, passing the John D. Rocke- 
feller Estate. 

2.2 1.5 Pocantico Hills, 4-corners just beyond RR crossing. Tarn 
left. Bear slightly left thru 4-corners 2.8. 

6.0 3.8 3-corners ; bear right onto Bedford Road. 

8.1 0.1 Pleasantville,* Bedford Road & Wheeler Ave., just beyond RR 

crossing. Straight thru upgrade. 
6.9 0.8 3-corners ; bear left, still on Bedford Road. 

8.5 1.6 Chappaqua, large concrete school on left. Straight thru. 
10.2 1.7 End of road; turn right. 

12.2 2.0 Mt. Kisco (outskirts), Bedford Ave., green on right. Turn 

right. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 36 to Pawling. 

14.9 2.7 4-corners; turn right on macadam. 

15.3 0.4 Fork; bear left with poles. 

16.8 1.5 End of road; turn left. 

17.3 0.5 Fork, green in center; bear left. 

17.6 0.3 Bedford, N. Y., irregular 4-corners at grass plot. Turn square 
right and follow Route 22 from mileage 40.4 balance of way 
(22.6 miles) to Danbury. 

Route 52— Peekskill, N. Y., to Danbury, Conn.— 33.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Yorktown, Somers, Brewster and Mill Plain. 

Macadam and concrete practically all the way. Thru hilly farming country, passing 
M>me of the New York City reservoirs. 
. This is the best route between the above terminals. 
^MILEAGE-^ 

T«tai B«twMR For this and other exits see City Map, page 84. 

Milaass Folate 

0.0 0.0 PEEKSKILL, S. Division & Main Sts. Go southeast on S. 

Division St., upgrade. 
0.3 0.3 5-corners; bear slightly left onto Crompond St. 

5.6 5.3 Fork; bear left, upgrade, on macadam. Thru Yorktown 6.4. 

Avoid right-hand road 8.2. 
8.6 3.0 Left-hand road; sign "Danbury"; turn sharp left. Gross RR 

at Amawalk Sta. 9.7. 
10.0 1.4 Left-hand diagonal road; sign "Lake Mahopac"; bear left. 
13.0 3.0 Right-hand road at end of reservoir; turn right. 

•Straight ahead before this turn is Route 38 to Pittsfield. 

14.2 1.2 End of road; turn left. 

14.9 0.7 Left-hand tosl^t, turn left. Cross RR at Lincolndale Sta. 15.2. 

15.4 0.5 Right-hand road beyond small concrete bridge; turn right. 
17.4 2.0 Seiners,* 3-corners, Elephant monument in center. Bear left. 

'Pleasantville, N. Y. (pop. 2,207, alt. 420 ft.), *Somers, N. Y. (pop. 102), breathes of circus 

is an old settlement renowned for its splendid da y s and menageries, the town originally 

production of apples and cucumbers. Horace havin * been settled in 1736 as a wintcr honw 

Greeley, editor of the New York Tribune, had ' or circus performers. The memory of "Old 

<■ far M k u L! . , Betsy," the first elephant transplanted to 

a tarm home here, which was known as .. . . . .. .. 4i.it.* 

,. . _ ,. — - .... tnis country, is kept alive thru the elephant 

^ley Swamp. The original house was monument erected here. Hachaliah Bailey, 

ed by fire, but another was shortly who wa8 pro prietor of the Elephant hotel, 

on the same site and occupied by his claims honor as being the originator of the 

traveling menagerie. 



City Section Page 87 Routes 54-56 

17.8 0.4 Left-hand diagonal road, water-trough on right; bear left. 

19.5 1.7 Fork; bear right across iron bridge, turning left immediately 
beyond. Go under RR 19.6. Bear left 23.1. 

23.5 4.0 Brewster, N. Y., Main St. & Railroad Ave., station on left. 
Turn right onto Main St. and follow Route 177 from mileage 
24.6 balance of way (10.2 miles) to Danbury. 

Route 54— New York City to Suffern, N. Y.— ^8.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Riverside drive, Yonkers, Tarrytown, Nyaok and Spring Valley. All macadam 
roajla 

This route starts from New York City by way of Riverside drive, affording fine 
views of the Hudson river and the Palisades, passing 1 many large apartment houses 

'-WILEAGE—, and private residences to Yonkers; balance thru a region of small 

T«t ■■ ffitSIS farms and summer residential towns. 
Mites* Paints Connects at Suffern with Route 88 to Port Jervis. 

0.0 0.0 COLUMBUS CIRCLE. See Route 48 for directions to Tarry- 
town, 24.2 miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 Tarrytown, Broadway & Main St., park on left. Keep ahead 
(north) on Broadway across trolley. 

0.1 0.1 Central Ave., telephone office on left; turn left. 

0.4 0.3 Orchard St.; turn left one block. 

0.5 0.1 Main St. ; meeting trolley, turn right. 

0.6 0.1 Tarrytown-Nyack Ferry across Hudson river. 

Rates 50c to $1.65. There are two boats, which alternate, thereby 
giving half hourly service. 

Leaving ferry, keep ahead, coming onto Burd St. 

1.1 0.5 Nyack, Burd St. & Broadway, bank on left. 

Turn right onto Broadway one block and next left onto Main 
St. Cross RR at West Nyack 8.6. Thru Brookside 4.1. Cross 
RR 5.9. 

6.2 5.1 Nanuet Straight thru. 

7.8 1.1 4-corners ; turn right with asphalt, 
8.4 1.1 Spring Valley. Straight thru. 

9.9 1.5 Monsey. Straight thru. 

Cross RR 10.0. Thru Tallman 11.5. 
14.2 4.8 3-corners, green in triangle; bear right with Lafayette Ave. 
14.5 0.3 SUFFERN,* Lafayette & Orange Aves. at RR. 

Right on Orange Ave. is Route 83 to Port Jervis and Route 88 to 
Newburgh. 

Route 56— New York City to West Point, N. T^-50.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Riverside drive, Yonkers, Tarrytown, Peekskill and Garrison. Macadam all the 
way. 

This route starts from New York City by way of Riverside drive, affording fine view 
of the Hudson river and the Palisades and passing many large apartment houses and 
private residences. From Yonkers to Peekskill, it passes many fine estates and farms; 
/^■"JrEAeE-^ balance is thru a hilly country, following several small valleys and alter- 
t i i s B S S S nate stretches of wooded vales and attractive summer home sections. 

MvEm pints A ff°° d option to West Point is via Route 91 or 93. 

0.0 0.0 COLUMBUS CIRCLE. See Route 48 for directions to Peek- 
skill, 41.8 miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 Peekskill, South & Division Sts. Turn left (north) with trol- 
ley on Division St. 

0.2 0.2 Fork, soldiers 9 and sailors' monument in center; bear left 

'Suffers, N. Y. (pop. 3,500, alt. 594 ft.). age is an old cannon of the revolution. The 

This prosperous village is situated in the chain that was stretched across the Hudson 

Ramapo valley and surrounded by the Ram- river during the revolutionary war was 

apo mountains, noted for their beauty. Suf- manufactured at Augusta Forge, near Tuxedo. 

fern' was first settled by an old revolutionary The °/ c fro » which thc chain was made 

family, for which it was named. During the cam * f J" om . ' he lfon f ore ™ n " at S i crhn f '??» 
• /' - , „ r .. ^ • . a short distance from Suffern. Fort Skid- ' 

revolutionary war Generals Washington and m buiu to defend th<J Hudson ^ 

Rochambtau spent a winter here m a house British invaiion> 8tood about lj4 . ilM , 

which if still standing on Lafayette avenue, yond the village and rcma ins of en' 

now ^ occupied by the Methodist Episcopal me nts can still be seen. This site ^ 

paraon^g^, .^irectly in front of the parson* a camp of the Tuscarora Indians. 



Route 60 Page 88 New York 

away from trolley onto Highland Ave. 
4.7 4.5 Fork; bear left. Thru irregular 4-corners 7.2. 

Right fork 4.7 is Route 48 at mileage 46.7 to Poughkeepsle. 
Highland Country Club on left 7.3. 

7.6 2.9 GaVrison. Turn left with road across RR at sta. 

7.7 0.1 Garrison-West Point Ferry across Hudson river. 

Ferriage, 50c, car and driver; passenger, 16c 

(Boats leave about five minutes after arrival of New York Central 

trains at Garrison. Special trips at special rates. 

Leaving ferry, keep ahead upgrade. 

8.0 0.3 Reverse fork; turn sharp right. 

Straight ahead at 8.0 is Route 212 to Tuxedo. 

Avoid left-hand diagonal road just beyond parade grounds 8.4. 
8.5 0.5 WEST POINT,* at statue of Washington. 

Route 60— New York City, N. Y., to Asbury Park and 
Lakewood, N. J. — 78.2. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Staten Island, thru the Amboys, Keyport, Red Bank, Long Branch, Asbury 
Park and Farmingdale. Pavement and macadam to Keyport; gravel to Red Bank; 
concrete, macadam and pavement to Asbury Park; balance practically all gravel with 
macadam in towns. 

The first part of this route along the southern end of Staten Island goes thru numer- 
ous residential towns. From Perth Amboy to Keyport the road goes over alternate 
ridges and intervening bays and swamps; then thru a farming region to Red Bank. 
From Red Bank to Seabright, over the Rumson road, many fine homes are seen; the 
route then runs along the shore thru resort towns to Asbury Park, and then thru a 
prosperous rolling farming section, entering the pine country at outskirts of Lakewood. 

For option to Perth Amboy via Newark see Route 64. 

^"'otouncT For this and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

JSSt B flS£ Detail Route Map, pages 90-91. 

0.0 0.0 COLUMBUS CIRCLE, Broadway & 59th St., Columbus statue 
in center. Go south with trolley on Broadway. 

0.5 0.5 Times Square (7th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 
on Broadway. 

1.2 0.7 Greeley square (6th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 
on Broadway. 

1.8 0.6 Madison square; bear right away from trolley onto 5th Ave., 

passing Flat Iron building on left. 

2.5 0.7 9th St., one block before Washington park; turn left. 

2.9 0.4 Lafayette St., Wanamaker's on right; turn right, passing 

statue of Lafayette in open square on left. 

8.6 0.7 Fork at small green; keep right on Lafayette St. 

4.1 0.5 Fork, just beyond trolley; bear left. Bear right onto Centre 

St., joining trolley 4.2 and passing Municipal building on left 
just beyond. Go under elevated sta. at end of Brooklyn 
bridge, and curve right with trolley onto Park Row. 

4.4 0.3 Right-hand street at far side of City Hall square, old P. O. on 

right; turn right away from trolley onto Main St. (week days 
only). 

4.5 0.1 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Broadway. 

•West Point, N. Y. (pop. 1,250, alt. 150 ft.), were frustrated by the capture of Major An- 

it noted as being the site of the United dre". A chain was stretched across the river 

States military academy, which was estab- at West Point during the war in order that 

lished here in 1802, Washington having made the British ships might not gain passage. 

such a recommendation years before. Dur- The chief points of interest at West Point 

ing the revolutionary war it was used as a are: Ruins of Fort Putnam and Kosciusko's 

fortress, being laid out by the Polish patriot, garden, reached by "Flirtation Walk"; Bat- 

Kosciusko. The ruins of Fort Putnam, built tie monument; headquarters with huge tow- 

at this time, may be seen on a high hill er; east academic building and library, 

above the river a little to the southwest of which contains memorial by St. Gaudens to 

the furthest point. Fort Clinton and the Whistler and Edgar Allan Poo (cadets); mess 

other works which went to make up the for- hall, containing portraits of Sheridan, Grant 

tress occupied the grounds now covered by and Sherman; Cullom hall; officers' club, 

the academic buildings. The fortress was where hang many battle-scarred standards 

Wended by redoubts on tho summits of (here cadet hops are held); chapel, to the 

v; Us, Fort Putnam being principal of west at base of mountains and the riding hall, 

It was given over to the command where daily exercises are open to visitors. 

diet Arnold in 1780, whose plans to The river view from West Point is said to 

sr it into the hands of the enemy be one of the most wonderful is the world. 



City Section Page 89 Route 60 

5.1 0.6 Fork at Bowling Green ; keep right with trolley. 

5.4 0.3 End of street at far side of Battery park; meeting cross- 

trolley, turn right under elevated onto Whitehall St. 

5.5 0.1 Staten Island Ferry across bay. 

Ferriage, 60c, oar and driver; passenger*, 5c. Service 16-30 minutea. 

Reset odometer to 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 From ferry landing, jog left and immediately right upgrade. 

0.2 6.2 St. George, irregular 4-corners at statue, borough hall on 
right. Meeting trolley, bear left onto Bay St. Avoid right- 
hand diagonal road at small green 0.6. Thru Tompkinsville 
0.7. 

1.4 1.2 Stapleton,* Bay & Water Sts., park on far right. Turn right 
onto Water St. Thru irregular 4-corners, joining trolley 1.5 
— now on Canal St. 

"Stapleton, S. I., was a former post Tillage Just beyond is the U. S. lighthouse reserva- 

of Richmond county. The rooms of the ^ on and wharves of the American Cotton 

Docks company (former quarantine station). 
Staten Island association of arts and sciences The tj. s# Marine hospital, located here (Sea- 
in Richmond Boro hall contain many relics. man's Retreat) was built in 1834. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, PERTH AM BOY, N. J. 

Pertb Amboy (pop. 50,000, alt. 61 ft.) was graveyard, one of the first in the country, 

the capital of the state in the colonial is an interesting place. During the French 

days and its harbor was greater than that an . d * ndia * wa " lar * e barracks were main- 

of New York. The old governor's house, tamed *t Perth Amboy. The city now boast. 

«_ •,. * 1. • , L t. A i w i j °* one °» tne largest copper and silver re- 

built of brick brought from England, now finerief {n %ht coufltry and ^ ^^ ^ 

used as a minister's home, is still standing. , argc8t tcrra cotta works . Q America# It 

Benjamin Franklin lived in this house for a i so has one of the very few electrolytic tin 

some time. The old St. Peter's church and refineries in the world. 

POINTS OF INTEREST, TOTTENVILLE, N. Y. 

Tottenville, N. Y. The Billop mansion, land and brick from Belgium. Bentley Manor, 

at present being used as a factory for the embracing 1,164 acres, was granted to Chris 
manufacture of rat poison was built about topher Billop as a reward for circumnavig 
167% of materials including cement from Eng- ting Staten island in twenty- four hours. 



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Route 6Q • Page 92 New York 

1.7 0.3 Irregular 4-corners; turn left away from trolley onto Tomp- 
kins Ave. 

2.1 0.4 Vanderbilt Ave.; turn right, ascending grade just beyond. 
Avoid left-hand road 2.6. Thru Concord 3.0, Grassmere 3.9 
and Linden Park 4.6. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 6.2. 

6.3 4.2 New Dorp,* fork. Bear left away from trolley onto Amboy 
Road. 

7.3 1.0 Fork; bear left with Amboy Road. Pass Ocean View Ceme- 
tery on right 7.7. Thru Giffords 8.8. 

8.9 1.6 Fork; bear right with Amboy Road. Thru Seaside Park 9.8, 
Bloomingview 10.9 and Huguenot 11.5. 

13.0 4.1 Princess Bay, 3-comers, cannon in triangle. Bear left. Cross 

RR at Pleasant Plains and Mount Loretto Sta. 13.1. Pass 
Richmond Valley Sta. on right 13.9. 

Tottenvi lie -Perth Amboy City Map and Points of Interest, page 89. 

15.2 2.2 Tottenville, N. Y*, right-hand road, boulevard traffic sign on 
right. Turn right onto Bentley St. 

15.6 0.4 Tottenville-Perth Amboy Ferry. 

Ferriage, 25c to 40c, car and driver; additional passengers, 6c each. 
Service 20 to 30 minutes. 

From ferry landing, keep ahead upgrade on Smith St., shortly 
joining trolley. 

15.8 0.2 Perth Amboy, N. J., Smith & High Sts. Turn left away from 

trolley onto High St. 

15.9 0.1 Washington monument in circle; turn right onto Market St. 

Cross RRs 16.4-16.7, joining trolley. 

16.8 0.9 Left-hand road; turn left with trolley. Cross long wooden 

bridge over Raritan bay 17.0. 

18.2 1.4 Left-hand road ; turn left with trolley. Bear right with trolley 

19.0 onto Main St. 

19.3 1.1 South Amboy, Stevens Ave. & Main St. Turn left onto Stevens 

Ave. 

19.7 0.4 Bordelitown road; meeting cross-trolley, turn right. 

19.9 0.2 Diagonal 4-corners; bear left with branch trolley onto Pine 

Ave. 

20.1 0.2 Turn right with trolley and take left-hand road immediately 

beyond. Cross RR at Morgan* 21.7. Cross switch 28.8. Cross 
wooden drawbridge 25.0 — now on Front St. - 

Right on Broadway 25.6 is Route 64 to Lakewood and Atlantic City. 

25.7 5.6 Keyport, Front & Broad Sts. Turn right away from trolley 

onto Broad St. Cross RR at sta. 26.1. 

26.8 1.1 Fork; bear left. 

80.1 8.3 Fork; keep right with branch line of poles. 

32.0 1.9 Middletown. Straight thru. 

32.9 0.9 3-corners; bear right with trolley. 

34.4 1.5 Headdons. Straight thru with trolley. Cross long iron bridge 

over Navesink river 35.6. 

•New Dorp, S. I., is conceded to be the first Dorp is Stony Brook, where was built the 
permanent Dutch colony in America, (1644). first Waldensian church in this country 
It served as a military base during the U66Q); the county jail and the court house 
British rule. It was here that General Am- wcre also located here ' The foundations of 

these buildings were easily discernible up to 
a few years ago. 
•Morgan Station, N. J., was the home of 
esting side trip is to New Dorp Lane, past the the Morgans of revolutionary fame. There is 
quaint Cubberly cottage to Elm Tree Beacon, an okl family cem etery here with headstones 
where the Huguenots are recorded as having dating back to 1712. This district was the 
landed in 1658. scene of great excitement in 1918, caused by 

During the civil war Camp Sprague was the explosions and fire which practically de- 
located at New Dorp and many of our men stroyed the great T. A. Gillespie shell plant, 
were trained there. Some few died and were the largest shell loading plant in the world, 
buried on the ground, but a couple of years owned and operated by the U. S. government. 
ago all that was mortal of them was removed Endless streams of men, women and children 
) the National cemetery at Washington, D. streamed down the Lincoln highway here in 
About a quarter of a mile west of New their flight for safety. I 



herst on his return from Ticonderoga, re- 
ceived the "Order of the Bath." An inter- 



City Section Page 93 Route 60 

35.9 1.6 Irregular 4-corners; turn left away from trolley onto River- 
side Ave. Cross RR 36.0. 
3&2 0.3 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Front St. 

36.5 0.3 Red Bank,* Front & Broad Sts. Turn right with branch trolley 

onto Broad St. * 

36.8 0.3 Irregular 4-corners, at churches; turn left onto Branch Ave. 
37.0 0.2 6-corners; bear right with Branch Ave., passing large brick 

school on left just beyond. 
38.0 1.0 Left-hand road; turn left onto Rumson Road. 
42.4 4.4 Seabright, end of road, just beyond long iron bridge. Turn 

right along RR. Bear left with travel across RR 42.6. 

44.6 2.2 Monmouth Beach, bath house on left. Straight thru. 

45.3 0.7 Diagonal 4-corners, sta. ahead; bear left with travel. 

46.2 0.9 End of road; turn left onto Seaview Ave. Turn right onto 
Ocean Ave. 46.3. 

46.7 0.5 Long Branch,* Ocean Ave. & Broadway. 

Straight thru on Ocean Ave., passing statue of President Gar- 
field on right just beyond. Turn right onto Brighton Ave. 47.1. 
47.2 0.6 West End, Brighton and Ocean Aves. Turn left onto Ocean 
Ave. 

50.4 3.2 Deal,* police sta, on left. Straight thru. 

51.7 1.3 End of street; turn right onto Corlies Ave. 

61.8 0.1 Allenhurst, Corlies & Norwood Aves. Turn left onto Norwood 

Ave. 



i N. J. (pop. 8,000, alt. 55 ft.), has was used by General Grant and the house in 

canneries and carriage factories, and is the **"<* President Garfield died. 

center of a large truck garden district. K ^ "• J ' <** 1W ' a,t ;* *>. *■ * *"! 

bathing beach between Asbury Park and 

•Long Branch, N. J. (pop. 15,000, alt. 28 ft.), l^ Beach# and ^4 goli linkf# It WM at 

is the summer home of President Wilson. Deal that General Grant died, and the house 

Here also is located the summer home which in which he died is pointed out to visitors. 



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Route 60 Page 94 New York 

52.2 0.4 Irregular 4-corners, just beyond Deal, lake; turn left onto 

Deal lake drive. Turn right onto Ocean Ave. 52.6. 

53.3 1.1 Asbury Park,* Ocean, Asbury & Lake Aves., at Westley lake. 

Bear right onto Lake Ave. along Westley lake. 

54.0 0.7 Irregular 4-corners; bear left across concrete bridge. Bear 

left onto Main St. 54.1, joining trolley and passing entrance 
to Ocean Grove* on left. 
54.3 0.3 Corlies Ave.; turn right away from trolley. Cross RR 54.4. 

Straight ahead on Main St. leads to Spring* Lake. 

6 Irregular 4-corners; bear .left and cross wooden bridge. 
3-corners; bear right. 
Fork; bear left. Pass school on left 58.7. 
Fork; bear left with travel. 
Fork; keep left. Cross RR 61.7. 
Farmingdale, end of road. Turn left. 
Cross RRs 64.0-64.8. 

66.1 2.8 Squankam. Straight thru. 

Cross RR 70.4. Same thorofare becomes Monmouth Ave. 
72.3 6.2 Right-hand street, sta. on left; turn right onto 2nd Ave. 

Lakewood City Map and Points of Interest, page 103. 

72.6 0.3 Madison Ave., church on right; turn left. 

72.7 0.1 LAKEWOOD, Madison Ave. & Main St., Lake Carasaljo ahead 



56.9 


2.6 


58.1 


1.2 


58.3 


0.2 


59.8 


1.0 


60.8 


1.6 


68.8 


8.0 



•Asbury Park, N. J. (pop. 12,763, alt. 22 ft.), 
is a very popular summer resort located on 
the Atlantic ocean. Ft has a splendid bath- 
ing beach and offers the usual resort diver- 
sions, being a close rival of Atlantic City. 

•Ocean Grove, N. J. (pop. 3,000, alt. 31 ft.), 
adjoining Asbury Park, is numbered among 
the best known seaside resorts in the coun- 
try and maintains one of the world's greatest 



camp meeting sites. It was established in 
1870 by the Methodist church. The large 
auditorium, holding 10,000 people, is used as 
a musical headquarters for the leading art- 
ists of the country. All vehicle traffic is 
prohibited on Sunday and the gates are 
closed to vehicle traffic from 12 p. m. Satur- 
day night to 12 p. m. Sunday night, except 
for medical and mercy purposes. 




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City Section Page 95 Route 61 

Route 61 — Lakewood and Asbury Park, N. J., to 
New York City, N. Y.— 78.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Farmlngdale, Asbury Park, Long Branch, Red Bank, Keyport and the Amboys. 
.Practically all -gravel to Asbury Park with macadam thru towns; pavement, macadam 
and concrete to Red Bank; gravel to Keyport; balance macadam and pavement. 

The first few miles are thru the pines country, then thru a prosperous rolling farming 
section to Asbury Park; from Asbury Park to Seab right thru numerous resort towns 
along the shore; then over the Rumson road to Red Bank, along both sides of which 
are many fine homes. From Red Bank to Keyport is a farming section. From Key- 
port to Perth Amboy the road goes over alternating ridges and intervening bays and 
swamps. On Staten Island the road follows the southern part of the island thru 
numerous residential towns. 

For option from Perth Amboy to New York via Newark, see Route 65. 

r- MILEAGE-^ 

Total BttaMi For this and other exits see City Map, page 103. 

ffilaaeo Points 

0.0 0.0 LAKEWOOD, Madison Ave. & Main St. Go north on Madison 

Ave. 
O.l 0.1 2nd Ave., church on right; turn right. 
0.4 0.3 End of street at sta.; turn left onto Monmouth Ave. Cross 

RR 2.3. 
6.6 6.2 Squankam. Straight thru. Cross RR 8.7. 
8.9 2.3 Farmingdale, right-hand diagonal road, store on right Bear 

right 
10.8 1.9 Fork; bear right with travel. Cross RR 11.0. 
14.6 3.8 3-corners; bear left. 

15.8 12 Irregular 4-corners; bear right with travel. 
16.4 0.6 Fork; bear left with macadam. Cross RR 18.3. 
18.4 2.0 Main St.; meeting trolley, turn left. 

18.6 0.2 Right-hand diagonal street; entrance to Ocean Grove on 

right; bear right away from trolley. 

18.7 0.1 Irregular 4-corners, just beyond concrete bridge; turn right 

onto Lake Ave. along Westley lake. 
19.4 0.7 Asbury Park, Asbury & Ocean Aves. 

Points of Interest, opposite page. 

i Bear left (north) onto Ocean Ave. Turn left onto Deal lake 

drive 20.2. 
20.6 1.1 Irregular 4-corners; turn right across Deal lake onto Nor- 
wood Ave. 

20.9 0.4 Allenhurst, Norwood & Corlies Aves. Turn right onto Cor- 

lies Ave. 
21.0 0.1 Ocean Ave.; turn left. 
1 22.8 1.8 Deal, 4 ' police sta. on right. Straight thru. 

House where General Grant died on right (fire alarm box on 
right) 24.5. 

26.6 3.2 West End, Ocean & Brighton Aves. Turn right onto Brighton 
Ave. Turn left onto Ocean Ave. 25.6. 

26.0 0.6 Long Branch,* Ocean Ave. & Broadway, just beyond statue of 

President Garfield. Straight thru on Ocean Ave. Turn left 
onto Seaview Ave. 26.4. 

26.6 0.5 New Ocean Ave.; turn right. 

27.4 0.9 Diagonal 4-corners, just beyond sta.; bear right with travel. 

28.1 0.7 Monmouth Beach, bath house on right. Straight thru. 

30.1 2.0 Fork; bear left across RR and immediately right along same. 

30.3 0.2 Seabright, left-hand road. Turn left across long iron bridge. 

34.1 3.8 Fork; keep right on Rumson Road. 

34.7 0.6 End of road; turn right. 

35.2 0.6 Fork; bear left onto Branch Ave. 
35.7 0.5 5-corners ; bear left with Branch Ave. 

*De*V JM. J. (pop. 164, alt. 32 ft.), has a fine *Long Branch, N. J. (pop. 15,000, alt. 28 ft.), 

bathing beach between Asbury Park and is the summer home of President Wilson. 

Long Beacli* and good golf links. It was at Here also is located the summer home which 

Deal that "General Grant died, and the house was used by General Grant and the hous 

in which 1£e died is pointed out to visitors. which President Garfield died. 

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^ - « - 

Route 61 Page 96 New York 

35.9 0.2 Irregular 4-corners, churches on left; turn right onto Broad 
St. 

36.2 0.3 Red Bank,* Broad & Front Sts. Meeting cross-trolley, turn 

left onto Front St. 

36.5 0.3 Right-hand diagonal street; bear right away from trolley onto 

Riverside Ave. Curve left across RR 36.7. 
36.8 0.3 Irregular 4-corners ; meeting trolley, turn right. Cross bridge 
over Navesink river 36.9. Avoid right-hand road 37.3. 

38.3 1.5 Headdons. Straight thru with trolley. 

39.8 1.5 3-corners ; bear left with trolley. 

39.9 0.1 3-corners; bear left away from trolley. 

40.7 0.8 Middletown. Keep ahead. 

41.0 0.3 Fork, just beyond RR bridge; bear right over another RR 

bridge. 
41.9 0.9 Fork; bear left. 

46.1 4.2 Right-hand diagonal street; bear right onto Broad St. Cross 

RR at tfta. 46.6. 
47.0 0.9 Keyport, Broad & Front Sts. 

Turn left onto Front St., joining trolley. Cross switch 48.7. 
Cross RR at Morgan* 51.0. 

52.6 5.6 End of road; jog right and immediately left with trolley onto 

Pine Ave. 

52.8 0.2 Diagonal 4-corners ; meeting cross-trolley, turn right onto 

Bordentown road. 

53.0 0.2 Stevens Ave.; turn left with trolley. 

. 53.4 0.4 South Amboy, Stevens Ave. & Main St. Meeting cross trol- 
ley, turn right, onto Main St. Bear left with trolley 53.6. 
54.5 1.1 End of road; turn right with trolley. Cross long wooden 
bridge over Raritan bay 54.7. 

Perth Amboy-Tottenvllle City Map and Points of Interest, page 89. 
Detail Route Map, pages 90-91. 

55.9 1.4 End of road; turn right with trolley. Cross RR 56.0. Thru 

irregular 4-corners 56.2. Cross RR 56.3. 

Left on Prospect St. 66.2 is Route 65 at mileage 103.6 to New York. 

56.8 0.9 Washington monument in circle; turn left onto High St. 

56.9 0.1 Perth Amboy, N. Y., High & Smith Sts. Meeting trolley, turn 

right onto Smith St. 

57.1 0.2 Perth Amboy-Tottenville Ferry. 

Ferriage, 25c to 40c, car and driver; additional passengers, 6c each; 
service 20 to 30 min. 

From ferry landing keep ahead on Bentley St. 
57.5 0.4 Tottenville, N. Y., end of street. Turn left onto Amboy road. 
Pass Richmond Valley Sta. on left 58.8. Pass Mount Loretto 
cemetery on right 59.5. Cross RR at Pleasant Plains and 
Mount Loretto Sta. 59.6. 

59.7 2.2 Princess Bay, 3-corners, cannon in small triangle. Bear 

right with Amboy road. Thru Huguenot 61.2. 

61.8 2.1 Bloomingview, fork. Bear right with Amboy road. Thru 
i Seaside Park 62.9 and Giffords 63.9. Pass Ocean View ceme- 
tery on left 65.0. 

66.4 4.6 New Dorp. Straight thru, joining trolley. 

Points of Interest, page 92. 
Moravian cemetery on left 66.8. 

67.0 0.6 Fork; keep right with trolley. Thru Linden Park 68.1 — now 

on Richmond road. 
68.8 1.8 Grassmere, fork. Bear left with trolley on Richmond road. 

Thru Concord 69.7. 

•Red Bank, N. J. (pop. 8,000, alt. 35 ft.), has was the scene of great excitement in 1918, 

canneries and carriage factories, and ia the caused by the explosions and fire which 

. , A , . ., . . . practically destroyed the great T. A. Gillespie 

center of a large truck garden district. , „ . ' ,. . * . / „ . ,. , 1 "»' ,c 

«. t. M . •. •. * she " P»nt f the largest shell loading plant in 

•Morgan Station, N. J., was the home of the wor , df owned tmd operated by the n g 

the Morgans of revolutionary fame. There government. Endless streams of men, women 
is an old family cemetery here with head- and children streamed down the Lincoln 
stones dating back to 1712. This district highway here in their flight""— safety. 



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3ity Section Page 97 Route 62 

£9.9 1.1 Fork; bear right away from trolley onto Vanderbilt Ave. 

Right at 70.5 is Fox Hills Golf Club. 

TO.6 0.7 Tompkins Ave.; turn left. 

n.O 0.4 Irregular 4-corners; meeting trolley, bear right onto Canal St. 

n.l 0.1 Right-hand diagonal street at green; bear right away from 

trolley — still on Canal St. 
ri.3 0.2 Stapleton,* Canal & Bay Sts., at far side of park. Meeting 

trolley, turn left onto Bay St. 
T2.0 0.7 Tompkinsville, fork at small green. Bear right with branch 

trolley on Bay St. 
T2.5 0.6 St. George, irregular 4-corners, city hall on left. 

Bear right away from trolley over RR fridge. 
72 .7 0.2 Staten Island Ferry across bay. 

Ferriage, 50c, car and driver; passengers, 6c. Service 15-30 minutes. 

Reset odometer to 0.0. 
O.O 0.0 From ferry landing, keep ahead with trolley on Whitehall St. 
along Battery park. Bear right onto Broadway 0.4. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

0.9 0.9 Fork; bear right onto Park Row, passing old P. O. and City 
Hall square on left. Go under elevated, sta. at end of Brooklyn 
bridge, and curve left with trolley onto Centre St. 

1.5 0.4 Fork; bear left away from trolley onto Lafayette St 

2.6 1.3 9th J3t., just beyond trolley and statue of Lafayette in open 

square, Wanamaker's on left; turn left. 

8.0 0.4 5th Ave.; turn right. 

8.7 0.7 Madison square, just beyond Flat Iron building; bear left 

onto Broadway, joining trolley. 

4.1 0.4 Greeley square (6th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 

on Broadway. 

4.7 0.6 Times Square (7th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 

on Broadway. 
5.5 0.8 COLUMBUS CIRCLE, Broadway & 59th St., Columbus statue 
in center. 

Route 62— New York City, N. Y., to New Brunswick, N. J.— 

241m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Staten Island, Carteret Ferry, Woodbridge, Iielln and Metuchen. Macadam to 
Carteret; ooncrete to Wood bridge; balance macadam. 

This route traverses a suburban district to Carteret, then thru a manufacturing sec- 
tion to Woodbridge; balance thru a flat farming area. 

For directions from Columbus Circle to Staten island, see Route 60. 

^"' DtaffloT For this and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

SSSmfSSSt Detail Route Map, pages 90-91. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Staten Island Ferry. 

Ferriage, 60c, car and driver; passengers, 5c each. Service, 15-30 
minutes; running time, 22 minutes. 

From ferry landing, jog left and immediately right upgrade. 
0.3 0.3 St George, irregular 4-corners at statue, borough hall on 

right. Meeting trolley, bear left onto Bay St 
0.6 9.3 Tompkinsville, right-hand diagonal street at green. Bear 

right with branch trolley onto Arietta St 
0.7 0.1 Irregular 4-corners at far side of green; bear slightly right 

with trolley onto Richmond turnpike. 
0.9 0.2 Fork; keep left with branch trolley on Richmond turnpike. 

8.8 2.9 West New Brighton. Keep ahead across trolley on Richmond 

turnpike. Avoid right-hand road, where trolley leaves 4.8, 
keeping ahead on Richmond turnpike. 

*SUpUton, S. L, was a former pott village beyond it the U. S. lighthouse reserratioa and 

oi Richmond county. The rooms of the Staten wharves of the American Cetton Docks com 

. pany (former quarantine station). The U. S 

MMd eetociation of arts and sciences in Marine hospital, located here (Seaman's R< 

Bfrhm ead Boro hall contain many relics. Just treat) was bnUt in l«34. gitize ^ by 



Route 63 Page 98 New York 

6.0 22 Bulls Hea4 irregular 4-corners. Straight thru on Richmond 

turnpike. Thru Linoleumville, N. Y., 7.6. 

8.7 2.7 Linoleumville-Carteret Ferry. 

Ferriage, 25-40& Service 6 K. M. to mldnlghti-every 20 minutes. 
Ferry runs from May 1st to December 1st. 

Leaving ferry, keep ahead on dirt road. 

8.8 0.1 Carteret, N. J., left-hand road. Turn left onto concrete. 

Gross RRs 9.1. Thru Canda 9.3. Cross RR 9.6. 
9.7 0.9 Sawyers, store on left. Straight thru. Cross RRs at Port 

Reading 11.0. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 11.1. Cross 

trolley 11.4. 
12.7 8.0 8-corners; bear right away from trolley onto Green St. Cross 

RR at sta. 198. 
13.1 0.4 Woodbridge, Green St. and Amboy Ave. Straight thru on 

Green St. 

Left la Route 64 to Atlantic City. 

Cross RR 13.8. Cross trolley 14.0. 
15.6 2.4 Iselin, diagonal 4-corners at RR. Keep ahead across RR and 

turn immediately left on concrete. 
18.6 3.1 Metuchen,* Middlesex Ave. & Main St., church on left. 

Straight thru across trolley. Cross RR 19.0. 
19.4 0.8 Turn left over RR bridge and immediately right at 4-corners 

just beyond. Cross long stone bridge over Raritan river 23.7 

— now on Amboy St. 
24.1 4.7 NEW BRUNSWICK,* Amboy & George Sts., brick church on 

left. 

Route 63— New Brunswick, N. J., to New York City, N. Y. 

—24.1 m. 

For Accommodations gee Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Metuchen, Iselin, WoodbridgB? Carteret Ferry and Staten Island. Macadam to 

Woodbridffe, concrete to Carteret; balance macadam. 

^NIJ-EAGE-^ Th | S route traverses a flat farming area to Woodbrldge, then a 

Tniiinlr^ manufacturing district to Carteret; balance, over Staten Island, is thru 

Mlleagi .points a suburban region. 

0.0 0.0 NEW BRUNSWICK, Albany & Georges Sts., brick church on 
right. Go east with trolley on Albany St. Cross long stone 
bridge over Raritan river 0.2. 

1.1 1.1 Fork; bear left away from trolley. 

4.7 8.6 Irregular 4-corners; turn left over RR bridge and immediately 
right. Cross RR 5.1. 

5.5 0.8 Metuchen, Middlesex Ave. & Main St., church on right. 

Straight thru across trolley on Middlesex Ave. 

8.6 8.1 Iselin, diagonal 4-corners, sta. on right. Turn right across 

RR, thru 4-corners just beyond. Cross trolley 10.1. Cross 
RR 10.8. 

Detail Route Map, pages 90-91. 

11.0 2.4 Woodbridge, Green St. & Amboy Ave. Straight thru on Green 
St. Cross RR at sta. 11.3. 

•Metuchen, N. J. (pop. 3,334, alt. 161 ft.). of the state agricultural and mechanical col- 
The Indian chief Matouchen, who roamed the lege with the state model farms. Besides 
wilds here in 1660-1700, and for whom the the Voorhees and the Gardner A. Sage Li- 
town was named, lies buried in "High Hill," Varies, the city has a large public library. 



i nearby farm. 
"New Brunswick, N. J. (pop, 45,000, alt. 18 



Other institutions of note are Wells memo- 
rial hospital, St. Peter's general hospital, 

. v ,--.,„ Parker memorial home, Carnegie public li- 

ft.), the county seat of Middlesex- county, bfary and thc Rutgefs coUege Hbrafy ^^ 

is situated at the head of navigation on the is a so i diers » monument and a mpnument in 

Raritan river and is the eastern terminus of memory of the three New Brunswick boys 

the Delaware and Raritan canal. The stone who went down with the battleship Maine. 

railway bridge which here spans the Raritan New Brunswick was settled in 1681 under 

is one of the finest structures of its kind. the name of Prigmore's Swamp. It suffered 

New Brunswick is the seat of Rutgers col- severely during the revolution and during the 

r e, established in 1775; of the Theological winter of 1776-77 was occupied by the British. 

ninary of the Dutch Reformed ctilirch in General Howe's headquarters are still stand- 



i j erica, New Jersey Woman's College", and ing on York street. 

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WHERE ib STOP in NEW Y0BK 




The VANDERBILT HOTEL 

Thirty- Fourth Street, East of Park Avenue, New York City 



Send for Boo 

"TWO 
WEEK! 
VACATK 
IN 
NEW YOF 



It tells you where 

to go end whet 

to see 



"The Ideal Hotel 9 



IFF: 

h Room 
Private 
Bath 

s Room 

$4.00 
Double Room 
n . $8.00 

Petit Selon end 
Bed Room $15.00 



SITUATED near the fashionable shopping district 
on the crest of Murray Hill on the city's broadest 
avenue and only thoroughfare, affording satisfactory 
parking space with garage at hand. Thirty-third 
Street Subway entrance at the door. 




Walton H. Marshall 

Manager 



For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page. 

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For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page 

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9 WWi 



WHERE to STOP in NEW Y0BK 




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la&ri WHEBE* STOP Z NEW YOBK 




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iafeMWHEBE«bST0Pa«NEyYOMCam>M 



New York City 

The American Metropolis 



Five boroughs went to the making of 
Greater New York, five distinct personalities 
merged into one to make the typical Ameri- 
can metropolis the supreme city of the west- 
ern world. They are the boroughs of Man- 
hattan, Brooklyn, Queensborough, Richmond 
and the Bronx. They have made the wonder 
city of the age. 

Four of the boroughs are on islands. Only 
the Bronx stands back on the main land as 
though it were the pier to which the citied 
islands were moored. 

New York is a city of superlatives. It has 
the largest area of any city in the world. Its 
population is the largest but one, and that it 
is rapidly overtaking. Its financial center 
dominates the world; the suspension bridges 
which connect its water-divided boroughs are 
the greatest; its subways which bring the 
homes of Harlem and the Bronx within easy 
access of the business district of lower Man- 
hattan, are the most extensive; its sky- 
scrapers are the tallest and rest on the deep- 
est foundations; its wonderful harbor gives it 
commercial supremacy. 

"Never in history," says Robert Shackle ton, 
"has there been such a magnificent city. It 
draws the great and the little; the masters of 
finance, of railroads and manufacturing, the 



leaders in law and surgery and authorship 
and art, and millions of little folk as well." 

The borough of Manhattan is the heart of 
the city. It is what the world in general 
means when its says New York. It is this 
island borough lying between the East and 
the Hudson rivers on the east and west, the 
nose of the Battery pointing out toward the 
Atlantic on the south, and the ship's canal 
that connects the Harlem river with the Hud- 
son, that is the great magnet for the Ameri- 
can people. Whether they go to New York 
to cast their lot with the city and become a 
part of it, or to sell their wares in the great- 
est of grain markets, to see the sights and im- 
prove their minds, or frivol thru a gay holi- 
day—they all go to New York. And New 
York, with a sort of kindly brilliant indiffer- 
ence, offers entertainment and allurement as 
varied as the myriad tastes of the people. 
Between the "Three Steps Down" into the 
mysterious candle-lit darkness of a Green- 
wich Village cafe, and an uptown roof garden 
a- sparkle with lights and jewels and gaiety; 
between the unconventional studio apartment 
made out of a fragment of an old house in 
Washington square and the palatial mansions 
of upper 5th Ave., or the correct little flats of 
Harlem— between these extremes lies every- 



,111111 i iirTTMTTTmui ii imri m utimm/ u i mu rTrrTTTTPTfRTTrrT i M nun n ii mihi mrrnm m m i ifmn n 1 1 n i rui nr 



Hotel Bretton Hall 

BROADWAY, 85th to 86th Sts., NEW YORK 




Between 

Riveraide Drive 

and 

Central Park 



Within 10 min- 
utes of the cen- 
ter of theatre 
and shopping 
districts. Ex- 
c e p t i o n - 
ally large, 
quiet rooms, 
with baths. 



Broadway Surface 
Cars and Subway 
Station at door. 



New York City 9 * 

Largest Tran~ 

mient Midtoton 

Hotel 



During the 
spring and 
summer months 
very attractive 
rates will be 
given motorists. 



Alwaym a Cool 
Breeze Through 
Bretton Hall 



EleTated Station 
within two blocks 
—86th St. Station. 



Belnord Garage Within One Block of Hotel 
All the Comforts of New York City's Best Hotels at Reasonable Rates 

TELEPHONE 1000 SCHUYLER 




For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page. / 

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iafeaJ|VHEBEoSTOPa.NEWWBKHHiM 



thing that a modern cosmopolitan American 
city has to offer. 

. The theatres of Manhattan set the standard 
for the entire continent. They cluster so 
closely and in such numbers around the 
neighborhood of Broadway that they create a 
distinctive atmosphere and have made a 
world-famous Rialto. In various parts of the 
city there are theatres presenting plays in 
French, Italian, Yiddish, and other foreign 
languages. 

The cafes of the city offer an experience 
like a tour around the world. There is not a 
nation on earth which has brought the art of 
cookery to any degree of perfection but sets 



forth its distinctive dishes in an environment 
peculiarly its own. 

Not only these cafes, but different sections 
of the city as well have been given over to 
people who have come in as aliens and been 
accepted as a part of New York's life even 
while they kept their own foreign language, 
customs and dress. According to Julian 
Street, himself a New Yorker, "An American 
in New York is at the mercy of the Greeks, 
Italians, Russians, Irish, French and Swiss, 
with no American consul to appeal to." But 
the foreign quarters dotted over Manhattan 
add much to its dramatic picturesqueness. 
There is a Chinatown, Russian, Syrian, Greek 
and Italian quarter, and a ghetto. There are 
a number of French scattered thru the city 



(g) international mm service. 
Luna Park, Coney Island, as It Looks from an Aeroplane 



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Lower Manhattan Skyline from New Jersey 



© Brown Brc 



that Lafayette loved, there are more Irish in 
New York than in Dublin, and more Jews 
than in Warsaw. 

The gaiety of the city is not choked by the 
congested poverty of the east side. The 
oriental display of color, the brilliant hues in 
the costuming of the women from southern 
Europe, and the dancing of the little children 
on the sidewalk to the music of a barrel 
organ dispel any suggestion of grey gloom. 

The palaces, if not all the pleasures, of New 
York are located up town, on upper 5th Ave., 
some of them facing Central Park, and along 
Riverside drive, and the traveler gets a good 
idea of prosperous Manhattan from a seat on 
the top of a 5th Ave. bus which he acquires 
more easily if he boards it at Washington 
square just south of the beautiful arch under 
which the avenue begins. 



The boulevards and parks offer irrestistit 
attractions to the motorist. Central park 
all that anyone would expect of a park plann 
originally by three men with poetry and t 
love of nature in their souls, for the thr 
citizens who served with the mayor and ti 
other city officials on the board which la 
out Central park in the middle nineteenth ce 
tury, were William Cullen Bryant, Washin 
ton Irving, and George Bancroft. To the nor 
and northeast of the city, the old Boston a 
Albany post roads, the latter now Broadwa 
lead away over hard, smooth roads into love 
country. 

For the serious sight-seer there are catt 
drals that compare with those of the < 
world. There are statues and monumer 
commemorating great men and great even 
There are public buildings that are triump 



HOTEL MAJESTIC 

Central Park West 
and 72nd Street 

NEW YORK 

Ideal accommodations for Automo- 
bilists in a location unsurpassed for 
beauty and convenience. 

A perfectly appointed hotel, only 
a few minutes from business and 
amusements ; fronting Central Park ; 
every room with outside exposure. 

Within the Zone of Attractions. 

Outside the Zone of Confusion. 

Restaurant a la Carte 

Dancing on Hurricane Deck atop the Hotel from June 20th 

Write for RESERVATION and SUMMER RATES 

also AUTO TRIP MAP GRATIS 

AUTHORIZED GARAGE CONVENIENT 



1 



For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page. 

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aEW|WHEBE*STOP,>, NEWYOBkMiSI 



architectural skill, libraries, art galleries, 
id museums. And always there is the lure 
the famous "great white way." 

Brooklyn, which was the third city of the 
nited States, before it became the borough 
Brooklyn in the city of Greater New York, 
a city of homes and churches. To the flip- 
tnt phrase-maker it is the "dormitory of 
ew York," for thousands of people doing 
isiness on Manhattan Island live in Brook- 
n. Yet it has its own business districts of 
> small importance, more than 5,000 factories, 
id an important and historic navy yard. 

Queensborough and the borough of Rich- 
ond both brought to the merger that made 
reater New York some historic old towns, 
ime busy industrial centers, many suburban 
immunities, beautiful private estates and 
atering places. 

The borough of the Bronx contains some 
:ry old villages and is rich in history. Mor- 
sania, one of the villages now included in 
te Bronx, was once suggested as the capital 
the United States, and City Island, also 
the Bronx, was at one time a potential 
immercial rival of Manhattan. 

It is hard to realize in the midst of the whirl 
id glitter, the activity and excitement, and 
le thrill that comes with the gathering to- 
other of millions of people, that a little more 



than three hundred years' ago a little Indian 
fishing village down on the point that is now 
Battery park, a few clustered wigwams on 
Staten and Long Islands, and an Indian vil- 
lage or two away up north beyond the swamp 
that stretched around and to the south of 
the Harlem river, were all the human habita- 
tions in the area that is now Greater New 
York. It is less than three hundred years 
since Peter Minuit, the third Dutch director 
general, bought the entire island of Manhat- 
tan from the Indians for beads and other 
geegaws amounting in real value to some 
thing like $24.00. 

From the time that Hendrik Hudson re- 
turned to Holland in 1609 after discovering 
the river that he thought was the northwest 
passage to the Indies, Dutch traders came and 
went without any fixed belief in a permanent 
settlement at first. Altho the Dutch domina- 
tion of New York lasted only a little more 
than fifty years it left its stamp on the city 
more indelibly than all the people who have 
come and gone since, and altho the British 
changed the name from New Amsterdam to 
New York, the old Dutch names persist thru- 
out the city and the oldest, bluest -blooded 
families boast of Dutch descent. 

New York remained British until the revolu- 
tion when many important battles were 



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@ Brown Broa. 
Columbus Circle, Where All Blue Book Routes Start and Terminate 



fought over ground that is now well within took place and in which the great generals 

the city limits. It was burned by the British and statesmen of the young republic held 

during the war, but some interesting old momentous meetings or had their headquar- 

houses still stand in which historic events ters. 

How to Reach Various Points of Interest 
in New York City 

In this suggestion to motorists regarding New York City and vicinity, Columbus Circle, 
the intersection of Broadway, Eighth Avenue and 59th Street, is the center from which 
radiate lines of travel as follows: 

1. Through the northern part of Manhattan, the Bronx, points on Long Island Sound, and 
points in the Hudson Valley and lower Croton watershed. 

2. Through the southern part of Manhattan to Staten Island and the southwestern section 
of Brooklyn. 

3. To the west across the ferries leading to northern, central and southern parts of New 
Jersey. 

4. To the east over the bridges, which form the gateways to northeastern Brooklyn, the 
resorts on the' south shore, adjacent to Brooklyn, and all points in the central and western 
part of Long Island, and along the western section to the north shore. 



HOTEL CHELSEA 

West 23rd Street at 7th Avenue NEW YORK CITY 

FIREPROOF HOTEL 

Officially appointed hotel of the Automobile Club of America 

GARAGES NEARBY. 175 Foot 
Frontage for Autos 

500 Rooms TARIFF 400 Baths 

Room with adjoining bath, one person, 32.50 

Room with private bath, 33.50 

Suites, Parlor, Bedroom and Bath, 36.00 and upward 

Modern Appointments. All Outside Rooms 

Restaurant A la Carte and Table d'Hote 

Club Breakfasts, 50c to 75c 

Luncheon, 65c Dinner, $1.00 

Cafeteria Attached 

Nearest hotel to Chelsea Piers and adjacent piers, where all principal ocean steamers 
dock. Convenient to shopping and theatre district. Five minutes from Madison 
Square Garden. Half block from 23rd Street Station of New 7th Avenue Subway. 

Map "F" of New York Sent Free on Application 



For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page. 

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One of the Many Beautiful Drives in Ventral tfark 



Northern Manhattan, Western Bronx 



To reach the northwestern part of Manhat- 
tan, the lower western part of the Bronx, and 
points near the east shore of the Hudson, as 
far as Yonkers and beyond, it is possible to 
take one of several routes from Columbus 
circle. 

Possibly the most popular and the one 
which usually has the best road surface is to 
follow Broadway to 72nd street, turn west to 
Riverside and follow this to 155th street 
(beyond Trinity cemetery) and there con- 
tinue to bear left along Riverside drive to 
Dyckman street, which is the junction of the 
drive and Broadway. The latter may be fol- 
lowed directly through Yonkers and to points 
beyond, or tourists may turn left to 230th 
street after crossing the Harlem river ship 
canal, and bear left and right up Riverdale 
avenue, along the top of a ridge which over- 
looks the Vale of Yonkers on the right, and 
drops down on the west to the edge of the 
Hudson river. This avenue is also a good 
route through Yonkers, and avoids, by bear- 



ing left, the congested corner in that city 
known as Getty square. 

Those who wish to reach the Grand boule- 
vard and concourse, Jerome and Sedgwick 
avenues, which are the direct lines running 
through the western part of the Bronx, may 
leave Columbus circle and follow Broadway, 
or Riverside drive, to 145th street, where there 
is a right turn crossing the bridge over the 
Harlem into 149th street, the Bronx. At the 
top of the hill turn to the left on Mott avenue 
and into the Grand boulevard and concourse 
which continues to Moshula parkway. 

An optional way to the Grand concourse 
is by going east on 59th St. to 5th Ave.; turn 
left and follow the avenue to Morris park; 
turn right onto 120th St. one block, then turn 
left on Madison Ave. At end of the avenue 
turn right across drawbridge onto 138th St., 
then left on Mott Ave., coming onto Grand 
concourse. 

To reach Jerome avenue from the circle, the 
most direct route is to follow the west drive 



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© Brown Broa 
The Pennsylvania Station, Seventh Avenue, S2d and 33d Streets 



of Central park from Columbus circle, and at 
the northwestern gate of the park, which leads 
to Central park west (Eighth avenue), con- 
tinue to bear right one block further east, 
inside the park to Seventh avenue, then left 
out of the park and follow Seventh avenue to 
its end at 153rd street; there turn left and 
next right across the Central bridge over the 
Harlem and follow Jerome avenue to its inter- 
section with the Grand boulevard and con- 
course at Mosholu parkway. 

Sedgwick avenue, which is the most western 
of the thorofares in the west part of the Bronx, 
may be reached by the Jerome avenue route 
by turning sharp left after crossing the bridge 
at 155th street. 

There is a pleasant variation from Riverside 
drive for those bound from 155th street to 
Dyckman street, along the Hudson. At 159th 
street and Broadway turn left on Fort Wash- 
ington avenue, and follow to its northern 



terminus, which winds down Abbey Hill and 
into Broadway at Fort George. 

Van Cortlandt park, which is the northern 
end of the section just described, may be 
reached from the concourse on the east, or 
Broadway on the west. Those who enter the 
park from Broadway may turn to the right 
at the end of the subway structure, and con- 
tinue to the overhead crossing of the Putnam 
division of the New York Central. West of 
the tracks is a turn left, to the old Van Cort- 
landt mansion, or the tourist may bear left 
around the lakes and the golf course, and on 
to Yonkers. Midway of the golf course is a 
'turn to the right up the hill to Jerome ave- 
nue. 

There are numerous points of interest in 
this section, beginning with Central park at 
the edge of Columbus circle. This park is to 
New York what Hyde Park is to London, or 
the Bois de Boulogne to Paris. It is an arti- 
ficial creation and has been called the most 
wonderful work of art produced in America. 



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lafeaflWHEBEfrSTOP*. NEWYQBKl^iMll 



"IN THE MIDDLE OF THINGS 

Hotel Bristol 



ft 



129-135 West 48th St., N. Y. 

Between Broadway and Fifth Avenue 
388 ROOMS 300 BATHS 

FIREPROOF GARAGE CONVENIENT 
NEAR ALL SHOPS AND THEATERS 

RATES — 

1.00 to S4.0C , „ 

> per day 

„ per day 

Bath 1 Four Persons.. 912.00 per day 

Excellent Restaurant Popular Price* 

T. ELLIOTT T0LS0N, Pres. & Mgr. 



b~» with B.th {Kgfc:fiS £ ftg SS & 

Two Booms with ( Three^Persons .^. f 9.00 per day 



It extends from 59th street north to 110th in Cairo and was presented to the United 

street and is outlined on the west by Central States in 1877 by the Khedive of Egypt. As 

Park West and on the east by Fifth avenue. one enters the park at Columbus circle, the 

It has a number of gates or entrances and Maine monument may be seen to the right, 

contains many interesting statues and monu- Directly east of this position, at the Fifth 

ments, including Cleopatra's Needle, an obe- avenue and 59th street entrance, may be seen 

lisk of great antiquity, which formerly stood the famous St. Gaudens equestrian statue 



^ 



The Polo Grounds— Borne of the "Giants" and "Yanks" 

For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page. 

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lafeWIWHEBEfeSTOPm NEWYOBK 




Brighton Beach 

This famous Beach vies with its next-door neighbor, Coney Island for first honors in 

welcoming New York City's myriads of bathers. From an aeroplane they 

resemble sandcrabs or driftwood. 



of General Sherman. The Metropolitan 
museum of art, containing the greatest art 
collection in America, is located within the 
borders of Central park, its principal entrance 
being on Fifth avenue, between 82nd and 83rd 
streets. 

At 77th street and Central Park West is the 
museum of natural history. Further west, on 
Riverside drive between 72nd street and 
Grant's tomb, are the residences of many 
well known people. 



Broadway as far south as Columbus circle, 
and below, was an Indian trail, and was 
opened as a Kings highway by the British 
about 1703 and called Queen Anne's road. It 
was eventually extended as far north as Al- 
bany, making it one of the oldest highways 
of more than one hundred miles in the Uni- 
ted States. 

Practically all of the ancient houses between 
the Harlem river and Columbus circle in this 
western section have been torn down, except 



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Iffifenfl WHERE*, STOP in NEW Ygji]§§g§| 



one at 204th street and Broadway, known as 
the Dyckman house, recently restored. It is 
the oldest farmhouse on Manhattan Island. 

Near 181st street and Fort Washington ave- 
nue was Fort Washington. On what was 
until recently a part of the estate of C. K. G. 
Billings, now owned by a corporation, in 
which the Rockefellers are interested, is the 
site of Fort Tryon, the last stand made by the 
continental army on the Island of Manhat- 
tan before the retreat of White plains. Be- 
yond this point and beyond where Washing- 
ton road turns down Abbey Hill is a promon- 
tory affording a magnificent view of the Hud- 
son and the Palisades, probably the best on 
the lower part of the river. On this point 
the white settlers maintained a lookout for 
approaching Indians, and it was also a signal 
point during -the revolution. 

Fort George, formerly an amusement resort, 
lies to the east of Broadway, opposite Wash- 



ington Heights, and is quite as historic as 
the latter, altho its historic landmarks have 
been largely obliterated by modern improve- 
ments. At the northeast base of Fort George 
runs the Harlem river speedway, where the 
owners of trotters and pacers used to congre- 
gate on afternoons, prior to the coming of the 
automobile, for lively races, often with large 
sums at stake. There are still a few devotees 
of this sport, but their ranks are thinning. 
The western end of the Speedway is a part of 
Dyckman street. 

Trinity cemetery, at Broadway and 155th 
street, is owned by Trinity church, which 
stands downtown at the head of Wall street. 
The cemetery used to interrupt Broadway at 
this point and the city had difficulty in ob- 
taining the right to build the thorofare thru 
it. Riverside drive, which skirts it on the 
west, was built on a steel viaduct at a large 
cost, to avoid disturbing the graves. 



Northeastern Manhattan and the Bronx 



The Bronx is the name given to the north- 
ernmost borough of New York City. It is 
said to have received its name from the Dutch 
settler Bronck, who located there in the 17th 
century. Formerly it was a country district 
of farm lands and villages, but the growth of 
the city has given it a metropolitan character 
and in certain sections it is already over- 
crowded. Many of the great trees of earlier 
days still remain, however, and old-fashioned 
houses of that ampler period may still be 
seen. It has gardens of great beauty and 
several splendid parks and avenues. 

To reach the northeastern part of Manhat- 
tan and the Bronx there are a number of good 
roads. From Columbus circle the tourist may 
follow either the east or west drives in the 
park, or go up Fifth avenue to 110th street; 
from there it is desirable to use Seventh ave- 



nue to 145th street, turn right over the bridge 
and east, up the hill, to Mott avenue, then 
along the Grand boulevard and concourse to 
Fordham road, turning downhill to the right 
and continuing on Fordham road to Southern 
boulevard and Bronx park. 

Bronx park contains the New York botan- 
ical garden on the north and the New York 
zoological garden to the south. It is of large 
extent, is watered thruout its length by 
the Bronx river and is one of the most beau- 
tiful natural parks in existence. In the 
botanical garden grounds is the original Loril- 
lard mansion and site of the snuff mill where 
the foundation of the family fortune was 
made. Beyond Bronx park to the east lies the 
boulevard known as the Bronx and Pelham 
parkway. This leads to Pelham Bay park on 
the shore of Long Island sound. This park 



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WHERE to STOP in NEW YOW 




covers 1,756 acres and as a public playground 
offers a greater range of facilities for outdoor 
sports than any other park in the city. Dur- 
ing the war the Pelham Bay training station 
of the United States navy was located in 
Pelham Bay park and young men from many 
different parts of the country received their 
training there and went forth from its fields 
to man American ships. From Pelham Bay 



park it is possible to reach City Island, a 
quaint and interesting locality where many 
New Yorkers spend their summer vacation. 

Beyond Pelham Bay park the Pelham park- 
way leads to Pelham Manor, which was the 
seat of Lord Pell, a manorial lord prior to the 
revolution, and is now one of New York's 
most charming suburbs. 



Southern Manhattan 



The most popular route to the Battery is 
via Broadway to Madison square, bearing 
right on 5th Ave. to 9th St. one block before 
Washington park; turn left across Broadway 
to LaFayette St., Wanamaker's store on 
right; turn right and follow LaFayette St., 



bearing right into Center St. past municipal 
buildings on left, and bearing right again 
onto Park Row. At far side of city hall turn 
right onto Main St. and turn next left onto 
Broadway, following same to the Battery. 



Southwestern Brooklyn and Shore Resorts 



Those wishing to go over the Williamsburg 
bridge into southwestern Brooklyn, or to the 
neighborhood of Coney Island, should use the 
above routing to LaFayette St., turning onto 
Delancy, then east over the Williamsburg 
bridge, and right into Taylor street and Bed- 
ford Ave. 

At Bedford avenue and Eastern parkway 
there is an option of routes to Coney Island. 
One is via Bedford avenue and into the Coney 
Island boulevard, at the southeastern end of 
Prospect park. The other is west from Bed- 
ford avenue and eastern parkway into the 
park at the Plaza gate and thru the winding 



drives of the park to the entrance of Coney 
Island avenue. 

To reach Bay Ridge and the Fort Hamilton 
section of Brooklyn the same route may be 
used from Manhattan to LaFayette St., then 
turn left into Canal and over the Manhattan 
bridge into Flatbush avenue; then instead of 
continuing to the Park plaza on the route to 
Coney Island, use Fourth avenue south from 
Flatbush avenue and Hanson place. There is 
also a ferry to the Hamilton avenue section 
from South Ferry (Battery) to Hamilton 
avenue. 



Ferries to All New Jersey 



Tourists bound for New Jersey will find 
numerous ferries crossing vhe Hudson. Most 
of them lead thru shabby streets with rough 
pavements on the Jersey shore, but neverthe- 
less cannot be avoided in going to certain 
towns. The Christopher, Desbrosses and 
Cortlandt street ferries do not lead to desir- 
able thorofares on the Jersey side. The 23rd 



street ferry, to 14th street, Hoboken, is not 
particularly desirable on account of the Jersey 
end, but it may be employed to save time in 
going to Newark and points southwest of 
that city. 

The 42nd street ferry to Weehawken is 
preferable, of the so-called downtown ferries, 
for reaching the Hudson county boulevard, 



3|otel ftfjereaa 

SEVENTH AVENUE NewYork 



124th to 125th Streets . 



Very Accessible. Cool, Comfortable. All 

Outside Rooms. One Block from "L" and 

Subway Station. Surface Cars and Bus 

Line at the Door 

Rooms with Running Water, some with Shower 

Single. $3.00. Double. $4.00 
With Beth, Single, $4.00. Double. $5.00 and up 
Parlor, Bedroom and Bath. $8.00 a day and up 

Large, Cheerful Dining Room at Top of 
Building. Excellent Cuisine. Table d'Hote 
and a la Carte Meals at Moderate Prices 

FINE GARAGE DIRECTLY OPPOSITE 

Telephone 7600 Morningside 



Vt%V 



R. P. L£UB£, Manaocq 



For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page. 

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Newark, Paterson, etc. 

The Fort Lee or 130th street ferry to Edge- 
water, New Jersey, is a desirable ferry for the 
Hackensack district, altho there is but little 
choice between it and the Dyckman Street- 
Englewood ferry. The latter, however, is not 



in operation during the late fall and winter. 
It leads into what is known as the Englewood 
approach, which is a 6 per cent grade, of mod- 
ern vitrified brick, a mile and a quarter up 
the Palisades. Along this winding incline ex- 
cellent views of the Hudson river may be had. 



Lower Manhattan 



The lower section of the island of Manhat- 
tan is known as the financial district and is 
familiarly called "downtown." The majority 
of the great skyscrapers of the city are 
located there and the famous skyline of the 
city is created by the picturesque aspect their 
roofs and towers present to ships coming in. 



The greatest of these artificial "peaks," 
which form the canyons of the most talked of 
commercial district in the world, is the Wool- 
worth building, at Broadway and Park place, 
51 stories high, and rising 750 feet from the 
level of the street, the tallest inhabited struc- 



Lower Manhattan — From an Aeroplane 



For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page. 

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WHERE* STOP in NEW YOW 




ture ever built by man. The Singer building 
is 612 feet from the street surface and 724 feet 
from its basement. 

The Park Row building, opposite the old 
post office, is 552 feet from its foundation to 
flagstaff. The Equitable building, opposite 
Trinity church, is the largest office building, 
in point of floor space, in the world. 

One of the largest structures in this district 
contains more than 20,000,000 cubic feet of 
space. The amount of glass used varies ac- 
cording to the shape of the building, and 
sometimes exceeds 200,000 square feet. In a 
few of the larger ones there are more' than 
thirty- five miles of steam pipes, twenty-five 
miles of plumbing, and seventy-five miles of 
picture molding, and a few have 7,000 doors 
each, and employ more than 12,000 electric 
lights, supplying as many as 4,000 offices and 
housing a population of 12,000 people. 

The effect of this enormous concentration of 
steel in a small area is so strong it frequently 
varies the points of the compasses on boats 
ii the harbor as much as seven degrees. 

In the historic inner harbor off the Battery 
are the famous Statue of Liberty, presented to 
the United States by the French government; 
Ellis Island, where the immigrants land; Gov- 
ernor's Island, the headquarters of the army 
in the east; historic Castle William; and off 
States Island is Robbins Reef lighthouse. 

On the Battery is an interesting and well- 
kept Aquarium, occupying a circular building 
dating from 1812, when it was Fort Clinton, 
used to defend the city against the British; 
later it was Castle Garden, an amusement 
resort, where Lafayette was tendered a recep- 
tion in 1824, and where there were receptions 
to the early presidents, also to the Prince of 
Wales. Jenny Lind sang there under the 
direction of P. T. Barnum, in 1850, and it was 
used as a federal government immigration 
station from 1855 to 1890, when Ellis Island 
was established. 

Near the Battery, at Bowling Green, is a 
new federal custom house, which cost $4,500,- 
000, standing on the site of Fort Amsterdam 
(1620). 

Bowling Green was established as a park by 
the English government in 1732; was the scene 
of a public demonstration against the stamp 



act, 1775; in 1776, when the act was repealed, 
an equestrian statue of King George was or- 
dered from Europe and erected by the citizens 
of New York; following the Declaration of 
Independence it was torn down by them, to 
gether with the surrounding fence, which 
contained miniature crowns. The statue was 
shipped to Litchfield, Conn., molded into 
bullets, and it was estimated that 500 British 
soldiers were killed by them. 

The first Trinity church at the head ot 
Wall street was built in 1697; destroyed by 
fire, rebuilt, torn down and the present struc 
ture erected in 1846. It is the richest church 
society in the United States, and enjoys an 
income from its properties of more than a 
million dollars a year. Many noted men and 
women are buried in its yard, and one of the 
most curious "graves" is that of Charlotte 
Temple, a fictitious character in Mrs. Row 
son's "Tale of Truth," 1790. The Martyrs' 
monument was erected to the American pris 
oners who died in New York prisons in the 
revolution. Captain Lawrence (war of 1812), 
commander of the Chesapeake, who during 
the fight with the Shannon said, "Don't give 
up the sh!p!" Alexander Hamilton and others 
are buried there. 

In the Wall street district the principal 
point of interest is the Stock Exchange, in 
which seats have been sold for more than 
$100,000. There is also the Consolidated Ex 
change at Broad and Beaver streets; the curb 
market, held unsheltered, in Broad street in 
all kinds of weather; the banking house of 
J. P. Morgan; and the sub-treasury, which 
stands upon the site of the old capitol of the 
province, which was later federal government 
hall, where the first congress was held, and 
where Washington took the oath of office, 
April 30, 1789. A statue of him in front of the 
building, rests upon a stone upon whch he 
stood in the building when he was sworn. 

The building is now the greatest repository 
of gold in the world. It is supposed to be self 
protective, and has steel doors with portholes 
and an arsenal within and on the roof is fitted 
with turrets from which guns could be fired 

Further south on Wall street is the National 
city bank in a building which was the old 
federal custom house. Nearby, on Cedar and 
Broadway, is the New York clearing house. 



"The Hotel < 

The CLENI 

"JUST E, 

A hotel distinctively 

desire a quiet home i 

venience and service < 

Rooms 

BATES— Single Room, 

Parlor, Bedr< 

Parlor, Two 

Parlor, Thre 

Exceptional Restaurant 

WRITE FOR BC 



For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page. 

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a&aflWHEBEibSTOP*. NEWY01?KE%lBlfll 



and on Liberty street the' Chamber of Com- 
merce, which dates from 1768. 

At Broad and Pearl streets is Frannce's 
Tavern (restored), where Washington hade 
farewell to his army. 

West street and South street, both starting 
at the Battery, one along the North river and 
the other along the East river, contain the 
wharves and piers, and bind together the 
wholesale and banking district. On South 
street and Coenties slip is the Seamen's insti- 



tute, an interesting sailor's home, which is 
capped by a Titanic lighthouse, a memorial 
to the ill-fated steamship Titanic. 

Further uptown, near the old post office, on 
Broadway* and Vesey street, is St. Paul's 
church (1766), the only church in New York 
dating from the revolution. Among the early 
worshippers were Lord Howe, King George 
IV, when a midshipman, and George Washing- 
ton, who repaired there to attend service after 
taking the oath of office in Wall street. 



North of the City Hall 



In City Hall park are the old city hall, 
considered a fine example of early architec- 
ture; the new municipal building, which low- 
ers above its historic forefather; the Hall of 
Records on Chambers street, and the entrance 
to Brooklyn bridge, opened in 1883, and which 
cost more than $25,000,000. On the east is Park 
Row, which leads into the Bowery at Chatham 
square, several blocks to the north. The 
Bowery was once famed for its dives, but 
has lost much of its former ill repute. Off 
Chatham square is Chinatown, and Pell, Mott 
and Doyers streets always appeal to the vis- 
itor. 

Further north, on Broadway and 10th street, 
is picturesque Grace church, with its open- 
air pulpit. On 14th street and Broadway is 
Cnion square, now largely used as an open- 
a r forum, where divers doctrines are deliv- 
ered. It is a favorite spot with the Socialists. 

To the west of Broadway, at 4th street, is 
Washington square, around which clusters 
the downtown artists' colony of Manhattan, 
and in which is a statue of Garibaldi, the 
shrine of the Manhattan Italians; and Wash- 
ington arch, a creation by Stanford Wlrte. 
This section was originally Captain Robert 
Richard Randall's farm. He left the property, 
now immensely valuable, for the support of 
Sailors' Snug Harbor, a sailors' home on 
Staten Island. It yields a rental of nearly 
$1,000,000 a year. 



East of Broadway, at 8th street, are Bible 
house and Cooper square, where stands the 
Cooper institute. 

Further north, at 23rd street and Broadway, 
is Madison square, containing Madison 
square garden designed by Stanford White 
and capped with a bronze Diana by Saint 
Gaudens; on the east side, also at 25th street, 
is the artistic white building occupied by the 
Appellate division of the New York supreme 
court. At the southwest corner of the square 
is the Flatiron building, one of the early ar- 
chitectural towers of the central business 
section. 

On 29th street, east of 5th avenue, is "The 
Little Church Around the Corner." 

At 34th street and Broadway is Herald 
square with the Herald building, an adapta- 
tion by Stanford White of the town hall of 
Verona. 

Fifth avenue, now said to be the most fash- 
ionable business street in the world, requires 
a directory of its own and several are pub- 
lished, covering it from Washington square 
to 110th street. 

In the newer and upper part of Manhattan 
is Cathedral Heights, facing Cathedral park- 
way (110th street), at the foot of Morningside 
park. The Cathedral of St. John the Divine 
was started by the late Bishop Potter, and is 
designed to be the greatest cathedral in 
America, and will require many more years 
for completion. 



Points of Interest, Hoboken, N. J. 



Hoboken (pop. 74,992, alt. 7 ft.), is situated 
opposite New York City on the Hudson river. 
It contains the docks of some of the great- 



est steamship companies in existence and 
sa'lors of all nations may be seen in its 
streets and by-ways. These sailors have 



Jfourteen €a*t &txttetf) Street 

NEW YORK CITY 

M1TH1N a block of the Plaza entrance to Central Park, with easv 
access to the theatres, clubs and shopping centers, it would be dif- 
ficult to find a situation for the summer months more convenient 
for retirement without separation from daily interests. 

An exclusive place for either temporary or prolonged abode, offering 
every appeal to the most exacting taste; sumptuous in furnishings, unsur- 
passed in cuisine, with the comfort inspiring atmosphere of the modern 
well appointed home. 

For these large, cool, airy rooms, single or en suite, open on all sides, 
special discounts are offered from June to September. 

Plans of the rooms and prices gladly submitted on request. 

EAGER & BABCOCK 



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carried the name and memory of the place 
all over the world. Notwithstanding the 
fact that it is a great port, Hoboken is for 
the most part an orderly place with many 
pretty homes and apartment houses. The 
late Mrs. Hetty Green, the richest woman 
in the world, maintained her principal resi- 
dence in Hoboken for many years, living with 
other tenants in an unpretentious apartment 
house of which she was the owner. 



From the New York side of the river 
Hoboken presents a particular point of inter- 
est in Castle Stevens and the neighboring 
Stevens Institute of Technology. The Castle 
is the old home of the Stevens family and 
the institute was founded and endowed by 
Edwin Stevens, son of the well-known Col 
John Stevens, who, early in the nineteenth 
century, owned the land upon which Hobo 
ken is built and who may be called the 
founder of the town. 



Points of Interest, Jersey City, N. J. 



Jersey City (pop. 293,921, alt. 21 ft.), is the 
county seat of Hudson county, including 
within its present limits are stockaded Dutch 
village of Bergen. The site on which lower 
Jersey City now stands was formerly known 
as Paulus Hook, and a monument has been 
erected commemorating the battle of this 
name, in which Light Horse Harry Lee de- 
feated the British. The city occupies the 
western bank of the Hudson river directly 
opposite the lower part of New York. It 
is the terminus of several railroads and 
steamship lnes and formerly marked the 
end of the Pennsylvania system, but has 
lost that position owing to the building of 
the tunnel under the Hudson, which now 
carries the Pennsylvania trains into the heart 
of New Y r ork. 

Jersey City is a great manufacturing cen- 
ter and has a large foreign colony. It con- 
tains immense mach : ne shops and foundries. 
It also contains one of the largest stock- 
yards in the country. The city's industrial 



plants include those of the American Sugar 
Refitting Co., the Pierre Lorillard Snuff and 
Tobacco Co., the Atlantic and Pacific Tea 
Co., and the Colgate Soap Co. The great 
factory belonging to Colgate's is surmounted 
by an electric clock of such gigant'c size 
that is may be seen for miles in the sur- 
rounding country. It is the largest practical 
clock in the world, larger than Big Ben at 
Westminster in London, larger even than the 
great clock in the Metropolitan Life tower 
in New York City. Its dial measures 38 feet 
in diameter and the minute hand, which 
weighs almost one- third of a ton, moves 2i 
inches every minute. 

Jersey City has a high school capable of 
accommodating 4,000 pupils; a county court 
house, erected at a cost of $900,000; a splen 
did public library building and many beau- 
tiful theatres and churches. Jt has the com 
mission form of city government and is well 
to the fore in all civic matters. 



Points of Interest, Fort Lee, N. J. 



Fort Lee (pop. 6,000, alt. 310 ft.), is one 
of the oldest towns along the Palisades. 
A monument marks the site of the old revo- 
lutionary fort which stood here. Among its 
former residents are numbered Dr. Thomas 
D. English, author of "Ben Bolt," and J. E. 



Brown, the famous American painter of street 
urchins. The studios of many of the prin- 
cipal motion picture companies are located 
at Fort Lee, and it is said to be the second 
largest motion picture center in the United 
States. 



The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fifth Avenue at 82d Street 



For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page. 

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WHERE to STOP in NEW Y0RK 




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orge Hotel 

5tKAve.©28tliSt. 



1000 Rooms 
All With Baths 

Highest Standards 
Moderate Prices 



New York s Ideal Hotel for Tourists 

The Italian Room in the New Million Dollar Annex 
is the Largest, Most Luxurious Lounge in New York 

Superb Cuisine Unexcelled Service Perfect Appointments 

LOCATED IN THE VERY HEART OF THE CITY 

HOTEL GARAGE on 28th Street 

Rates: One Person $2.00 and Up. Two Persons $3.00 and Up 
Parlor, Bedroom and Bath, $5.00 and Upwards 

GEORGE H. NEWTON, Manager Telephone Madison Square 9900 
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THE PARK AVENUE 

HOT 



FAMOUS FOR ITS LIBERAL MANAGEMENT, HOMELIKE 
SURROUNDINGS, EXCELLENT FOOD AND SERVICE, CEN- 
TRAL LOCATION AND CONVENIENCE FOR SHOPPING. 

LARGE ROOMS, COOL IN SUMMER. MORE THAN 150 
AT $2.50 PER DAY WITHOUT BATH, WITH BATH $5.00. 

UNIQUE DINING LOGGIA, OVERLOOKING THE SUNKEN 
PALM GARDEN. THE FINEST ORCHESTRAL MUSIC IN 
NEW YORK DURING MEAL HOURS. 

POPULAR WITH MOTOR- _ 
I STS ON ACCOUNT OF I TS ^ 
AMPLE CURB PARKING x 
SPACE AND CON V EN- 
IENT GARAGE. 

Other Hotels in New York 

Harftrave 72nd Street West 
One Square to Central Park 

George C. Brown, Prop. 




For location of Hotels, see Map on eighth page. 

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City Section Page 99 Route 64 

11.4 0.4 3-corners; bear left, joining: trolley. 

11.7 0.3 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right away from trolley, pass- 

ing cemetery on left just beyond. Cross RRs at Port Reading 
13.1. 
14.4 2.7 Sawyers, store on right. Straight thru. Cross RR 14.6. Thru 
Canda 14.8. Cross RRs 15.0. 

16.3 0.9 Carteret, N. J., end of road. Turn right. 

16.4 0.1 Carteret-Linoleumville Ferry. 

Ferriage, 25-40c; service. 6 a. m. to midnight — every 20 minutes. 
Ferry runs from May 1st to December 1st. 

Leaving ferry, keep ahead. 
16.6 1.2 Linoleumville, N. Y. Straight thru on Richmond Turnpike. 
18.1 1.6 Bulls Head, irregular 4-corners. Straight thru. 

20.3 2.2 West New Brighton. Straight thru with trolley on Richmond 

Turnpike. 

23.4 3.1 Irregular 4-corners at green; bear left with trolley onto Ari- 

etta St. 
23.6 ■ 0.1 Tompkinsville, Arietta & Bay Sts. at far side of green. Meet- 
ing cross-trolley, turn left onto Bay St. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

23.8 0.3 St. George, irregular 4-corners at far side of small green, 

borough hall on left. Bear right away from trolley over RR 
bridge. 
24.1 0.3 Staten Island Ferry. 

Ferriage, 60c, car and driver; passengers, 5c each; service, 15-80 
minutes; running time, 22 minutes. 

24.1 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Battery Park at ferry landing. 

For directions to Columbus Circle, see Route 61. 

Route 64 — New York City, N. Y., to Lakewood and Atlantic 
City, N. J.— 135.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Weehawken. Newark, Elizabeth, Rahway, Perth Amboy, Keyport, Matawan, 
Freehold, Lakewood, Toms River. Oceanville and Pleasantville. 

Pavement to Elizabeth; macadam to Perth Amboy; gravel to South Amboy; pave- 
ment to Matawan; balance gravel and macadam. 

This route runs over city streets to Rahway. then thru a rather poor residential 
section to Perth Amboy; thru a manufacturing district to Matawan and a prosperous 
rolling farming country to Just beyond Adelphia; then thru serub timber areas and 
"the pines" to Lakewood; balance thru wooded section and along the shore of the 
Atlantic ocean. t 

Route 60 furnishes a popular option to Keyport via Staten Island. 

^"'ohtSSr For * Ms and ottier exit s see City Map, bet. pages 9S*-$9. 

Jik^ B pohS Detail Route Map, pages 90-91. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, W. 42nd St— Weehawken Perry. 

Runabouts, 20c. including car, driver and one passenger. Small 
touring cars, Fords, etc., 30c. including driver and three pas- 
sengers. Large touring cars, 40c, including driver and five passen- 
gers. Extra passengers, 3c. 

0.0 0.0 Weehawken, N. J. Leaving ferry, turn left and immediately 
right, joining trolley. 

0.6 0.6 Irregular 4-corners ; bear right away from trolley onto Boule- 
vard East one block. 

0.7 0.1 Left-hand street; turn left onto 5th St. Jog left and right 
across Bergen Ave. trolley 1.2. 

1.8 0.6 North Bergen, 5th St. & Hudson County Blvd. Turn left onto 
Hudson County Blvd. Pass town hall on right 1.6. 

6.5 4.2 Jersey City, Hudson County Blvd. & Newark Ave. 

Straight thru across trolley on Hudson County Blvd. 

6.8 1.8 Right-hand road, park on right; take first right-hand drive. 

7.0 0.2 Circle, fountain in center; curve right three-fourths way 
around same. 

7.4 0.4 Fork; bear left. Bear right onto Communipaw Ave. 7 
leaving park and joining trolley. Cross long iron bridjr 
Hackensack river 8.0, and long iron bridge over Passai 
9.1. Cross RR 10.8. 
i-*4 



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City Section 



Page 101 



Detail Map 




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r 



Route 64 , Page 102 New York 

10.4 3.0 Fork; bear right with branch trolley onto Bowery St Same 

thorofare becomes Fleming Ave. Bear right with trolley 
onto Market St. 10.9. 

12.2 1.8 Newark, Market & Broad Sts. 

Straight thru with trolley on Marjcet St. 

12.5 0.3 Fork at open square; bear left with branch trolley onto 

Springfield Ave., passing court house on right. 

12.6 0.1 5-corners at bank; bear left away from trolley onto High St. 

18.5 0.9 Irregular 4-corners; jog right and immediately left across 

trolley onto Astor St 

18.6 0.1 5-corners, fire sta. on left; bear right onto Frelinghuysen 

Ave. Cross RR 14.5. Same thorofare becomes Newark Ave. 
Bear left with trolley onto N. Broad St 17.8. 

17.8 4.2 Elizabeth,* N. Broad St. & Westfield Aw., P. O. on right. 

Turn right away from trolley onto Westfield Ave. 

18.1 0.3 Cherry St. ; turn left over RR bridge. 

18.3 0.2 Irregular 4-corners ; jog right and immediately left, keeping 

ahead on Cherry St. 
18.5 0.2 End of street; bear right onto Rahway Ave. Cross RR 20.6, 
coming onto St. Georges Ave. 

23.4 4.9 Rahway,* St. Georges & Westfield Aves. Straight thru across 

trolley on St. Georges Ave. Thru West Rahway 24.1. Cross 
RR at Georges Road Sta. 26.8. 

27.2 3.8 Fork, just beyond RR; bear right onto Amboy Ave. 

28.0 0.8 Woodbridge, Amboy Ave. & Green St. Straight thru on 
Amboy Ave. 

* Right on Green St. is Route 62 to New Brunswick. 

81.0 3.0 End of street; turn left onto New Brunswick Ave., across RR 

one block. 

Perth Amboy City Map and Points of Interest, page 89. 

81.1 0.1 First right-hand street ; turn right onto Prospect St. 

81.5 0.4 Perth Amboy, Prospect & Market Sts. r at stores. Turn right 

onto Market St. Cross RR 31.6, joining trolley. 

31.7 0.2 Left-hand road; turn left with trolley. Cross long wooden 

bridge over Raritan bay 31.9. 
83.1 1.4 Left-hand road ; turn left with trolley. 

33.9 0.8 Jog left with trolley and immediately right onto Main St. 
84.1 0.2 South Amboy, Main St. & Stevens Ave. Meeting cross-trol- 
ley, turn left onto Stevens Ave. 

84.5 0.4 Bordentown road; turn right with trolley. 
34.7 0.2 4-corners; turn left with branch trolley onto Pine Ave. 
35.0 0.3 Turn right with trolley and take left-hand road immediately 
beyond. Cross RR at Morgan* 86.6. Cross wooden draw- 

♦Elizabeth, N. J. (pop. 95,682, alt. 40 ft.), # Rahway, N. J. (pop. 11,056, alt. 22 ft.), was 
was once the capital of the province and an founded in 1720. Here lived Abraham Clark, 
important social center. John Ogden is said signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
to have been the first settler and founder. His grave may be seen in the old Presby- 
Among other noted residents of the city were terian cemetery. The New Jersey state re- 
Abraham Clark, signer of the Declaration of formatory is located here on Woodbridge 
Independence; Gen, Jonathan Dayton, for road. Before the civil war Rahway was the 
whom Dayton, Ohio, was named, and Elias second city in the U. S. in carriage building. 
Boudinot, president of continental congress. Today it has many auto body factories. 
Many old homes built prior to the revolu- *Morgan Station, N. J. f was the home of 
tion are still standing. Among these are St. the Morgans of revolutionary fame. There 
John's parsonage at 629 Pearl street; DeHart is an old family cemetery here with head- 
house, 101 Rahwa<y avenue, and Hetfield stones dating back to 1712. This district 
house, near the Elizabeth river. Gen. Win- was the scene of great excitement in 19ff, 
field Scott lived at 1106 Jersey street. Gouv- caused by the explosions and fire which 
erneur Mansion, on Broad street, is where practically destroyed the great T. A. Gillespie 
Washington Irving wrote "Salmagundi." The shell plant, the largest shell loading plant in 
chief industries of Elizabeth are the Singer the world, owned and operated by the U. S. 
Sewing Machine Co., Bethlehem Ship Build- government. Endless streams of men, women 
' corporation, Standard Oil Co., Simons and children streamed down the Lincoln 
and the Willys Corp. highway here in their flight for safety. 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



City Section Page 103 Route 64 

bridge 36.7, joining trolley. Cross RR 38.7. Cross wooden 
drawbridge 39.8 — now on Front St. % 

40.1 5.1 Keyport, Front St. & Broadway. 

Straight ahead 0.5 mile leads to center of town, and is Route 60 to 
Lakewood. 

Turn right with branch trolley onto Broadway. 
40.4 0.8 5-corners; bear right with trolley. Cross RR at sta. 41.5. 
42.0 1.6 Matawan, church on left. Straight thru with trolley. Cross 

RR at Matawan Sta. 42.8. Thru Morganville 45.9. Cross 

RR at Wickatunk 46.8. 

49.2 7.2 Marlboro, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 

53.4 4.2 Freehold,* E. Main & South Sts., at open square. 

Turn left onto South St. Cross RR 53.5. Pass Freehold 

military school on right 53.8. 
66.8 3.4 Adelphia, right-hand road, P. O. on right. Turn right. 
. Same thorofare becomes Madison Ave. 

'Freehold, N. J. (pop. 3,800, alt. 167 ft.), has night before the battle of Monmouth (June, 
of historic interest the Hankinson house, in . 1778). The battlefield lies only two miles dis- 
which Sir Henry Clinton and staff spent the tant. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, LAKEWOOD, N. J. 

Lakewood (pop. 6,150, alt. 54 ft.) is a pop- . the midst of pine forests close to two beauti- 

.... . . ful lakes, has a famous golf club, and is the 

ular resort town, its principal seasons being . . t ,~ n „ . , 

' location of Georgian Court," the property of 

the fall,- winter and spring. It is situated in George J. Gould. 



laurel = in =tfje=$meg 



THE TOURING CENTER OF THE 

NEW JERSEY SEABOARD 

Excellent roads connect with the north 

m>ire -rai? v ^i« » ftfTV n via New York J with the south and 

. OPEN THE YEAR BOUND west via Philadelphia. Unsurpassed 

cuisine. Chauffeurs' quarters. 

Lakewood New lersev 0pm the ye " around - 

i^aitcwooa, ncw jersey FRANK F SHUTE Manager 



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Route 64 Page 104 New York City Sec. 

66.2 \4 Lakewood, Madison Ave. & Main St., Lake Carasaljo ahead 
on right. Straight thru (south) on Madison Ave. 
Pass Lake Carasaljo on right 66.4. Cross RR 66.5. 

76.1 9.9 Toms River.* Straight thru across iron bridges, 

76.2 0.1 Fork, just beyond RR; bear left along same. 

76.5 0.3 Fork of three roads; bear left onto Atlantic City Blvd. 

Cross RRs 76.8-77.4, 

86.6 9.1 Forked River, P. 0. on right. Straight thru. 

Cross RRs 86.6-88.1. Thru Waretown 89.1. 
92.8 6.7 Barnegat Straight thru. Cross RR 93.2. 

96.8 4.5 Manahawkin, 3-corners. Bear right. 

Left leads to Beach Haven. 

96.9 0.1 Fork of three roads, just beyond stone bridge; bear left 

Thru Cedar Run 97.6 and Mayetta 98.4, straight thru. 
Caution for RR 99.5-100.4. Thru West Creek 101.3, Parker- 
town 102.4 and Tuckerton* 104.8. 

105.2 8.3 Fork, water trough in center; bear right. Cross iron draw- 
bridge over Bass river 110.5. 

111.0 5.8 New Gretna, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

111.7 0.7 Left-hand road; turn left. Follow narrow gravel road over 
the marshes. Cross long iron bridge 114.2. Pass soldiers' 
monument on right 115.0. 

116.6 4.9 Left-hand road; turn left. 

Straight ahead before this turn leads to Egg Harbor. 

117.7 1.1 Port Republic irregular 4-corners. Bear left. 

118.8 0.6 Left-hand road; turn left. 
122.2 3.9 Oceanville. Straight thru. 

*Toms River, N. J. (pop. 3',000, alt. 15 ft.), numerous large poultry farms are located 

the capital of Ocean county, is a pretty sum- here. 

mer resort. During the revolution this town *Tuckerton, N. J. (pop. 1,500, alt. 23 ft.), 

supplied the continental army with quanti- is a famous fishing resort, noted for its sea 

ties cf salt. It was burned by the British in foods. Lake Pohatcong is situated in the 

17fP. The cultivation of cranberries is car- center of town. The highest radio station in 

ried on to a great extent in this section, and America is located here. 



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Page 105 

don Hall 

ATLANTIC CITY 

ALWAYS OPEN " 

RIGHT ON THE BEACH AND THE BOARDWALK 

Atlantic City, with its surf bathing, golfing and yachting, and 
its thousand and one shops and amusements along the Board- 
walk, is the mecca of 10,000,000 seekers of rest and recreation 
every year. 

For forty years Haddon Hall has been Home to people of cul- 
ture and refinement from every section of the country. Free 
from ostentation. Quiet and comfortable. Perfect service and 
appointments. Rooms are large and sunny. Hot and cold salt 
sea water in every room. Salt sea air at every window. 

Haddon Hall is Home 
Make reservations — write for illustrated folder 

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Route 64 Page 106 New York 

128.5 1.8 Sea View, at golf grounds. Straight thru on Shore Blvd. 
125.9 2.4 Absecon,* 3-corners. Bear left. Caution for RRs 126.0-128.8. 

Left at Absecon is new boulevard to Atlantic City. 

128.4 2.5 Pleesantville* Main & Washington Sts., P. 0. on left. Keep 
ahead on Main St. Caution for RRs at sta. 128.5. 



N. J. (pop. 850, alt. 25-30 ft.), it 
the site of an old Indian mint where wampum 
was extensively manufactured. Its name, 
meaning "Place of Swans," was given on 
account of the flocks of these birds which, in 
the early days, frequented the place. It is 
a shipping center for clams and oysters. 
The Seaview golf club is located near the 
city limits. 
•Pleaaantvflle, N. J. (pop. 6,000, alt. 30 to 



70 ft.), is a residence city for Philadelphia and 
Atlantic City business and professional men. 
Among its local points of interest are the 
county almshouse and asylum, the Seaview 
golf club, completed at a cost of half a million 
dollars, and the Atlantic City, country club, 
noted all over the United States for its 
wonderful year round golf links. Twelve 
miles north of the city on the New York road 
is the site of the battle of Chestnut Hill, 
now marked by a statue. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 
Atlantic City (permanent pop. 50,682, alt. 
sea level), known throughout the world as an 
all-the-year resort, is situated upon Abse- 
con island off the Jersey coast, with an un- 
rivalled location because of its proximity to 
the large eastern centers of population. Mo- 
torists visit the. seashore metropolis by tens 
of thousands in all seasons of the year. 

For six miles along one of the finest bath- 
ing beaches on the Atlantic seaboard extends 
the world-famed boardwalk, 60 feet wide, 
topped with planking and built upon a steel 
and concrete foundation, where promenade 
health and recreation -seeking delegates from 
all parts of America and many foreign climes. 
There are four great piers varying in length 
from 1,000 to 3,000 feet, with auditoriums and 
all kinds of amusement enterprises. The 
shops of the boardwalk are one of its most 
attractive features. 
Other attractions include two country clubs, 
-here golf is played throughout the year; 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. ^ 

yachting, fishing, concerts and swimming 
tournaments in one of the finest indoor pools 
in the country. The city is reached by three 
boulevards from the mainland, and the fa- 
vorite drives for motorists are numerous, in- 
cluding the run to Longport on Egg Harbor 
Inlet. Ocean City may be reached by a bridge 
across the harbor to Somers Point. Pacific 
avenue, one of the principal streets, is known 
as the "boulevard of a thousand chauffeurs" 
because the cars come from many states. 

Absecon lighthouse, 170 feet high, is well 
worth a visit. So are the coast guard sta- 
tions. Atlantic City has 1,200 hotels and 
boarding houses to meet every purse, and en- 
tertains 20,000,000 people annually, the tran- 
sient population reaching 400,000 in August 
and never being less than 50,000. The Easter 
season brings 200,000. Climate made equable 
by the gulf stream makes the city much 
warmer than New York or Philadelphia in 
the winter and weather records show 62 per 
cent sunshine. 

Digitized byLjOOQlC 



City Section Page 107 Route 65 

128.6 0.2 Atlantic City Blvd.; turn left away from trolley. 
Cross long iron bridge 133.2— now on Albany Ave, 

188.3 4.7 Ventnor Ave.; turn left, coming onto Atlantic Ave. at monu- 
ment. { 

135.1 1.8 ATLANTIC CITY, Atlantic & N. Carolina Aves., Pennsyl- 
vania sta. on left. 

Route 65— Atlantic City and Lakewood, N. J., to New York 
City, N.Y.— 135.1m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via. Pleasantvllle, Oceanville, Toms River, Lakewood, Freehold, Matawan, Keyport, 
Perth Amboy, Rahway, Elizabeth, Newark and Weehawken. . 

Gravel and macadam to Lakewood; gravel to Matawan; pavement to South Amboy; 
gravel to Perth Amboy; macadam to Elizabeth; balance pavement. 

The route runs along the shore of the ocean and thru a wooded section to Lake- 
wood; then eight miles thru "the pines" and scrub timber sections, followed by a 
prosperous rolling country as far as* Matawan. From- there to Perth Amboy it runs 
thru a manufacturing district, and then thru rather a poor residential section Into 
/-MILEAGE— * Rahway; balance over city streets. 

»-^i BlS^L * Route 61 furnishes a popular option from Perth Amboy to New 

MIImm PoSST York via staten Jpland. 

0.0 0.0 ATLANTIC CITY, Atlantic & N. Carolina Aves., Pennsyl- 
vania sta. on right. Go west on Atlantic Ave. 

1.6 1.6 Fork, monument in center; keep right away from trolley onto 
Ventnor Ave. 

1.8 0.2 Albany Ave.; turn right. Cross long iron bridge 2.0, coming 
onto Atlantic City Blvd. 

6.6 4.7 End of boulevard; meeting trolley, turn right onto Main St. 

Caution for RRs at sta. 6.6. 

6.7 0.2 Pleasantville, Main & Washington Sts., bank and P. O. on 

right. Straight thru on Main St. Caution for RRs 6.8-9.2. 

Points of Interest, opposite page. 

9.2 2.5 Absecon. Bear right onto Shore Blvd. 

Points of Interest, opposite page. 

11.6 2.8 Sea View, at golf grounds. Straight thru. 

12.9 1.4 Oceanville. Straight thru. 

13.3 0.4 Fork of three roads, church at right; keep middle road. 
16.8 8.5 End of road; turn, right. 

17.4 0.6 Port Republic, irregular 4-corners. Bear right. 

18.5 1.1 End of road; turn right. 

Left leads to Egg Harbor City. 

Turn right across long iron bridge 20.9. Follow narrow 
road over marshes. 

28.4 4.9 End of road; turn right with poles. 

24.1 0.7 New Gretna, P. O. on right. Straight thru. Cross iron draw- 

bridge over Bass river 24.6. Thru Tuckerton* 30 JB» 

Thru Parkertown 32.7 and West Creek 38.8. Caution for RRs 

84.7-85.6. Thru Mayetta 36.7 and Cedar Run 87.3. 

88.2 14.1 Irregular 4-corners. Bear right across small stone bridge. 

38.8 0.1 Manahawkin, 3-corners. 

Right leads to Beach Haven. 

Bear left, avoiding right-hand diagonal road just beyond. 
Cross RR 41.9. Thru Barnegat 42.8. Thru Waretown 46.0. 

49.5 11.2 Forked River, irregular 4-corners. Straight thru. 
55.4 5.9 Fork; bear left. Cross RRs 57.7-58.2. 

58.9 3.5 End of road; turn right across RR at sta. 
59.0 0.1 Toms River,* bank on right. Straight thru. 

Right leads to Seaside Park. 

•TuckeVton, N. J. (pop. 1,500, alt. 23 ft.), is mer resort. During the revolution this town 
• famous fishing resort, noted for its sea supplied the continental army with quanti- 
f#ods. Lake Pohatcong is situated in the ties of salt. It was burned by the British in 
center of town. The highest radio station in 1782. The cultivation of cranberries is car- 
America fcjocated here. ried On to a!' great extent in this section, a 

♦Toms HWer, #1. J. (pop. 3,000, alt. 15 ft.), numerous large poultry farms are 1 

the capftafc of Ocean county, is a pretty sum- here. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Route 65 Page 108 New York 

60.1 1.1 Forkr cemetery in center; keep left. 

61.2 1.1 Fork; bear right. Cross RR 68.4. Pass Lake Manetta on left 

68.5 and Lake Carasaljo on left 68.7. 

Right on Main St. at 68.8 leads to Point Pleasant. 
Lake wood City Map and Points of Interest, page 106. 

68.9 7.7 Lakewood, Madison Ave. & 2nd St. Straight thru (north) 
on Madison Ave. 

78.8 9.4 Adelphia, end of road, P. 0. on right. Turn left. 

78.9 0.6 Fork; bear right with poles and travel. Same thorofare be- 

comes South St. Pass Freehold Military School on left 81.3. 
Cross RR 81.6. 

81.7 2.8 Freehold,* South & E. Main Sts., at court house. Turn right 

onto E. Main St. 
81.9 0.2 Fork; bear left with E. Main St. 

85.8 3.9 Marlboro, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

Cross RR at Wickatunk 88.2. Thru Morganville 89.1. Cross 

RR at Matawan Sta. 92.8, joining trolley. 
93.1 7.8 Matawan, church on right. Straight thru with trolley. Crosa 

RR at sta. 93.6. 
94.7 1.6 5-corners; bear left with trolley onto Broadway. 
95.0 0.3 Keyport, Broadway & Front St. 

Right on Front St., 0.5 mile, leads to center of town. 

Meeting cross-trolley, turn left onto Front St. Cross wooden 
drawbridge 95.3. Cross RR at Morgan* 98.5. 

100.1 5.1 End of road; jog right and immediately left with trolley onto 

Pine Ave. 
100.4 0.3 Diagonal 4-corners; meeting cross-trolley, turn right onto 

Bordertown road. 
100.6 0.2 Stevens Ave.; turn left with trolley. 

Perth Am boy City Map and Points of Interest, page 89. 

101.0 0.4 South Amboy, Stevens Ave. & Main St. Meeting cross-trol- 
ley, turn right onto Main St. 

101.2 0.2 End of street, church on left; jog left and immediately right . 

with trolley. 
102.0 0.8 End of road; turn right with trolley. Cross long wooden 

bridge over Raritan bay 102.2. 
103.4 1.4 End of road; turn right with trolley onto Market St. Cross 

103.5 and keep ahead two blocks. 
103.6 0.2 Perth Amboy, Market & Prospect Sts., stores on left. 

Straight ahead is Route 61 at mileage 66.2 to New York. 

Turn left onto Prospect St. 

104.0 0.4 End of street; turn left across RR one block. 

104.1 0.1 First right-hand street; turn right onto Amboy Ave. 

107.1 3.0 Woodbridge, Amboy Ave. & Green St. Straight thru on Am- 
boy Ave. 
Cross RR 108.1 and RR at Georges Road sta. 108.3 — now on 

•Freehold, N. J. (pop. 3,800, alt. 167 ft.), has stones dating back to 1712. This district 

of historic interest the Hankinson house, in was the scene of great excitement in 1918, 

which Sir Herny Clinton and staff spent the caused by the explosions and fire which 

night before the battle of Monmouth (June, practically destroyed the great T. A. Gillespie 

1778), The battlefield lies only two miles dis- shell plant, the largest shell loading plant in 

tant. the world, owned and operated by the U. S. 

"Morgan Station, N. J., was the home of government. Endless streams of men, women 

the Morgans of revolutionary fame. There and children streamed down the Lincoln 

is an old family cemetery here with head- highway here in their flight for safety. 



SDCDNY 

» REG. U*. PM. OFF. 

MOTOR GASOLINE 



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City Section 



Page 109 



Route 65 



St. Georges road. Thru West Railway 111.0. 

111.7 4.6 Railway,* St. Georges & Westfield Aves. 

Straight thru across trolley on St. Georges Ave. Cross RR 
114.5. 
116.6 4.9 Left-hand road; turn left onto Cherry St. 

116.8 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; jog right and immediately left, keeping 

ahead on Cherry St. 
117.0 0.2 Westfield Ave., just beyond RR bridge; turn right. 

Left on Morris ^ve. at 117.2 is Route 66 to Morrlstown. 

117.3 0.3 Elizabeth,* Westfield Ave. & N. Broad St. P. O. on left. 
Meeting trolley, turn left onto N. Broad St., bearing right 
with trolley at soldiers' monument just beyond. 

117.8 0.5 Fork; bear right with branch trolley onto Newark Ave. Same 

thorof are becomes Frelinghuysen Ave. Cross RR 120.6. 

121.5 3.7 5-corners at fire sta. ; bear left onto Astor St. 

Detail Route Map, pages 100-101. 

121.6 0.1 Irregular 4-cornere; jog right and immediately left across 

trolley onto High St. 
122.5 Q.9 5-corners, bank on left; meeting trolley, bear right onto. 
Springfield Ave. Bear right at open square onto Market St. 
122.6. 

122.9 0.4 Newark, Market & Broad Sts. Straight thru with trolley on 

Market St. 

123.3 0.4 Keep straight ahead with trolley on Market St., under Penn- 
sylvania RR at sta. 

124.2 0.9 Fork; bear left with trolley onto Fleming Ave. Same thoro- 
f are becomes Bowery St. 124.6. CrosS RR 124.8. Cross long 



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Route 66 Page 110 New York 

184.4 0.6 End of street; turn left and immediately right downgrade. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

185.1 0.7 Weehawken, N. J., at ferry landing. Take ferry across Hud- 
son river. 

Runabouts, 20c, Including- car, driver and one passenger. Sma.ll 
touring cars (Fords, etc.), 30c, including driver and three passen- 
gers. Large touring cars, 40c, including driver and five passengers. 
Extra passengers, 3c. 

135.1 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, 42nd St., at ferry landing. 

Route 66— New York City, N. Y., to Morristown, N. J. — 

26.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via St. George, Staten Island, Howland Hook, Elizabeth, Springfield and Madison. 
Pavement and asphalt macadam all the way. 

The road along the north shore of Staten Island passes many ship yards and manu - 
facturing plants, then thru suburbs and country residential districts; a very attractive 
drive and a very good connection. 

See Route 60 for directions from Columbus Circle to Staten Island ferry. 

Route 67 furnishes an excellent option via 42d St ferry and Montclair. 

^mileage-. For this and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

Total Betwee? Detail Route Map, pages 90-91. 

■Hiraoft Points 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Staten Island ferry. 

Ferriage, 60c, car and driver; passengers, 5o each. Service 16-30 
minutes; running time, 22 minutes. 

Prom ferry landing, jog left and immediately right upgrade. 
* 0.8 0.8 St. George, irregular 4-corners at statue, borough hall on 

right. Meeting trolley, turn sharp right onto Richmond 

terrace. 
. 1.2 0.9 New Brighton, sta. on right. Straight thru with trolley. 

Sailors' Snug Harbor on left 2.0. 

Avoid right-hand road where trolley leaves 2.8, coming onto 
Delafield place. 

2.4 1.2 End of street; turn right onto Davis Ave. 

2.5 0.1 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Richmond 

terrace. 
8.8 1.8 End of road; meeting cross-trolley, turn right onto Jewett 
Ave. Cross RR at Port Richmond Sta. 3.9. 

4.0 0.2 Port Richmond,* irregular 4-corners. Straight thru with 

trolley on Richmond terrace. 
5.5 1.5 Mariners Harbor, bank on left. Straight thru with trolley 
across switch. Cross RR at Howland Hook, N. Y., 6.8. 

7.1 1.6 Howland Hook-Elizabethport Ferry. 

Ferriage, 20c, car and driver. Service every 20 minutes. 

Leaving ferry, keep ahead on E. Jersey Ave., joining trolley. 
7.8 0.2 1st St. ; meeting cross-trolley, turn left three blocks. 
,7.4 0.1 Marshall St.; turn right away from trolley. Cross RR 7.8. 

8.4 1.0 End of street; turn left onto High St. 

8.5 0.1 Diagonal 4-corners, monument in open square; meeting trol- 

ley, turn right onto Elizabeth Ave. 

9.2 0-.7 Irregular 4-corners at court house; meeting cross-trolley, turn 

right onto Broad St. 

9.6 0.4 Fork of three roads, betwen RR underpasses; take center 

road, keeping ahead on Broad St. 

9.7 0.1 Elizabeth, N. J., Broad St. & Westfield Ave., P. O. on left. 

Turn left (west) onto Westfield Ave. one block. 

9.8 0.1 Diagonal 4-corners; meeting trolley, bear right onto Morris 

Ave. Thru Union 13.3. 
15.6 5.8 Springfield, church on right. Straight thru with trolley. 

•Port Richmond, L. I. (pop. about 20,000), who frequently was a guest of the Winants, 

has a number of interesting old buildings, (lied here in !836. The name of the hotel has 

among them the old Port Richmond hotel, bee " " hanged . many t tim j es ; Th . e bu | ldin S 

itself is materially altered from its original 
s the private residence of the Winant form< It standg on the site of the revolu . 

after the revolution. Aaron Burr, tionary Fort Decker. 



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City Section Page 111 Route 6Y 

16.6 1.0 Fork; bear right away from trolley. 

18.0 1.4 Brantwood. Straight thru. 

20.1 2.1 Chatham, store on right. Straight thru with trolley. 
22v2 2.1 Madison, bank on left. Keep ahead with trolley. 

22.4 0.2 Fork, water trough in center; bear left away from trolley 

under RR. 
22.9 0.5 Fork; bear left with travel. 

Morrlstown City Map and Points of Interest, page 113. 

28.3 0.4 S-corners; bear right. Bear left onto Madison St. 25.3. Bear 

right onto South St. 26.1. 
26.9 8.6 MORRISTOWN, South & Market Sts., park on right. 

Route 67— New York City, N. Y., to Morristown, N. J. — 

34.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Weehawken, Jersey City. Belleville turnpike, Bloomfield, Montclalr, Caldwell, 
Parslppany and Morris Plains. Pavement and macadam roads. 

Over city streets practically all the way to Montclalr, then thru rolling farming 
country and residential districts 

On account of the very rough condition of Newark Ave. .and John St., motorists are 
advised to use Route 64 to Newark and then Route 70 to Montclalr. 

'" l,IL Dhu5w For tWs and other exits see Cit y Ma P» bet - P a & es 98*99. 

J t «* 1 ■y 1 *? 1 Detail Route Map, pages 100-101. 

Vifaffe Point* # r> r- o 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, W. 42nd St— Weehawken Perry. 

Runabouts, 20c, including' car, driver and one passengrer. Small 
touring- cars (Fords, etc.). 30c, Including driver and three passengers. 
Lance touring cars, 40c, Including: driver and five passengers. Intra 
passengers, So. 

0.0 0.0 Weehawken, N. J. Leaving ferry, turn left and immediately 

right, joining trolley. 
0.5 0.6 Irregular 4-corners ; bear right onto Blvd. E. 
0.6 0.1 Left-hand street; turn left onto 5th St. Jog left and light 

across Bergen Ave. trolley 1.1. 

1.2 0.6 North Bergen, 5th St. & Hudson County Blvd. Turn left onto 

Hudson County Blvd. 

6.3 4.1 Jersey City, Hudson County Blvd. & Newark Ave. 

Straight ahead on Hudson County Blvd. is Route 64 to Newark and 
Atlantic City. 

Meeting trolley, turn right onto Newark Ave. Cross RRs 
5.6-7.8. 
7.5 2.2 Right-hand diagonal road; hear right across trolley onto 
Belleville turnpike. Cross RRs 7.7-8.5-9.1. Thru 4-corners 
11.8, crossing iron hridge over Passaic river just heyond. 
Cross RR 11.6. 

11.7 4.2 Belleville,* Rutgers St. & Washington Ave. Meeting trolley, 

turn left onto Washington Ave. one block. 

11.8 0.1 John St., town hall on left; turn right away from trolley. 

12.9 1.1 Fork; bear left onto Belleville Ave., passing hospital on right 

just beyond. 

14.4 1.5 Bloomfield, Belleville Ave. & Broad St., school on left. Keep 

ahead on Belleville Ave. Thru 4-corners 15.0, bearing right 
onto Glenridge Ave. just beyond. 
15.9 1.5 Montclair,* Glenridge Ave., Fullerton St. & Bloomfield Ave. 
Bear right onto Bloomfield Ave., joining trolley. Pass munici- 
pal building on right 16.1. 

•Belleville, N. J. (pop. 14,500, alt. 20-120 ft.). from New York. The street on which this 

Here, on the Belleville turnpike, may be seen church is located was the route taken by 

*n old copper mine opened prior to the revo- Washington's army in its retreat thru Jersey, 

lotion. This mine was discovered thru a The engine for Robert Fulton's steamboat 

•lave of Colonel Schuyler. The old colonial "Clermont" wat built in Belleville on Mill 

house of the latter is still in fairly good con- atr«et. 

ditto* and is located on the Passaic river 'Montclalr, N. J. (pop. 28,810, alt. 341 ft.), 

near Belleville. The Dutch Reformed church, one of New York's most charming suburbs, 

tie first charge of the Rev. T. Dewitt Tal- contains many beautiful homes. A state 

**!*, may also be seen as you cross the normal school and military academy are 

PsjasJt fiver over the Belleville turnpike located here. 



r 

Route 68 Page 112 New York 

17.8 1.9 Vernon, bank on right. Straight thru with trolley on Bloom- 

field Ave. 

19.6 1.8 Caldwell,* Bloomfield & Roseland Aves., bank on right. 

Straight thru with trolley on Bloomfield Ave. 

19.9 0.3 Fork; bear right with trolley. 

20.7 0.8 Irregular 4-corners, church on right; bear left, passing school 

on right. 
23.6 2.9 Pine Brook. Straight thru downgrade. 
27.6 8.9 Left-hand road, Boonton reservoir on right; turn left. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 70 at mileage 80.0 to 
Dlngmens Ferry. 

28.0 0.5 Parsippany, edge of town. Straight thru. 

31.6 8.6 Forest Park. Straight thru. 

82.2 0.6 Morris Plains, just beyond sta. Bear left, joining trolley. 

Same thorofare becomes Speedwell Ave. 

34.4 2.2 Irregular 4-corners at park; bear right with trolley onto 

Park place. 

34.5 0.1 MORRISTOWN, Park place, Washington & Bank Sts. 

Route 68— Newark, N. J., to Delaware Water Gap, Pa. — 

69.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Springfield, Madison, Morristown, Mendham, Chester, Hackettstown, and Dela- 
ware. First 57.0 miles asphalt and macadam, then 7.0 miles gravel, balance (5.3 miles) 
macadam. 

Thru suburban and country residential districts to Morristown; farming country 
to Great Meadow, rolling toward Hackettstown, gradually becoming hilly. From 
Great Meadow to Bridgeville, the road follows the Delaware river, becoming more 
scenic as the Gap is approached. The route as a whole is a very scenic and attractive 
one. 
s-MILEAGE-> 

T»tai Behmii For this an( * other exits see City Map, page 100. 

Mlleais Points 

0.0 0.0 NEWARK, Market & Broad Sts. Go west with trolley on 
Market St. 

0.3 0.3 Fork; bear left with branch trolley onto Springfield St., pass- 
ing court house on right. 

0.4 0.1 Diagonal 4-corners, bank on left; bear left away from trolley 
onto High St. 

1.3 0.9 End of street; meeting troltey, turn right onto Clinton Ave. 
1.6 0.3 Fork of three streets ; keep ahead wih trolley on Clinton Ave. 

% Cross RR 2.Q. 

3.8 2.2 6-corners ; bear left with trolley onto Springfield Ave. Avoid 
right-hand diagonal streets 4.3-5.4. 

6.4 2.6 Vauxhall,~fork; trolley leaves to right. Keep left on Spring- 

field Ave. 
8.3 1.9 Springfield, church on right. Straight thru with trolley. 
9.3 1.0 Fork; bear right away from trolley. 

10.7 1.4 Brantwood. Straight thru. Thru Chatham 11.8. 
14.9 4.2 Madison, bank on left. Keep ahead with trolley. 

15.1 0.2 Fork, water-trough in center; bear left away from trolley 

under RR. 

15.6 0.5 Fork; bear left with travel. 

19.6 4.0 Morristown, South & Market Sts., park on right. Straight 

thru (west) coming onto Washington St. 
26.4 6.8 Mendham, traffic lamp in center. Straight thru. 

31.3 4.9 5-corners; turn left (not sharp left) with travel. 
32.0 0.7 Chester, 5-corners at stores. Straight thru. 

32.2 0.2 Fork; keep right. Cross RR 32.5. 

•Caldwell, N. J. (pop. 5,000, alt. 650 ft.), was by Bret Harte, called "Caldwell of Spring- 
named for the "fighting parson" of Eliza- field " Grover Cleveland was born in Cald- 

. x . xt t • « *• j .. n well in a large white house now owned by 

beth, N. J., in revolutionary days, the Rev. ., ~. . . .. ., - . , . 

the Cleveland birthplace memorial atsocia- 
James Caldwell, pastor of the Presbyterian tion# It contains some memorabilia of Mr. 
church. He was the subject of a poem Cleveland. 



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City Section 



Page 113 



Route *> 



36.7 



Turn right. Cross RR at sta. 36.1 
Caution for sharp right curv'e 37.1 



4.5 Long Valley, 4-corners. 
ascending steep grade. 
Thru Schooleya 39.2. 

Hackensack City Map and Points of interest, page 134. 

48.2 . 6.5 Hackettstown,* Main, High & Hope Sts. & Grand Ave. a 
open space. Keep ahead onto Hope St. Cross RR at sta. 43.5 
Fork; bear right. Thru Vienna 47.1. 

3-corners; bear left. Cross RR 48.1. Thru Great Meadow 
48.3. Avoid right-hand road 48.6. 
Buttzville, irregular 4-corners. Turn right. 
Fork; bear left. Thru Bridgeville 55.9. 
Caution — right-hand road; turn right upgrade. Thru diag 
onal 4-corners 57.9. 

End of road ; jog right under RR and next left. 
Delaware, N. J., left-hand road, wooden church on left. Tun 
left under RR. 
61.6 0.1 Right-hand road, wooden school on right; turn right. Cros 

long iron bridge over Delaware river., New Jersey-Pennsy] 

vania state line 62.5 — toll 25c. 



44.2 

47.7 


1.0 
3.5 


54.7 
54.8 
57.7 


7.0 
0.1 
2.9 


61.0 
61.5 


3.3 
0.5 



'Hackettstown, N. J. (pop. about 3,000), one* 
of the oldest towns in the state, stands on 
'•n eminence with the Musconetong valley 



stretching away from its feet to the Delawar 
river. It has a large state fish hatchery, sill 
mills, several factories and is the site of th< 
Centenary colleeiate institute for orirls. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 
Morristown (pop. 13,033, alt. 404 ft.) con- 
tains the handsome homes of many New 
York business men. Historically speaking, 
it is very interesting. The site of Fort Non- 
sense, constructed by Washington, stands 
near the center of town, a steep eminence. 
Twice during the revolutionary war Morris - 
town was the headquarters of Washington. 
Colonel Ford House, known at "Headquar- 



MORRISTOWN, N. J. 

ters," occupied during the winter of 17784 

is still standing. 

Morristown is regarded as the cradle 
electric telegraph, as here was made the fit 
practical application of Morse's in v en tic 
Here also was manufactured part of the n 
chinery use in "Savannah," the first stei 
vessel to cross the ocean. At Greystone pai 
just a short distance from Morristown, is t 
New Jersey state hospital for the insane. 



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wte 69 Page 114 New York 

62.8 1.2 End of road; turn right. Cross RRs 64.2-64.3. 

64.7 1.9 Portland, Pa., RR on right. Straight thru with trolley. 
66.4 1.7 Slateford, P. 0. on right. Straight thru with trolley. 

69.9 3.5 DELAWARE WATER GAP, at small green. 



Route 69 — Delaware Water Gap, Pa., to Port Jervis, 

N.Y.-39.8m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Shawnee-on-the-Delaware, Bushkin, Dlngmana Ferry and Mllford. First 7 
miles gravel; shale to Milford; concrete to Port Jervis. 

A very pretty drive along the Delaware river, winding between the bluffs and river. 
<-mileage-^ Caution must be used on all curves as the road Is very winding and 
~~~ rather narrow. 

Note (a) furnishes a better option to Bushkill via East Stroudsburg/. 



Distance 
Total Between 
Mlleue p«int> 



0.0 0.0 DELAWARE WATER GAP, at green, 
downgrade. 



Go west with trolley 




Delaware 

Water Gap 

Pa. 



THE WTDMOBIIE BLUE BOOK HilCa 



POINTS OF INTEREST. DELAWARE WATER GAP, PA. 



Delaware Water Gap (pop. 600) is a popular 
resort visited by thousands of pleasure- seek- 
ers annually. While the altitude at the sta- 
tion is only 296 ft., the water gap is from 
600 to 1,100 ft. above sea level at the resort 
hotels. Formed by the Delaware river as it 
breaks thru the Kittatinny ridge, the Gap is 
walled in on both sides by mountains 1,600 
ft. high. The gorge is about 2 miles long 



and so narrow as to scarcely leave room for 
the river and the railway. Geologists believe 
that the unusual formation is the result of a 
large lake overflowing its bounds. This lake 
probably covered most of the country above 
the Gap. Many short trips may be taken 
hereabouts, including the ascent of Tammany 
mountain, Winona cliff, Eureka falls, Sunset 
hill, Lovers' retreat, etc. 



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City Section Page 116 Route 69 

0.2 0.2 Right-hand road; turn right away from trolley. 

0.7 0.5 Right-hand road; turn right. Cross RRs 1.1. 

1.2 0.5 Right-hand road; turn right across iron bridge. 

1.4 0.2 N. Water Gap, store on right. Straight thru under RR. 

Avoid left-hand road 1.5. 

2.2 0.8 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

3.3 1.1 Shawnee-on-the-Delaware,* irregular 4-corners, assembly 

hall on far right. Turn left upgrade on winding narrow road. 

7.5 42 End of road; just beyond RR; turn right 

12.3 4.8 Bushkill, Pa.,* just beyond RR at sta. Straight thru. 
15.7 3.4 Egypt Mills, P. 0. on right. Straight thru. 

24.0 8.3 Dingmans Ferry, P. 0. on right. Straight thru. 

Right is Route 246 and 248 to New York. 

Caution for sharp right curve across bridge at foot of grade 
27.8 and right curve upgrade 29.3. Caution for sharp right 
turn across iron bridge 32.3 — now on Main St. 
32.5 8.5 Harford St.; turn left two blocks. 

82.7 0.2 Milford,* Harford & Broad Sts., P. 0. on far right. 

Turn right onto Broad St. Caution for curve just beyond 
bridge 33.2. Avoid left-hand road 35.5. 

39.4 6.7 Matamoras, Pa.* Straight thru on Pennsylvania Ave, across 

Delaware river (toll 25c), coming on Pike St. 

Port Jervls City Map and Points of Interest, page 221. 

39.8 0.4 PORT JERVIS, N. Y„ Pike & Front Sts., just beyond RR. 

Note (a) Route 69— Delaware Water Gap to Bushkill, Pa.— 16.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via East Stroudsburg. Asphalt macadam to MarshaUs Creek; balance shale. 
A pretty drive up the Delaware river valley, winding along foot of bluffs. 
The following note furnishes an option to the regular route between Delaware Water 
Gap and Bushkill. 

0.0 0.0 DELAWARE WATER GAP. green on right. Go northwest. 
0.2 0.2 Right-hand diagonal road, just beyond small iron bridge; bear right. Cross 

RR 1.1. Avoid right-hand road 1.2. 
1 9 1.7 Caution— 4-corners; turn sharp left around hill. 
2.7 0.8 4-corners; turn right. 
2.9 0.2 Left-hand road; turn left. 



# ShawnM-oo-Delawar», Pa. (pop. 200, alt. 
300 ft.), is a popular resort town located a 
few miles above the Delaware Water Gap. 
The river is particularly scenic at this point. 
Buckwood park, lying across the river, in 
New Jersey, is one of the most important 
state reservations in the east. It abounds in 
deer and other wild animals and game birds, 
all of which are under the protection of the 
New Jersey fish and game commissioners. 
Buckwood lake, lying upon the top of the 
mountain, and the many peaks, cliffs and 
glens in the vicinity are very attractive to 
the lovers of nature. The town itself has 
much of historic interest, it being the oldest 
permanent settlement in Pennsylvania. It 
also boasts of the first stone dwelling in the 
state. Portions of this house, built in 16B0, 
are still in a state of splendid preservation. 
Additions were made to the building in 1783. 
The house was fortified with a stockade and 
withstood numerous attacks of the red man. 
In the Wyoming massacre every white settler 
in the vicinity, excepting those who took 
refuge in the stone house, was slain. The 
Shawnee country club, while exclusive in its 
membership, extends the privilege of the 
course to visitors properly introduced. 

•Bvehkfu; Pa. (pop. 125, alt. 412 ft.), was 
settled in 1750 by one Gonzales, who lies 
buried at Wurtsboro, the first man to have 
been buried in this county (Orange). Bush- 



kill falls, known as "The Niagara of Penn- 
sylvania," and Forest park are the town's 
chief attractions. 

•Milford, Pa. (pop. 872, alt. 469 ft.). The 
county seat of Pike county, situated in a 
portion of the Delaware valley noted for its 
beautiful and picturesque scenery. 

In the vicinity are the Sawkill falls and 
cliffs and three miles south are the pictur- 
esque falls of the Raymonds Kill. Near the 
village is a monument erected to Thomas 
Quick, one of the first settlers, who was 
killed by the Indians. His son, swearing 
vengeance, is said to have killed ninety-nine 
savages in retaliation of his father's death. 

Interesting side trips may be taken to 
Bushkill Falls, Forest park and the Water 
gap. 

*Matamoras, Pa. (pop. 2,000, alt. 800 ft.), is 
situated on the Delaware river in the foot- 
hills of the Blue Ridge mountains. It is at 
the intersection of three states — Pennsyl- 
vania, New York and New Jersey. It is a 
residential town with no large industries. 
Matamoras was settled in 1730, while the 
American troops were fighting in Mexico, 
and was named for one of the Mexican cities 
captured by our soldiers. An old stone house, 
still in a good state of preservation, served 
as a fort during the revolution and before 
that in the Indian wars of 1755. There are 
excellent facilities here for boating, bathin* 

fishing and mountain climbing. 



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r 



Route 70 Page 116 New York 

8.3 0.4 4-corners: turn right with travel. 

3.4 0.1 Left-hand road, atone posts on right; turn left with travel. 
3.6 0.2 Right-hand road. Just beyond RR bridge; turn right. 

8.9 0.3 East Stroudsburg, Crystal & Washington Sts. Keep ahead on Crystal 8ts. f 
joining trolley. 

4.0 0.1 Irregular 4-corners; Jog left and immediately right with trolley onto N. Cort- 

land St/ Avoid left-hand diagonal road 5.3. 
8.8 4.8 Marshall* Creek. P. O. on left. Straight thru. Cross RR 9.6. 
16.4 7.6 BUSHKILL, Just beyond RR at sta. 

Left leads to Bushklll Falls, 

Straight ahead is Route 69 to Port Jervls, 

Route 70-^Newark, N. J., to Dingmans Perry, Pa. — 67.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Bloomfleld Ave., Montclair, Caldwell, Parsippany, Den vi lie, Dover, Newton, and 
Branch ville. Pavement and macadam all the way. 

Route goes thru farming and residential districts. 

Note (a) gives a connection from Dover to Lake Hopatoong. 

Route 75 offers an option via Paterson, but the following route is the best connec- 
tion between Newark and Dingmans Ferry* 

^-MILEAGE-* 

Total Se&S!? For * n w an< * other exits see City Map, page 100. 

Mlleaoe Points 

0.0 0.0 NEWARK, Market & Broad Sts. Go north with trolley onto 

Broad St. 
0.2 0.2 Fork at Military park; keep left with trolley on Broad St. 

1.1 0.9 Left-hand road; bear left with trolley onto Belleville Ave. 

1.4 0.3 Fork; bear left with branch trolley onto Bloomfield Ave. Cross 

RR at Bloomfield Ave. sta. 3.2. 

4.5 3.1 Bloomfield, Bloomfield & Glenwood Aves. Straight thru with 

trolley. 

5.1 0.6 Glen Ridge, sta. on left. Straight thru with trolley. 

6.2 1.1 Montclair,* Bloomfield Ave., Church St. & Glenridge road. 

Straight thru with trolley on Bloomfield Ave. 

♦Montclair, N. J. (pop. 28,810, alt. 341 ft.), normal schbol and military academy are 
one of New York's most charming suburbs, located here, 
contains many beautiful homes. A state 



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City Section 



8.1 
9.9 

10.2 
11.0 



18.1 

21.5 
23.1 

23.6 

26.8 

30.6 

31.9 
33.0 

35.4 
35.7 
42.0 

47.0 
47.9 

48.0 
50.2 
53.0 

55.7 

55.9 



Page 117 Route 70. 

1.9 Verona. Straight thru with trolley on Bloomfield Ave. 
1.8 Caldwell,* Bloomfield & Roseland Aves., bank on right. 

Straight thru. 
0.3 Fork; bear right with trolley. 
0.8 Irregular 4-corners, church on right. Bear left, passing 

school on right. Thru Pine Brook 13.9. Avoid left-hand road 

at Boonton reservoir 17.8. 

Left at 17.8 is Route 67 at mileage 27.5 to Morrlstown. 

7.1 Parsippany. Straight thru. Cross RR 19.8. Avoid right- 
hand road 19.9. 

3.4 Denville. Curve right with trolley. Cross same 20.2. 

1.6 Rockaway,* sta. on right. Straight thru across RR, joinmg 
trolley. Cross RR 23.4. 

0.5 3-corners at open square; bear left with trolley. Same thoro- 
fare becomes E. Blackwell St. 

3.2 Dover,* E. Blackwell & Sussex Sts., store on left. Straight 
thru with trolley on W. Blackwell St. Avoid right-hand road 
at church 27.9. Thru Mine Hill 29.0. Cross RRs 30.2-30.3. 

3.8 Kenvil, diagonal 4-corners, trolley leaves to left. Straight 
thru. Cross RR 30.8, ascending grade just beyond. 

Diagonally right at 31.4 is Route 40 Note (a) to Lake Hopatcong. 

1.3 Ledge wood. Bear right, joining trolley. 

1.1 Left-hand road; turn left with trolley under RR. Thru diag- 
onal 4-corners 35.1. Thru outskirts of Netcong 35.3. 

2.4 Left-hand road just beyond bridge. over canal; turn left. 
0.3 Stanhope, irregular 4-corners, stores on right. Turn right. 
6.3 Andover, wooden church on left. Straight thru. Cross RRs 

42.9-43.1. Avoid left-hand road 44.0. 
5.0 Fork; bear left onto Main St. 
0.9 Newton, Main & Spring Sts., at far side of park. Turn left 

onto Spring St. 
0.1 Right-hand street ; bear right onto Main St. 

2.2 Fork; bear left. Cross RRs 50.7-52.7. 

2.8 4-corners; turn left. Cross RR at Augusta 53.8. Cross RR 
55.5. 

2.7 Branchville, at open space, bank on left. Straight thru, pass- 
ing water-trough on left. 

0.2 Fork; bear left with travel. Pass Culver lake on right 58.8. 



•Caldwell, N. J. (pop. 5,000, alt. 650 ft.), was 
named for "the fighting parson" of Eliza- 
beth, N. J., in revolutionary days, the Rev. 
James Caldwell, pastor of the Presbyterian 
church. He was the subject of a poem 
by Bret Harte, called "Caldwell of Spring- 
field." Grover Cleveland was born in Cald- 
.well in a large white house now owned by 
the Cleveland birthplace memorial associa- 
tion. It contains some memorabilia of Mr. 
Cleveland. The annual matches of the Na- 
tional rifle association were held on the 
rifle range just west of Caldwell in July 
and August, 1919. There were contests by 
picked riflemen from all the states and pos- 
sessions of the United States, the teams 
being selected by competitive shooting con- 
tests in their respective states, the final com- 
petition being held at Caldwell. Under the 
direction of the secretary of the navy, ar- 
rangements were made for practice shooting 
by groups and individuals. 

•Rockaway, N. J. (pop. 2,300, alt. 925 ft.), was 
settled before the revolutionary war. There 
were a number of old forges in this vicinity 
where iron was made from the ore mined near- 
by. After the battle of Trenton, during the 
revolution many of the Hessian prisoners 



were brought here and put to work in the 
mines and forges making cannon for the 
army. A number of the present residents of 
the town N can trace their ancestry back to 
some of these prisoners who remained in the 
country after the war had closed. 

•Dover, N. J. (pop. 12,000, alt. 750 ft.), is a 
thriving industrial town situated on the 
Rockaway river, among the beautiful Hopat- 
cong hills and but a few miles distant from 
the far famed Lake Hopatcong. The Morris 
canal winds thru the town. Among the prin- 
cipal products of the Dover industries are 
Onyx hosiery, Perfect ranges and furnaces, 
Brotherhood overalls and Ulster iron, while 
the highest smoke stacks in the world are 
made here by the Dover boiler works, such 
as the ones on the Woolworth and Singer 
buildings. The green-houses of the Lack- 
awanna railroad, whose purpose it is to fur- 
nish flowers for all of its station yards, are 
also located in Dover. North of the city, 
about six or seven miles, is the United States 
government arsenal (Picatinny) and naval 
depot. A community and reading room is 
maintained by the chamber of commerce, to 
which all visitors are invited and where a 
information desired may be obtained. 

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Route 71 Page 118 New York 

60.6 4.7 Fork; bear right. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 62.3. 

63.7 3.1 Layton, N. J., right-hand road, just beyond small wooden 

bridge. Turn right. Cross long iron toll bridge over Dela- 
ware river (New Jersey-Pennsylvania state line) 66.5. 

Charges— runabout. 30c; touring: car, 40c. 

66.9 3.2 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left. 

67.2 0.3 DINGMANS FERRY, PA., 4-corners, P. 0. on left. 

Right is Route 69 to Port Jervls. 

Left is Route 240 to Delaware Water Gap. 

Note (a) Route 70 — Dover to Lake Hopatcong, N. J<— 10.9 m. 

/Via Kenvil, Mt. Arlington and Berry Corners. Asphalt macadam all the way. 

0.0 0.0 DOVER, B. Blackwell & Sussex Sts., store on left. 

Go west with trolley on W. Blackwell St. Avoid right-hand road at stone 
church 1.1. _ 

2.2 2.3 Mine Hill, church on right. Straight thru with trolley. Cross RRs 3.4-3.5. 

8.8 1.6 Kenvil. diagonal 4-corners, trolley leaves to left. Straight thru. Cross RR 4.0. 

4.6 0.8 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right. . . . 

6.1 1.6 Right-hand road, Just beyond RR underpass; turn right. Turn left with road 
at open space 6.1 

6.7 0.6 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right upgrade. 
8.6 1.S Fork; bear right. 

8.6 0.1 Mt. Arlington. Straight thru. 

10.0 1.4 Berry Corners, end or road. Turn left. 

10.1 0.1 Fork; bear left over RR bridge. 

10.2 0.1 3-corners; bear left ascending grade. 

10.3 0.1 End of road; turn left, continuing upgrade. 

10.6 0.2 8 -corners; bear left, passing church on right. 

10.7 0.2 Fork; bear right. 

10.9 0.2 LAKE HOPATCONG*, 3-corners at foot of grade, RR on right. 

Route 71 — Newton, N. J., to Middletown, N, Y^—34.1 nu 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

MILEAGE 

r DUtanee Via Sussex, Unlonville and Slate Hill. Dirt with some stretches 

Total Between of macadam. Thru rolling, farming country* 
Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 NEWTON, Spring & Main Sts., park on left. Go west on 
Spring St. 

0.1 0.1 Fork; bear right. Avoid right-hand diagonal roads 1.5-2.4. 

Cross RRs 2.8-4.8. Thru. 4-corners. Avoid right-hand diag- 
onal road 6.6. Curve right across RR at Pelletow Sta., 8.8. 
18.9 13.8 Sussex, N. J. End of road. Turn right and next left. 

14.4 0.5 End of road; turn right. Cross RR 14.7. 
17.6 3.2 Fork; bear right. 

17.8 0.2 Fork; bear left. 

20.1 2.3 Unionville, N. Y., right-hand road at water trough. Turn 

right. 
20.8 0.2 Fork; bear left on macadam. 

21.4 1.1 End of road ; turn right. 

21.5 0.1 End of road at barn; turn left. Thru 4-corners at Westown 

23.0. Bear right 24.2 and left 24.6. Avoid left-hand road 25.8. 

26.6 5.1 End of road; turn left. 

26.8 0.2 Right-hand road; turn right. 

28.5 1.7 Slate Hill, end of road. Turn right. 

31.9 3.4 3-corners at open space; turn left. 

Right at this 3-corners is Route 288 to Goshen. 
32.3 0.4 Fork; bear right on macadam. Cross RR 32.9, coming onto 
Academy Ave. 

Middletown City Map and Points of Interest, page 129. 

33.9 1.6 5-corners, fire sta. on right; turn left with trolley onto Main 

Street. 
34.1 0.2 MIDDLETOWN, Main, North and South Sts. 

'Lake Hopatcong, N. J. (alt. 1,200 ft.), is and bathing. Macadam roads surround ths 
the largest and highest lake of any of the lak «» and there arc numerous fine hotels for 



-astern states. It is 9 miles long and has a 



the accommodation of visitors. The Locks, 
river Styx, Bear mountain, Raccoon island 
line * 60 miles. Fishing is excellent Three Sisters island and Byram cove art a 
it "so canoeing, sailing, yachting few of the points of interest in this vicinity. 



O 



City Section Page 119 Routes 72-73 

Route 72 — Montclair, N. J,, to Haverstraw, N. Y. — 38.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

via Singac, Pompton, Oakland, Suffern, and Ladentown. Macadam and asphalt- 
aacadam roads. 

aiLEA6E^ A very attractive drive thru residential district. The read over the 

Trf.iSSS"®* nUls from Ladentown to Haverstraw is thru a wooded section and 
iteSe PoSS" affords many picturesque views. 

O.O 0.0 MONTCLAIR, Bloomfield Ave., Fullerton St. & Glenridge 
Ave. Go northwest with trolley on Bloomfield Ave., passing 
bank on right. 

1.0 1.0 Irregular 4-corners at top of hill; bear right upgrade away 
! from trolley. 

12 0.2 Verona, diagonal 4-corners. Bear right onto Pompton Ave. 

3.1 1.9 Cedar Grove, P. O. on left. Straight thru under RR. 
5.4 2.3 Singac. Straight thru across trolley. Cross RR 5.8. 

Right with trolley at 5.4 is Route 73 to Paterson. 

7.6 2.2 Mountain View, diagonal 4-corners, school on left. Straight 
thru. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 7.7, crossing bridge and 
RR just beyond. 

9.8 2.2 Right-hand, wooden school on right; turn right onto macadam. 

1L5 1.7 8-corners; bear left with poles. 

11.9 0.4 8-corners; bear right with poles. 
113.5 1.6 Pompton, right-hand street, P. O. on right. Turn right. 

I Straight ahead is Route 75 to Dlngmans Ferry. 

Avoid left-hand diagonal road 14.7. 
f 16.X 2.6 Left-hand road, stone church on left; turn left. 
112 1.1 Oakland, N. J. Straight thru across RR. Avoid right-hands 

road 17.5. Avoid right-hand diagonal road 23.8. 

Right at 23.8 to Mahwah then left is an option to Suffern. 

24.7 7.5 8-corners; bear left downgrade. 

26.1 0.4 Fork; keep right under RR, turning left at end of road just 
beyond onto Orange Ave. 

25.8 0.7 Suffern, N. Y., Orange & Lafayette Aves. Trolley ends. 

Sharp right on Lafayette Ave. is Route 202 to Nyack. 

Keep ahead on Orange Ave. 

25.9 0.1 End of road, just beyond RR; turn right onto Wayne Ave. 

28.3 2.4 Fork; bear left. 

32.5 4.2 Ladentown. Straight thru. Cross RR at Mt. Ivy sta. 34.4. 
34.5 2.0 End of road; turn left. 
37.0 2.5 West Haverstraw, at outskirts, store on left. 
Left leads to center of town. 

Straight thru, avoiding left-hand road. Avoid left-hand road 
37.8 and left-hand diagonal road 37.9. 

38.4 1.4 Irregular 4-corners, cemetery on right; bear right onto Conger 

Ave. 

Sharp left at this turn is Route 93 to West Point. 

38.7 0.3 HAVERSTRAW, Conger Ave. & New Main Sta., RR on left. 

Route 73— Montclair, N. J., to Haverstraw, N, Y.— 34.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Paterson, Ridgewood, Hohokus, Monsey and Ladentown. Asphalt-macadam 
roads practically all the way. 

" IIIL Sftf E ^ ° ver clt y streets to Montclair; then thru country residental dis- 

T«t«i r!£JJ?« tricts. The road over hills from Ladentown to Haverstraw is thru 
siictjje pSSS wooded sections and affords many pretty views. 

0.0 0;0 MONTCLAIR, Bloomfield Ave., Church St. & Glenridge road. 
Go northwest with trolley on Bloomfield Ave. 

0.2 0.2 Diagonal 4-corners, municipal building on right; bear right 
with branch trolley onto Valley road. Thru irregular 4-cor- 
ners 0.4. 

2.2 2.0 Upper Montclair,* Valley road & Bellevue Ave., bank on left. 

Straight thru with trolley on Valley road. Thru Great Notch 
4.6. Cross RR at sta. 6.7. 

tipper Montclair, N. J. (pop. 2,000), is on contains many fine residences. It is a r 
the smsi slop* of tfee Orange mountains, and Montclair. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Route 73 



Page 120 



New York 



6.8 4.6 Irregular 4-corners, just beyond small wooden drawbridge; 
turn left onto Marshall St. 

7.5 0.7 Slater St., just beyond brick school; turn right. 

7.6 0.1 Main St.; meeting trolley; turn left. 

8.0 0.4 Paterson,* Main & Market Sts., bank on far right. 
Straight thru (north) with trolley on Main St. 

8.2 0.2 5-corners; turn right with branch trolley onto Broadway. 

8.8 0.1 Bridge St. ; turn left with branch trolley. 

8.6 0.3 Irregular 4-corners ; bear right with branch trolley onto River 
St. Cross RRs 9.1-9.8 Cross concrete bridge over Passaic 
river 10.5. Same thorofare becomes Maple Ave. Cross RR 
12.2. j 

12.7 4.1 Glenrock, fire sta. on left. Straight thru on Maple Ave. Thru 
diagonal 4-corners 13.4. 

Diagonally left on N. Prospect St. 13.4 leads to business center. 

13.7 1.0 Ridgewood,* Maple & Ridgewood Aves. Straight thru on N. 

Maple Ave., 
15.0 1.3 Hohokus, end of street, just beyond bridge. 

Left is Route 83 to Port Jervls. 

Turn left and take right-hand road at P. O. immediately be- 
yond. Cross trolley 15.4. 

17.5 2.5 Saddle River, N. J., irregular 4-corners, P. O. on right. Turn 

sharp right. 

17.6 0.1 Left-hand road, just beyond stone bridge; turn left. 
23.4 5.8 Monsey, N. Y M 4-corners. 

Right is Route 202 to Tarrytown. 
Left is Route 54 to Suffern. 

• Turn right and take left-hand road immediately beyond. Cross 

RR at Erie sta. 23.5. 

28.8 5.4 Ladentown, end of road. Turn right, passing store on left 

just beyond. Cross RR at Mt. Ivy Sta. 30.6. 
33.2 4.4 West Haverstraw, at outskirts, store on left. 
Left leads to center of town. 

Straight thru, avoiding left-hand road. Avoid left-hand road 
33.5 and left-hand diagonal road 34.1. 
34.6 1.4 Irregular 4-corners, cemetery on right; bear right onto Conger 
Ave. 

Sharp left Is Route 93 to West Point. 

34.9 0.3 HAVERSTRAW,* Conger Ave. & New Main Sta., RR on left. 

•Paterson, N. J. (pop. 136,000, alt. 100 ft.), 
is the most important silk manufacturing 
city in the United States. It also has various 
other thriving and important manufactories. 
This city was originally settled thru a grant 
to Alexander Hamilton and his associates, 
known as the Society of Useful Manufactures, 
whose object was the industrial emancipa- 
tion of the United States from Europe. This 
society still exists and is actively engaged 
in business. During the British occupation 
of New York the hills surrounding Pat- 
erson were occupied by Washington's army. 
The old mansion used by Washington him- 
self as headquarters is located close by. 
The old home of the Colt family, who made 
their first Colt firearms here, is also in this 
city, as was the home of the late G. A. Hohart, 
vice president with McKinley, still occupied 
by his family. Garret and Preakness moun- 
tains afford splendid views from their sum- 
mits. The fall 8 of the Passaic are another 
interesting feature of the city. 

♦Ridgewood, N. J. (pop. 7,000, alt. 250 ft.), 



is situated among the foothills of the Ramapo 
mountains and upon the western edge of the 
fertile Paramus valley. Across this valley 
from north to south runs the historic Para- 
mus road, along which in the early days 
the Indian, the colonist and the British had 
many an encounter. The original Dutch 
homesteads were built along this route and 
along here also in 1725 was founded the old 
historic Paramus Dutch reformed church, and 
in 1776 the commissary department of the 
American army. At this latter point many 
noted personages stopped from time to time, 
among them being General Washington. The 
old ohurch and many of the homes of the 
early colonists may still be seen. 

•Haverstraw, N. Y. (pop. 5,669, alt. 103 ft.), 
is popularly known as "Brick Town," as it 
manufactures brick for the entire Eastern 
market. Near West Haverstraw is Treason 
hill, at which place Benedict Arnold had 
planned to surrender West Point to the 
enemy in September, 1780, and where he met 
the spy, Major Andre. 




For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



I City Section Page 121 Route 75 

Route 75 — New York City, N. Y., to Dingmans Ferry, Pa. 

—70.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Dyckman St. Ferry, Englewood, Teaneck, Hackensack, Areola, Paterson, Pomp- 
ton, Newfoundland. Franklin and Branchville. Brick, asphalt-macadam and macadam 
to Franklin, then 9 miles dirt; balance macadam. 

Thru attractive suburban sections and slightly hilly farming country. From Butler 
to Newfoundland the route follows a picturesque river . valley used as part of the 
Paterson reservoir system. 

Route 70 furnishes a better option via Montclair and Newton. 

rJI,L DtoSSU For this and other ^^ see ***** MaD » bet ' P a S es 98-99. 

WBotyoaa Detail Route Map, pages 100-101. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Dyckman St.— Englewood Ferry. 

Rates — 20-30c, oar and driver; passengers 6c each. Service every 
fifteen minutes, 6 A. M. to 11 P. M.; Saturdays, Sundays and holi- 
days, 5 A. M. to midnight. 

Leaving ferry, ascend long winding grade. 
0.7 0.7 3-corners; bear left, continuing upgrade. 

2.5 1.8 Englewood, N. J., Palisade, Engle & Grand Aves. Straight 

thru on PaliSade Ave. Cross RR 2.6. 

2.9 0.4 5-comers, brick school on right; bear left. 

&2 0.3 Fork: bear left onto Lafayette Ave. 

3.8 • 0.6 End of street; turn right onto Forest Ave. 

4.4 0.6 Teaneck, end of street, brick school on right. Turn left. 

6.1 0.7 Irregular 4-corners; bear right. Cross RR 5.9. Cross draw- 
bridge over Hackensack river 6.8 — now on Anderson St, Cross 
trolley 7.0. 

Hackensack City Map and Points of Interest, page 134. 

7.1 2.0 Left-hand street, stone church on left; turn left onto Union St. 
12 0.1 Hackensack, Union & Passaic Sts., sign on left. 

Left leads to center of town. ♦ 

Turn right onto Passaic St. Cross RR 7.3. 

8.6 1.3 Maywood, Passaic St. & Maywood Ave. Straight thru on 

Passaic St. Thru Rochelle Park 9.2. Cross trolley at Areola 
Sta. 102. 

10.6 2.1 Areola,* left-hand diagonal road at old water wheel. 

Straight ahead is Route 83 to Port Jervls. 

Bear left across bridge. 

10.7 0.1 3-corners; bear right onto Saddle River road. 

11.0 0.3 Fork; keep left 

11.9 0.9 Warren Point, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 
12.9 1.0 Fork; bear right with trolley across bridge over Passaic 
river. Cross RRs 14.2-14.9. 

16.1 2.2 Paterson,* Broadway, Main & West Sts. Bear right with 

trolley onto West St. Same thorofare becomes Hamburg 
Ave. 

15.6 0.6 Right-hand diagonal street; bear right with branch trolley 

onto Belmont Ave. ~ 

16.7 1.1 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left away from trolley. 

17.9 1.2 Irregular 4-corners; bear right. Cross concrete bridge 18.6. 
Avoid right-hand diagonal road 21.7. 

'Areola, N. J. This place was principally tion of the United States from Europe. This 

owned by and was the home o! the late Mr. society still exists and is actively engaged 

Easton. president of the Columbia Grapho- in business. During the British occupation 

phone Co. The picturesque waterwheel, of Ncw York thc fcill > surrounding Pat- 

which may be viewed here, is one of Jersey's %* on wcrc occupied by Washington's army, 

old Dutch relics mansion used by Washington him- 

••_* m '» / „,^ u ,~ , A v ««W as headquarters is located close by. 

-PaU»on, N. J. (pop. 136.000, alt 100 ft.). The M homc of ^ ^ who ^J e 

>s the most important silk manufacturing thcir first Colt firearm9 herCf |§ aUo in thu 

city in the United States. It also has various c i ty , as was the home of the late G. A. Hobart, 

other thriving and important manufactories. vice president with McKinley. still occupied 

This city was originally settled thru a grant by his family. Garret and Preakness moun- 

to Alexander Hamilton and his associates. tains afford splendid views from their sum 

known at the Society of Useful Manufactures. mits. The falls of the Passaic are anot' 

vatse object was the industrial emancipa- interesting feature of the city. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Route 75 Page 122 New York 

23.8 5.4 Pompton, P. 0. on right. Straight thru. 

Right le Route 72 to Haverstraw. 

24.1 0.8 Pompton Lakes,* diagonal 4-corners at cannon. Bear left. 

Right at 24.4 is Route 81 at mileage 1.1 to Greenwood Lake. 

Cross RR at Pompton Sta. 24.7. Cross RR 25.4. 

26.6 2.5 Bloomingdale, 3-corners. Bear right. 

26.7 0.1 Fork; bear left. 

27.3 0.6 Butler, store on right. Straight thru. 

27.8 0.5 Fork; bear left across iron bridge. Cross RR 28.3. Cross RR 

at Smiths Mills 28.7. 
30.8 2.5 Fork; bear left with asphalt-macadam. Cross RR 32.9. 
34.3 4.0 Newfoundland, sta. over to left. Keep ahead along RR. 
34.8 0.5 Fork; bear left, passing school over to right. 

Right fork is Route 77 at mileage 27.0 to Goshen. 

35.0 0.2 Fork; keep right. 

39.7 4.7 Stockholm, left-hand road. Turn left. Cross RRs 39.9-40.0. 

43.1 3.4 Beaver Lake, just beyond RR bridge. Straight thru down- 

grade. 

44.8 1.7 End of road; turn right across RR onto Rutherford Ave. 

45.3 0.5 Fork; bear left onto Franklin Ave. along Furnace pond. 

45.8 0.5 4-corners, beyond small iron bridge; turn right onto Church 

St. Bear left onto Main St. 46.1. 

46.2 0.4 Franklin, Main & Church Sts., stone church on left. Keep 

ahead on Main St. Cross RR 46.3. 

46.4 0.2 3-corners, just beyond RR underpass; bear left. 

47.9 1.6 3-corners, just beyond church; bear left. Cross RR 48.9, 

curving right just beyond. 

49.8 1.9 Monroe. Straight thru. 

52.9 3.1 Irregular 4-corners ; meeting poles, turn right. 

53.1 0.2 Fork; bear right away from poles. 

53.7 0.6 Lafayette. Straight thru. 

54.2 0.5 Fork; bear left. 

55.4 1.2 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left. Thru 4-corners 55.8. 

Cross RR 56.7. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 57.9. Cross 
RR at sta. 58.4. 
58.6 3.2 Branchville, open space at banks. Straight thru, passing 
water trough on left. 

58.8 0.2 Fork; bear left with travel. Pass Culver lake on right 61.7. 

63.5 4.7 Fork; tear right. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 65.2. 

66.6 3.1 Layton, N. J.; right-hand road, just beyond small wooden 

bridge. Turn right. 
69.4 2.8 Cross long iron toll bridge over Delaware river (New Jersey- 
Pennsylvania state line). 

Charges— runabout, 30c; touring car, 40c. 

69.8 0.4 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left. 

70.1 0.3 DINGMANS FERRY, PA., 4-corners, P. O. on left 

Right is Route 69 to Port Jervls. 

Left is Route 240 to Delaware Water Gap. 

♦Pompton Lakes, N. J. (pop. 5,000, alt. 202 of the Ryerson furnace, where the chain 

ft.), is one of the oldest towns in New Jer- thrown across the Hudson river at West 

sey. Settled by the Dutch in 1682. Two of Point to prevent the British from going up 

the houses built at that time, the Schuyler the river, was forged. Other points of in- 

and Outwater homesteads, are still occupied. terests are Federal Rock, used by Washington 

The town gets its Indian name, meaning as a signal station between Morristown and 

"Meeting Waters," from its location at the Newburgh, and "Windbeam Mountain," the 

conflux of the Ramapo, Wanaque, and Pe- land first seen by mariners entering the port 

quannock rivers. During revolutionary days of New York. The Maine memorial monu- 

Pompton was noted for its iron furnaces, ment stands on the site of Washington's 

where the iron ore from the Ringwood mines former headquarters in Federal square. It 

was smelted into cannon balls and carried by was erected by the town in memory of two of 

ox teams over mountain trails to West its boys who went down with the battleship 

Point. Near the Brookside inn are the ruins Maine. 



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Google 



City Section Page 123 Routes 77-78 

Route 77 — Newfoundland, N. J., to Goshen, N. Y.— 28.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Warwick and Florida. Dirt, with some stretches of macadam, to Warwick; bai- 

mce macadam and gravel. 

,-mileage-s Road is narrow and winding with short, rough stretches and caution 

t.».i BSSSf* should be used as far as Warwick; balance of route is an attractive 

mSi§ Point!" Arive over BttgMly hilly country, with numerous prosperous farms. 

0.0 0.0 NEWFOUNDLAND, sta. on left. Go northwest on main road. 

Pass wooden church on right 0.4. 
0.6 0.6 Fork, beyond concrete bridge, school ahead on right; bear 

right. 
0.7 0.1 Fork; bear left. * Cross small bridge 1.9, going upgradt 
I beyond. 

2.2 1.5 Fork; bear left aldhg Newark reservoir. Follow winding 

but direct road, crossing bridges 4.4-5.1. 
5.2 3.0 Fork; bear left— sign "Moes-Warwick." Thru Moes 9.9. 

14.2 9.0 Fork; bear right downgrade. 

15.3 1.1 End of road; turn right. 

16.2 0.9 Fork; bear right onto Oakland Ave. Cross RR at sta. 17.3. 

17.4 1.2 Warwick, N. Y„ Oakland Ave., West & Main Sts. Keep ahead 

onto Main St. 
17.7 0.3 Fork, bandstand in center; bear left onto Maple Ave. 
19.2 1.5 Fork; bear right. 
23.1 3.9 Florida,* church on right. Straight thru. Avoid left-hand 

road 23.5. 

23.7 0.6 Left-hand road, sign on left; turn left. 

24.8 1.1 Fork; bear left. Same thorofare becomes Greenwich Ave. 

Goshen City Map and Points of Interest, page 126. 

28.9 4.1 GOSHEN, Greenwich Ave., Church & Main Sts., at fountain. 

Route 78— Warwick to Central Valley, N. Y,— 17.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

,-MILEAGE-^ 

Total Between ^' a Monroe an< * Tuxedo. Dirt to Monroe; balance macadam. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 WARWICK, Main & West Sts. Go north on Main St. crossing 

RR 0.4. 
0.3 0.3 Fork, bear right on Main St. 

0.6 0.3 Fork, water-trough in center; bear right — sign "Chester." 
5.2 4.6 Right-hand road, turn right — sign "Monroe." Cross RR at 

Lake Sta. 5.3. 
5.9 0.7 End of road, turn right. 
6.6 6.7 Left-hand road, turn left shortly descending long winding 

grade. 
8.4 1.8 Right-hand road — sign "Monroe," turn right. 
8.8 0.4 Fork at pond; turn left. 
9.4 0.6 End of road ; turn left along Walton lake. 

12.4 3.0 Monroe, 4-corners, at outskirts. Turn right. 

Straight ahead leads to center of town. 

12.7 0.3 Fork, bear left. 

14.5 1.8 Fork, keep left under RR. 

Right is Route 238 to Tuxedo and New York. 

•Florida, N. Y., it the birthplace of William growing district, producing 600 or more bush- 
H. Seward, secretary of state in ^Lincoln's els to the acre, 
cabinet. It is the center of a large onion 



SDCDNY 

RSG. UJ. RAT. OFF 

MOTOR GASOLINE 






1^ 



Routes 80-81 Page 124 New York 

14.9 0.4 Harriman, end of road at sta. Turn left under RR. 
17.0 2.1 CENTRAL VALLEY— 4-corners. 

Right is Route 91 to West Point. 
Straight ahead is Route 88 to Newburgh. 

Route 80— Warwick to Tuxedo, N. Y.— 15.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book.. 

Via Greenwood Lake. Two miles asphalt-macadam, then 7 miles of rough, narrow, 
,-MiLEAQE-^ winding road over the mountain with numerous steep grades— caution 
» * . g 1 ***"" for numerous sharp turns; balance asphalt-macadam. 
Nitaw pSSS" Thia is a P rett y ***▼• **«» timbered hills. 

0.0 0.0 WARWICK, Main & West Sts. Go south on Main St 

0.1 0.1 Railroad Ave., first left-hand street, just beyond RR; turn left 

one block and at 4-corners at sta., turn right two blocks. 
0.3 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; bear left onto Parkway. 
0.6 0.3 Left-hand street; turn left onto Burr St. 
0.7 0.1 End of street; turn right onto Forrest Ave. Curve left along 

cemetery 0.9. 

3.2 2.5 Bellvale, P. 0. on right. Straight thru. 

6.7 8.5 Greenwood Lake, fork. Keep left, curving left at end of road 
immediately beyond. 

Sharp right at end of road is Route 82 to New York City. 

6.9 0.2 Fork; bear right. 

8.1 1.2 End of road in middle of upgrade; turn right, using extreme 

caution for narrow winding grade with sharp turns over the 

mountain. 
13.5 5.4 End of road at open space; turn right. 

Left is Route 88 at mileage 83.8 to Newburgh, Route 91 at mileage 
2.3 to West Point, Route 90 at mileage 2.2 to Bear Mountain in 
Palisades park and Route 89 at mileage 2.2 to Haverstraw. 
Tuxedo Golf Club on right 13.7. 

15.7 2.2 TUXEDO, sta. on left. 

Straight ahead is Route 201 to New York City. 

Route 81 — New York City to Greenwood Lake, N. Y. — 

451 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Pompton, Wanaque, Midvale, Hewitt and Browns. Macadam to Browns: bal- 
ance dirt and gravel, narrow and winding — somewhat rocky, with exception of last 8 

/-mileage^ miles, which is macadam. 

t a . £!£ ane# Route 88 to Tuxedo, combined with Route 87 to Greenwood Lake 

Mileage pSS? offers a Preferable option. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK— Columbus Circle. See Route 75 for directions 

to Pompton, 23.3 miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 
0.0 0.0 Pompton, P. 0. on right. Straight thru. 
0.9 0.9 Pompton. Lakes,* diagonal 4-corners at cannon. Bear left. 
1.1 0.2 Right-hand road, church on right; turn right. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 75 at mileage 84.4 to 
Dlngman's Ferry. 

Cross RR 1.5. Thru irregular 4-corners at Pompton Jet 1.7. 

3.3 2.2 Haskell,* P. O. on left. Straight thru across RR. Cross 

RR 4.2. 

•Pompton Lakes, N. J. (pop. 2,500, alt. 202 Point to prevent the British from going up 

ft.), it one of the oldest towns in New Jer- the river, was forged. Other points of in- 

sey. Settled by the Dutch in 1682. Two of terest are Federal Rock, used by Washington 

the houses built at that time, the Schuyler as a signal station between Morristown and 

and Outwater homesteads, are still occupied. Newburgh, and "Windbeam Mountain," the 

The town gets its Indian name, meaning land first ^seen by mariners entering the port 

"Meeting Waters," from its location at the of New York. The Maine memorial monu- 

conflux of the Ramapo, Wanaque, and Pe- raent stands on the site of Washington's 

quannock rivers. During revolutionary days former headquarters in Federal square. It 

Pompton was noted for its iron furnaces, was erected by the town in memory of two of 

where the iron ore from the Ringwood mines its boys who went down with the battleship 

was smelted into cannon balls and carried by Maine. 

ox teams over mountain trails to West 'Haskell, N. J. Here in January, 1917, oc« 

Point. Near the Brook side inn are the ruins curred the DuPont powder explosion, involv- 

of the Ryerson furnace, where the chain ing loss of only two lives and some $300,000, 

thrown across the Hudson river at West but felt thruout four of neighboring states. 



Digitized by VjOOQ I 



•City Section Page 125 Routes 82*83 

4.3 1.0 3-corners; bear right across long iron bridge. 

4.4 0.1 Wanaque. Straight thru across RR. 
4.9 0.5 Midvale, brick school on left. Straight thru. 
6.3 1.4 Fork; bear right over RR bridge. 
8.8 2.6 Boardville, fork. Bear left. 

'Right fork leads to Sloatsburg. 

Cross RR at Erskin Sta. 8.9. 

12.3 3.5 Hewitt, fork. Keep left, passing wooden school on right just 
beyond. 

18.2 0.9 Fork; keep left. Gross concrete bridge 13.7. 
:i4.3 1.1 Fork; bear right, coming along shore of Greenwood lake. 
15.6 1.3 Browns, N. X, right-hand road. Turn right — sign "Green- 
wood Lake/' 

17.4 1.8 Fork; keep right. 

21.8 4.4 GREENWOOD LAKE, N. Y., end of road at stores, P. 0. ahead 
on left. 

Left is Route 87 to Warwick. 

Route 82 — Greenwood Lake to New York City, N. Y. — 

45.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Browns, Hewitt, Erskin, Midvale, Wanaque and Pompton. First 2 miles mac- 
adam; then gravel and dirt to Browns, narrow and winding — somewhat rocky; balance 
r-M I LE A E-> ma^afl* 1 ?*. 

■■.-*-■ BS^" 00 Route 80 to Tuxedo combined with Route 201 to New York offers 

m&mVSSb a Preferable option. 

0.0 0.0 GREENWOOD LAKE, N. Y., at stores. Go northeast on 

main road, bearing left beyond (south) along west shore of 

Greenwood lake. 
4.0 4.0 Fork; keep left. 
6.2 2.2 Browns, N. J., end of road. Turn left — sign "Paterson." Go 

under RR 9.3. 
9.6 3.3 Hewitt, just beyond wooden school. Straight thru. 
10.5 1.0 Fork; bear right with asphalt macadam. 

Cross RR at Erskin Sta. 12.9. Thru Boardville 13.0. 
16.9 6.4 Midvale, brick school on right. Straight thru. 

17.4 0.5 Wanaque. Keep ahead across RR. Cross long iron bridge 

17.5, curving left immediately beyond. Cross RR 17.6. 

18.5 1.1 Haskell. Straight thru across RR, passing P. O. on right. 

Points of Interest, opposite page. 

Thru irregular 4-corners at Pompton Jet. 20.1. Cross RR 20.3. 

20.7 2.2 End of road, church on right; turn left. 

Right at this turn is Route 75 at mileage 24.4 to Dingman's Ferry. 

20.9 0.2 Pompton Lakes, diagonal 4-Corners, green with cannon in 
center on left. Bear right. 

Points of Interest, opposite page. 

21.8 0.9 Pompton, P. O. on left. Straight thru and follow Route 245 

from mileage 46.8 balance of way (23.3 miles) to New York. 
Left Is Route 72 to Haverstraw. 

Route 83— New York City to Port Jervis, N. Y.— 77.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Dyckman St. Ferry, Englewood, Hackensack, Areola, Ramsey, Suffern, Tuxedo, 
Harrlman. Monroe. Chester. Goshen. Slate Hill and Tri-States. 

Asphalt-macadam to 6 miles west of Goshen, then gravel to Slate Hill; balance 
asphalt-macadam. Summary: 73.8 miles asphalt-macadam; 3.5 miles gravel. 

An attractive drive thru suburban communities and intervening farming sections to 

Suffern. thence along the picturesque valley of the Ramapo river to Harriman; balance 

s-MlLEAeE-^ thru a pleasant rolling farming country. The climb over the mountain 

fw-i S5&" 00 from South Cenierville to Tri-States is very pretty; thru a wooded sec- 

MitaM PoiSS" tion * Tnis ls tne best conn ection between the above terminals. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY. See Route 88 for directions to 
81.5 31.6 Tuxedo, just beyond P. O., sta. on right. Straight thru (north) 
along RR. n . T 

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Goshen City Map 



Page 126 



New Yorl 



POINTS OF INTEREST, GOSHEN, N. Y. 



Goshen (pop. 3,061, alt. 431 ft.) is the seat 
of Orange county and the cradle of trotting 
horse breeding in the U. S. Here is located 
the historic Goshen race track, probably the 
most complete in equipment of any in the 
country. Here hundreds of horses are kept 
in training and the annual race meets have 
for many years attracted thousands of visi- 
tors and made of this place a popular ren- 
dezvous for the sportsman and for society 



in general. The trotting horse industry dates 
back to 1803, when Imported Messenger was 
kept here for a season. Goshen was settled 
in 1714. Here Noah Webster taught and 
worked on his famous dictionary in 1872, De- 
Witt Clinton, builder of the Erie canal, went 
to school here, and here W. H. Seward studied 
law. A tablet on the road from Goshen to 
Florida, N. Y., marks the site of the old 
"Phillipsburg powder mill," which furnished 
powder for the revolutionary war. 



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City Section 



Page 127 



Route S3 



33.8 


2.8 


84.1 


0.8 


36.6 


1.6 


402 


4.6 


40.7 


0.6 


42.8 


2.1 


43.8 
47.9 


0.6 
4.6 


49.0 
49.3 


1.1 
0.3 


68.7 


4.4 


65.4 
66.7 


1.7 
0.3 


682 
692 


2.5 
1.7 


68.4 
66.0 
67.8 
70.7 


8.6 
2.6 
1.3 
8.4 



75.8 5.1 



3-corners at open space; bear right. 

Left is Route 87 to Warwick. 

Fork, just beyond concrete bridge; keep right. Under RR 
bridge 34.2. 

Left fork 34.1 to 34.2, where turn right over RR bridge connects with 
Route 90 at mileage 2.5 to* Bear Mountain in Palisades park. 

Southfield, fork at flagpoles. Bear right. Pass Arden over to 
right 38.0. 
Fork; keep left. 

Right fork is Route 91 at mileage 8.2 to West Point and Route 88 at 
mileage 40.2 to Newburgh. 

Harriman,* irregular 4-corners at store. Bear left. Pan 

cemetery on right 42.7. 

Fork; bear right. Thru diagonal 4-corners 43.0. 

Right at 43.0 leads to center of Monroe. 

Monroe,* at outskirts. Straight thru. 

Fork, sign in center; bear left. Caution for right and left 

curves under RR 48.6. 

Fork at open space; bear right away from RR. 

Chester, Left-hand road. Turn left. Avoid left-hand road 

49.8. Same thorof are becomes S. Church St. 

Goshen, S. Church St., Greenwich Ave. & Main St., at fountain. 

Bear left onto W. Main St. Cross RRs 53.8-54.3-64.5-56.0. 

Right-hand road; turn right with asphalt macadam. 

Fork; bear left with poles. Cross iron bridge over Walkill 

river 57.4. 

New Hampton. Straight thru. 

8-corners ; turn left away from poles. 

Right at this turn is Route 84 to Port Jervls and Route 86 to Blng- 
hamton. 

Slate Hill. Straight thru. Cross RR at sta. 63.5. 

South Centerville. Straight thru. 

Irregular 4-corners ; bear left with macadam. 

Right-hand diagonal road; bear right with macadam and 

ascend long winding grade. 

End of road, just beyond bridge at foot of grade; turn right. 

erected memorial tablet to late £. H. Har- 
riman on east end of station, near under- 
pass, and in partial sight from road. The 
Harriman mansion is located on the top of 
the Ramapo mountains, east of the village. 
•Monroe, N. Y. (pop. 1,560, alt. 616 ft.), sit- 
uated in the heart of the lake region of 
Orange county and surrounded by pictur- 
esque mountains, was named in honor of 
James Monroe, who achieved military dis- 
tinction in the revolutionary war and who 

later became nresident nf the United States. 



N. Y. (pop. 680, alt. 558 ft.). 
Just west of Erie RR. station is bronse 
tablet on stone foundation commemorating 
fcrst telegraphic message directing movement 
of trains, sent 1851 by Charles Minot, then 
Gen. Supt. N. Y. ft Erie RR., to agent and 
operator at Goshen. Pedestal hewn on Harri- 
man estate and presented by Mrs. Harriman. 
Andrew Carnegie, one of pioneer telegra- 
phers on Penna. RR., was largest general 
contributor. Directors of Erie RR. have also 



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Routes 84-86 Page 128 New York 

76.1 0.3 Tri-States, irregular 4-corners. Keep ahead across bridge 

over Neversink river, joining trolley on B. Main St. 
76.4 0.3 Left-hand diagonal street; bear left away from trolley onto 
Jersey Ave. Cross RR 76.6. Thru 4-corners 77.1, coming: 
onto Front St. 

Port Jervls City Map and Points of Interest, page 221. 

77.3 0.9 PORT JERVIS, Front & Pike Sts., RR on left. 

Route 84— Goshen to Port Jervis, N. Y.— 28.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Middietown and Cuddebackville. Asphalt-macadam all the way. 
Thru attractive farming and wooded country. 

Route 83 from Goshen furnishes a popular and shorter option thru Slate Hill. 
^-MILEAGE-. 

Total b^SSS! For this and other exits see City Map, page 126. 

Miieao« points 

0.0 0.0 GOSHEN, W. Main St., Church St. & Greenwich Ave., at foun- 
tain. Go west on W. Main St. Cross RRs 0.1-0.6-0.9-1.3. 

1.7 1.7 Fork; bear right. 

4.5 2.8 Denton, diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. Cross concrete 

bridge 6.1. 
6.2 1.7 3-corners; bear right. Cross RR 7.2. 

7.6 1.4 Irregular 4-corners ; bear right with travel onto Academy St., 

joining trolley one block beyond. 
8.2 0.6 5-corners ; bear left with trolley onto Main St. 
*A 0.2 Middietown, Main & North Sts. 

Right on North St. is Route 86 to Binghamton. 

Straight thru with trolley on Main St. Pass P. O. on right 8.6. 
8.6 0.2 Irregular 4-corners, just before RR; turn left onto Mill St. 

8.8 0.2 Fork; bear right upgrade onto Monhagen Ave. Cross RR 9.8. 
12.0. 3.2 Fork; bear left. 

12.7 0.7 Fork; bear left. 

14.3 1.6 End of road; turn right. 

15.8 1.5 Fork ; bear right under RR. 

16.3 0.5 End of road; turn left. 

16.4 0.1 Otisville, right-hand road. Turn right, passing U. S. A. Gen- 

eral hospital over to right. 
17.4 1.0 Fork; bear left downgrade. Cross RR 19.9. 
20.3 2.9 Cuddebackville, fork at grass plot. Bear left. 

Right fork leads to Wurtsboro. 

21.0 0.7 Fork, just beyond bridge over Neversink river; bear left. 

21.8 0.8 Fork; bear right. 

23.0 1.2 3-corners; bear right. 

24.2 1.2 Huguenot, irregular 4-corners at P. O. Bear left and imme- 

diately right. Cross RRs 24.6-27.5. 
27.6 3.4 Left-hand road ; turn left onto Kingston Ave. 

Port Jervis City Map and Points ofMnterest, page 221. 

28.3 0.7 Main St.; turn right. 

28.4 0.1 Pike St., water trough on right; turn left, joining trolley. 
28.8 0.4 PORT JERVIS, Pike & Front Sts. 

Route 86 — Goshen to Binghamton, N. Y. — 133.9 m. - 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Monticello, Liberty, Hancock and Windsor. All macadam with a short stretch 
of concrete. 

Thru hilly farming country, some long grades. Follows valley of Beaver Kill and 
Delaware rivers from Parksville to Deposit. This is a section of the Liberty highway 
and best route from southeastern New York to Binghamton and southern tier. 

^-MILEAGE-, 

Trial bIiwmm For this and other exits see City Map, page 126. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0* GOSHEN, W. Main St., Church St. & Greenwich Ave., at 

fountain. Go west on Main St. Cross RRs 0.1-0.6-0.9-1.8. 
1.7 1.7 Fork; bear right. 
"> 2.8 Denton, diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. 



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Google 



City Section 



Page 129 



Route 86 



6.2 1.7 3-corners; bear right. Cross RR 7.2. 

7.6 1.4 Irregular 4-corners; bear right with travel onto Academy 

St., joining trolley one block beyond. 
8.2 0.6 5-corners; bear left with trolley onto Main St. 
8.4 0.2 Middletown, Main & North Sts. 

Turn sharp right with branch trolley onto North St. Cross 

RR 8.7. Thru diagonal 4-corners 8.9. 

9.7 1.8 Fork, trolley ends; bear left. 
11.8 2.1 Fork; bear left. Cross RR 12.5. 

16.5 4.7 End of road; turn left across iron bridge. 

16.7 0.2 Bloomingburg,* diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Curve right upgrade thru High View 18.2. Cross RR 20.8. 
21.1 4.4 Wurtsboro,* store on left. Straight thru. 

Right is Route 231 to Kingston. 
Left hf»Route 266 to Port Jervls. 



•Bloomingburg, N. Y. (alt. 752 ft.), is an old 
historic town in Sullivan county offering ex- 
cellent boating, bathing and fishing facilities. 
It has all the delights of mountain, lake, 
forest and stream. 

•Wurtsboro, N. Y. (pop. 500, alt. 720 ft.), 
at the foot of the Shawangunk mountains, 
was first inhabited in 1660 by Dutch traders. 
Nearby is Mamakating Park, a private reser- 



vation of more than 2,000 acres and at an 
elevation of 1,600 feet. Mamakating (Masten) 
lake is a beautiful body of spring water, 
covering more than one hundred acres. The 
village is surrounded by trout streams, and 
the Basher Kill, just east, is well stocked 
with pickerel and perch. Five miles from 
Mamakating Station (the railroad station on 
the main line for Wurtsboro) is located Yan- 
kee lake at an elevation of 1,500 feet. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 
Middletown (pop. 20,000, alt. 700 ft.) is situ- 
ated in Orange county, in the fertile agri- 
cultural district, which produces quantities of 
grain, onions, celery, lettuce, etc. It is the 
seat of the state homeopathic hospital for the 



MIDDLETOWN, N. Y. 

insane. Several collegiate institutions are 
located here, also the noted Thrall hospital 
and Thrall library. It is within ten minutes 
of the Orange county golf links, considered 
one of the finest courses in this section of the 
Southern tier. 



The Globe Hotel 

R. L. ZELZER, Pro,. 

MIDDLETOWN. N. Y. 



On the road from Liberty to New York. A hotel 

noted for its homelike atmosphere, comfortable rooms, 

and good home cooking. Regular dinners, afternoon 

teas served, and service a la carte. 

Garage and Machine Shop Across the Street 

Bates Reasonable 



Route 86 Page 130 New York 

Thru Rock Hill 28.0 and Bridgeville 29.3. 
33.2 12.1 Monticello,* Broadway & St. Johns St., court house on right. 

Keep ahead on Broadway. 
33.6 0.4 Right-hand road, Soldiers' monument on right; turn right. 

Avoid left-hand diagonal road 34.3. Curve left thru Harris 

38.8. Thru Ferndale 40.2. Cross RR 42.1. 



•Monticello, N Y. (pop. 3,000, alt. 1,700 ft.), 
a popular summer resort and seat of Sulli- 
van county. There are several trout streams 
and fishing lakes in this vicinity and the 
surrounding country affords good hunting. 
Among the scenic attractions are Katrina 
falls, a picturesque cataract with beautiful 
surroundings; Edwards island in the Never- 



sink; Mongaup falls and the beautiful grove 
bordering the eastern shore of lake Kia- 
mesha. A very pleasant drive may be taken 
to White lake, considered* the deepest lake 
in the country, and stocked with bass. An 
attractive feature of Monticello Is the annual 
coaching parade, held at the end of August 
in connection with the agricultural fair. 



BEECHER f S GARAGE 



MONTICELLO 



NEW YORK 



DODGE BROS. SALES ft SERVICE 

Machine Shop. First class mechanics. 
Tires, Tubes, Parts and Accessories. 
Storage. Towing. Phone 78. 



<4 P1?CTP A 1X7TJTT 17 " AIRY rooms — comfortable beds 
iXEsa x - r\> - yy nii^Cs fo R a delightful rest 

216 South Main Street 

LIBERTY NEW YORK MRS. L. STEENROD Phone 233R 



TOURISTS INN 

LIBERTY Phone 293 NEW YORK 
FLORENCE A. HOLMES, Proprietor 



On Liberty Highway— From New York to Buffalo* 
Restaurant and Tea Room Service. In the Hear t 
of Liberty Village. Lodging. Liberty Lunches put 
up on order. Accommodation* lor Cart and 
Chauffeurs. Shady Lawn at Rear. 



GEROW'S NEW GARAGE 

Machine Shop and Supplies 
IXBkktx Ben B. Gerow NEW YORK 



The oldest and best equipped garage In Sulli- 
van County. Cadlllao, Overland, Bulck and 
Dodge Bros. Cars. Look for the big Banner. 
Open day and night. Steam heated annex In 
rear of Liberty House. 



Nichols' Garage 

E. H. NICHOLS. Prop. 



21 School Street 



LIBERTY. N. Y. 



-DISTRIBUTORS AND SERVICE— 

HUDSON and ESSEX Motor Cars 

EXIDE STORAGE BATTERIES 

A few exceptionally nice rooms, rood beds, 
clean and comfortable at TRAVELERS IEST 



STORING and WASHING A SPECIALTY 

BERINGER'S GARAGE 

LIBERTY NEW YORK 

KELLY-SPRINGFIELD TIRES— SUPPLIES 



Monticello Inn 



Monticello 



New York 



Modern and Up-to-Date Hold 

Hot and Cold Water in Every Room. Cuisine 
the very best. Located at 2000 feet elevation 
in healthful Sullivan County. Open All Year 

G. MACHSON. Propri.tor 



City Section Page 131 Route 86 

45.4 11.8 liberty,* Main & Chestnut Sts., at stores. 
Straight thru on Main St 

46.1 0.7 Left-hand road; turn left over RR bridge and take right- 
hand road immediately beyond. Cross RR at sta. 49.2. 

49.4 3.3 Parksville, stores on right. Straight thru. 

50.8 1.4 Right-hand road ; turn right across iron bridge. 

54.6 3.8 Livingston Manor,* right-hand road, at church and cemetery. 
Turn right. Avoid right-hand road just beyond bridge 55.0. 

•Liberty, N. Y. (pop. 2,600, alt. 1,580 ft.), is Catskill mountains and originally settled by 

a summer and health resort located in the the Indians in 1797. This village was named 

region of Sha wan gunk mountains. The town for Dr. Robert E. Livingston, a son of one 

is popular with sportsmen, as there is an of the signers of the Declaration of Inde- 

abundance of trout, pickerel and bass in the pendence. Dr. Livingston's residence is still 

streams and plenty of woodcock, partridge, standing and has been made a part of the 

deer and rabbit in the surrounding woods. Manor house, one of the leading hotels. It 

It is located on the new "Liberty highway" is the birthplace of John R. Mott of Y. M. 

from New York to Buffalo and offers every C. A. fame and lately of the Mexican and 

inducement to tourists. also Russian commissions. Two trout streams 

'Livingston Manor, N. Y. (pop. 1.500, alt. run thru the village— The Beaver Kill and the 

1,400 ft.). Situated in the foothills of the Willowernoc. 



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Page 132 



OPEN MAY 30th TO OCTOBER 10th 



1AWGDDFARM 
IMM 

THREE AND ONE-HALF MILES FROM 

ROSCOE, NEW YORK 



THE FINEST SUMMER RESORT IN AMERICA 
CATERING TO AN EXCLUSIVE CLIENTELE 



SUPERBLY LOCATED. 2700 FEET ELEVATION 



STEAM HEAT, HOT AND COLD WATER, AND 

ALL CONVENIENCES IN. EACH ROOM. 
SEVENTY SUITES WITH PRIVATE BATHS 



EXCELLENT ORCHESTRA, DANCING,- 
BOWLING, BILLIARDS, TENNIS, WATER 
SPORTS, SADDLE HORSES, LIBRARY, 
INDOOR PLAYROOM, TELEPHONE, 
BARBER, GARAGE, PRIVATE LAKE, 
FOREST PRESERVE, MODEL DAIRY 
FARM AND GARDENS, RESIDENT 
PHYSICIAN 



AMERICAN PLAN, RATES $7 to $10 PER DAY 



FOLLOW MAIN BUSINESS STREET (ROSCOE) . ACROSS 

R. R. TRACKS AND TURN RIGHT JUST BEYOND IRON 

BRIDGE 



New York City Section Page 133 Route 87" 

56.3 1.7 Fork; bear left with travel along Beaverkill river. 

61.4 5.1 Roscoe, "stores on left. Keep ahead. 

61.6 0.2 Left-hand diagonal road just beyond church; bear left. 

61.9 0.3 End of road, just beyond iron bridge; turn sharp left, using 

caution. 
67.2 5.3 Cooks Falls, 3-corners. Bear slightly right. 
77.0 9.8 East Branch, at double bridge, just beyond RR. 

Center of town to left across river. 

Bear right across long iron bridge. 
81.9 4.9 Fish's Eddy (center of town to left). Keep right along RR 
ascending long winding grade. Bear left, onto Front St. 87.9. 

89.2 7.3 Hancock,* Front & Reed Sts. Turn right one block onto 

Reed St. 

89.3 0.1 Main St., water trough on left; turn left. Thru Hale Eddy 

97.7. 
.102.5 13.2 2nd* St.; turn left. 
102.9 0.4 Deposit (business center one block to left). Straight thru 

on 2nd St. 
106.3 3.4 Fork; keep left. Thru McClure 107.8 and Damascus 115.7. 

Cross RRs 117.5, and long iron bridge over Susquehanna 

river 117.6. 
117.9 11.6 Windsor, end of road. Turn right, passing park on left. 
118.5 0.6 Left-hand road; turn left. 

Straight ahead Is Note (a) to Harpursvllle. 

128.9 10.4 Right-hand road; turn right across small bridge. 

Straight ahead is Route 667 to Scranton. 

Bingham ton City Map and Points of Interest, page 484. 

Same thorof are becomes Court St. 
133.9 5.0 BINGHAMTON, Court & Chenango Sts., court house on left 

Note (a) Route 86— Windsor to Harpursville, N. Y. — 9.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
This note may be used In conjunction with Route 652 as a connection from Harpur*- 
vlUe to Oneonta, 

117.9 117.9 WINDSOR. End of road. Turn right, passing park on left beyond. 
Left at 118.5 is Route 86 to Binghamton. 
Follow macadam along river past Ouaquaga P. O. 121.6. 
126.8 8.9 Central Village. Straight thru. 
127.8 1.0 HARPURSVILLE, 4-corners. 

Straight ahead is Route 652 to Oneonta. 

Route 87— Tuxedo to Warwick, N. Y.— 15.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Bpok. 

Via Greenwood Lake. Asphalt macadam to Greenwood Lake, then 7 miles of rough. 
.-MILEAGE—, narrow, winding road over the mountain with numerous steep grades— 
» * ■ SSJ?" 06 caution for numerous sharp turns. 
* il ieage Potato" This is a P rettv drive thru timbered hills. 

0.0 0.0 TUXEDO, sta. on left. Go south along RR. 

Tuxedo Golf Club on left 2.0. 

2.2 2.2 3-corners at open square ; bear left, ascending grade. 
4.2 2.0 Irregular 4-corners ; bear slightly right, using extreme caution 
for narrow winding grade with sharp turns over the mountain. 
7.6 3.4 Left-hand road, in middle of downgrade; turn left. 
8.9 1.3 Greenwood Lake, fork. Bear right. 

Left fork is Route 82 to New York City. 
•Hancock, N. Y. (pop. 1,500, alt. 985 ft.). In convenient to a number of trout streams. 



Delaware county, surrounded by the east and 



west branches of the Delaware river, and fishing. 



Hancock is growing popular as a summer 
resort offering picturesque drives and good 




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r Route 88 Page 134 New York 

12.5 3.6 Bellvale, P. 0. on left. Keep ahead. 
12.9 0.4 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

14.6 1.7 Right-hand diagonal street, cemetery on left; bear right onto 

Forrest Ave. 

15.0 0.4 Left-hand street; turn left onto Burr St. 

15.1 0.1 End of street; turn right onto Parkway. 
15.4 0.3 Irregular 4-corners ; turn right two blocks. 

15.6 0.2 Railroad Ave.; turn left along RR one block, and at end of 

street, turn right across RR onto Main St. 

15.7 0.1 WARWICK, Main & West Sts. 

Points of Interest, page 215. 

Diagonally right on Main St. is Route 77 to Goshen. 

Route 8S— New York City to Newburgh, N. Y.— 57.6 m 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Dyckman St. Ferry, Englewood, Hackensack. Areola, Par am us road, Ramsey. 
Suffern, Tuxedo, Southfleld and Central Valley. Asphalt-macadam all the way. 

An attractive drive thru suburban communities and intervening farm areas to 
Suffern and thence thru the picturesque valley of the Ramapo river. 

^ M,L du?J^ For this and °ther exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

mTie?Je B p!hS - Detail Route Map, pages 100-101. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Dyckman St.— Englewood Feny. 

Rates 20 to 80c, car and driver; passengers, 5c each. Service every 
fifteen minutes. 6 A. M. to 11 P. M.; Saturdays, Sundays and holi- 
days, 5 A. M. to midnight. 

Leaving ferry, ascend long winding grade. 
0.7 0.7 3-corners; bear left, continuing downgrade. 
2.5 1.8 Englewood, N. J., Palisade, Engle & Grand Aves., bank on 

right. Straight thru on Palisades Ave. Cross RR 2.6. 

3.0 0.5 5-corners, brick school on right; bear left.^ 
3.2 0.2 Fork; bear left onto Lafayette Ave. 

3.8 0.6 End of street; turn right onto Forest Ave. 

4.5 0.7 Teaneck, end of street, brick school on right. Turn left. 

5.1 0.6 Irregular 4-corners; bear right. Cross RR 5.9. Gross draw- 

bridge over Hackensack river 6.8 — now on Anderson St. Cross 
trolley 7.0. 

7.1 2.0 3-corners, stone church on left; turn left onto Union St. 

7.2 0.1 Hackensack, Union & Passaic Sts., sign on left. 

Left on Passaic St. leads to center of town. 



POINTS OF, INTEREST, HACKENSACK, N. J. 
Hackensack (pop. 16011, alt. 573 ft.), was ing court house offers one of the country's 
settled by the Dutch in 1640 and named for finest examples. Many New York businesi 
the Hackensacky tribe of Indiana. Its impos- men reside here. 



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(my 



y Section 



Page 135 



Route 93 



8.5 1.3 



10.7 2.2 



16.2 5.5 

17.4 1.2 

18.7 1.3 

20.8 2.1 

23.3 2.5 

24.9 1.6 

25.0 0.1 



Turn right onto Passaic St. Cross RR 7.3. 

Maywood, Passaic St. & Maywood Ave. Straight thru on 

Passaic St. Thru Rochelle Park 9.2. Cross trolley at Areola 

sta. 10.2. 

Areola,* water wheel over to left. Straight thru. 

Left at 10.7 is Route 75 to Dingmans Ferry. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 14.7. Cross trolley 16.1. 

Hohokus, irregular 4-corners, P. O. on left. 

Straight thru. Cross trolley 17.3. 

Waldwick, wooden school over to left. Straight thru. 

Allendale, wooden church on right. Straight thru. 

Ramsey,* sta. over to left. Straight thru. 

Mahwah, N. J., fire bell on right. Straight thru. 

Suffern,* N. Y., Orange & Lafayette Aves. Keep ahead on 

Orange Ave. 

3-corners, just beyond RR; bear left. Cross RR 26.1. Pass 

Ramapo Sta. (town over to right) on right 26.9. Pass Ster- 



• Areola, N. J. This place was principally 
owned by and was the home of the late Mr. 
Easton, president of the Columbia Grapho- 
phone Co. The picturesque waterwheel, 
which may be viewed here, is one of Jersey's 
old Dutch relics. 

'Ramsey, N. J. (pop. 1,960, alt. 410 ft.) Here 
is the fine estate of Emerson McMillan, for* 
merly owned by the late George Crocker, also 
the estate of Joseph Deloycoff. 

•Suffern, N. Y. (pop. 3,500, alt. 394 ft.). 
This prosperous village is situated in the 
Ramapo valley and surrounded by the Ram- 
apo mountains, noted for their beauty. Suf- 
fern was first settled by an old revolutionary 
family, for which it was named. During the 



revolutionary war. Generals Washington and 
Rochambeau spent a winter here in a house 
which is still standing on Lafayette avenue 
now occupied by the Methodist Episcopal 
parsonage. Directly in front of the parsonage 
is an old cannon of the revolution. The chain 
that was stretched across the Hudson river 
during the revolutionary war was manufac- 
tured at Augusta Forge near Tuxedo. The 
ore from which the chain was made came, 
from the iron ore mines at Sterlington, a 
short distance from Suffern. Fort Skidman, 
built to defend the Hudson valley from 
British invasion stood about 1% miles be- 
yond the village and remains of entrench- 
ments can still be seen. This site was also 
a camp of the Tuscarora Indians. 



Areola Manor 

"With Its Old MM" 

Areola New Jersey 

Beautifully Situated Amid 
Private Parks and Lakes 

Management of 
PETER THOMAS 

TELEPHONE 72 HACKENSACK 




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r- 



Route 88 Page 136 New York 

lington Sta. on right 28.0. Cross RR 28.3. 

28.7 3.7 Sloatsburg, just beyond concrete bridge. Straight thru. 

31.5 2.8 Tuxedo,* just beyond P. O., sta. on right. Straight thru 

(north) along RR. 

33.8 2.3 3-corners at open space ; bear right. 

34.1 0.3 Fork, just beyond concrete bridge; keep right. Under bridge 

34.2. 

Left fork 34.1 to 34.2, where turn right over bridge connects with 
Route 90 at mileage 2.5 to Bear Mountain in Palisades park. 

35.6 1.5 Southfield, fork at flagpoles. Bear right. Pass Arden over 

to right 38.0. 

40.2 4.6 Fork; bear right with asphalt macadam. 

Left fork is Route 83 at mileage 40.2 to Port Jervls. 

40.6 0.4 Harriman,* 3-corners at outskirts. Bear right under RR. 

•Tuxedo, N. Y. f is a beautiful and exclusive 
winter and summer resort, laid out by the 
noted Pierre Lorillard. The park, which is 



privately owned by the residents, is mag- 
nificently laid out with picturesque drives 
around the lake. No admittance except by 
letter from a resident. 

♦Harriman, N. Y. (pop. 680, alt. 558 ft.). 
Just west of Erie RR. station is bronze 
tablet on stone foundation commemorating 
first telegraphic message directing movement 



of trains, sent 1851 by Charles Minot, then 
Gen. Supt. N. Y. & Erie RR., to agent and 
operator at Goshen. Pedestal hewn on Harri- 
man estate and presented by Mrs. Harriman. 
Andrew Carnegie, one of pioneer telegra- 
phers on Penna. RR., was largest general 
contributor. Directors of Erie RR. have also 
erected memorial tablet to late E. H. Har- 
riman on east end of station, near under- 
pass, and in partial sight from road. The 
Harriman mansion is located on the top of 
the Ramapo mountains, east of the village. 



Open Day and Night All Year 

Youngs Garage, Newbwgh, N. Y. 

Best Garage in Newburgh Plenty of Room Established in 1905 

Specialists in Repairing and Caring for Disabled Machines on the Road 
Phone 76 YOUNGS A CO., Inc. 248 Grand Street 




Garage Company of Tuxedo Park 



-INCORPORATED- 



Tuxedo N. Y. 

npHE Finest Stock of Tires, 
A Tubes and Accessories in 
the Ramapo Valley. Repairs 
promptly made by compe- 
tent mechanics. 

CHAS. E. DU COLON, Manager 
Telephone 50 Tuxedo 



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City Section 



Page 137 



Routes 89-90 



42.6 



51.4 
52.8 
54.6 



57.1 
57.6 



1.9 Central Valley, opera house on right, straight thru. 

Right is Route 91 to West Point. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 42.6. Thru Highland Mills 
43.7. Caution for right and left curve under RR at foot of 
grade 45.3. Avoid right-hand diagonal road 51.1. 
8.9 Fork, just beyond iron bridge; bear right. 

1.4 Vailsgate, irregular 4-corners. Turn right. 

1.8 Left-hand road; turn left. Thru 4-corners 55.5, coming onto 
Mill St. 

Newburgh City Map and Points of Interest, page 205. 

2.5 Broadway; meeting trolley, turn right. 
0.5 NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand St. 



Route 89— Tuxedo to Haverstraw, N. Y. — 17.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via western end of Palisades Park and Thiels. Asphalt macadam thru Palisades 

Park, then 5 miles of dirt; last 2 miles macadam. 

^-MlLEAQE^ The first 9 miles make a very attractive drive thru wooded areas 

_ . £Jj5j" ee with several lakes, then the route goes thru a poor farming district on 

Milemoo Polite" a narrow winding road with several grades. 



0.0 

2.2 
2.5 
2.6 



11.1 
12.5 

12.7 
13.7 

15.6 



17.3 



0.0 TUXEDO, sta. on right. Go north along RR. 
2.2 3-corners at open space; bear right along RR. 
0.3 Fork, just beyond concrete bridge; bear left. 
0.1 Right-hand road at open space; turn right over RR bridge. 
Avoid left-hand diagonal road 7.7. 

Diagonally left at 7.7 is Route 90 at mileage 7.6 to Palisades Park. 

8.5 Fork; bear right downgrade. 

1.4 Right-hand diagonal road, wooden school on left; bear right 

across bridge. 
0.2 Fork; bear left with travel. Pass P. O. on left 13.6. 
1.0 Thiels. Straight thru. Cross RR 14.8. Avoid right-hand road 

15.0. 
1.9 West Haverstraw, 4-corners, just beyond RR at sta. Turn 

right. 

Left is Route 93 to West Point. 

1.7 HAVERSTRAW,* Congers Ave. & New Main St., sta. on far 
left. 

Left on New Main St. leads to business center. 



Route 90 — Tuxedo to Bear Mountain (Palisades Park), 

N. Y.— 18.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

^-MlLEAGE-v Asphalt macadam all the way. 

-r-^i n!&f. e .? A ver y attractive drive across Palisades Park, over wooded hills and 

Mitosis PoXS alon & mar, y Pretty lakes. 

O.O 0.0 TUXEDO, sta. on right. Go north along RR. 

2.2 2.2 3-corners at open space ; bear right along RR. 

2.4 0.2 Fork, just beyond concrete bridge; bear left. 

2.5 0.1 Right-hand road at open space ; turn right over RR bridge. 



# Haverstraw v N. Y. (pop. 5,669, alt. 103 ft.), 
is popularly known as "Brick Town," as it 
manufactures brick for the entire Eastern 
market. Near West Haverstraw is Treason 
hill, at which place Benedict Arnold had 
planned to surrender West Point to the 
enemy in September, 1780, and where he met 



the spy, Major Andre. In the immediate 
vicinity is Stony Point, famed for the battle 
of Stony Point, in which action "Mad" An- 
thony Wayne stormed the sides of the 
Palisades and routed the English garrison. 
Bear Mountain park, the show place of the 
Palisades, is 12 miles from Haverstraw. 



SDCDNY 

REG. US. PAT. OFF 

MOTOR GASOLINE 




Routes 91-93 Page 138 New York 

7.6 5.1 Left-hand road; turn left. 
18.4 10.8 Fork; bear left. 
18.8 0.4 BEAR MOUNTAIN (PALISADES PARK*). 

Straight ahead 0.1 mile connects with Route 93 to West Point. 

Route 91— Tuxedo to West Point, N. Y.— 25.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Southfleld, Harriman Sta. and Central Valley. Asphalt-macadam practically all 

the way. A very good connection. 

,-MILEAGE-^ A very pretty drive. The road goes up the Ramapo valley — small 

_ . , 6|v?J oe farms in the bottom and wooded hillsides — to Central Valley, balance 

Mileage Points" is over tne mountains thru woods and lake regions. 

0.0 0.0 TUXEDO, sta. on right. Go north along RR. 

2.8 2.3 3-corners at open space ; bear right. 

2.6 0.3 Fork, just beyond concrete bridge; keep right under bridge. 

4.1 1.5 Southfield, fork at flagpoles. Bear right. Pass Arden over 

to right 6.5. 

8.6 4.5 Fork; bear right with asphalt-macadam. 

9.0 0.4 Harriman Sta., 3-corners at open space. Bear right under RR. 

11.0 2.0 Central Valley, 4-corners, opera house on right. Turn right. 

Straight ahead is Route 88 to Newburgh. 

23.2 12.2 End of road at foot of grade, store on left; turn left. 

Right at this turn is Route 203 at mileage 1.9 to New York City. 

23.3 0.1 Highland Falls, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 

Entrance to West Point Military Academy at 23.8. 

24.0 0.7 Fork; keep left. 

24.6 0.6 Fork; keep left. Avoid left-hand diagonal road just beyond 
parade grounds 25.0. 

25.1 0.5 WEST POINT,* at statue of Washington. 

Route 93— New York City to West Point, N. Y.— 49.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Fort Lee, Leonia, Englewood, Closter, Tappan, Orangeburg, Nyack, edge of 
Haverstraw and Palisades Park. All asphalt-macadam or macadam roads, except 2 
miles entering Highland Falls. 

A very scenic trip thru suburban section and along the west shore of the Hudson 
river, with the Palisades rising up on the left-hand side of the road. 

Better road conditions will be had by using Route 48 to Tarry town and then the 
ferry to Nyack. Route 56 offers an option to West Point via east side of Hudson river. 

Route 96 offers a shorter but not as preferable an option to Nyack. 

♦Palisades Park is a great natural park, the furthest point. Forf Clinton and the 
covering 22,000 acres. In 1900 is was decided other works which went to make up the for- 
by legislative action of the states of New tress occupied the grounds now covered by 
Jersey and New York to set aside a large sec- the academic buildings. The fortress was 
tion of land for an interstate park similar to defended by redoubts on the summits of 
the great natural parks of the west. Large the hills, Fort Putnam being principal of 
sections of land were contributed together these. It was given over to the command 
with $8,000,000 in cash. In 1910 Mrs. E. H. of Benedict Arnold in 1780, whose plans to 
Harriman, widow of America's railroad king, surrender it into the hands of the enemy 
presented to New York state as an addition were frustrated by the capture of Major An* 
to the interstate park 10,000 acres of land dre. A chain was stretched across the river 
together with $1,000,000 for its development at West Point during the war in order that 
and maintenance. There are seven chains the British ships might not gain passage, 
of lakes in the park, some artificial and The chief points of interest at West Point 
some natural, affording- good fishing. This are: Ruins of Fort Putnam and Kosciusko's 
is a very popular recreation resort in sum- garden, reached by "Flirtation Walk"; Bat- 
mer, offering splendid picnic* and camping tie monument; headquarters with huge tow- 
privileges, er; east academic building and library, 

•West Point, N. Y. (pop. 1,250, alt. 150 ft.), which contains memorial by St. Gaudens to 

is noted as being the site of the United Whistler and Edgar Allan Poe (cadets); mess 

States military academy, which was estab- hall, containing portraits of Sheridan, Grant 

lished here in 1802, Washington having made and Sherman; Cullom hall; officers' club, 

such a recommendation years before. Dur- where hang many battle-scarred standards 

ing the revolutionary war it was used as a (here cadet hops are held); chapel, to the 

fortress, being laid out by the Polish patriot, west at base of mountains and the riding hall, 

Kosciusko. The ruins of Fort Putnam, built where daily exercises are open to visitors. 

it this time, may be seen on a high hill The river view from West Point is said to 

above the river a little to the southwest of be one of the most wonderful in the world. 

y O 



City Section 



Page 139 



Route 93 



,-MILEAGE-^ 
DIsteftM 
Tttal Between 
■ItMflt Points 



For this and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 
Detail Route Map, pages 100-101. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, 130th St.— Fort Lee Ferry across Hudson 
river. 

Ferriage 20c to 75c, passengers 5c; service every 15 to 20 minutes. 

Leaving ferry, keep ahead. 
0.1 0.1 Edgewater, N. J., 4-corners, bank on left. Turn right onto 
River road. 

1.8 1.7 Fork, in middle of upgrade; bear left onto Main St. 

2.1 0.3 Fort Lee,* Main St. & Lemoine Ave. Straight thru with 
trolley on Main St. 

3.6 1.5 Leonia, Central & Grand Aves. Turn right onto Grand Ave. 

Avoid left-hand diagonal road 5.3. 

5.9 2.3 Englewood, Grand, Palisades & Engle Aves., bank on right 

Straight thru on Engle Ave. . 

8.7 2.8 Tenafly, end of road at outskirts. Turn left downgrade. 

9.0 0.3 4-corners, at foot of grade, store on right; turn right. Turn 
left with road 10.2, avoiding right-hand road immediately 
beyond. 

11.0 2.0 Demarest, irregular 4-corners, sta. over to left. Straight thru 
along RR. 

11.8 0.8 End of road; turn left. 

11.9 0.1 End of road; turn right. 

12.2 0.3 Closter, right-hand diagonal road at RR. Bear right along 

same. 
12.9 0.7 End of road; turn left across RR. 
13.0 0.1 3-corners; bear right across bridge. 

onal road 13.2. 



i 



Avoid right-hand diag- 



13.8 0.8 Diagonal 4-corners, covered wooden well on right; bear right. 

14.1 0.3 Norwood, N.J. (outskirts). Straight thru. 

15.8 1.7 Avoid left-hand diagonal road, curving left just beyond. 

15.9 0.1 Tappan,* N. Y., irregular 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Right leads to Spark! II, connecting there with Route 96 to Nyack. 

16.0 0.1 Fork; bear left, passing cemetery on left. Cross RR 16.3. 
17.3 1.3 Fork; bear right across RR. Cross RR 17.5. 

17.7 0.4 Orangeburg. Straight thru. 

18.1 0.4 Fork; keep right. Avoid right-hand diagonal road 19.5. 

19.9 1.8 Right-hand road; turn right upgrade. Avoid left-hand road 
20.5. Caution for sharp left curve in middle of downgrade 
21.2. 



•Fort Lee, N. J. (pop. 6,000, alt. 310 ft.), is 
one of the oldest towns along the Palisades. 
A monument marks the site of the old revo- 
lutionary fort which stood here. Among its 
former residents are numbered Dr. Thomas 
D. English, author of "Ben Bolt," and J. E. 
Brown, the famous American painter of street 
urchins. The studios of many of the, prin- 
cipal motion picture companies are located 
at Fort Lee, and it is said to be the second 



largest motion picture center in the United 
States. Some of the first hill climbing con- 
tests took place in Fort Lee. 

*Tappan, N. Y. (pop. 700), was one of the 
first Dutch settlements on the west shore 
of the Hudson. In the Tappan Dutch Re- 
formed church the court-martial that con- 
demned the British spy, Major Andre 1 , was 
held. The "76 Stone House," now a hotel, 
in the center of town, was his prison. 



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oute 93 Page 140 New York 

.5 1.6 4-corners ; turn left with travel onto Highland Ave. 

Nyack City Map and Points of Interest, page 81. 

.9 0.4 Irregular 4-corners; turn sharp right onto Main St. 

Left on Main St. is Route 202 to Suffern. 

.1 0.2 Nyack, Main St. & Midland Ave., at Carver gravestone. 

Straight ahead 0.4 mile leads to center of town. 

Turn left (north) onto Midland Ave. 
1.2 1.1 Irregular 4-corners ; bear left upgrade. 
1.5 0.3 Fork; bear right, continuing upgrade. 
>.0 1.5 3-corners; bear right along shore of Rockland lake. 
J.2 1.2 Rockland Lake Village, fork, wooden church on right. Bear 

left downgrade. Cross RRs 27.1-27.5. 
*.0 1.8 Congers. Keep ahead across RR at sta. 



Taylor Garage, IllC. Millard Service Station 



-fireproof- 



Co m p 1 e t e Machine Shop 

Maple Ace'^iNeu, Main St. f^'' 1 *"?*?. " oT? 
__ ., ., Complete Stock Tires & Tubes 

HAVERSTRAW N. Y. Emergency Car, Telephone 167 



HOTEL ST. GEORGE 

The House of Comfort 

Member of the Empire Tours . TXy A j~ T *> . , xx , * T -- 

Open Ail the Year Round. Near the NYACK Oil the Hudson N Y 
Ferry. A Boat every half-hour. x * x r*^^ V11 U1C liuuauil, ±*. X • 

25 miles from New York, via Tarrytown. 
Dyckman Street and Englewood Ferry and 
Port Lee Ferry. , 

46 miles from Newhurph 
52 miles from Middletown 
40 miles from Montclalr 
62 miles from New Haven 
39 miles from Danhury 
131 miles from Del. Water Gap 
123 miles from Philadelphia 
130 miles from Seranton 
123 miles from Albany 

Famous lor oo lears. nesxaurani rrunca^s a ia v,arce and Table d'Hote. Open from 6:30 A. M. to 
11 P. M. Private Dining Booms for 4 to 30 Persona. Open Air Tea Garden. Booms with Private Batb. 
Clean and Airy. 

GARAGE— PRIVATE PARK SPACE 

Telephone Nyack 103, 104 



NYACK GARAGE, Inc. 



TELEPHONE 
654 NYACK 

Courteous and Efficient 
Service, Night and Day. 

EXIDE BATTERY 
STATION 

Storage, Repairs 
and Supplies 

MAIN OFFICE 

93-95 Burd St. 

Branch at 

132-134 Main St. 

NYACK, N. Y. 



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City Section 



Page 141 



Route 93 



28.2 0.2 Irregular 4-corners, wooden church on far right; turn right, 

32.0 3.8 Haverstraw,* Congers Ave. & New Main St. 

Right on New Main St. leads to business center. 

Straight thru on Congers Ave. Thru diagonal 4-corners at 
cemetery 32.5. 

33.7 1.7 West Haverstraw, irregular 4-corners, sta. on left. Straight 

thru. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 34.2. 

35.1 1.4 Stony Point, irregular 4-corners at top of grade. Keep ahead. 
35.5 OA Fork; bear left. 

35.8 0.3 Fork; keep left upgrade. 

Right fork leads, to Stony Point State Park. 

36.5 0.7 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

37.3 0.8 Tompkins Cove. Straight thru, passing school and P. O. on 

left. Thru Jones Point 39.8. 

lona Island (site of U. S. Government Powder Reserve) to right 42.0. 

42.2 4.9 Fork; keep right. 

Left fork leads to Bear Mountain, Palisades park, and is Route 207 
to Tuxedo. 

42.8 0.6 Fork; keep left with macadam upgrade thru Interstate Pali- 

sades Park.* Avoid left-hand diagonal road at store 47.8. 

47.9 5.1 Highland Falls, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 

Entrance to West Point Military Academy at 26.7. 

48.6 0.7 Fork; keep left. 

49.2 0.6 Fork; keep left. Avoid left-hand diagonal road just beyond 
parade grounds 49.6. 

49.7 0.5 WEST POINT,* at statue of Washington. 



•Haverstraw, N. Y. (pop. 5,669, alt. 103 ft.), 
is popularly known as "Brick Town," as it 
manufactures brick for the entire Eastern 
market. Near West Haverstraw is Treason 
hill, at which place Benedict Arnold had 
planned to surrender West Point to the 
enemy in September, 1780, and where he met 
the spy, Major* Andre. In the immediate 
vicinity is Stony Point, famed for the battle 
of Stony Point, in which action "Mad" An- 
thony Wayne stormed the sides of the Pali- 
sades and routed the English garrison. Bear 
Mountain park, the show place of the Pali- 
sades, is 12 miles from Haverstraw. 

'Palisades Park is a great natural park, 
covering 22,000 acres. In 1900 it was decided 
by legislative action of the states of New 
Jersey and New York to set aside a large sec- 



tion of land for an interstate park similar to 
the great natural parks of the west. Large 
sections of land were contributed together 
with $8,000,000 in cash. In 1910 Mrs. E. H. 
Harriman, widow of America's railroad k'ng, 
presented to New York state as an addition 
to the interstate park 10,000 acres of land 
together with $1,000,000 for its development 
and maintenance. There are seven chains 
of lakes in the park, some artificial and 
some natural, affording good fishing. This 
is a very popular recreation resort in sum- 
mer, offering spit ndid picnic and camping 
privileges. 

•West Point, N. Y. (pop. 1,250, alt. 150 ft.), 
is noted as being the site of the United 
States military academy, which was estab- 
lished here in 1802, Washington having made 
(Continued on next page) 



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Routes 94-96 Page 142 New York 

Route 94— Haverstraw to Tuxedo, N. Y. — 17.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Thiols and western end of Palisades Park. First 2 miles macadam, then 5 miles 
of dirt to Palisades Park; balance asphalt-macadam. 

To Palisades Park the road is narrow and winding, with several grades, thru hills 
,-mileage^ and a poor farming district; balance of the trip is very attractive thru 
-r-^-i S!S^ , !5? wooded areas, with several lakes. 
M ISage Points Motorists bound for SufTern will find Route 445 preferable. 

0.0 0.0 HAVERSTRAW, Congers Ave. & New Main St., sta. on right. 
Go northwest on Congers Ave. Thru diagonal 4-corners at 
cemetery 0.5. 

1.7 1.7 West Haverstraw, irregular 4-corners, sta. on left. Turn left 

across RR. 

Cross RR 2.2. Avoid left-hand road 2.3. Cross RR 2.5. 

3.6 1.9 Thiels. Keep ahead. 

. 3.7 0.1 Fork, just beyond P. 0.; bear right upgrade. 

4.8 1.1 End of road at school; turn left. 

5.2 0.4 Fork; bear right. Avoid right-hand diagonal road 5.4. 

7.9 2.7 Fork; bear right thru Palisades Park. Avoid left-hand diago- 

nal road 11.0, ascending grade. 
14.7 6.8 End of road, just beyond RR bridge; turn left. 

Right at this turn connects with Route 83 at mileage 34.1 to Port 
Jervls and Route 88 at mileage 34.1 to Newburgh. 

15.1 0.4 3-coraers at open space ; bear left. 

Right is Route 87 at mileage 2.2 to Warwick. 

17.3 2.2 TUXEDO, sta. on left. 

Straight ahead is Route 201 to New York City. 

Route 96— New York City to Nyack, N. Y.— 21.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Fort Lee, Alpine and Spark ill. Macadam roads practically all the way. 

The route goes up the west shore of the Hudson passing numerous estates, summer 
residences and a few small farms. 

Route 93 furnishes a longer option. 
Route 54 offers an option via Tarrytown. 
,-MILEAGE-v 

Total BrtSSe? F( >r this and other exits see City Map, het. pages. 

Mllssge Points 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, 130th St.— Fort Lee Ferry across Hudson 
river. 

Ferriage 20c to 75c, passenger, 5c; service every 15 to 20 minutes. 

Leaving ferry, keep ahead. 
0.1 0.1 Edgewater, N. J., 4-corners, bank on left. Turn right onto 
River road. 

1.7 1.6 Fork, in middle of upgrade; bear left onto Main St. 

2.1 0.4 Fort Lee, Main St. & Lemoine Ave. Turn right away from 
trolley onto Lemoine Ave. Thru diagonal 4-corners 4.4, com- 
ing onto Sylvan Ave. 

Points of interest, page 139. 

Left on Palisade Ave. leads to Englewood. 

Avoid left-hand diagonal road 9.2. 
9.5 7.4 Diagonal 4-corners ; bear left. 
9.7 0.2 Alpine, N. J., P. 0. on right. Straight thru. 
11.7 2.0 Irregular 4-corners; turn right, keeping ahead thru 4-corners. 

(West Point Points of Interest, continued from page 141) 
such a recommendation years before. Dur- at West Point during the war in order that 
ing the revolutionary war it was used as a the British ships might not fain passage. 
fortress, being laid out by the Polish patriot, The chief points of interest at West Point 
Kosciusko. The ruins of Fort Putnam, built are: Ruins of Fort Putnam and Kosciusko's 
at this time, may be seen on a high hill garden, reached by "Flirtation Walk"; Bat- 
above the river a little to the southwest of tie monument; headquarters with huge tower; 
the furthest point. Fort Clinton and the east academic building and library, which 
other works which went to make up the for- contains memorial by St. Gaudens to Whistler 
tress occupied the grounds now covered by and Edgar Allan Poe (cadets); mess hall, 
the academic buildings. The fortress was containing portraits of Sheridan, Grant 
defended by redoubts on the summits of and Sherman; Cullom hall; officers' club, 
the hills, Fort Putnam being principal of where hang many battle-scarred standards 
these. It was given over to the command (here cadet hops are held); chapel, to the 
of Benedict Arnold in 1780, whose plans to west base of mountains and the riding hall, 
surrender it into the hands of the enemy where daily exercises are open to visitors. 
were frustrated by the capture of Major An* The river view from West Point is said to 
tL A ohain was stretched across the river be one of the most wonderful in the world. 



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City Section Page 143 Route 98 

16.6 4.9 Sparkill, N. Y., 3-corners. Bear left and take first right-hand 

diagonal road at stone bridge just beyond. Avoid left and 
right-hand roads 17.2. 

17.4 0.8 Turn left across iron drawbridge and right at end of road 

immediately beyond. 

17.5 0.1 First left-hand road; turn left. Cross RR 17.6. 

17.7 0.2 Piermont, store on left. Straight thru on Piermont Ave. 

21.2 3.5 Burd St., George hotel on left; turn left upgrade, and at 4-cor- 

Nyack City Map and Points of Interest, page 81. 

ners at bank just beyond, turn right onto Broadway. 

21.3 0.1 NYACK, Broadway & Main Sts., bank on left. 

Route 98— Newark, N. J., to Suffern, N. Y.— 32.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Belleville, Rutherford, Hackensack, Areola, Hohokus and Ramsey. Pavement 
and macadam roads. 

Route is over city streets practically all the way to Hackensack, then thru suburban 
communities and intervening: farm areas. 

^-MILEAGE^ 

Total Brt^wn For this and other exits see City Map, page 100. 

Mi leaf e Points 

0.0. 0.0 NEWARK, Broad & Market Sts. Go north with trolley on 
Broad St. 

0.1 0.1 Fork at Military park; keep left with trolley on Broad St. 
Pass Washington park 0.6. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 
where trolley leaves 1.1. 

1.9 1.8 End of street at cemetery; turn left onto Harvey St. and im- 
mediately right onto Belleville Ave., joining trolley. 

2.2 0.3 Fork; bear right with trolley onto Washington Ave. 

4.8 2.6 Belleville, Washington Ave. & Rutgers St., one block beyond 
town hall. Turn right away from trolley onto Rutgers St. 
Cross RR 4.9. Cross long iron bridge over Passaic river 5.0. 

*5.2 0.4 4-corners; turn left onto Riverside Ave. 

6.6 1.4 Lyndhurst, fork. Bear right. Thru 6-corners 7.3, joining 

trolley on Park Ave. 

8.4 1.8 Rutherford, end of street at sta. square. Bear left onto Erie 

St. and immediately right across RR onto Park Ave. 

Points of interest, page 213. 

8.5 0.1 Irregular 4-corners; turn right onto Union Ave. 

8.7 0.2 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Hackensack St. 
9.1 0.4 Carlstadt, Hackensack St. & Paterson Ave. Straight thru. 

Points of Interest, page 213. 

10.3 1.2 Woodridge, school on left. Straight thru on Terrace Ave. 
L1.0 0.7 Hasbrouck Heights, fork. Keep right on Terrace Ave. 

13.1 2.1 Essex St. ; turn right. Cross RR at sta. 13.3. 

Hackensack City Map and Points of Interest, page 134. 

13.6 0.5 Fork, large bell in center; keep left on Essex St., turning left 

at end of street just beyond onto Main St., joining trolley. 

13.7 0.1 Hackensack, Main & Court Sts., court house on right. Straight 

thru (north) with trolley on Main St. Cross RR at sta. 14.1. 
14.5 0.8 Passaic St.; turn left away from trolley. Thru irregular 

4-corners at sign 14.7. Cross RR 14.8. 
16.0 1.5 Maywood, Passaic St. & Maywood Ave. Straight thru on 

Passaic St. Thru Rochelle Park 16.7. Cross trolley at Areola 

Sta. 17.7. 

18.2 2.2 Areola, fork, water wheel over to left. Bear right. 

Left fork is Route 75 to Dlngman's Ferry. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 22.2. Cross trolley 23.6. 

23.7 5.5 Hohokus, irregular 4-corners, P. O. on left. 

Straight thru. Cross trolley 24.8. 
24.9 1.2 Waldwick, wooden school otfer to left. Straight thru. 
26.2 1.3 Allendale, wooden church on right. Straight thru. 
28:3 2.1 Ramsey, sta. over to left. Straight thru. 

80.8 2.5 Mahwah, N. J., fire bell on right. Straight thru. x 

82.4 1.6 SUFFERN, N. Y., Orange & Lafayette Aves. 



r 

Brooklyn and Queens Page 144 Long Island Section 



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Long Island Section Page 145 . Detail M 



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Points of Interest 



Page 146 Long Island Section 



Brooklyn (pop. 2,000,000, alt. 8 to 30 ft.), at 
the west end of Long }sland, is the second 
largest borough of Greater New York in popu- 
lation. It is the fourth largest manufactur- 
ing center of the country. It hat more than 
8,000 factories, most of the larger ones being 
grouped along the water-front. Brooklyn has 
grown out of more than a dozen independent 
villages of Revolutionary days, which merged 
into one city and finally into a borough of 
the Greater City. It is connected with Man- 
hattan across the East river by three bridges, 
many tunnels and a number of ferries. Its 
principal thorofares are Fulton street, which 
terminates near the Brooklyn bridge, and 
Broadway, extending from the Williamsburg 
bridge. Brooklyn Heights, rising abruptly 
above the shore of the East river to an eleva- 
tion of some seventy to one hundred feet, was 
formerly the most fashionable section, but 
is now rapidly given over to boarding houses 
and apartment buildings. 

Practically all of Brooklyn is historic as a 
battlefield, the American forces under Gen- 
eral Washington having been defeated here 
by the British under Lord Howe. 

Following are some of the interesting fea- 
tures of the city: 
Brooklyn Bridge: 

Opened 1883; total length 6,016 ft., with cen- 
tral span of 1,595 ft. and breadth of 86 ft. 
Height above water, 135 ft. Took 13 years to 
build, at cost of some fifteen million dollars. 
Manhattan Bridge: 

Opened in 1909; 6,855 ft. long, 122 ft. wide; 
roadway in center, 149 ft. above water. Cost 
of construction approximately $29,900,000. 
View of Williamsburg bridge (left), Brook- 
lyn bridge (right). 
Sperry Bldg.: 

On plaza of Manhattan bridge. On top of 
this building is the Sperry searchlight, said 
to be the most powerful in the world. Its 
beam is more than a billion and a quarter 
candlepower and carries 20 miles. 
Williamsburg Bridge: 

Opened 1903; 7,308 ft. long, 118 ft. wide; 
height above water, 135 ft.; cost approxi- 
mately $15,000,000. 
Chamber of Commerce Bldg.: 

Tallest building in Brooklyn, 23 stories in 
height. 
Greenwood Cemetery: 

Situated on a high ridge near the extreme 
southern end of the city. One of the world's 
famous Jurying grounds and last resting 
place of John W. Mackay, builder of the com- 
mercial cable; John McCullough, famous 
actor; S. F. B. Morse, inventor of the tele- 
graph; Henry Ward Beecher, and many other 
famous persons. 
Prospect Park: 

Located on the same ridge as Greenwood 
cemetery; largest park in the borough, oc- 
cupying 516 acres. Cost $28,000,000. 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Memorial Arch: 

At main entrance of Prospect park; erected 
to memory of the men who lost their lives 
in the war for the Union. Bas relief prepared 
by Maurice J. Power, showing Lincoln and 
Grant on horseback reviewing army after 
fall of Richmond. In 1898. the arch was fur- 
adorned by bronze group on top, called 



POINTS OF INTEREST, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



the Quadriga, designed by Frederick Mac- 
Monnies; and in 1900 by two massive groups 
for the sides, one representing the army and 
the other the navy. 
Lafayette Memorial: 

Forming an entrance to Prospect park at 
Ninth street and Prospect Park West. Dedi- 
cated May 10, 1917; erected and presented by 
Henry Harteau, a distinguished citizen of 
Brooklyn. Represents Lafayette in the uni- 
form of an American general, as a youth of 
20, at which age he offered his services to 
Washington. 
Martyrs' Monument: 

In Fort Greene park. Erected to memory 
of the 20,000 patriots who were confined and 
died in British prison ships in the Wallabout 
basin, near here, during the revolution. 
Work of Stanford White. Shaft unveiled by 
President Wm. H. Taft, Nov. 14, 1908. 
Fort Greene park: 

Occupies 29 acres and is revolutionary bat- 
tleground, part of the battle of Long Island, 
so disastrous, to the American forces, being 
fought here. During civil war this park was 
used as training ground for Brooklyn regi- 
ments. Named for General Greene of the Am- 
erican army. 
Fort Hamilton: 

Named for Alexander Hamilton. One of 
the most powerful coast defenses of the U. S. 
Cornerstone laid in 1825; first garrisoned in 
1831. 
Plymouth Church: 

Organized in 1847; made famous by Henry 
Ward Beecher. Located on Orange street, 
Brooklyn Heights. 
Navy Yard: 

On east and south shores of Wallabout bay; 
chief naval station of the U. S*. 
Brooklyn Institute Museum: 

Located on Eastern Parkway near Pros- 
pect park; maintained at public expense un- 
der the direction of Brooklyn Institute of 
Arts and Sciences. Contains large and valu- 
able collection of paintings and other works 
of art and scientific material. Particularly 
notable among the exhibits are the famous 
Tissot paintings of the life of Christ. 
Botanic Garden: 

One section devoted to wild flowers of 
New York state and vicinity, another to 
Japanese garden and a third to children's 
gardens. Open to public. 
Ebbets Field: 

Brooklyn's baseball park; all steel and con- 
crete; built at cost of $1,000,000. Seats 25,000 
persons. The world's series games were 
played here in 1920. 
Coney Island: 

World famed as an amusement resort and 
visited by practically every tourist entering 
the vicinity of New York City. A boardwalk 
is to be built by the city along the entire 
water-front which will rival the famous At- 
lantic City boardwalk. 

Ocean parkway from Prospect park to Coney 
Island; Eastern parkway running eastward 
from Prospect park almost to the boundary 
of the borough, and the Shore Road drive 
along the edge of the lower bay, are- three of 
the most popular auto roads in Greater New 
York. 



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Long Island Section Page 147 Route 101 

Route 101— New York City to Port Jefferson (L. I.), N. Y. 

— «0.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Long 1 Island City, Flushing, Bayslde, Roslyn, East Norwich, Cold Spring: Harbor, 
Huntington, Centerport and Northport. Pavement and asphalt-macadam all the way. 

The main north shore road. An uninteresting: road as far as Dougrlaston, then thru 
a summer residential section to Roslyn; truck gardening and small farms to Cold Spring: 
Harbor; balance thru suburban and farming: district. 

Connects at Port Jefferson with Route 118 to Greenport. 

Route 118 offers a better option via Jamaica. 

^" ,L DuSSct ^ or * n * 8 and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

iiTi^ B pou!5 n Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

0.0 0.0 COLUMBUS CIRCLE, 59th St. & Broadway, Columbus statue 

in center. Go east with trolley on 69th St. along Central park. 
1.0 1.0 Just beyond elevated; bear left away from trolley onto 

Queensboro bridge. 
2.5 1.5 Long Island City, at end of bridge, elevated goes ahead. Turn 

left onto Crescent Ave. 
3.0 0.5 Webster Ave., end of pavement; turn right up slight grade. 
3.5 0.5 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Jackson Ave. 

Thru Corona 7.0. Cross RR at sta. 8.6. 
8.7 5.2 Flushing,* Jackson Ave. & Main St., fountain in parkway on 

right. Straight thru on Jackson Ave., leaving trolley. 

Avoid left-hand diagonal street at Flushing high school just 

beyond Armory 9.0. 
10.3 1.6 Fork, just beyond Broadway Country club; bear right with 

Broadway under RR. 
12.8 2.0 Bayside, Broadway & Bell Ave. Straight thru on Broadway. 

Right on Bell Ave. is Route 107 to Lake Ronkonkoma. 

13.7 1.4 Douglaston. Straight thru with trolley. Thru Little Neck 

14.3. 
14.6 0.9 Fork; bear right with trolley. 
16.5 1.9 Manhasset, fork. Bear right with trolley onto E. Turnpike. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 19.2. 

19.8 3.3 3-corners, old clock tower in center; bear left away from 

trolley. 

19.9 0.1 End of road, just beyond bank; turn left. 

Right at this turn is Route 143 at mileage 3.8 to Long Beach. 

20.1 0.2 Roslyn,* fork flagpole and water trough in center. 

Left fork is Route 103 to Sea Cliff and Oyster Bay. 

Bear right, ascending grade. 
21.1 1.0 Fork; bear left with macadam. Thru Greenvale 23.6. 

Right at 23.6 is Route 142 to Massapequa. 

26.8 5.7 East Norwich, irregular 4-corners. Straight thru upgrade. 

Left is Route 128 to Oyster Bay. 
Right is Route 105 to Massapequa. 

27.1 0.3 Fork; keep left. 

30.8 3.8 End of road; turn left. 

31.9 1.1 Cold Spring Harbor, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 
32.3 0.4 Fork; bear right upgrade. 

'Flushing, L. I. (pop. 25,000). The oldest The Country club and Broadway country club 

Quaker settlement on Long Island. On the are located here, and other points of interest 

south side of Broadway is the Friends' meet- are the armory and the civil war obelisk, 

ing house, one of the oldest places of wor- 'Roslyn, L. I. (pop. 2,500, alt. 120 ft.), is on 

ship now standing in the United States; it the north shore of Long Island and at the 

was erected in 1694. One of the old houses is head of Hempstead Harbor. Here are located 

the Bowne mansion on Bowne avenue, erected many estates of wealthy New Yorkers, in- 

in 1661. William Penn sent George Fox, eluding the Mackays and Whitneys. William 

Quaker proselyter, to establish Quakerism Cullen Bryant, the American poet of nature, 

ra this country* and he lived in the Bowne did much literary work here. The house 

mansion in 1672. Almost opposite this house which Bryant occupied for thirty-five years 

is a large stone marker, on the site of "Fox was called "Cedarmere," a rambling and 

Oaks," beneath whose branches George Fox, picturesque home. The poet is buried in the 

founder of Society of Friends, preached on village cemetery. The North Shore country 

June 7, 1672. Among Flushing's prominent club and the Engineers country club are 

citizens is Ellis Parker Butler, the writer. located here. 



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Route 103 Page 148 Long Island Section 

33.7 1.4 Huntington,* Main St. & New York Ave. 

Right is Route 109 to Amltyvllle. 

Straight thru (east) on Main St. 
84.0 0.3 Fork, cemetery and soldiers' monument on right; bear left. 
Pass Hecksher Park on left 34.1. Thru irregular 4-corners 
34.4. 

85.0 1.0 Fork; bear left upgrade. 
35.3 0.8 Fork; bear left. 

35.8 0.5 Fork; bear right with macadam. Thru Centerport 36.9. 

87.2 1.4 End of road; turn left. 

38.3 1.1 Northport, fork. Bear right. Cross RR 38.8. 

39.1 0.8 Irregular 4-corners ; meeting trolley, turn right. 

40.2 1.1 East Northport, sta. on right. Straight thru across RR. 
43.1 2.9 4-corners, aviation field on left; turn left. 

44.3 1.2 Commack. Keep ahead. 

48.8 4.5 Fork, just beyond RR underpass; bear right. 

49.5 0.7 Smithtown. Straight thru across RR. 

50.1 0.6 Smithtown Branch, town hall on right. Keep ahead. 

50.2 0.1 Left-hand road, just beyond wooden school; turn left, keep- 

ing right at fork just beyond. Cross RR 52.7. 
58.8 3.6 St. James, diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. 

55.3 1.5 Stony Brook, right-hand road. Turn right. Pass Stony Brook 

Sta. on right 56.8. 

57.6 2.3 Fork; bear right. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 59.4. 

60.6 3.0 End of road ; turn right onto Main St., passing P. O. on right. 

60.7 0.1 PORT JEFFERSON, Main & Jones Sts., bank on left. 

Straight ahead is Route 118 to Greenport. 

Route 103— New York City to Oyster Bay (L. I.), 
N. Y.— 32.4 m. 

# For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Flashing, Bayside, Little Neck, Roslyn and Sea Cliff. Pavement and asphalt - 
macadam all the way. 

This route follows the shore practically all the way, winding around all the bays and 
running out on all the points. As far as Flushing it is uninteresting, but it traverses a 
^-MILEAGE-s beautiful residential area, mainly summer homes, balance of way. 

8%* c * Route 101 to East Norwich, combined with Route 128 to Oyster Bay. 

Mileage PoloS" offers the best connection between above terminals. 

0.0 0.0 COLUMBUS CIRCLE, 59th St. & Broadway, Columbus statue 
in center. See Route 101 for directions to Roslyn, 20.1 miles, 
where reset odometer to 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 Roslyn, fork, flagpole and water trough in center. 

Right fork is Route 101 to Huntington. 

Bear left (north). 
1.0 1.6 Left-hand road ; turn left with travel. 
1.6 0.6 Fork; bear left. 

1.6 0.1 Fork; keep left. 

1.7 0.1 Fork; bear right along Hempstead harbor. Avoid right-hand 

road 2.1. 
3.7 2.0 Sea Cliff,* Prospect & Sea Cliff Aves. 

Straight ahead on Prospect Ave. leads to Ferry for Rye Beach. 

Turn right onto Sea Cliff Ave., bearing right with Sea Cliff 

•Huntington, L. I. (pop. 8,000, alt. 205 ft.). street, is the soldiers' monument. Here also 

A famous yachting rendezvous on the north at one time Walt Whitman, the poet, lived, 

shore of Long Island, founded in 1653. Many The Huntington country club is another at- 

British ships anchored in Huntington bay traction of the place. 

during the revolution. A large glacial boul- ^ea Cliff, L. I. (pop. 2,000 alt. 200 ft.) is 

, , A , . xt tL tt i primarily a summer resort offering many in- 

der marks the spot where Nathan Hale, spy duCtmentSf 8uch as fine boating> bathing> 

from Washington's army, was captured, Sep- fishing> etc u was founded j Q the 8Cvcnties 

tember, 1776. Along the driveway is a public as a Methodist camp meeting ground by the 

drinking fountain, on the marble shaft of Sea Cliff Grove and Metropolitan Camp 

which is inscribed Hale's last words, "I re- Ground association of New York and Brook- 

gret that I have but one life to give for my lyn. The North Shore country club is an at- 

country." Near Memorial building on Main tractive feature, having excellent golf links. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Long Island Section Page 149 Route 105 

Ave. at flagpole just beyond. Thru irregular 4-corners 4.0. 
4.4 0.7 Irregular 4-corners, roadhouse on left; turn left onto Glen 
Cove Ave. 

Straight ahead is Route 142 to Massapequa. 

5.4 1.0 4-corners; turn left. 

5.5 0.1 Glen Cove.* Straight thru, joining trolley.. 

5.8 0.3 4-corners ; bear right away from trolley onto Forest Ave. 
6.8 1.0 Fork; keep right on Forest Ave. Thru Matinecock 7.7. Avoid 
left-hand diagonal road 8.1. Thru Locust Valley 8.5. 

9.8 3.0 Fork, just beyond stone bridge; bear left. 

9.9 0.1 3-corners; bear right upgrade. 
10.8 0.9 Fork; bear right upgrade. 

11.5 0.7 End of road; turn left 

12.0 0.5 End of road; turn left and at end of road just beyond, turn 

right onto W. Main St. 
12.3 0.3 OYSTER BAY,* W. Main & South Sts. 

Right on South St. is Route 105 to Massapequa. 

Route 105 — Oyster Bay to Massapequa (L. I,), N. Y. 15. 6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
^MlLEAGE-x Via Jericho and Hicksville. Asphalt-macadam all the way. 

t . i Ski*" 0- This route traverses a region of small farms and truck gardens, some 

m&YSSff wooded sections. 

0.0 0.0 OYSTER BAY, South & Main Sts. Go south on South St. 
0.4 0.4 Fork; bear right. 

2.1 1.7 East Norwich, irregular 4-corners, store on right. Straight 
thru. 

Right is Route 139 to New York. 
T Left is Route 101 to Huntington. 

Sharp left at 5.6 is Route 118 to Port Jefferson. 

5.8 3.7 Jericho, fork. Bear left. • 

Right on Jericho turnpike is Route 145 to New York City. 

7.6 1.8 Irregular 4-corners-; bear left with Broadway. Cross RR 7.7. 
7.8 2 Hicksville, Broadway & Marie Ave., bank on left. 

Straight thru on Broadway. Under Motor parkway 10.8, cross- 
ing switch just beyond. Same thorofare becomes Hicksville 
road. Thru diagonal 4-corners 11.4. Cross RR 14.9. 

Left at 11.4 is Route 120 at mileage 17.5 to Babylon. 
Right at 11.4 is Route 153 to New York City. 

15.6 7.8 MASSAPEQUA, Hicksville & Merrick roads. 

Right on Merrick road is Route 147 to New York. 
Left on Merrick road is Route 122 to Babylon. 

•Glen Cove, N. Y. (pop. 12.000. alt. 5 ft.), who came here in 1653. The shore of the bay 

was the scene of many battles of the revolu- extends northward to Sagamore hill, on the 

tionary war, including the battle of Long crest of which was the home of America's 

Island. It is the only city on Long Island famous ex-President, the late Theodore 

outside of Greater New York. Roosevelt. On Centre island, near Oyster 

•Oyster Bay, L. I. (pop. 4,000, alt. 8 ft.). On Bay, is the home of the Seawanhaka Cor- 

the north shore of Long Island, settled by a inthian yacht club, a favorite rendezvous 

colony of Englishmen from Sandwich, Mass., for sport enthusiasts. 



Sagamore - Garage FULL LINE 0F accessories and 

West Main and Spring Streets SUPPLIES 

Oyster Bay, Long Island, N. Y. Distributor of CHEVROLET CARS 



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Routes 107-109-111 Page 150 Long Island Section 

Route 107 — New York City to Lake Ronkonkoma (L. L), 

N. Y.— 56.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Queensboro Bridge, Flushing, Bay side and the Motor parkway. Pavement and 
asphalt-macadam the entire distance. 

The Motor parkway is 42 ft miles long. It was built for the first Vanderbilt cup race, 
which occurred in 1904. There are practically no crossroads as the Motor park-way 
either goes under or is bridged over all crossroads. Speed limit on the parkway is 40 
miles per hour. Entrance may be had to the parkway from all main north and south 
roads. 

~" ,L Dtou!!icV For this and otlier exits see Cit y MaD » bet « P a S es 98-99. 

*Ti2& B p& < S n Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus Circle, 59th St. & Broadway, 

Columbus statue in center. Go east with trolley on 59th St. 

along Central park. 
1.0 1.0 Just beyond elevated; bear left away from trolley onto 

Queensboro bridge. 
2.5 1.5 Long Island City, at end of bridge, elevated goes ahead. Turn 

left onto Crescent Ave. 

3.0 0.5 Webster Ave., end of pavement; turn right up slight grade. 
3.5 0.5 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Jackson Ave. 

Thru Corona 7.0, coming along Flushing bay. Cross wooden 

drawbridge 8.5 and RR at sta. 8.6. 
8.7 5.2 Flushing, Jackson Ave. & Main St., fountain in parkway on 

right. Straight thru on Jackson Ave., leaving trolley. 

Avoid left-hand diagonal street at Flushing high school, just 

beyond Armory 9.0. 
10.3 1.6 Fork, just beyond Broadway Country club; bear right with 

Broadway. 

12.3 2.0 Bayside, Broadway & Bell Ave. Turn right onto Bell Ave. 

Straight ahead on Broadway is Route 101 to Port Jefferson. 

12.6 0.3 End of street; turn left onto Rocky Hill road. 

14.4 1.3 Motor parkway ; turn left. 
15.9 1.5 Toll Gate— charges $1.00. 
56.9 41.0 LAKE RONKONKOMA. 

Route 109— Huntington to Amityville (L. I.), N. Y.— 14.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
/-MILCAGE-x Via Melville. Asphalt-macadam and concrete roads. 

Tat»i RiSSSS? ThiB route goes thru a region of small farms with a few wooded sec- 

Mileage Point* tions. An excellent connection from the north to the south shores. 

0.0 0.0 HUNTINGTON, New York Ave. & Main St. Go south with 

trolley on New York Ave. 
1.7 1.7 Fork; keep right with trolley. 

3.1 1.4 Fork; bear right with trolley. 

6.2 3.1 Melville, end of road. Turn right away from trolley. Bear 

right with trolley at St. Rose Industrial school 8.6. 
9.0 2.8 Fork; keep left with trolley. 

Left at 11.1 is Route 120 at mileage 21.1 to Babylon. 
Right at 11.1 is Route 153 at mileage 6.1 to New York City. 

Cross RR 11.2. Thru diagonal 4-corners, joining trolley on 

Broadway. Cross RR 14.2. 
14.4 5.4 Fork; bear left — still on Broadway. 
14.9 0.5 AMITYVILLE, Broadway & Merrick road. 

Right on Merrick Road is Route 147 to New York. 
Left on Merrick Road is Route 122 to Green port. 

Route 111 — Centerport to Babylon, L. I. — 14.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

^-MILEAGE-^ 

Total Between Gravel roads, with some macadam. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 CENTERPORT, 4-corners. Go south. Cross RR at Green, 
lawn Sta. 1.5. Thru diagonal 4-corners 8.5. r~ 

igi ize y ^ 



Long 'Island Section Page 151 Routes 112-113-114 

3.7 3.7 4-corners; turn left. 

5.0 1.3 Right-hand road; turn right — sign "Babylon." Go under 
Motor parkway bridge 6.4. Cross RR at Deer Park Sta. 9.9. 
Cross RR 14.1. Join trolley from right 14.2 — now on Deer 
Park Ave. 
14.4 9.4 BABYLON, Deer Park Ave. & Main St. 

Route 112— Smithtown to East Islip, (L. I.), N. Y.— 9.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

*" DltUnee Via Hauppauge. First 2% miles concrete; balance sandy dirt. 

Tttal Between An uninteresting ride thru scrub country with a few small farms. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 SMITHTOWN, at RR. Go east. 

0.2 0.2 Smithtown Branch, right-hand road. Turn right. 

0.7 0.5 Fork; bear right. 

2.2 1.5 End of road; turn right. 

2.3 0.1 Hauppauge, left-hand diagonal road. Bear left. 
4.0 1.7 Fork; bear left. Thru 4-corners 4.3. 

Gross RR at Central Islip Sta.* 5.3. Gross RRs 6.7-9.0 on Carle- 
ton Ave. 

9.4 5.4 EAST ISLIP, Carleton Ave. & Merrick road. 

Route 113 — St. James to Sayville, L. L — 13.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

^-MlLEAGE-x Lake Ronkonkoma. Dirt road most of the way. 

Distance Thru an uninteresting scrub section of interior Long Island that is 

Trtal Between being slowly developed. 
Mi lento Points Gives connections to the Motor Parkway at mileage 4.6. 

0.0 0.0 ST. JAMES, 4-corners. Go southeast turning first right. 

Cross RR 0.3. 
2.0 2.0 Fork, school ahead on left; bear right. Bear left 3.7. Avoid 

right-hand diagonal road 4.6. Pass Lake Ronkonkoma on 

right 6.3. 

Diagonally right at 4.6 leads to Motor Parkway. 

6.5 4.5 Irregular 4-corners, bear left. 

6.8 0.3 End of road; turn right. Over RR bridge 7.5. 

7.6 0.8 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right. 

9.4 1.8 Diagonal 4-corners, bear left onto Sayville road. Cross RR 

. at sta. 12.9. / 

13.1 3.7 SAYVILLE,* end of road at trolley. 

Route 114 — Port Jefferson to Patchogue (L. I.)> 
N.Y.— 14.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Coram and Medford. Asphalt-macadam all the way, except half a mile of gravel 
,-MILEAGE-v coming into Patchogue. 

t^.1 8%"** This route traverses a scrub oak section and a cut-over scrub sec- 

MiuSw PoKS" tion witn a few nouses scattered along the road. 

0.0 0.0 PORT JEFFERSON, Main & Jones Sts., bank on left Go 
south on Main St. Gross RR at sta. 1.1. 

6.7 6.7 Coram, fork. Keep right. 

6.8 0.1 Diagonal 4-corners ; bear right with macadam. 
10.4 3.6 Medford. Straight thru across RR at sta. 

•Central Islip, N. Y. (pop. 500.). The New *Sayville, N. Y. (pop. 3,200, alt. 28 ft.), on 

York state hospital, covering over one hun- Lon * Island ' is a P°P«Iar resort and the cen- 
ter of a fishing and oyster industry. Near 
dred acres and caring for nearly six thousand here was found a very active German wire . 

patients is located here. less station. 



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Route 118 



Page 152 Long Island Section 



14.0 3.6 End of road ; meeting trolley, turn right onto E. Main St. 

Left is Route 122 to Green port. 

14.4 0.4 PATCHOGUE,* E. Main St. & Ocean Ave. 

Straight ahead on Main St. is Route 147 to Babylon. 

Route 116 — Riverhead to Southampton, L. I. — 15.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Flanders and Good Ground. First 8 miles dirt; balance concrete and asphalt- 
macadam. Thru scrub oak and pine sections practically all of the way. 

This route gives a connection from the north shore for east-bound tourists wishing 

to reach points on the south shore at the eastern end of the island. However, motorists 

<~miJ:A6E-> from points west of Port Jefferson will find preferable road conditions 

»-• i 52^5* by going directly south to the Merrick road from their respective start- 

muS!i. B pS!!Sr **g Point* 

0.0 0.0 RIVERHEAD, Main & Peconic Sts. Go south on Peconic St. 
0.2 0.2 Fork; bear left. Avoid right-hand road 0.4. Thru Flanders 

2.7. Bear right 7.3. 
7.9 7.7 End of road at lumber yard, turn left on the South Country 
road. Thru Good Ground* 8.6. Curve right over RR bridge 
9.2 and left beyond. Cross iron bridge 9.8 and follow direct 
road. 
15.9 8.0 SOUTHAMPTON,* 4-corners at wooden church. 

Route 118— New York City to Greenport (L. L), N. Y.— 

104.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Queensboro Bridge. Jamaica. Mineola, Jericho, Port Jefferson and Riverhead. 
Macadam and asphalt- macadam to Port Jefferson; then 5 miles of gravel, followed by 
dirt to outskirts of Riverhead: balance gravel and gravelly dirt. 

Thru truck garden and slightly rolling farming area to Port Jefferson with some 
wooded sections near Smithtown and Stony Brook; wooded and scrub oak section to 
Riverhead: bain nee thru a farming aren 

Route 101 offers an option to Port Jefferson via Roslyn. 

Route 122 over the south shore road furnishes an option. 



•Patchogue, L. I. (pop. 7,000, alt. 15 ft.), an 
Indian name meaning "Many Waters." This 
name is well applied, for besides the Atlantic 
ocean and Great South bay one finds here 
many attractive lakes and rivulets. It is 
noted for its oyster markets and is within 
about a mile of the actual strip of land known 
as Blue Point, from which the famous Blue- 
Foint oyster derives its name, thousands of 
barrels being shipped from here. 

Patchogue is a popular summer resort offer- 
ing excellent boating and fishing facilities. 
The South Bay yacht and field club is located 
here. 

•Good Ground, L. I. (pop. 1,000, alt. 60 ft.), 
is a noted summer resort and the home of 
Charles F. Murphy, Tammany boss. It is sur- 
rounded by Peconic bay and the Shinnecock 
bay and canal. The bay, which is landlocked 
and especially safe for boating and sailing, is 
about 2J4 miles wide and 12 miles long. Fish- 
ing is good, and there is an abundance of 
oysters and crabs in the bay. There is 
excellent still water bathing. The Shinnecock 
golf l.nks. which are easily accessible, are 
famous among golf players. The old Canoe 
Place inn has been a tavern since 1635, when 
it catered to Indians and traders. It has a 
charter direct from Her Majesty Queen Anne 
obliging the inn to "supply both man and 
beast." It took its name from the fact that 
he Indians portaging their canoes across the 
sthmus between Shinnecock and Peconic 
bays, then called Merosue, or Canoe Place, 



stopped there for refreshments. It is a popu- 
lar resort for motorists, coaching parties and 
hunters. An interesting tradition connected 
with a figure head of Hercules (seen here), 
taken from an old ship, is that "all girls who 
kiss this will be married within a year." 

♦Southampton, L. I. (pop.* 3,000, alt. 45 ft.), 
a popular summer resort located on the 
southeastern shore of Long Island, east of 
Shinnecock bay, is the oldest English settle- 
ment in New York state. Here are located 
the Hampton and Meadow tennis clubs, on 
whose grounds matches are held annually 
between the leading tennis players of the 
country in preparation for the great tourna- 
ments; and the Southampton horse associa- 
tion, with its park of about 50 acres, which 
provides for the annual horse show, polo, 
baseball and other athletic sports. Here also 
is the Parrish art gallery, built and main- 
tained by Samuel L. Parrish. A few hundred 
feet from the ocean is the picturesque Aga- 
warn lake, at the southern end of which is 
the well known "Dune church." On the walls 
of this church are mementos and tablets de- 
scribing wrecks of vessels which have oc- 
curred in the neighborhood. The Art Village, 
with its quaint and cozy cottages, is an 
interesting settlement, as is also the Indian 
reservation nearby in its surviving remnants. 
High above these are the "Hills" in a park 
of 5,000 acres, with numerous fine villas, 
lovely views and excellent sailing on the 
bay. The drive to "Barrell Hill" is most 
scenic and interesting. 



Long Island Section Page 153 



Route 11* 



^MILEAQE-v 
Distance 
Total Between 
Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 



1.0 1.0 

2.7 1.7 

3.0 0.3 

6.4 3.4 

8.2 1.8 

10.2 2.0 

11*3 1.1 



14.5 3.2 
16.4 1.9 

20.4 4.0 



26.6 6.2 
26.8 0.2 



40.9 14.1 

45.5 4.6 

46.2 0.7 

46.8 0.6 

46.9 0.1 

49.5 2.6 

52.0 2.5 



For this and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 
Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

NEW YORK CITY, Columbus Circle, 59th St. & Broadway, 
Columbus statue in center. Go east with trolley on 59th St. 
along Central park. 

Just beyond elevated, bear left away from trolley onto 
Queensboro bridge. 

Long Island City, at circle. Bear right under branch ele- 
vated. 

Irregular 4-corners, biscuit factory on left; bear left with 
trolley on Queens Blvd. Thru Winfield 5.1 and Newtown 6.1. 
Irregular 4-corners; bear left with trolley — still on Queens 
Bivd. 

Forest Hills.* Straight thru with trolley. Thru Kew Gar- 
dens 9.1. 

Hillside Ave. ; turn left away from trolley. 
Jamaica,* Hillside & Bergen Aves., Peace monument in 
center. 

Right is Route 122 to Green port. 

Straight thru (east) on Hillside Ave. 

End of road ; turn right onto Rocky Hill road. 

Fork; bear left with trolley under RR onto Jericho turnpike. 

Thru Floral Park* 16.7 and New Hyde Park 17.7. 

Mineola,* Jericho-turnpike & Willis Ave. 

Straight thru on Jericho turnpike. Cross RR 20.6. 

Right at 20.8 is Route 127 to Rockvllle Center and Long Beach. 

Left at 20.8 is Route 143 to Roslyn and Sea Cliff. 

Jericho, end of road. Turn left. 

Right is 'Route 105 to Massapequa. , 

Right-hand diagonal road ; bear right. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 130 to Sea Cliff and Route 
128 to Oyster Bay. 

Gross RR 28.6. Caution for cross-road 31.0. Thru diagonal 
4-corners, keeping ahead across trolley 34.3. Thru 4-corners 
at aviation field 39.8. 

Right at 84.3 is Route 109 at mileage 3.3 to Amity vl He. 
Left at 34.3 is Route 129 at mileage 11.6 to Huntington. 

Commack. Straight thru. 
Fork, just beyond RR underpass ; bear right. 
Smithtown. Straight thru across RR. 
Smithtown Branch, town hall on right. Keep ahead. 
Left-hand road, just beyond wooden school ; turn left, keep- 
ing right at fork just beyond. Cross RR 49.0. 
St. James, diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. 
Stony Brook, right-hand road. Turn right. Pass Stony Brook 
Sta. on right 53.0. 



•Forest Hills, L. L (pop. 3,000). A residen- 
tial section near Forest Park, Brooklyn. 
That part of the village known as Forest 
Hills Gardens was established by the Russell 
Sage Foundation Homes Co. The Fourth of 
July celebrations held here each year have 
achieved national fame. The West Side 
Tennis club, considered one of the finest in 
the country, is located here. On its courts 
several international tournaments have been 
held. 

•Jamaica, L. I., is the railroad center of 
Long Island. It is one of the old towns of 
Queensboro and has some historical old 
houses. Among them is the colonial home- 
stead of Governor John A. King, the first 
ambassador to England from the United 
States. It was built more than 125 years ago 
and is now used as a colonial museum. Ja- 
maica also has an interesting peace monu- 
ment. 



•Floral Park, L. I. (pop. 2,000, alt. 97 ft.). 
This village, formerly known as East Hins- 
dale, was the intersecting point of the old 
Stewart railroad running from Flushing to 
Babylon. In the early eighties John Lewis 
Childs settled here and renamed it Floral 
Park and founded the large seed, bulb and 
plant business which bears his name. This 
village is an all -year- round suburb of New 
York City. 

♦Mineola, U I. (pop. 2,000, alt. 107 ft.). The 
seat of Nassau county and second largest 
railroad center on Long Island. The Nassau 
county court house, corner Old Country road 
and Franklin avenue, cost $1,500,000. The 
Queen's and Nassau counties' fair, held here 
annually during the last week in September, 
has as high as 40,000 paid admissions in one 
day. The government aviation fields, started 
by Glenn Curtiss and the Wright Bros., are 
located }4 mile from Mineola on the Old 
Country road. 



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Route 118 Page 154 Long Island Section 

54.3 2.8 Fork; bear right. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 56.1. 

57.3 3.0 End of road ; turn right onto Main St., passing P. 0. on right. 

57.4 0.1 Port Jefferson, Main & Jones Sts., bank on left. 

Straight thru on Main St. 
58.3 0.9 Irregular 4-corners, concrete building on left; turn left. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 114 at mileage 0.9 to 
Patchogue. 

Thru Mount Sinai 60.4. 
61.9 8.6 Fork at foot of grade; bear right with travel. Thru Miller 

Place 62.2. Bear right 62.6. 
62.9 1.0 Fork; bear left. Cross RR 64.2. 

67.5 4.6 Fork; bear left. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 67.6. 

Gross RR 68.0. Caution for right curve around hill 69.7. 
76.9 8.4 8-corners ; bear right. 

71.1 0.2 Wading River, fork, P. O. in center. Bear right. 

71.5 0.4 Fork; keep left. Thru diagonal 4-corners 72.6. 

82.0 10.5 Riverhead,* Main St., Peconic St. & Roanoke Ave., P. O. on 
left. 

Right on Peconic St. is Note (a) to Quogue. 

Straight thru on Main St. Cross RR 82.6. Thru Aquebogue 
85.1 ; Jamesport 87.6 and Laurel 89.0. Cross RR 90.1. 

91.6 9.6 Mattituck, irregular 4-corners, cemetery on left. Bear right. 

94.7 8.1 Cutchogue, stores on right. Straight thru. 

99.2 4.5 8-corners, soldiers' monument in center; bear right. Thru 

Southhold 99.6. Cross RR 102.2. Same thorofare becomes 
Front St 
104.5 5.3 GREENPORT,* Front & Main Sts., at Western Union Sta. 

Note (a) Route 118 — Riverhead to Quogue (L# I.), N. T. — 7.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Dirt road all the way. This note connects with Route 147 and thereby offers the best 
connection from. Riverhead to Jamaica and New York. 

Mlhrerhead, L. I. (pop. 3,000, alt. 25 ft.), is an ceptional facilities for boating, bathing, auto- 
important town on the eastern end of Long ing and fishing. About one mile beyond 
Island and county seat of Suffolk county. It Grecnport is Fort Terry, on Plum Island, 
is the scene of a real country fair, held annu- wh , icn is one of the most important coast 
ally. In the immediate neighborhood is good <* efen »« »tations .covering the approach to 
t. \s j £ «.• Ncw York by way of Long Island sound. A 
boating and fishing ^^ §py opcrated from hcrc duri tnc 

•Graenport. L. I. (pop. 3,800, sea level), is Ute worW war Hc wag an mlgn and had 

on Peconic bay at the eastern end of Long map8 of all thc mincg in Long Illand gound 

Island. It has four big shipbuilding plants. Eighty years ago this was an important 

an extensive oyster culture industry and ex- whaling town. 



BOOTH HOUSE LOCATED ON PECONIC BAY : 

Rooms with Baths 
H. C. XAYNOR.OwneranJProprietor Tenn j 8 Court ^ ^ 

Telephone 236 Greenport and Fishing 

GREEN'POR. r, L.. I., N. I. Special accommodations J 'or auiomobilhts 



STEVE'S VIENNA RESTAURANT and HOTEL 

GREENPORT, L L 



Official Blue Book Hotel and 
New York State Association Club 

The most handsomely decorated 
and appointed Restaurant and 
Grin on east end of Long Island 

Insures the highest quality of sea 
food. Excellent service and cooking 

STEPHAN CVIJA. Proprietor 
34 Front Street Phono 2S5 J 



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Long Island Section Page 155 Route 120 

0.0 0.0 RIVERHEAD, Peconic & Main Sts. at P. O. Go south on Peconic St. (a right 

turn if coming from New York City). 
t.2 0.2 Fork; bear lelt. 
0.6 0.3 Right-hand road; turn right. 
(.5 6.0 Fork; bear right. Cross RR at Quogue SU. 7.0. 
7.9 2.4 End of road at outskirts of Quogue. 

Right is Route 147 to New York City. 

Left is Route 122 to Qreenport. 

Route 120— New York City to Babylon, (L. I.), 
N. Y.— 43.9 m. 

. For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Williamsburg Bridge, Jamaica, Hempstead and Farmingdale. A 
all the way, except 6 miles between Farmingdale and Babylon which Is 



Via Williamsburg Bridge, Jamaica, Hempstead and Farmingdale. Asphalt-macadam 

the way, except 6 miles between Farmingdale and Babylon which Is dirt. 

Thru a truck farming region to Farmingdale, then thru a wild deserted section cov- 



ered with brambles and a few scrub oaks and stunted pines. 
Route 122 offers an option to Babylon via Rockville Center. 

'~ M,L Dirta!nM For this an< * other exite see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

mSmVSSff Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus Circle, Broadway & 59th St., 
Columbus statue in center. Go south with trolley on Broad- 
way. 

0.5 0.5 Times square (7th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 
on Broadway. 

1.2 0.7 Greeley square (6th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 
on Broadway. 

1.8 0.6 Madison square; bear right away from trolley onto 5th Ave., 

passing Flat Jron building on left. 

2.5 0.7 9th St., one block before park; turn left. 

2.9 0.4 Lafayette St., Wanamaker's on right; turn right, passing 

statue of Lafayette in open square on left. 

3.6 0.7 Fork at small green; keep right on Lafayette St. and imme- 

diately turn left onto Kenmar St. 

3.7 0.1 End of street; turn right under elevated onto The Bowery and 

immediately left onto Delancey St. 

4.2 0.5 Take left-hand drive over Williamsburg Bridge. 

5.7 1.5 Roebling St., just beyond Valley Forge monument; turn right 
with trolley. Bear right away from trolley at church onto 
Taylor St. 5.9. 

6.0 0.3 Bedford Ave.; turn left. 

7.3 1.3 Lafayette St., synagogue on left; turn left. 

8.7 1.4 Irregular 4-corners; turn right under elevated and immedi- 
ately left away from same, continuing on Lafayette St. 
8.9 0.2 End of street; turn right onto Bushwick Ave. 
10.6 1.7 Fork; keep right on Bushwick Ave. 

10.8 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; meeting trolley, bear left onto Jamaica 
Ave. 

14.6 3.8 Richmond Hills, irregular 4-corners at 117th St. 

Turn left away from trolley onto Hillside Ave. Cross RR 14.7, 
avoiding left-hand diagonal road just beyond. Thru diagonal 
4-corners 15.3-15.7. 

16.7 2.1 Jamaica, Hillside & Bergen Aves., at peace monument. 

Right is Route 122 to Qreenport. 

Straight thru (east) on Hillside Ave. 
19.3 2.6 Queens road; turn right. 
20.1 0.8 End of road ; meeting trolley, turn left onto Jamaica Ave. and 

immediately bear right with trolley onto Fulton St. Cross 

RR 20.2. Belmont race track on left 21.2. Cross RR at W. 

Hempstead Sta. 25.9. 
26.0 5.9 Fork; bear left on Fulton St. 
26.6 0.6 Hempstead, Fulton St. & Franklin Ave. 

Right on Franklin Ave. is Route 143 to Long Beach. 
Left on Franklin Ave. is Route 127 to Sea Cliff. 

Straight thru on Fulton St. Cross trolley at bank 26.7. 
Thru diagonal 4-corners 34.2. Thru 5-corners 34.5. Croi 
RR 35 A 



Route 122 Page 156 Long Island Section 

Right at 34.2 is Route 105 at mileage 11.4 to Massapequa. 

Left at 34.2 is Route 128 at mileage 4.2 to Oyster Bay. % 

36.0 9.4 Fork; bear right onto Fulton St. 

36.7 0.7 Farmingdale, Fulton & Main Sts. Straight thru across trolley 
on Fulton St. 

Right at 37.8 is Route 109 at mileage 11.1 to Amltyvllle. 
Left at 37.8 is Route 129 at mileage 3.8 to Huntington. 

41.4 4.7 Fork; bear right. 

42.4 1.0 Fork; bear left with poles. Cross RR and trolley 42.9. 

43.3 0.9 End of road ; turn sharp left onto Main St. 

43.9 0.6 BABYLON, Main St. & Deer Park Ave., just beyond town hall. 

Straight ahead is Route 122 to Greenport. 

Route 122— New York City to Greenport (L. I.), 
N.Y.— 116.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Queensboro Bridge, Jamaica, Lynbrook, Rockvllle Center, Freeport, Amityville,. 
Babylon, Islip. Patchogue, Southampton, Sag Harbor and ferry to Shelter Island. All 
macadam ana concrete except 4 miles of graded dirt between Brldgehampton and 
Sag Harbor. 

Route follows the south shore of Long Island thru a rolling farming country, passing, 
many large estates. 

Route 118 furnishes an option, shorter, but not as good as the following route. 

Route 120 offers an option to Babylon via Hempstead. 

Note (a) gives a connection from Quogue to Riverhead, connecting there with Route 
118 to Greenport. 

Note (b) gives a connection from Brldgehampton to Montauk. 
^MiLEA0E-> For this and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

T»tai Between Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

0.0 0.0 COLUMBUS CIRCLE, 59th St. & Broadway, Columbus statue 
in center. Go east with trolley on 59th St. along Central 
park. 

1.0 1.0 Just beyond elevated, bear left away from trolley onto 
Queensboro bridge. 

2.7 1.7 Long Island City, at circle. Bear right under branch ele- 
vated. 

3.0 0.3 Irregular 4-corners, biscuit factory on left; bear left with 
trolley on Queens Blvd. Thru Winfield 5.1 and Newton 6.1. 

6.4 3.4 Irregular 4-corners; bear left with trolley — still on Queens 
Blvd. 

8.2 1.8 Forest Hills.* Straight thru. Thru Kew Gardens 9.1. 

10.2 2.0 Hillside Ave. ; turn left away from trolley. 

11.3 1.1 Jamaica, Hillside & Bergen Aves., Peace monument in center.. 

Straight ahead is Route 118 to Port Jefferson. 

Turn right onto Bergen Ave. Cross RR 11.7. Same thoro- 
fare becomes Merrick road. Cross RR 14.3. Thru Spring- 
field 14.6. 
17.8 6.5 Valley Stream. Straight thru. Cross RR 18.2. 

Right at 17.8 is Route 124 to Rockaway Park and Ft. Tllden. 

19.3 1.5 Lynbrook. Straight thru on Merrick road. 
Cross RR 20.3. 

20.5 1.2 Fork, cannon and flagpole in center; keep left on Merrick 

road. 

20.6 0.1 Rockville Center, Merrick road & Village Ave., bank on left. 

left. 

Left on N. Village Ave. is Route 127 to Sea Cliff. 
Right on S. Village Ave. is Route 143 to Long Beach. 

Straight thru on Merrick road. Thru Baldwin 22.8. 

•Forest Hills, L. I. (pop. 3,000). A residen- July celebration held here each year have 
tial section near Forest Park, Brooklyn. achieved national fame. The West Side 



Tennis club, considered one of the finest in 

the country, is located here. On its courts 

Hills Gardens was established by the Russell 8ev eral international tournaments have been 



That part of the village known as Forest 
Hills Gardens was established by the Russell 
Sage Foundation Homes Co. The Fourth of held 



CLAREMONT INN 

RockvilleCenter.Longlsland A mb^ b ac ^^^^ 



On MERRICK ROAD. Famous for LONG 

ISLAND DUCK DINNERS. Perfect 

Hotel Accommodations 



Long Island Section Page 157 



Route 122 



24.4 3.8 Freeport. Straight thru across trolley. 

. Thru Merrick 26.1 and Bellmore 27.5. 
29.6 5.2 Seaford, P. 0. on right. Straight thru. 

30.2 0.6 Massapequa, Merrick road & Hicksville road, Massapequa 

Inn on left. 

Left on Hicksville Road is Route 128 to Oyster Bay. 

38.4 3.2 Amityvilie, Merrick road & Broadway. Straight thru. 

Left on Broadway is Route 129 to Huntington. 

39.0 6.6 Babylon, Merrick road & Deer Park Ave. 

Straight thru across trolley. Thru Brightwaters 42.8. 
43.8 4.8 Bayshore,* Merrick road, Maple & 4th Aves. 

Straight thru on Merrick road. 

45.8 2.0 Islip, town hall on left. Straight thru. 
47.0 1.2 E. Islip. Straight thru. 

Pass Oakdale Sta. on left 51.0. Thru W. Sayville 53.0. 
54.0 7.0 Sayville,* 5-corners. Bear left on Merrick road. Cross RR 
54.2. Thru Blue Point 56.7. 

58.3 4.3 Patchogue,* W. Main St. & Ocean Ave., store on far right. 

Left at 58.8 on Medford Ave. is Route 134 to Port Jefferson. 

Straight thru with trolley on E. Main St. Cross RR 59.7. 
Thru E. Patchogue 60.2. 

62.6 4.3 Bellport. Straight thru. 

64.7 2.1 Brookhaven, end of road, P. O. on right. Turn left. 

Thru Moriches* 70.6. 

72.5 7.8 Center Moriches, bank and P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

Thru East Moriches 74.5. 

74.9 2.4 Right-hand road, small wooden church on right; turn right. 

75.4 0.5 Left-hand road; turn left. 

76.8 1.4 Eastport, end of road, just beyond RR. Turn right. 

78.0 1.2 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left. Thru Speonk 78.4 and 
Remsenburg 78.8. 



•Bay Shore, L. I. (pop. 4000, alt. 25 ft.), is 
the home of many wealthy families, among 
which is that of Thomas Adams, the chiclet 
chewing gum king. Washington, our first 
president, made his headquarters here at 
Apple Tree Wicks, Sagtikos manor, for a 
brief time during the revolutionary war. The 
shore line is very beautiful. 

♦Sayville, N. Y. (pop. 3,200, alt. 28 ft.), on 
Long Island, is a popular resort and the cen- 
ter of fishing and oyster industry. Near 
here was found a very active German wire- 
less station. 

•Patchogue, L. I. (pop. 7,000, alt. 15 ft.), an 
Indian name meaning "Many Waters." This 
name is well applied; for besides the Atlantic 
ocean and Great South bay one finds here 



many attractive lakes and rivulets. It is 
noted for its oyster markets and is within 
about a mile of the actual strip of land known 
as Blue Point, from which the famous Blue 
Pont oyster derives its name, thousands of 
barrels being shipped fron here. 

Patchogue is a popular summer resort offer- 
ing excellent boating and fishing facilities. 
The South Bay yacht and field club is located 
here. 

•Moriches, L. I. (pop. 1,600, alt. 16 ft.), is 
an old town in the region of bays, short riyers 
and small lakes. There is good bathing, boat- 
ing and fishing. The village postoffice has 
been conducted by the descendants of one 
family for a hundred years. There are many 
large duck and chicken farms in the vicinity. 



The Cliffton Hotel 

Casino and Cottages 
Foot of BAY AVE., Patchogue, L. I. 

WILLIAM A. RILEY, Prop. 
Phones: 38 Patchogue— 378M Patchogue 



Largest modern hotel direction on Great 
South Bay. Rooms single and en suite 
with baths. Acknowledged headquarters 
for motorists. Noted for its table. 

Delightful bathing, yachting, fishing and 
golf. Concert orchestra, consistent terms, „ 
ample garage. Booklet. 



ROE'S HOTEL 

MAIN STREET 

Patchogue, L. I., N. Y. 



EUROPEAN PLAN, $1.50 Up 
AMERICAN PLAN, $5.00 Up 

Located on the Merrick or South Country 
Road. In the business center of the 
town. Telephone Numbers 4 and 132 



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Route 122 Page 158 Long Island Section 

81.1 8.1 Pork; bear left, passing cemetery on left. 

Right fork leads to Weethampton Beach. 
82.4 1.3 Pork; bear left. Thru irregular 4-corners 84.6. Avoid left- 
hand diagonal road 84.9. Thru East Quogue 86.2. Cross 
RR 89.0. Thru Good Ground* 90.4. 

Diagonally left at 84.9 Is Note (a) to Rlverhead. 

Cross iron bridge 91.7, coming along Shinnecock bay. Same 
thorof are becomes Hill Ave. Bear left onto Job's Lane 97.6. 

97.8 15.4 Southampton,* Job's Lane & Main St., wooden church on 
right. Turn left onto Main St. 

98.0 0.2 Irregular 4-corners, fountain on right; turn right onto Hamp- 
ton road. 

100.0 2.0 Fork; bear right with macadam. Thru Water Mill 100.6. 

Thru 6-corners at wooden church 103.6. 

104.1 4.1 Bridgehampton, irregular 4-corners at Soldiers' monument. 

Straight ahead is Note (b) to Montauk via East Hampton. 

Bear left onto Sag Harbor turnpike. Cross RRs 104.6-105.4- 
107.8. 
108.7 4.6 Sag Harbor,* fork, flagpole in green. Bear left across 

is the Parrish art gallery, built and main- 
tained by Samuel L. Parrish. A few hundred 
feet from the ocean is the picturesque Aga- 
warn lake, at the southern end of which is 
the well known "Dune church." On the walls 
of this church are mementos and tablets de- 
scribing wrecks of vessels which have 'oc- 
curred in the neighborhood. The Art Village, 
with its quaint and cozy cottages, is an 
interesting settlement, as is also the Indian 
reservation near by in its surviving remnants. 
High above these are the "Hills" in a park 
of 5,000 acres, with numerous fine villas, 
lovely views and excellent sailing on the 
bay. The drive to "Barrell Hill" is most 
scenic and interesting. 

•Sag Harbor, N. Y. (pop. 3,500, alt. 8 ft.), 
was settled in 1730, and during the years 
1760 and 1870 was one of the leading whaling 
ports of the United States. In one year 
(1845) one million dollars' worth of whale oil 
and bone was brought in by whaling vessels. 
No whale ships are now sent out from this 
point. In the battle of Sag Harbor (May, 
1777) the British, who were in possession of 
the city at that time, were defeated when 
the Meigs expedition came across from Con- 
necticut. A monument erected to the 
memory of Meigs occupies a site near where 
stood the British fort and garrison. Again 
in the war of 1812 the British were repulsed 
with great disaster in their attack on Sag 
Harbor. A monument on High St. marks the 
site on which the fort stood during this war. 
The Bliss torpedo experimental station, 



•Good Ground; L. I. (pop. 1,000, alt. 60 ft.), 
is a noted summer resort and the home of 
Charles F. Murphy, Tammany boss. It is sur- 
rounded by Peconic bay and the Shinnecock 
bay and canal. The bay, which is landlocked 
and especially safe for boating and sailing, is 
about 2J4 miles wide and 12 miles long. Fish- 
ing is good, and there is an abundance of 
oysters and crabs in the bay. There is 
excellent still water bathing. The Shinnecock 
golf links, which are easily accessible, are 
famous among golf players. The old Canoe 
Place inn has been a tavern since 1635, when 
it catered to Indians and traders. It has a 
charter direct from Her Majesty Queen Anne 
obliging the inn to "supply both man and 
beast." It took its name from the fact that 
the Indians portaging their canoes across the 
isthmus betwen Shinnecock and Peconic 
bays, then called Merosue, or Canoe Place, 
stopped there for refreshments. It is a popu- 
lar resort for mo* ovists, coaching parties and 
hunters. An interesting tradition connected 
with a figure head of Hercules (seen here), 
taken from an old ship, is that "all girls who 
kiss this will be married within a year." 

*3outhampton, L. I. (pop. 3,000, alt. 45 ft.), 
a popular summer resort located on the 
southeastern shore of Long Island, east of 
Shinnecock bay, is the oldest English settle- 
ment in New York state. Here are located 
the Hampton and Meadow tennis clubs, on 
whose grounds matches are held annually 
between the leading tennis players of the 
country in preparation for the great tourna- 



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Route 124 Page 160 » Long Island Section 

Route 124— New York City to Rockaway Park and Ft. 
Tilden (L. I.), N. Y.— 37.1 in. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Williamsburg Bridge, Jamaica, Merrick Road. Valley Stream, Cedarhurst and 
IjRwrence. Pavement all the way. 

Route 122 furnishes a preferable option to Jamaica over the Queensboro bridge. 

"* IL Du?a»c« ^ or ^is an( * ot ^ er exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

*T&w B po7nto" Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus Circle, Broadway & 59th St., 
Columbus statue in center. Go south with trolley on Broad- 
way. 

0.5 0.5 Times Square (7th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 
on Broadway. 

1.2 0.7 Greeley square (6th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 
on Broadway. 

1.8 0.6 Madison square; bear right away from trolley onto 5th Ave., 

passing Flat Iron building on left. 

2.5 0.7 9th St., one block before park; turn left. 

2.9 0.4 Lafayette St., Wanamaker's on right; turn right, passing 

statue of Lafayette in open square on left. 

3.6 0.7 Fork. at small green; keep right on Lafayette St. and imme- 

diately turn left onto Kenmar St. 

3.7 0.1 End of street ; turn right under elevated onto The Bowery and 

immediately left onto Delancey St. 

4.2 0.& Take left-hand drive over Williamsburg bridge. 

5.7 1.5 Roebling St., just beyond Valley Forge monument; turn right 
with trolley. Bear right away from trolley at church onto 
Taylor St. 5.9. 

6.0 0.3 Bedford Ave.; turn left. 

7.3 1.3 Lafayette St., synagogue on left; turn left. 

8.7 1.4 Irregular 4-corners; turn right under elevated and imme- 
diately left away from same, continuing on Lafayette St. 
8.9 0.2 End of street; turn right onto Bushwick Ave. 
10.6 1.7 Fork; keep right on Bushwick Ave. 

10.8 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; meeting trolley, bear left onto Jamaica 
Ave. 

14.6 3.8 Richmond Hills, irregular 4-corners at 117th St. 

Turn left away from trolley onto Hillside Ave. Cross RR 14.7, 
avoiding left-hand diagonal road just beyond. Thru diagonal 
4-corners 15.3-15.7. 

16.7 2.1 Jamaica, Hillside & Bergen Aves., at Peace monument. 

Straight ahead is Route 118 to Port Jefferson and Route 120 to 
Babylon. 

Turn right onto Bergen Ave. Cross RR 17.1, coming onto 

Smith St. Bear left onto Merrick road 17.3. Cross RR 19.8. 

Thru Springfield 20.1. 

23.2 6.5 Valley Stream, Merrick road & Rockaway Ave. 

Straight ahead is Route 122 to Green port and Route 125 to Long 
Beach. 

Turn right onto Rockaway Ave. Cross RRs at sta. 23.6. 
24.6 1.4 Right-hand road; turn right. Thru Hewlett 25.7. 

26.3 1.7 Woodmere. Straight thru, coming on Broadway. 

Thru Cedarhurst 27.4 and Lawrence 28.0. 

29.2 2.9 Irregular 4-corners ; turn right onto Cornaga Ave. 

29.3 0.1 Fork; keep right on Cornaga Ave. 

29.6 0.3 Far Rockaway, Cornaga Ave. & Beach 20th St., bank on left. 
Straight thru across trolley on Cornaga Ave. Cross RR 29.7. 

29.8 0.2 Grassmere Ave.; turn left. 

29.9 0.1 Atlantic Ave.; turn right. Cross RR 30.1, coming onto Far 

Rockaway Blvd. Pass Edgemere Sta. on left 30.6. Cross RR 
31.6. Pass Averne Sta. on right 31.8 — now on Rockaway 
Beach Blvd. 



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Long Island Section Page 161 Routes 125-127 

32.4 2.5 Arverne. Straight thru on Rockaway Beach Blvd. Ocean 

Parkway amusement grounds on left at 33.5. 
34.3 1.9 End of road; jog right and immediately left with trolley — 

still on Rockaway Beach Blvd. 
34.6 0.3 Rockaway Park, Rockaway Beach Blvd., Beach 116th St. 

Straight thru on Rockaway Beach Blvd. Same thorofare 

becomes Washington Ave. 35.1. 
37.1 2.5 FT. TILDEN. 

Route 125— New York City to Long Beach (L. I.), 
N. Y.— 26.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Queensboro bridge, Jamaica, Merrick road and Rockville Center. Pavement and 
—••■LEAGE-x asphalt-macadam all the way. 

T«tei SihHM Route 124 gives an option to Jamaica over the Williamsburg bridge, 

Miieaao Pointa Dut » due to congested traffic, is not advisable. 

0.0 0.0 COLUMBUS CIRCLE, 59th St. & Broadway, Columbus statue 
in center. See Route 122 for directions to Rockville Center, 
20.6 miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 Rockville Center, Merrick road & Lincoln Ave., at cannon. 

Straight ahead on Merrick Road is Route 122 at mileage 20.5 to 
Babylon. 

Bear right onto Lincoln Ave. Bear right onto Beach Ave. 0.9. 
1.3 1.3 Gceanside, fork. Bear left across trolley — still on Beach Ave. 

Cross RRs 3-6-4.6. Cross long wooden viaduct 4.9, going 

thru diagonal 4-corners just beyond. 
5.5 4.2 Double drive; turn right. Pass sta. on right 5.7. 

5.8 0.3 National St. (double drive), just beyond village office; turn 

left. 

6.0 0.2 LONG BEACH,* at board walk. 

Route 127— Long Beach to Sea Cliff (L. I.), N. Y.— 20.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Rockville Center, Mineola and Roslyn. Pavement and asphalt -macadam all 

the way. 

'~ i,IL nf? E "~ N A trunk llne connection from the south shore to the north shore thru 

Tatai BtiiwMn suburban towns and their outskirts, connecting at Sea Cliff with ferry 

Ml iea§« Polite to Rye for those going: to Westchester county points. 

0.0 0.0 LONG BEACH, at board walk. Go north on National Ave. 

(double drive). 
0.2 0.2 Double drive ; turn right, passing village office on left. 
0.5 0.3 Riverside St.; turn left. 
0.9 0.4 Fork; bear right. Thru diagonal 4-corners 1.0, crossing long 

wooden viaduct just beyond. Cross RRs 1.4-2.4. 
4.7 3.8 Oceanside. Keep ahead across trolley, bearing right with 

Beach Ave. just beyond. Avoid right-hand street 5.0. 

Right on Foxhurst Ave. at 5.0 leads to Baldwin, connecting there 
with Route 122 to Babylon. 

5.1 0.4 Fork; bear left onto Lincoln Ave. 

5.9 0.8 Rockville Center, Lincoln & S. Village Aves. 

Straight ahead on Lincoln Ave. Is Route 155 to New York. 

Bear right onto S. Village Ave., keeping ahead across Merrick 
road just beyond. Cross RR 6.0. 

Right on Merrick Road is Route 122 to Babylon. 
Left on Merrick Road is Route 147 to New York. 

6.1 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; bear right onto Hempstead Ave. Same 

thorofare becomes Franklin Ave. 
9.9 3.8 Hempstead, Franklin Ave. & Fulton St. 

Left on Fulton St. is Route 153 to New York. 
Right on Fulton St. is Route 120 to Babylon. 

Straight thru on Franklin Ave. Cross RR 10.6. 



L. I. (pop. 1,500, alt. 10 ft.), other characteristics make it an ideal water 

,. . , ,. . . A ing place. It has a splendid beach walk, mile 

a popular all-year residential and amusement . 4 4 j • »• *u r„~~... K rta rri«oiL 

y y * in extent, and rivaling the famous board* aiK 

resort. Jti climate, bathing facilities and at Atlantic City. 



Route 128 Page 162 Long Island Section 

11.1 1.2 Garden City,* just beyond RR. 

Straight thru. Cross RR 11.7. I 

12.2 1.1 Mineola,* Franklin Ave. & Old Country road, court house on 

left 

Turn right away from trolley onto Old Country road. Cross 

RR 12.3. 

12.5 0.3 Roslyn road; turn left. Cross RR 12.6. Thru diagonal 4-cor- 

ners 13.3. 

Right at 13.3 is Route 118 at mileage 20.8 to Port Jefferson. 

Caution for cross-roads 14.7 and 15.7. 

16.6 4.1 Right-hand diagonal road, sign "Engineers Club"; bear right. 
17.1 0.5 Roslyn, fork, flagpole and water-trough in center. Bear left. 

Right fork is Route 101 to Port Jefferson. 

18.1 1.0 Left-hand road; turn left with travel. 

18.6 0.5 Fork; bear left. 

18.7 0.1 Fork; keep left. 

18.8 0.1 Fork; bear right along Hempstead harbor. Avoid right-hand 

road 19.2. 
20.8 2.0 SEA CLIFF,* Prospect & Sea Cliff Aves. 

Straight ahead on Prospect Ave. leads to Ferry for Rye Beach. 
Right on Sea Cliff Ave. is Route 103 to Oyster Bay. 

Route 128 — Massapequa to Oyster Bay (L. I.), N. Y. 15.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
<-MILEAGE-> Via Hicksville and Jericho. Asphalt-macadam ' all the way. 

t«»«i rII&L** This route traverses a region of small farms and truck gardens. 

Mileage Points some wooded sections. 

0.0 0.0 MASSAPEQUA, Hicksville & Merrick roads. Go north on 

Hicksville road. 
0.4 0.4 Fork; bear left with Hicksville road. Cross RR 0.7. Avoid 

right-hand diagonal road 3.6. 

Gross switch 4.8, going under Motor Parkway bridge just 

beyond. 
7.8 7.4 Hicksville, Broadway & Marie Ave., bank on right. Straight 

thru on Broadway. Gross RR 7.9. 
8.0 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; bear right with Broadway. 
9.8 1.8 Jericho, 3-corners. Bear right. 

'Garden City, L. I. (pop. 1,800, alt. 87 ft.), is seat of Nassau county and second largest 

a religious an deducational town founded by railroad center on Long Island. The Nassau 

Alexander T. Stewart, a New York merchant. county court house, corner Old Country road 

The Cathedral of Incarnation was erected by and F^nklin avenue, cost $1,500,000. The 

Mrs. Stewart, as a memorial to her husband; Queen ' 8 and . Na,sau counties' *fir, held here 

both Mr. and Mrs. Stewart are buried in the annuaI * d " nn * * h « ^J^ , m . Scpt « mber - 

lA - A . A . , . -,. . 0i has as high as 40,000 paid admissions in one 

vault of the cathedral. The famous St. day The government aviation fields, started 

Paul s school for boys was also erected by by Glenn Curtis , and thc Wright BrM are 

Mrs. Stewart as well as St. Mary's school for located y 2 mile from Mineola on the Old 

girls. On the links of the Garden Gty golf Country road. 

club have been held many tournaments of # Sea Cliff, L. I. (pop. 2,000, alt. 200 ft.), is 
national importance. The Cherry Valley goll primarily a summer resort offering many in- 
club is also located here, as is also the ducements, such as fine boating, bathing, 
"Country Life" press of Doubleday, Page & fishing, etc. It was founded in the seventies 
Co., and the plant of the Curtiss Airplane Co. as a Methodist camp meeting ground by the 
The Curtiss field for experimental aeronautics Sea Cliff Grove and Metropolitan Camp 
and Mitchell field, the permanent U. S. Army Ground association of New York and Brook- 
Aviation field, are also near by. lyn. The North Shore country club is an at- 
'Mineola, L. I. (pop. 2,000, alt. 107 ft.). The tractive feature, having excellent golf links. 



SDCDNY 

REG. U.S. PAT. OFF 

MOTOR GASOLINE 

^Google - 



Digitized bv^ 



Long Island Section Page 163 Routes 129-130 

9.9 0.1 Fork; keep left 

Right fork on Jericho turnpike is Route 118 to Greenport. 
Left at 10.1 is Route 130 at mileage 10.1 to Sea Cliff. 

13.5 3.6 East Norwich, irregular 4-corners, store on left. Straight 

thru. 

Right is Route 101 to Port JefTerson. 

15.6 2.1 OYSTER BAY,* South & Main Sts. 

Left on W. Main St. is Route 141 to New York. 

Route 129— Amityville to Huntington (L. I.), N. Y.— 14.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

^MILEAGE-, Via Melville. Asphalt-macadam and concrete roads. 

2% nc * Tnis route Boos thru a region of small farms with a few wooded sec- 

Mitaite PoXS* 1 tions. An excellent connection from the south to the north shores. 

0.0 0.0 AMITYVILLE, Broadway & Merrick road. Go north with 

trolley on Broadway. Cross RR 0.7. 
0.8 0.8 Fork; bear left with trolley. 
2.9 2.1 Diagonal 4-corners; bear right away from trolley. Cross 

RR 3.7. 

Left at 3.8 is Route 153 at mileage 6.1 to New York City. 

Bear left with trolley at St. Rose* Industrial School 6.3. Under 
Motor Parkway 6.7. 

8.7 5.8 Melville, fork. Bear left, joining trolley. 

Thru 4-corners 11.6. 

Right at 11.6 is Route 118 at mileage 34.3 to Greenport. 
Left at 11.6 is Route 145 at mileage 70.2 to New York City. 

14.9 6.3 HUNTINGTON,* New York Ave. & Main St. 

Left on Main St. is Route 139 to New York. 

Route 130— Massapequa to Sea Cliff (L. I.), N. Y.— 18.1 m 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Hicksvine and Jericho. Asphalt-macadam all the way. 

Thru a farming- and truck garden section, with a few wooded areas. An excellent 
^MILEAGE-^ connection from the Merrick road to the north shore routes at Green- 
2%"°* vaIe and ^ ea Cliff: also a direct way for motorists desiring to reach 
Mileate piKS" Westchester county • points via the Sea Cliff-Rye ferry. 

0.0 0.0 MASSAPEQUA, Hicksville & Merrick roads. Go north on 

Hicksville road. 
0.4 0.4 Fork; bear left with Hicksville road. Cross RR 0.7. Avoid 

right-hand diagonal road 3.6. Cross switch 4.8, going und*- 

Motor Parkway bridge just beyond. 

7.8 7.4 Hicksville, Broadway & Marie Ave., bank on right. StraigM 

thru on Broadway. Cross RR 7.9. 
8.0 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; bear right with Broadway. 

9.8 1.8 Jericho, 3-corners. Bear right. 

9.9 0.1 Fork; keep left. 

Right fork on Jericho Turnpike Is Route 118 to Greenport. 

10.1 0.2 Left-hand road; turn left. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 128 to Oyster Bay. 

13.7 3.6 Greenvale, diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Right is Route 101 to Port Jefferson. 
Left is Route 139 to New York. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal roads 13.8-14.7. Avoid left-hand 
diagonal road 15.3. 

♦Oyater Bay, L. I. (pop. 4,000, alt. 8 ft.). On shore of Long Island, founded in 1653. Man* 

the north shore of Long Island, settled by a British ships anchored in Huntington bay 

colony of Englishmen from Sandwich, Mass., during the revolution. A large glacial boul- 

who came here in 1653. The shore of the bay der marka the s P ot where Nathan Hale, sp* 

extends northward to Sagamore hill, on the fro ™ Washington's army, was captured, Ser 

crest of Which was the home of America's X f?^ 177 ( 6 ' ?° n * thc f^eway is • P«blk 

.. A A . , ., -,. , drinking fountain, on the marble shaft of 

famous ex-president, the late Theodore whJch . § ingcribcd Hale , 8 , agt wordgf ^ „. 

Roosevelt. On Centre island, near Oyster gret that j have but one , ife to giyc fof . mJ 

Bay, is the home of the Seawanhaka Cor- country." Near Memorial bnilding On Main 

inthian yacht club, a favorite rendezvous for street, is the soldiers' monument. Here also 

sport enthusiasts. at one time Walt Whitman, the poet, liv^ 

*Hunttegton, L. I. (pop. 8,000, alt. 205 ft.). The Huntington country club is another * 

\ famov* yachting rendezvous on the north traction of the place. 



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Routes 131-132-134 Page 164 Long Island Section 

16.4 2.7 Left-hand road; turn left onto Sea Cliff Ave. Cross RR and 
trolley at Sea Cliff Sta. 16.8. Thru irregular 4-corners 17.4- 
17.7. 

Right at 17.4 is Route 103 at mileage 4.4 to Oyster Bay. 

18.1 1.7 SEA CLIFF,* Sea Cliff & Prospect Aves. 

Right on Prospect Ave. leads to ferry. 

Left on Prospect Ave. is Route 141 to New York. 

Route 131— Babylon to Centerport, (L. L), N. Y. — 14.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

^-MILEAQE-s 

Total bSS)! Gravel roads with some macadam. 

•Memo* Points 

0.0 0.0 BABYLON, Deer Park Ave. & Main St. Go north on Deer 
Park Ave. with trolley, which leaves to left 0.2. Cross RE 
0.8. Cross RR at Deer Park Sta. 4.5. Go under Motor Park- 
way bridge 8.0. 

9.0 9.0 Fork; keep left. 

9.4 0.4 End of road; turn left. 

10.2 0.8 Fork; keep left. 

10.7 0.5 4-corners; turn right — sign "Greenlawn." Thru diagonal 

4-corners 10.9. 

Cross RR at Greenlawn Sta. 12.9. 
14.2 8.5 Fork; bear left— sign "Centerport." 
14.4 0.2 CENTERPORT, 4-corners. 

Left is Route 139 to New York. 
Right is Route 101 to Port Jefferson. 

Route 132— East Islip to Smithtown, (L. I.), N. Y.— 9.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

*" Dlstanoo Via Hauppauge. Sandy dirt road except last 2ft miles, which is 

Total Between concrete. 
Mlleaoe Points 

0.0 0.0 EAST ISLIP, Merrick road & Carleton Ave. Go north on Car- 
leton Ave. Cross RRs 0.4-2.7. Cross RR at Central Islip* 
4.1. Thru 4-corners 5.1. 

7.1 7.1 Hauppauge, left-hand road. Turn left. 

9.2 2.1 End of road; turn left. 
9.4 0.2 SMITHTOWN, at RR. 

Route 134 — Patchogue to Port Jefferson (L. I.), 
N.Y.— 14.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Medford and Coram. Asphalt-macadam all the way, except the first half mile 
^-MlLEAQE-^ out of Patchogue on Medford Ave. 

T f . fig*!!? Tnis route traverses a scrub oak and a cut -over scrub section with 

Mlloojo Polnto a few h° u ses scattered along the road. 

0.0 0.0 PATCHOGUE, E. Main St. & Ocean Ave. Go east with trol- 
ley on E. Main St. 

0.4 0.4 Medford Ave.; turn left away from trolley. 

1.9 1.5 Fork; bear right with macadam. 

4.0 2.1 Medford. Straight thru across RR at sta. 

7.6 8.6 Diagonal 4-corners ; bear left with macadam. 

7.7 0.1 Corajn. Straight thru. 

•Sea Cliff, L. I. (pop. 2,000, alt. 200 ft.), is Ground association of New York and Brook- 
primarily a summer resort offering many in- ^ Thc North Shore country club is an at- 



ducements, such as fine boating, bathing, 



tractive feature, having excellent golf links. 
♦Central Islip, N. Y. (pop. 500). The New 
fishing, etc. It was founded in the seventies York state hospital, covering over one bun- 
as a Methodist camp meeting ground by the dred acres and caring for nearly six thousand 
ca Cliff Grove and Metropolitan Camp patients is located here. 



Long Island Section Page 165 Route 139 

8.0 0.3 Fork; keep right. Cross RR at sta. 13.3. Thru 4-corners at 
concrete building 13.5. 

x Right at 13.5 is Route. 118 to Greenport. 

14.4 6.4 PORT JEFFERSON, Main & Jones Sts., bank on right. 

Straight ahead on Main St. is Route 139 to New York City. 

Route 139— Port Jefferson (L. I.) to New York City, N. Y. 

—60.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Northport, Centerport, Huntington, Cold Spring Harbor, East Norwich, Roslyn, 
Bayside, Flushing and Long Island City. Pavement and asphalt-macadam all the way. 

The main north shore road. The route goes thru a farming and summer home dis- 
trict to Cold Spring Harbor, then along a small farm and truck gardening area to 
<-MILEA8E-x Roslyn; Roslyn to Douglaston is a summer residential section; balance 
t.4.1 nSKfff of the route uninteresting, 
iffil ti tt Pffhiti Route 145 offers a better option via Jamaica. 

6.0 0.0 PORT JEFFERSON, Main & Jones Sts., bank on right. 

Go ndrth on Main St., passing P. O. on left. 
0.1 0.1 S-corners; turn left. 

3.1 3.0 4-corners ; turn left. Pass Stony Brook Sta. on left at 4.4. 

5.4 2.3 Stony Brook, end of road. Turn left. , 

7.9 2.5 St James, diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. Cross RR 9.0. 

10.5 2.6 End of road; turn right. Thru Smithtown Branch 10.6. 
11.2 0.7 Smithtown. Straight thru across RR. 

11.9 0.7 Fork; bear left under RR. Thru Commack 16.4. 

17.6 5.7 4-corners, aviation field on right; flirn right. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 145 at mileage 17.6 to 
Jamaica. 

20.5 2.9 East Northport Keep ahead across RR, bearing left at fork 

just beyond. 

21.6 1.1 Irregular 4-corners; turn left away from trolley. Cross RR 

21.8. 

22.4 0.8 Northport. Turn left thru town. Avoid left-hand diagonal 

road 22.6. 

28.5 1.1 Right-hand road; turn right, bearing left at fork just beyond. 
23.8 0.3 Centerport. Straight thru. 

24.8 1.0 Fork; bear right with macadam. 

25.6 0.8 Fork; bear left downgrade. Thru irregular 4-corners 26.3. 

27.0 1.4 Huntington,* Main St. & New York Ave. 

Left on New York Ave. is Route 109 to Amltyvllle. - 

Keep ahead (west) on Main St. 

27.4 0.4 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right upgrade. 
28.8 1.4 Cold Spring Harbor, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

29.8 1.0 Right-hand road; turn right. 

30.7 0.9 Right-hand diagonal road ; bear right. 

38.9 3.2 East Norwich. Straight thru. 

Right is Route 128 to Oyster Bay. 
Left is Route 105 to Massapequa. 

37.1 3.2 Greenvale. Straight thru. 

Right is Route 130 to Sea Cliff. 

39.7 2.6 Fork; bear right downgrade. Under RR 39.9. 

40.5 0.8 Fork; bear left with travel. 

40.6 0.1 Roslyn,* flagpole and water-trough on right. Keep ahead. 

'Huntington, L. L (pop. 8,000, alt. 205 ft.). The Huntington country club is another at- 

A famous yachting rendezvous on the north traction of the place. 

short of Long Island, founded in 1653. Many ntoslyn, L. I. (pop. 2,500. alt. 120 ft.), is on 

British ships anchored in Huntington bay the north shorc of Lon * I » land and at the 

during the revolution. A Urge glacial bouL head of Hempstead Harbor Here are located 

x _i *t *«. xt ai_ rr i many estates of wealthy New Yorkers, ln- 

der marks the spot where Nathan Hale, spy . .* .. ., . , ,„.... w, f . 

„. .. . . « eluding the Mackays and Whitneys. William 

from Washington's army, was captured, Sep- Cullen Bryant( the Amcrican poct of naturCf 

tember, 1776. Along the driveway is a public did much Horary work here. The house 

drinking fountain, on the marble shaft of which Bryant occupied for thirty-five years 

which is inscribed Hale's last words, "I re- was called "Cedarmere," a rambling and 

fret that I have but one life to give for my picturesque home. The poet is buried in thr 

country." Near Memorial building on Main village cemetery. The North Shore r^- 

street, is the soldiers' monument. Here also club and the Engineers country 

at one tine Walt Whitman, the poet, lived. located here. 



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Route 141 Page 166 Long Island Section 

40.8 0.2 Right-hand road; turn right, passing bank on left. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 143 at mileage 3.8 to Long 
Beach. 

40.9 0.1 3-corners, old clock tower on left; bear right, joining trolley. 
44.4 3.5 Manhasset, fork. Bear right with trolley upgrade. 

Left fork leads to Great Neck. 

46.4 2.0 Little Neck. Straight thru with trolley. Thru Douglaston 
47.0. 

Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

48.4 2.0 Bayside, Broadway & Bell Ave. Straight thru on Broadway. 
50.1 1.7 Fork; bear right. Same thorofare becomes Jackson Ave. 
51.7 1.6 Fork at parkway, Flushing high school on right. Keep right- 
hand drive, passing Armory over to left. 

52.0 0.8 Flushing, 41 Jackson Ave. & Main St., fountain in park on left. 

Straight thru on Jackson Ave., joining trolley. Gross RR at 
sta. 52.1 and wooden drawbridge 52.2, coming along Flushing 
bay. 

53.1 1.1 Fork; bear right with branch trolley. 

53.3 0.2 Fork; bear left with trolley — still on Jackson Ave. Thru 
Corona 53.7. 

57.2 3.9 Right-hand diagonal street ; bear right away from trolley onto 

Webster Ave. 
57.7 0.5 Crescent Ave., at bottom of slight grade ; turn left. 
58.2 0.5 Long Island City. Turn right onto Queensboro bridge. 

Straight ahead on Crescent Ave. is Route 162 to Coney Island. 

59.7 1.5 At far side of bridge ; bear right and immediately left under 
elevated onto 60th St. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

60.2 0.5 End of street at Central park; jog left and immediately right 

along same onto 59th St. 
60.7 0.5 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus Circle, 59th St. & Broadway, 

Columbus statue in center. 

Route 141— Oyster Bay (L. I.) to New York City, N. Y.— 

324 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via the north shore thru Sea Cliff, Roslyn, Little Neck, Bayside and Flushing. 
Pavement and asphalt-macadam all the way. 

This route follows the shore practically all the way, winding around all the bays 

and running out on all the points. The road traverses a beautiful residential area. 

,-MiLEA6E-> mainly summer homes, as far as Flushing; beyond, the drive is unlnter- 

T«t»i R«VwI!fn esting. Route 105 to East Norwich, combined with Route 139, offers the 

Mileage Potato Dest connection between the above terminals. 

0.0 0.0 OYSTER BAY, W. Main & South Sts. Go west on W. Main St. 
0.3 0.8 Left-hand road; turn left and take right-hand road just be- 
yond. 
0.8 0.5 Right-hand road; turn right. 

2.4 1.6 3-corners at foot of grade ; bear left. Avoid right-hand diag- 

onal road at Locust Valley 3.8. 

4.5 2.1 Fork; bear right. Thru Matinecock 4.6. 

6.8 2.3 Glen Cove, 41 trolley leaves to left. Keep ahead. 

6.9 0.1 4-corners ; turn right onto Glen Cove Ave. 

7.9 1.0 Irregular 4-corners, roadhouse on left; turn right onto Sea 
Cliff Ave. Thru irregular 4-corners 8.3. 

'Flushing, L. I. (pop. 25,000). The oldest Oaks," beneath whose branches George Fox, 

Quaker settlement on Long Island. On the founder of Society of Friends, preached on 

south side of Broadway is the Friends' meet- June 7, 1672. Among Flushing's prominent 

ing house, one of the oldest places of wor- citizens is Ellis Parker Butler, the writer. 

ship now standing in the United States; it The Country club and Broadway country club 

was erected in 1694. One of the old houses is are located here, and other points of interest 

the Bowne mansion on Bowne avenue, erected are the armory and the civil war obelisk. 

in 1661. William Penn sent George Fox, *Glen Cove, N. Y. (pop. 12,000, alt. 5 ft.), 

Quaker proselyter, to establish Quakerism was the scene of many battles of the revolu- 

this country, and he lived in the Bowne tionary war, including the battle of Long 

n in 1672. Almost opposite this house Island. It is the only city on Long Island 

ge stone marker, on the site of "Fox outside of Greater New York. 

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Long Island Section Page 167 Routes 142-143 

8.6 0.7 Sea Cliff,* Sea Cliff & Prospect Aves. Turn left onto Pros- 

pect Ave. 

Right on Prospect Ave. leads to Ferry for Rye Beach. 

Turn left onto Prospect Ave., coming along Hempstead harbor. 

Avoid left-hand road 10.2. 
10.7 2.1 Fork; bear right. 
11.3 0.6 End of road; turn right. 
12.3 1.0 Roslyn, flagpole and water-trough on left. 

Bear right and follow Route 139 from mileage 40.6 balance 

oi the way (20.1 miles) to New York City. 

Route 142— Sea Cliff to Massapequa (L. I.), N. Y.— 18.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Jericho and Hicksville. Asphalt-macadam all the way. 

Thru a farming and truck garden section with a few wooded areas. 

Motorists coming from Rye and the north shore of Long Island will find this an 
excellent connection to eastern points on the south shore of Long Island. 
'-mileage^ Those desiring to go to Babylon and points east of there will And a 

t«*.i o!!£Uf! eoo6 connection by using this route to mileage 12.9. then turn left and 
Mileage PoES follow Route 120 from mileage 34.2 to Babylon. 

0.0 0.0 SEA CLIFF, Sea Cliff & Prospect Aves. Go east on Sea Cliff 
Ave,, bearing right at flagpole just beyond. Thru irregular 
4-corners 0.4-0.7, joining trolley. Cross RR at Sea Cliff Sta. 1.3. 

1.7 1.7 End of road; turn right. 

4.4 2.7 Greenvale, diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Left is Route 101 to Port Jefferson. 
Right is Route 139 to New York. 

8.0 3.6 End of road; turn right. 

Left at this turn is Route 128 to Oyster Bay. 

8.3 0.3 Jericho, 3-corners. Bear left onto Broadway. 

10.1 1.8 Irregular 4-corners ; bear left with Broadway. Cross RR 10.2. 

10.3 0.2 Hicksville, Broadway & Marie Ave., bank on left. Straight 
thru on Broadway. Under Motor parkway bridge 13.3, cross- 
ing switch just beyond. Same thorofare becomes Hicksville 
road. Thru diagonal 4-corners 13.9. Cross RR 17.4. 

Left at 13.9 is Route 120 at mileage 34.2 to Babylon. 
Right at 13.9 is Route 153 at mileage 9.7 to New York. 

18.1 7.8 MASSAPEQUA, Hicksville & Merrick roads. 

Right on Merrick Road is Route 147 to New York. 
Left on Merrick Road is Route 122 to Green port. 

Route 143— Sea Cliff to Long Beach (L. I.), N. Y.— 20.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Roslyn, Mineola and Rockville Center. Pavement and asphalt- macadam all 

^-MILEAGE-, the way. 

t-»-i a!&2f! A trunk line connection from the north shore to the south shore thru 

Ml lew Potato suburban towns and their outskirts. 

0.0 0.0 SEA CLIFF, Prospect & Sea Cliff Aves. Go south on Pros- 
pect Ave. along Hempstead harbor. Avoid left-hand road 1.5. 

2.1 2.1 Fork; bear right. 

2.7 0.6 End of road; turn right. 

3.7 1.0 Roslyn,* flagpole and water trough on left. Bear right. Avoid 
right-hand road 3.8. 

4.2 0.5 End of road; meeting trolley, turn left. Avoid right-hand 

diagonal road where trolley leaves 4.4. 

•Sea Cliff, L. I. (pop. 2,000, alt. 200 ft.), it head of Hempstead Harbor. Here are located 
primarily a summer resort offering many In- many estates of wealthy New Yorkers, in- 
ducements, such as fine boating, bathing, eluding the Mackays and Whitneys. William 
fishing, etc. It was founded in the seventies Cullen Bryant, the American poet of nature, 
as a Methodist camp meeting ground by the did much literary work here. The house 
Sea Cliff Grove and Metropolitan Camp which Bryant occupied for thirty-five years 
Ground association of New York and Brook- was called "Cedarmere," a rambling and 
lyn. The North Shore country club is an at- picturesque home. The poet is buried in the 
tractive feature, having excellent golf links. village cemetery. The North Shore countr 

'Roslyn, L. I. (pop. 2.500, alt. 120 ft.), is on club and the Engineers country club ' 

the north shore of Long Island and at the located here. 

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Route 145 Page 168 Long Island Section 

4.6 0.4 Fork; bear right. Caution for cross-road 5.1. Avoid left-hand 
road 5.8. Caution for cross-road 6.1. Cross RR 8.2. 

Diagonally right at 7.5 Is Route 145 at mileage 83.7 to New York. 
Left at 7.5 is Route 118 at mileage 20.8 to Port Jefferson. 

8.3 8.7 End of road ; turn right onto Old Country road. Cross RR 8.5. 

8.6 0.8 Mineola,* Old Country road & Franklin Ave., court house on 

left. Meeting trolley, turn left onto Franklin St Cross RR 
8.7. 

9.7 1.1 Garden City.* Straight thru across RR. Cross RR 10.2. 
10.9 1.2 Hempstead, Franklin Ave. & Fulton St. Straight thru. 

Right on Fulton St. is Route 158 to New York. 
Left on Fulton St. is Route 120 to Babylon. 

11.2 0.3 Fork; bear left — still on Franklin St. Same thorofare be- 

comes Hempstead Ave. 

14.7 3.5 Irregular 4-corners ; bear left onto N. Village Ave. Cross RR 

14.8. 
14.9 0.2 Rockville Center, N. Village Ave. & Merrick road. 

Right on Merrick Road is Route 147 to New York. 
Left on Merrick -Road is Route 122 to Babylon. 

Keep ahead on S. Village Ave., bearing left onto Lincoln Ave. 
just beyond. Bear right onto Beach Ave. 15.7. 
16.1 1.2 Oceanside, fork. Bear left across trolley — still on Beach Ave. 
Cross RRs 18.4-19.4. Cross long wooden viaduct 19.7, going 
thru diagonal 4-corners just beyond. 

20.3 4.2 Double drive; turn right. Pass sta. on right 20.5. 

20.6 0.3 National St. (double drive), just beyond village office; turn 
left. 

20.8 0.2 LONG BEACH,* at boardwalk. 

Route 145— Greenport (L. I.) to New York City, N. Y. 

—104.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Riverhead; Port Jefferson, Jericho, Mineola, Jamaica and Queensboro Bridge. 
Gravel and gravelly dirt to Riverhead; dirt practically all of the way to Port Jefferson; 
balance macadam and asp halt- macadam. 

The route traverses a farming area to Riverhead; then a wooded and scrub-Oak sec- 
tion to Port Jefferson; balance thru slightly rolling farming area and truck garden 
section, with some wooded sections near Stony Brook and Smithtown. 
^-MlLEAGE-x Route 147 over the south shore road furnishes a better option. 

•-*.• D J*t* noe Route 139 offers an option from Port Jefferson to New York via 

Mileage Points KOSiyn. 

0.0 0.0 GREENPORT, Front & Main Sts., at Western Union Sta. 

Go west on Front St. Cross RR 2.3. Thru Southold 4.9. 
5.3 5.3 3-corners, soldiers' monument in center; bear left. Thru 

irregular 4-corners 5.7. Thru Cutchogue 9.8. 
12.9 7.6 Mattituck, irregular 4-corners, cemetery on left. Bear left. 

Gross RR 14.4. Thru Laurel 15.5 ; Jamesport 16.9 and Aque- 

bogue 19.4. Cross RR 21.9. 

•Mineola, L. I. (pop. 2,000, alt. 107 ft.). The vault of the cathedral. The famous St 

seat of Nassau county and second largest Paul's school for boys was also erected by 

railroad center on Long Island. The Nassau Mrs - Stewart as well as St. Mary's school for 

county court house, corner Old Country road * irIs ' On the links of the Garden City golf 

and Franklin avenue, cost $1,500,000. The clu * h * v . c **'» he ! d ""* *<>^me nt. of 
_ , , _ _ '. , , . . . . . ■ national importance. The Cherry Valley golf 

Queen's and Nassau counties fair, held here dub . g also Iocate(J hefe> ^ . g ^ ^ 

annually during the last week in September, "Country Life" press of Doubleday. Page & 

has as high as 40,000 paid admissions in one Co., and the plant of the Curtis Airplane Co. 

day. The government aviation fields, started The Curtis field for experimental aeronautics 

by Glenn Curtiss and the Wright Bros., are and Mitchell field, the permanent U. S. army 

located }4 mile from Mineola on the Old Aviation field, are also near by. 
Country road. # Long Beach, L. I. (pop. 1,500, alt. 10 ft.), 

'Garden City, L. I. (pop. 1,800, alt. 87 ft.), is a popular all-year residential and amusement 

a religious and educational town founded by resort. Its climate, bathing facilities and 

Alexander T. Stewart, a New York merchant. other characteristics make it an ideal water* 

The Cathedral of Incarnation was erected by ing place. It has a splendid beach walk, miles 

Mrs. Stewart, as a memorial to her husband; in extent, and rivaling the famous boardwalk 

both Mr. and Mrs. Stewart are buried in the at Atlantic City. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



25.1 


2.6 


25.8 


0.7 


29.8 


4.0 


33.4 


3.6 


33.6 


0.2 


41.2 


7.6 


43.6 


2.4 


46.1 


2.5 


46.2 


0.1 


47.1 


0.9 


47.2 


0.1 


502 


3.0 


52.5 


2.3 


55.0 


2.5 


57.6 


2.6 


58.3 


0.7 


59.0 


0.7 



[Long Island Section Page 169 Route 145 

J.5 9.6 Riverhead,* Main St., Roanoke Ave. & Peconic St., P. 0. on 
right. Keep ahead on Main St., bearing left at fork just 
beyond. 

Fork; bear right with macadam over RR bridge. 
Fork; bear right. 

Fork; bear right. Thru diagonal 4-corners 31.9. 
Wading River, P. 0. on right. Straight thru. 
3-corners ; bear left. Caution for left curve around hill 34.8. 
Cross RRs 36.6-40.3. 

Fork; bear right. Thru Miller Place 42.5. 
Fork; bear left with travel upgrade. Thru Mount Sinai 44.1. 
Fork; bear left. 

4-corners, concrete building on right; turn right downgrade 
onto Main St. 

Left at this turn is Route 114 at mileage 0.9 to Patchogue. 

Port Jefferson, Main & Jones Sts., bank on right. 

3-corners; turn left. 

4-corners ; turn left. Pass Stony Brook Sta, on left 51.5. 

Stony Brook, end of road. Turn left. 

St. James, diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. Gross RR 56.1. 

End of road; turn right. Thru Smith town Branch 57.7. 

Smithtown. Straight thru across RR. 

Fork; bear left under RR. Thru Commack 63.6. Thru 

4-corners at aviation field 64.7. 

Right at 64.7 is Route 139 at mileage 17.6 to New York. 

Thru diagonal 4-corners, keeping ahead across trolley 70.2. 

Right at 70.2 is Route* 129 at mileage 11.6 to Huntington. 
. Left at 70.2 is Route 109 at mileage 3.3 to Amltyvllle. 

Caution for downgrade between hills and across RR 75.9. 

77.7 18.7 End of road; turn left. 

Right at this turn is Route 130 to Sea Cliff and Route 128 to Oyster 
Bay. 

77.9 0.2 Jericho, fork. Bear right onto Jericho Turnpike., 

Left fork is Route 105 to Massapequa. 

Right at 83.7 is Route 127 at mileage 13.3 to Sea Cliff. 

Left at 83.7 is Route 143 at mileage 7.6 to Long Beach. 

Cross RR 83.9. 

84.1 6.2 Mineola,* Jericho turnpike & Willis Ave. Straight thru 

across trolley on Jericho turnpike. Thru New Hyde Park 
86.8 and Floral Park* 87.8. 

Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

88.8 4.7 Fork; bear right away from trolley onto Rocky Hill road. 
90.0 1.2 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left thru 4-corners onto Hill- 
side Ave. 

93.2 3.2 Jamaica,* Hillside & Bergen Aves., at Peace monument. 

Straight thru on Hillside Ave. 

94.3 1.1 Queens Blvd. ; meeting trolley, turn right. Thru Kew Gar- 

dens 97.4. 

Straight ahead at 84.3 is Route 157 to New York. 

'Riverhead, L. I. (pop. 3,000, alt. 25 ft.), is an This village, formerly known as East Hins- 

important town in the eastern end of Long dale, was the intersecting point of the old 

Uland and county seat of Suffolk county. It Stewart railroad running from Flushing to 

is the scene of a real country fair, held annu- Babylon. In the early eighties John Lewis 

ally. In the immediate neighborhood is good Childs settled here and renamed it Floral 

boating and fishing. Park and founded the large seed, bnlb and 

*Mmeola, L. I. (pop. 2,000, alt. 107 ft.). The plant business which bears his name. This 

»eat of Nassau county and second largest village is an all-year-round suburb of New 

railroad center on Long Island. The Nassau York City. 

county court house, corner Old Country road 'Jamaica, L. I., is the railroad center of 

and Franklin avenue, cost $1,500,000. The Long Island. It is one of 'the old towns of 

Queen's and Nassau counties' fair, held here Queensboro and has some historical old 

annually during the last week in September, houses. Among them is the colonial home- 

has as high as 40,000 paid admissions in one stead of Governor John A. King, the first 

day. The government aviation fields, started ambassador to England from the United 

by Glenn Curtiss and the Wright Bros., are States. It was built more than 125 years ago 

located J4 mile from Mineola on the Old and is now used as a colonial museum. Ja- 

^ottntry road. maica also has an interesting peace monu 

1$NteL Park, L. I. (pop.. 2,000, alt. 97 ft.). ment. 



Route 147 Page 170 Long Island Section 

96.3 2.0 Forest Hills.* Straight thru with trolley on Queens Blvd. 
Bear right with trolley 98.1. Thru Newtown 98.4 and Win- 
field 99.4. 
101.5 5.2 Irregular 4-corners, Loose-Wiles biscuit factory on left; bear 
right with branch trolley along elevated. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest A Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

101,8 0.3 Long Island City. Straight thru under elevated. Cross 
Queensboro Bridge 102.0. 

Left on Crescent Ave., just before bridge, is Route 162 to Coney 
Island. 

103.5 1.7 At far side of bridge; bear right and immediately left under 

elevated onto 60th St. 
104.0 0.5 End of street at Central park; jog left and immediately right 

along same onto 59th St. 
104.5 0.5 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus Circle, 59th St. & Broadway, 

Columbus statue in center. 

Route 147— Greenport (L. I.) to New York City, N. Y.— 

116.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via ferry to Shelter Island, Sag Harbor, Southampton, Patchogue, Isllp, Babylon, 
Amltyville, Freeport, Rockville Center, Lynbrook, Jamaica and Queensboro Bridge. 
All macadam and concrete, except 4 miles of graded dirt between Sag Harbor and 
Bridgebampton. 

Route follows the south shore thru a rolling farming country, passing many large 
estates. 

,-MILEAQE-s Route 14R furnishes an option, shorter, but not as good. 

t**.i £iS!f* Route 153 offers an option from Babylon to Jamaica. 

M \\ lew pJKtt Note < a > *i ves a connection from Sag Harbor to Easthampton. 

0.0 0.0 GREENPORT, Main & Front Sts., Western Union Sta. on 

left. Go south on Main St. 
0.1 0.1 Ferry (summer) across Greenport harbor to Shelter Island. 

Rates, $1.00; each passenger, 15c. During spring and fall ferry lands 
passengers at mileage 0.6. 

From ferry landing, keep ahead. 
0.2 0.1 Fork; bear right. 
0.3 0.1 Fork; bear left. 
0.5 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; bear left. Turn right with road at 

spring and fall ferry landing 0.6. Avoid left-hand diagonal 

road 0.7. 

1.1 0.6 End of road; turn left with macadam. 

1.7 0.6 Right-hand road; turn right with macadam. 

2.2 0.5 4-corners, store on left; turn left. 

2.3 0.1 Shelter Island,* 4-corners, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 
2.5 0.2 End of road; turn right with macadam. 

3.1 0.6 4-corners; turn right with macadam. 

3.8 0.7 Ferry across Noyack bay. 

Ferry runs on signal. Charges — auto, 75c; passengers, 10c. 

From ferry landing, keep ahead. 
6.5 2.7 4-corners, wooden church on right; turn left with macadam. 
Cross iron bridge over Gardiner's bay 7.6. 

•Forest Hills, L. I. (pop. 3,000). A residen- Tennis club, considered one of the finest in 

tial section near Forest Park, Brooklyn. th « country, is located here. On its courts 

_ ...... ~ several international tournaments have been 

That part of the village known as Forest . . . 

Kills Gardens was established by the Russell .shelter Island, N. Y. (pop. 400. alt. 5 ft.), is 

Sage Foundation Homes Co. The Fourth of connected by ferry with Greenport, L. I. It 

July celebrations held here each year have is a popular summer home for New Yorkers 

achieved national tame. The West Side and has an interesting Quaker history. 




Digitized by 



HoogTe 1 



Long Island Section Page 171 



Route 147 



7.8 1.3 Sag Harbor,* fork, just beyond switch, flagpole in green. 
Bear right onto Main St. 

Left fork is Note (a) to Easthampton. 

8.0 0.2 Fork, fountain and small park with soldiers' monument in 
center; bear right. Avoid right-hand diagonal road at Wash- 
ington park 8.6. Cross RRs 8.7-11.1-11.9. 

12.4 4.4 Bridgehampton, 4-corners at soldiers' monument. Bear right. 

Thru 5-corners at wooden church 12.9. Thru Water Mill 15.9. 
16.2 8.8 Fork; bear right. 

18.5 2.8 4-corners, fountain on left; turn left onto Main St. 

18.7 0.2 Southampton/ Main St. & Job's lane, wooden church on left. 

Turn right onto Job's lane. 
18.9 0.2 Fork, small green, with flagpole and cannon in center; bear 

right ohto Hill Ave. Descend grade at Shinnecock bay 28.9. 

Thru Good Ground* 26.1. Cross RR 27.5. Thru East Quogue 

30.8. 

32.2 13.3 Fork; bear right. Thru irregular 4-corners 83.0. Avoid left- 

hand diagonal road 33.5. 

35.5 3.3 Fork; bear left. 

37.3 1.8 Fork; bear right. Thru Remsenburg 37.7 and Speonk 88.1. 
39.7 2.4 Eastport, left-hand road. Turn left across RR. 

41.1 1.4 End of road; turn right. 

41.6 0.5 End of road, church on left; turn left. Thru East Moriches 

42.0. 
44.0 2.4 Center Moriches, P. O. and bank on right. Straight thru. 
Thru Moriches* 45.9. 



•Sag Harbor, N. Y. (pop. 3,500. alt. 8 ft.), 
was settled in 1730, and during the /ears 
1760 and 1870 was one of the leading whaling 
ports of the United States. In one year 
(1845) one million dollars' worth of whale oil 
and bone was brought in by whaling vessels. 
No whale ships are now sent out from this 
point. In the battle of Sag Harbor (May, 
1777) the British, who were in possession of 
the city at that time, were defeated when 
the Meigs expedition came across from Con- 
necticut. A . monument erected to the 
memory of Meigs occupies a site near where 
stood the British fort and garrison. Again 
in the war of 1812 the British were repulsed 
with great disaster in their attack on Sag 
Harbor. A monument on High St. marks the 
site on which the fort stood during this war. 
The Bliss torpedo experimental station, 
Mashashimuet playground, the old Umbrella 
house, which was the first brick structure 
erected in this city, and Otter pond are 
numbered among the local points of interest. 

•Southampton, L. L (pop. 3,000, alt. 45 ft.), 
a popular summer resort located on the 
southeastern shore of Long Island, east of 
Shinnecock bay, is the oldest English settle- 
ment in New York state. Here are located 
the Hampton and Meadow tennis clubs, on 
whose grounds matches are held annually 
between the leading tennis players of the 
country in preparation for the great tourna- 
ments; and the. Southampton horse % associa- 
tion, with its parks of about 50 acres, which 
provides for Jhe annual horse show, polo, 
baseball and other athletic sports. Here also 
is the Farrish art gallery, built and main- 
tained by Samuel L. Par risk A few hundred 
feet from the ocean is the picturesque Aga- 
warn lake, at the southern end of which is 
the well known "Dune church." On the walls 
of this church are mementos and tablets de- 



scribing wrecks of vessels which have oc- 
curred in the neighborhood. The Art Village, 
with its quaint and cozy cottages, is an 
interesting settlement, as is also the Indian 
reservation near by in its surviving remnants. 
High above these are the "Hills" in a park 
of 5,000 acres, with numerous fine villas, 
lovely views and excellent sailing on the 
bay. The drive to "Barrell Hill" is most 
scenic and interesting. 

•Good Ground, L. I. (pop. 1,000, alt. 60 ft.), 
is a noted summer resort and the home of 
Charles F. Murphy, Tammany boss. It is sur- 
rounded by Peconic bay and the Shinnecock 
bay and canal The bay, which is landlocked 
and especially safe for boating and sailing, is 
about 2# miles wide and 12 miles long. Fish- 
ing is good, and there is an abundance of 
oysters and crabs in the bay. There is 
excellent still water bathing. The Shinnecock 
golf links, which are easily accessible, are 
famous among golf players. The old Canoe 
Place inn has been a tavern since 1635, when 
it catered to Indians and traders. It has a 
charter direct from Her Majesty Queen Anne 
obliging the inn to "supply both man and 
beast." It took its name from the fact that 
the Indians portaging their canoes across the 
isthmus between Shinnecock and Peconic 
bays, then called Merosue, or Canoe Place, 
stopped there for refreshments. It is a popu- 
lar resort for motorists, coaching parties and 
hunters. An interesting tradition connected 
with a figure head of Hercules (seen here), 
taken from an old ship, is that "all girls who 
kiss this will be married within a year." 

•Moriches, L. I. (pop. 1,600, alt. 16 ft.), is 
an old town in the region of bays, short rivers 
and small lakes. There is good bathing, boat- 
ing and fishing. The village postoffice has 
been conducted by the descendants of one 
family for a hundred years. There are man- 
large duck and chicken farms in the vieini 



Route 147 Page 172 Long Island Section 

51.8 7.8 Brookhaven, right-hand road. Turn right. 

68.9 2.1 Bellport. Straight thru. 

Thru E. Patchogue 58.3. Cross RR 56.8. Avoid right-hand 
road 57.8. 

Right on Medford Ave. at 57.8 is Route 134 to Port Jefferson. 

58.2 4.3 Patchogue^* E. Main St. & Ocean Ave., store on left. 

Straight thru with trolley on W. Main St. Avoid left-hand 

diagonal road 58.7. Thru Blue Ppint 59.8. 
62.5 4.3 SayviUe,* 5-corners. Straight thru on Merrick Road. Thru 

W. SayviUe 63.5. Pass Oakdale sta. on right 65.5. 
69.5 7.0 E. Islip. Straight thru. 

70.7 1.2 Islip, bank and town hall on right. Straight thru. 
71.7 1.0 Bayshore,* Merrick road, 4th & Maple Aves. Straight thru 

on Merrick road. Thru Brightwaters 73.7. 
77.5 5.8 Babylon^ Merrick road & Deer Park Ave. Straight thru. 

83.3 5.8 Amityville* Merrick road & Broadway. Straight thru. 

Right on Broadway is Route 129 to Huntington. 

86.3 3.0 Massapequa, Merrick road & Hicksville road. 

Right on Hicksville Road is Route 128 to Oyster Bay and Route 130 
to Sea Cliff. 

Straight thru on Merrick road. 

86.9 0.6 SeafonL Straight thru, passing P. O. on left. Thru Bell- 
more 89.0 and Merrick 90.4. 

92.1 5.2 Freeport. Straight thru across trolley. 

93.7 1.6 Baldwin, Merrick road, Foxhurst & Grand Aves. 
Straight thru on Merrick road. 

95.9 2.2 Rockville Center, Merrick road & Village Ave., bank on 
right. 

Right on N. Village Ave. is Route 127 to Sea Cliff. 
Left on S. Village Ave. is Route 143 to Long Beach. 

Straight thru on Merrick road. Cross RR 96.2. 
©7.2 1.3 Lynnbrook, fork. Bear right — still on Merrick road. 
Cross RR 98.3. 

Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

98.7 1.5 Valley Stream. Straight thru on Merrick road. 

Left is Route 124 to Rockaway Park and Ft. Tllden. 
101.9 3.2 Springfield. Straight thru. Cross RR 102.2. Bear right onto 
Smith St. 104.6. Cross RR 104.8. Under elevated 105.0, 
coming onto Bergen Ave. 

105.2 3.3 Jamaica,* Bergen & Hillside Aves., Peace monument in cen- 

ter. Turn left onto Hillside Ave., going around far side of 
monument. 

106.3 1.1 Queens Blvd.; meeting trolley, turn right. Thru Kew Gar- 

dens 107.4. 

Straight ahead at 106.3 is Route 157 to New York. 

•Patchogue, L. I. (pop.- 7,000, alt. 15 ft.), as # Bay Shore, L. I. (pop. 4,000, alt. 25 ft.), it 

Indian name meaning "Many Waters." This the home of many wealthy families, among 

name is well applied, for besides the Atlantic which is that of Thomas Adams, the chiclet 

ocean and Great South bay one finds here chewing gum king# Washingtonf our first 

many attractive akcs and rivulets. It is id madc hi8 headquarter5 hcre at 

noted for its oyster markets and is within , 

about a mile of the actual strip of land known Ap P lc Trce Wlcks » Sagtikos manor, for a 

as Blue Point, from which the famous Blue bricf time durin « thc revolutionary war. The 

Point oyster derives its name, thousands of shore line is very beautiful, 

barrels being shipped from here. 'Jamaica, L. I., is the railroad center of 

Patchogue is a popular summer resort offer- Long Island. It is one of the old towns of 
ing excellent boating and fishing facilities. Queensboro and has some historical old 
The South Bay yacht and field club is located houses. Among them is the colonial home- 
here, stead of Governor John A- King, the first 

•Sayville, N. Y. (pop. 3,200, alt. 28 ft.), on ambassador to England from the United 

Long Island, is a popular resort and the cen- States. It was built niore than 125 years ago 

♦ er of a fishing and oyster industry. Near and is now used as a colonial museum. x Ja- 

-e was found a very active German wire- maica also has an interesting peace monu- 



station. ment. 

Digitized by 



Google 



Long Island Section Page 173 Route 148 

108.8 2.0. Forest Hills.* Straight thru with trolley on Queens Blvd. 
Bear right with trolley 110.1. Thru Newtown 110.4 and 
Winfield 111.4. 
. 113.5 5.2 Irregular 4-corners, Loose- Wiles biscuit factory on left; 
bear right with branch trolley along elevated. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

113.8 0.3 Long Island City. Straight thru under elevated. Gross 
Queensboro bridge 114.0. 

Left on Crescent Ave., just before bridge, is Route 102 to Coney 
Island. 

115.5 1.7 At far side of bridge ; bear right and immediately left under 

elevated onto 60th St. 
116.0 0.5 End of street at Central park; jog left and immediately right 
along same onto 59th St. 

116.6 0.5 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, 59th St. & Broadway, 

Columbus statue in center. 

Note (a) Route 147 — Sag Harbor to Easthampton, L. I. — 7.3 m. 

Asphalt-macadam and concrete all the way. An excellent connection between the 
above points; thru a scrub-oak section. 
0.0 0.0 SAG HARBOR. At flagpole in green. Go east (straight ahead if coming from 

Greenport. 
0.1 0.1 Fork, bear right on Division St. 

Under RK 5.9. 
R»2 6.1 Irregular 4-corners, bear left. Bear left at flagpole 6.8 onto Main St. 
7.8 1.1 PA8THAMPTON.* Main- St. & Newton Lane, P. O. on left. 
Straight ahead is Note (b) to Montauk. 

Route 148 — Southampton to Riverhead, (L. I.), 
N. Y.— 15.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Good Ground and Flanders. Asphalt-macadam and concrete to Good Ground; 
balance dirt. Thru scrub oak and pine sections practically all the way. 

This route connects at Riverhead with 145 to Port Jefferson and points west on the 

,-MiLEAGE-s north shore, but motorists will find preferable road conditions by using 

T*#.r nS&Tf? Route 147 (Merrick road) to points directly south of their destination and 

Mlkat* PoKS then using a cross-island route at that point to reach the north shore. 

0.0 0.0 SOUTHAMPTON, 4-corners at wooden church. Go west on 

the South Country road. . 

0.2 0.2 Fork, flag pole in center; bear left. Cross iron bridge 6.1. 

Curve right 6.7 across RR bridge and left beyond. Thru Good 

Ground* 7.3. 
8.0 7.8 Right-hand road beyond lumber yard; turn right. Bear left 

8.7 on direct road thru woods. Thru Flanders 13.2. Bear 

right onto Peconic St. 15.7. 
15.9 7.9 RIVERHEAD,* Peconic & Main Sts. 

Left is Route 145 to Port Jefferson. 
Riffht is Route 118 to Greenport. 

•Forest Hills, L. I. (pop. 3,000). A residen- golf links, which are easily accessible, are 

tial section near Forest Park, Brooklyn. famous among golf players. The old Canoe 

That part of the village known as Forest p » ac « inn ha > bccn a tavern since 1635 » when 

Hills Gardens was established by the Russell { \ caterc <! to ^ ndia " "i t . raders ' lt has a 

Sage Foundation Homes Co. The Fourth of c Jf. rtcr *rect from Her Majesty Queen Anne 

_ . , . , , , , , , obliging the inn to "supply both man and 

July celebrations held here each year have bea8t „ u tQok iu namc from the ^ ^ 

achieved national fame. The West Side thc Indians portaging their canoc8 acro88 the 

Tennis club, considered one of the finest in i st hmus between Shinnecock and Peconic 

the country, is located here. On its courts bays, then called Merosue, or Canoe Place, 

several international tournaments have been stopped there for refreshments. It is a popu- 

held. lar resort for motorists, coaching parties and 

*Good Ground, L. I. (pop. 1,000, alt. 60 ft.), hunters. An interesting tradition connected 

is a noted summer resort and the home of with a figure head of Hercules (seen here), 

Charles F. Murphy, Tammany boss. It is sur- taken from an old ship, is that "all girls who 

rounded by Peconic bay and the Shinnecock kiss this will be married within a year." 

bay and canal. The bay, which is landlocked 'Riverhead, L. I. (pop. 3,000, alt. 25 ft.), is an 

and especially safe for boating and sailing, is important town on the eastern end of Long 

about 2# miles wide and 12 miles long. Fish-. Island and county seat of Suffolk county. It 

tng is good, and there is an abundance ot is the scene of a real country fair, held attnjp*- 

oysters and crabs in the bay. There is ally. In the immediate neighborhood is sr J 

excellent still water bathing. The Shinnecock boating and fishing. 



Routes 150-151 Page 174 Long Island Section 

Route 150 — Sayville to St. James, L. I. — 13.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Mll _. nc Via Lake Ronkonkoma. Dirt road most of the way. Thru an unin- 

DhSuice teresting scrub section of interior Long Island that Is being Slowly 
T«tal Between developed. 
MMeaie Pelntt Affords connection to the Motor parkway at Lake Ronkonkoma, 

0.0 0.0 SAYVILLE, at trolley. Go northwest on Sayville road. Cross 

RR at sta. 0.2. 
0.6 0.6 Fork; keep left. 
3.4 2.8 Diagonal 4-corners; bear right. Bear left 5.2. 

6.0 2.6 Left-hand road; turn left. 

6.2 0.2 Fork, school on right; bear right. 

6.3 0.1 Irregular 4-corners; bear right. 

Slightly left at 6.8 leads to Motor Parkway. 

Pass Lake Ronkonkoma on left 6.6. Avoid right-hand roads 
7.0-7.6. 

9.1 2.8 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right. Avoid left-hand 

diagonal road 10.8. Cross RR at sta. 12.8. 

13.1 4.0 ST. JAMES. 

Route 151 — Lake Ronkonkoma (L. I.) to New York City, 

N. Y.— 56.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Motor Parkway, Bayside, flushing and Queensboro Bridge. Asphalt-macadam 
and pavement the entire distance. 

The first 42 % miles are over the Motor parkway. It was built for the first Vander- 
bilt cup race, which occurred in 1904. There are practically no crossroads as the Motor 
parkway either goes under or is bridged over all crossroads. Speed limit on the park- 
way is 40 miles per hour. Entrance may be had to the parkway from all main north 
and south roads. 

^MILEAGE^ Motorists desiring to go into Jamaica should turn left at end of road 

▼«*.i MftHf* a t mileage 42.5 and go south 0.4 mile to Hillside Ave., there turning 
M \\ IwSe PoSS ri « ht f °r Jamaica. 

0.0 0.0 LAKE RONKONKOMA. Go west on Motor parkway, thru 
toll gate (charges $1.00). 

42.5 42.5 End of parkway; turn right onto Rocky Hill road. 
44.8 1.8 Right-hand road; turn right onto Bell Ave. 

Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

44.6 0.8 Bayside, Bell Ave. & Broadway. Turn left onto Bell Ave. 

46.8 1.7 Fork; bear right. 

Same thorofare becomes Jackson Ave. 

47.9 1.6 Fork at parkway, school on right; keep right-hand drive, 

passing armory over to left. 

48.2 0.3 Flushing, Jackson Ave. & Main St., fountain in parkway on 

left. Straight thru on Jackson Ave., joining trolley. 
- Gross RR at sta. 48.8 and wooden drawbridge 48.4, coming 
along Flushing bay. 

49.3 1.1 Fork; bear right with branch trolley. 

49.5 0.2 Fork; bear left with trolley — still on Jackson Ave. Thru 
Corona 49.9. 

63.4 3.9 Right-hand diagonal street; bear right away from trolley onto 

Webster Ave. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

63.9 0.5 Crescent Ave., at bottom of slight grade ; turn left. 
54.4 0.5 Long Island City. Turn right onto Queensboro bridge. 

Straight ahead on Crescent Ave. is Route 162 to Coney Island. 

55.9 1.5 At far slue of bridge; bear right and immediately left under 

elevated onto 60th St. 
56.4 0.5 End of street at Central park; jog left and immediately 

right along same onto 59th St. 
o 0.5 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, 59th St. & Broadway, 

Columbus statue in center. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Long Island Section Page 175 Route 153 

Route 153— Babylon (L. I.) to New York City, 
N. Y.— 43.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Farmingdale, Hempstead, Jamaica and Williamsburg Bridge. Asphalt-macadam 
all the way, except 6 miles between Babylon and Farmlngdale, which is dirt. 

Thru a wild deserted section covered with brambles and a few scrub oaks and 
,-MILEAGE-> stunted pines to Farmingdale; balance thru a truck farming region. 
•»'» ■ SlS!?" 06 This route furnishes the quickest way from Babylon and points east 

■T8&S.MST to New York. 

0.0 0.0 BABYLON, Main St. & Deer Park Ave. Go west on Main St., 

passing town hall on right. 
0.6 0.6 Right-hand road; turn sharp right. 
0.8 0.2 Fork; bear left. Cross trolley and RR 1.0. 
1.6 0.8 Fork; befcr left with poles. 

Right at 6.1 is Route 129 at mileage 3.8 to Huntington. 

7.2 5.6 Farmingdale, Fulton & Main Sts. Straight thru across trol- 
ley on Fulton St. Cross RR 8.1. Thru 6-corners 9.4 and 
diagonal 4-corners 9.7. 

Right at 9.7 is Route 130 at mileage 4.2 to Sea Cliff and Route 128 
at mileage 4.2 to Oyster Bay. 

16.7 9.5 Fork, small park in center; bear right — still on Fulton St. 

17.8 0.6 Hempstead, Fulton St. & Franklin Ave. Straight thru on 

Fulton St. 

Right on Franklin Ave. is Route 127 to Sea Cliff. 
Left on Franklin Ave. is Route 143 to Long feeach. 
Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

17.9 0.6 Fork; bear right. Cross RR at W. Hempstead Sta. 18.0, join- 

ing trolley. Belmont race track on right at 21.8. Cross RR 
28.7. 

23.8 5.9 End of street; turn left with trolley, onto Jamaica Ave. and 

immediately right away from trolley onto Queens road. 
24.6 0.8 Hillsdale Ave.; turn left. 

27.2 2.6 Jamaica, Hillside & Bergen Aves., at peace- monument. 

Points of Interest, page 172. 

Straight thru on Hillside Ave. 

Thru diagonal 4-corners 28.2-28.6. Cross RR 29.2. 

Right on Queens Blvd. 28.2 is Route 147 at mileage 106.3 to New 
York. 

29.3 2.1 Richmond Hills, end of street, at elevated. 

Meeting trolley, turn right onto Jamaica Ave. 

33.1 3.8 Fork of three streets; bear right away from trolley onto 

Bushwick Ave. 
35.0 1.9 Left-hand street, large wooden church on right; turn left 
onto Kossuth PI. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest &, Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

36.2 0.2 Irregular 4-corners ; bear right under elevated onto Lafayette 

St. 
36.6 1.4 Bedford Ave., synagogue on right; turn right. 

37.9 1.3 Taylor St. ; turn right. Bear left at 38.0; joining trolley. 
38.2 0.8 Turn left with trolley across Williamsburg bridge, coming 

onto Delancey St. beyond. 

40.2 2.0 End of street; jog left under elevated onto the Bowery and 

immediately right onto Kenmar St. * 

40.3 0.1 Cleveland PL; turn right along small green, coming onto 

Lafayette St. just beyond. 

41.0 0.7 9th St., just beyond trolley and statue of Lafayette in open 

square, Wanamaker's on left; turn left. 

41.4 0.4 5th Ave.; turn right. 

42.1 0.7 Madison square, just beyond Flat Iron Bldg.; bear left onto 

Broadway, joining trolley. 

42.5 0.4 Greeley square (6th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 

on Broadway. 
48.1 0.6 Times square (7th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahea^ 

on Broadway. 
48.9 0.8 MEW TORE CITY, Columbus circle, Broadway & 59th S* 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



Routes 155-157 Page 176 Long Island Section 

Route 155— Long Beach (L. I.) to New York City, N. Y.— 

26.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Rockville Center, Merrick road, Jamaica and Queensboro bridge. Asphalt - 
,-MiLEAGE-v macadam and pavement all the w.ay. 

_ . . g 1 *^ 080 Route 184 gives an option from Jamaica into New York over the 

Mileage Poll tT Williamsburg bridge, but, due to congested traffic, is not advisable. 

0.0 0.0 LONG BEACH, at boardwalk. Go north on National St. 

(double drive). 
0.2 0.2 Double drive; turn right, passing village office on left. 
0.5 0.3 Riverside; turn left. 
0.* 0.4 Fork; bear right. Thru diagonal 4-corners 1.0, crossing long 

wooden viaduct just beyond. Gross RRs 1.4-2.4. 

4.7 3.8 Oceanside. Keep ahead across trolley, bearing right with 

Beach Ave. Avoid right-hand street 5.0. 

Right on Foxhurst Ave. at 6.0 leads to Baldwin, connecting there 
with Route 122 to Babylon. 

5.1 0.4 Fork; bear left onto Lincoln Ave. Avoid right-hand diagonal 

street 5.9. 
6.0 0.9 Rockville Center, Lincoln Ave. & Merrick road at cannon. 
Bear left onto Merrick road and follow route 147 from mile- 
age 95.9 balance of the way (20.6 miles) to New York City. 

Route 157— Ft. Tilden and Rockaway Park (L. I.) to New 
York City, N. Y.— 37.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Lawrence, Cedarhurst. Valley Stream, Merrick road, Jamaica and Williams- 
,-mileage-^ burg bridge. Pavement all the way. 

_. . , DtotM«e Route 147 furnishes a preferable option from Jamaica to New York 

Mileage Point*" over the Queensboro bridge. 

0.0 0.0 FT. TILDEN. Go northeast on Washington Ave. Same 
thorofare becomes Rockaway Beach Blvd. 2.0. 

2.5 2.5 Rockaway Park, Rockaway Beach Blvd., Beach 116th St 
Keep ahead, joining trolley on Rockaway Beach Blvd. 

2.8 0.3 Right-hand road, brick school on right; jog right and imme- 

diately left with trolley, continuing on Rockaway Beach Blvd. 
4.7 1.9 Arverne. Keep ahead. 

4.9 0.2 Fork, brick school on left; bear left — still on Rockaway Beach 

Blvd. Pass Arverne Sta. on left 5.3. Cross RR 5;5. Pass 
Edgemere Sta. on right 6j>, coming onto Far "Rockaway Blvd. 
Cross RR 7.0 — now on Atlantic Ave. 

7.2 2.3 End of road; turn left. 

7.3 0.1 Cornaga Ave.; turn right. Cross RR 7.4. 

7.5 0.2 Far Rockaway, Cornaga Ave. & Beach 20th St., bank on right. 

Straight thru across trolley on Cornaga Ave. 
7.9 0.4 Irregular 4-corners; bear left onto Beach 9th St. and keep 

right at fork just beyond onto Broadway. Thru Lawrence 

9.1 and Cedarhurst 9.7. 

10.8 2.9 Woodmere. Straight thru on Broadway. 

11.4 0.6 Hewlett. Straight thru. 

Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

12.3 0.9 Fork, roadhouse in center ; bear left. 

12.5 0.2 End of road; turn left onto Rockaway Ave. Cross RRs at sta. 

13.5. 

18.9 1.4 Valley Stream, Rockaway Ave. & Merrick road. 

Right is Route 122 to Greenport. 

Turn left onto Merrick road. Thru Springfield 17.0. Cross 
RR 17.3. Bear right onto Smith St. 19.8. Cross RR 20.0, 
coming onto Bergen Ave, 

20.4 6.5 Jamaica, Bergen & Hillside Aves., at peace monument. 

Turn left onto Hillside Ave. Thru diagonal 4-corners 21.4- 
21.8. Cross RR 22.4. 

Right on Queens Blvd. 21.4 is Route 147 at mileage 106.3 to New 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



Long Island Section Page 177 Route 160 

22.5 2.1 Richmond Hills, end of street, at elevated. # 

Meeting trolley, turn right onto Jamaica Ave. 

26.8 8.8 Pork of three streets; bear right away* from trolley onto Bush- 
wick Ave. 

28.2 1.9 Left-hand street, large wooden church on right; turn left 
onto Kossuth PI. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest &, Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

28.4 0.2 Irregular 4-corners ; bear right under elevated onto Lafayette 

St. 
29.8 1.4 Bedford Ave., synagogue on right; turn right. 

31.1 1.8 Taylor St.; turn right. Bear left at 31.2, joining trolley. 
31.4 0.3 Turn left with trolley across Williamsburg bridge, coming 

onto Delancey St. beyond. 

38.4 2.0 End of street; jog left under elevated onto the Bowery and 

immediately right onto Kenmar St. 

33.5 0.1 Cleveland PL; turn right along small green, coming onto 

Lafayette St. just beyond. 

84.2 0.7 9th St., just beyond trolley and statue of Lafayette in open 

square, Wanamaker's on left; turn left. 

34.6 0.4 5th Ave.; turn right. 

35.3 0.7 Madison square, just beyond Flat Iron Bldg.; bear left onto 

Broadway, joining trolley. 

35.7 ' 0.4 Greeley square (6th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 

on Broadway. 
36.3 0.6 Times square (7th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 

on Broadway. 
37.1 0.8 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, Broadway & 59th St. 

Route 160— New York City to Coney Island (L. I.), 

N. Y.— 172 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Broadway, Lafayette St, Williamsburg bridge, Bedford Ave. and Ocean park- 
way. Pavement all the way. 

Route 164 offers the best way from New York to Coney Island. Route 162 furnishes 
another option. 

'~ MIL Dto&noe For this an( * ottier exits. see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

tHieS« B p2Tnto" Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, Broadway & 59th St., 
Columbus statue in center. Go south with trolley on Broad- 
way. 

0.5 0.5 Times square (7th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 
on Broadway. 

1.2 0.7 Greeley square (6th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 
on Broadway. 

1.8 0.6 Madison square; bear right away from trolley onto 5th Ave., 

passing Flat Iron Bldg. on left. 

2.5 0.7 9th St., one block before park; turn left. 

2.9 0.4 Lafayette St., Wanamaker's on right; turn right, passing 

statue of Lafayette in open square on left. 

3.6 0.7 Fork at small green; keep right on Lafayette St. and imme- 

diately turn left onto Kenmar St. 
3.7* 0.1 End of street; jog right under elevated onto the Bowery and 

immediately left onto Delancey St. 
4.2 0.5 Take left-hand drive over Williamsburg bridge. 

5.7 1.5 Roebling St., just beyond Valley Forge monument; turn right 

with trolley. Bear right away from trolley 5.9 onto Taylor 

St. 
6.0 0.3 Bedford Ave.; turn left. 
7.9 1.9 Brooklyn, Bedford Ave. & Fulton St. 

Straight thru across trolley on 1 Bedford Ave. 
9.7 1.8 Parkside Ave.; turn right. Entrance to Prospect park on 

right at 10.0. 

10.8 1.1 Circle at far side of park; bear right around same, keeping 

ahead. * 

Digitized by VjOOQ lC ".; 



Roitfe 161 Page 178 Long Island Section 

11.0 0.2 Fork; bear left onto Ocean parkway. Avoid right-hand diag- 
onal road 12.7. 

16.4 6.4 Brighton Beach.* Turn right onto Surf Ave. 
17.2 ' 0.8 CONEY ISLAND,* Surf Ave. & 17th St. 

Route 161— Coney Island (L. I.) to New York City, 
N. Y.— 17.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ocean parkway, Bedford Ave., Williamsburg bridge, Lafayette St. and Broad- 
way. Good pavement all the way. 

Route 166 offers the best way from Coney Island to New York. Route 163 furnishes 
another option. 
.-MILEAGE-. 

Total b*!KS- Vet** 1 R oute Map, pages 144-145. 

Mileaoe Point* 

0.0 0.0 CONEY ISLAND, Surf Ave. & 17th St. Go east with trolley 

on Surf Ave. Trolley leaves to left 0.6. 
0.8 0.8 Brighton Beach.* Turn left onto Ocean parkway 0.8. 

6.2 5.4 Fork; bear right. 

6.3 0.1 Circle at Prospect park; curve right around same onto Park- 

side Ave., joining trolley. 
7.5 1.2 Bedford Ave.; turn left. 
9.3 1.8 Brooklyn, Bedford Ave. & Fulton Ct. 

Straight thru across trolley on Bedford Ave. 

Right on Lafayette St. at 9.9 is Route 124 at mileage 7.3 to Rockaway 
Park and Ft. Tllden. 

11.2 1.9 Taylor St.; turn right. Bear left at 5.9 onto Roebling St. 

11.5 0.3 Turn left with trolley across Williamsburg bridge, coming 

onto Delancey St. beyond. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest &, Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

13.5 2.0 End of street; jog" left under elevated onto the Bowery and 

immediately right onto Kenmar St. 
13i6 0.1 Cleveland place; turn right along small green, coming onto 

Lafayette St. just beyond. 

14.3 0.7 9th St., just beyond trolley, and statue of Lafayette in open 

square, Wanamaker's on left; turn left. 

14.7 0.4 5th Ave. ; turn right. 

15.4 0.7 Madison square, just beyond Flat Iron building; bear left 

onto Broadway, joining trolley. 

15.8 0.4 Greeley square (6th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 

on Broadway. 
16.4 0.6 Times square (7th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 

on Broadway. 
17.2 0.8 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, Broadway & 69th St- . 

'Brighton Beach is a less crowded section will be given to those who wish to take up 

of Coney Island. The Brighton Beach avia- aviation as a sport or profession. Lieut, 

tion field, east of Coney Island, has been Howard C. Brown, Lieut. Wilde and Lieut, 

opened by the Amusement and Allied Flying Morse Levitt are the pilots. One feature of 

Circus, Inc. This field is on the site of the the planes used at this field is the electrical 

old Brighton Beach race track on Ocean device used to illuminate the airplanes for 

parkway, opposite the Shelburne hotel, and is night flying, which will make it possible for 

now used as the New York port for aerial patrons to view the electrical splendors of 

transportation between New York, Asbury Coney Island at night. 

Park and Atlantic City. It is planned to hold # Coney Island, N. Y., is world-famed as an 

monthly contests open to all pilots, in aerial amusement resort and is visited by prac- 

sporting events, such as looping the loop, tically every tourist entering the vicinity of 

ascending and landing in the smallest possi- New York City. During the summer months 

ble area, altitude contests, cross country hundreds of thousands of citizens and visitors 

races for speed and distance, and parachute alike seek recreation and diversion here, 

jumping contests. There is no charge for ad- Coney Island is said to have taken its name 

mission to the Brighton Beach aviation field from an island in Sligo, Ireland. As early as 

and people are given an opportunity to see 1829 a hotel was erected here, but the place 

the airplanes at close range and the more did not become an amusement resort until 

daring ones may even take a short flight and 1844. A number of quaint old houses will b« 

view New York from the clouds, at a reason- seen in the nearby vicinity, relics of the 

le sum per flight. Instructions in flying early days of settlement. 



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Long Island Section Page 179 Routes 162-163 

Route 162— New York City to Coney Island (L. I.), 

N. Y.— 22.3 m. 

For Accommodations, see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Queensboro bridge, Bedford Ave., Bay Ridge and Ft. Hamilton parkway. 

This route avoids congestion of Lower Manhattan during week days. On Sundays 
use Route 164 via Manhattan bridge, which connects with this route (162) at Prospect 
park. Goes thru Bay Ridge along the lower harbor, passing Fort Hamilton. 

A shorter way is to use this route (162) to Prospect park and then Route 164 to Coney 
Island via Ocean parkway or Route 160 via Williamsburg bridge. 

" MIL di1u5m For this and other exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

■IiS!e B p e iS5 a Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, 59th St. & Broadway, 
Columbus statue in center. Go south with trolley op Broad- 
way. 

0.1 0.1 57th St. ; turn left away from trolley. 

1.0 0.9 2nd Ave.; meeting trolley, turn left under elevated. 

1.1 0.1 Turn right away from elevated onto Queensboro bridge. 

2.6 1.5 Long Island City at end of bridge. Turn right onto Crescent 

Ave. 

2.7 0.1 Irregular 4-corners; turn left onto Harris Ave. 

2.9 0.2 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto Jackson Ave. 

3.5 0.6 4th St.; turn right away from trolley. 

3.6 0.1 Manhattan Ave.; meeting trolley, turn left across iron 

bridge. Avoid right-hand diagonal street just beyond iron 
bridge 3.9. 

4.5 0.9 Greenpoint St.; meeting cross-trolley, turn left and imme- 
diately right away from trolley onto Leonard St. 

5.3 0.8 Bayard St.; turn right. 

5.5 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; bear left onto Roebling St. 

5.9 0.4 Irregular 4-corners; jog right and immediately left, keeping 
ahead on Roebling St. Avoid right-hand road which crosses 
Williamsburg bridge, keeping ahead across trolley 6.3. 

6.5 0.6 Irregular 4-corners ; bear right across trolley onto Taylor St. 

6.6 0.1 Bedford Ave.; turn left. Bear right across Lafayette Ave. 7.1. 

Left at 7.1 is Route 124 to Rockaway Park and Ft. Tllden. 

8.5 1.9 Brooklyn, Bedford Ave. & Fulton St. Straight thru across 
trolley on Bedford Ave. 

10.3 1.8 Parkside Ave.; turn right. Pass entrance to Prospect park 

on right at 10.6. 

11.2 0.9 Circle at far side of park; bear right around same, keeping 

ahead. 

11.4 0.2 Fork; bear right onto Ft. Hamilton parkway. 

Left fork on Ocean Parkway is Route 160 at mileage 11.0 to Coney 
Island. 

13.7 2.3 Shore road ; turn right. Thru Bay Ridge 14.9, passing receiv- 
ing sta. on right and turning left onto Ft. Hamilton parkway. 

18.3 4.6 4-corners; turn right. 

19.3 1.0 End of road; turn left up slight grade onto Cropsey Ave. 

Same thorofare becomes Harway Ave. Cross iron bridge 21.9 

—now on W. 17th St. Cross RR 22.2. 
22.3 3.0 CONEY ISLAND, W. 17th St. & Surf Ave. 
Points of Interest, opposite page. 

Route 163— Coney Island (L. I.) to New York City, 

N. Y.— 22.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ft. Hamilton parkway, Bay Ridge, Bedford Ave. and Queensboro bridge, with 
connections across Williamsburg bridge to Lower Manhattan. 

This optional route to New York passes Fort Hamilton and goes thru Bay Ridge 
along the lower harbor. Avoids congestion in Lower Manhattan during week days. On 
Sundays use Route 166 via Manhattan bridge, which connects with this route (168) at 
Prospect p*»,rk. 

A shorter way to New York is to use Route 166, which goes via Ocean parkway to 
Prospect park. 

.-MILEAGE-. 

Tttai SShES! Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

HIIbim points 

0.0 0.0 CONEY ISLAND, W. 17th St. & Surf Ave. Go north on 



Digitized by 



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Route 164 Page 180 Long Island Section _ 

,17th St. Gross RR 0.1 and iron bridge 0.4, coming onto Har- . 
way Ave. Same thorof are becomes Cropsey Ave. . 
3.0 3.0 Right-hand road at foot of slight grade; turn right. 
4.0 1.0 Ft. Hamilton parkway; turn left. Turn right onto Shore 

road at receiving sta., going thru Bay Ridge just beyond. 
8.6 4.6 End of road; turn left onto Ft. Hamilton parkway. 
10 J 2.8 Fork; bear left. 

11.0 0.1 Circle at Prospect park; curve right around same onto Park- 
side Ave., joining trolley. 
12.0 1.0 Bedford Ave.; turn left. 
18.8 1.8 Brooklyn, Bedford Ave. & Fulton St. 

Straight thru across trolley on Bedford Ave. Bear left across : 
Lafayette Ave. 15.2. 

Right at 16.2 is Route 124 to Rockaway Park and Ft. Tllden. 

15.7 1.9 Taylor St.; turn right. l 

15.8 0.1 Irregular 4-corners ; bear left across trolley onto Roebling St. 

Cross trolley 16.0, avoiding left-hand road just beyond, which 
crosses Williamsburg bridge. 

Left at 16.0 is Route 161 to New York. 

16.4 0.6 Irregular 4-corners; jog right and immediately left, keeping 

ahead on Roebling St. 
16.8 0.4 Irregular 4-corners; bear right across trolley onto Bayard St. a 
17.0 0.2 Leonard St.; turn left. 
17.8 0.8 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Greenpoint St. 

and immediately right onto Manhattan Ave. 

18.7 0.9 4th St. % just beyond iron bridge; turn right away from trolley. ;i 

18.8 0.1 Jackson Ave. ; meeting trolley, turn left. 

19.8 0.5 Fork; keep left with trolley on Jackson Ave. - 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. \ 

19.4 0.1 Irregular 4-corners; turn left away from trolley onto Harris i 
Ave. 

19.6 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; turn right onto Crescent Ave. 

19.7 0.1 Long Island City. Turn left onto Queensboro bridge. 

Straight ahead Is Route 101 to Huntington. 

21.2 l.f> At far side of bridge; turn right under elevated and imme- 
diately left onto 60th St. 

21.6 0.4 End of street at Central park; jog left and immediately right 
along same onto 59th St. 

22.8 0.7 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, 59th St. & Broadway, 

Columbus statue in center. 

Route 164— New York City to Coney Island (L. L), 
N. Y.— 15.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. . 

Via Broadway, Lafayette St., Manhattan bridge, Flatbush Ave. Prospect park and 
Ocean parkway. Macadam and pavement all the way. 

This is the shortest and most popular route to Coney Island and is easily followed. 
Routes 160 and 162 offer less preferable options. 

^* ,L Dto8»3 For this an( * °ther exits see City Map, bet. pages 98-99. 

JSS^fSSff Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

0.0 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, Broadway & 59th St., 
Columbus statue in center. Go south with trolley on Broad- 
way. 
TT6 0.5 Times square (7th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 

on Broadway. 
1.2 0.7 Greeley square (6th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 
on Broadway. 

1.8 0.6 Madison square; bear right away from trolley onto 5th Ave., 

passing Flat Iron building on left. 
2.5 0.7 9th St., one block before park; turn left. 

2.9 0.4 Lafayette St., Wanamaker's on right; turn right, passing 

statue of Lafayette in open square on left. 



Digitized by 



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Long Island Section Page 181 Route 165 

S.6 0.7 Fork at small green; keep right on Lafayette. St. 
3.9 0.3 Canal St.; meeting trolley, turn left. 

4.2 0.3 Just beyond the Bowery elevated; turn right onto Manhattan 
bridge, joining trolley on Flatbush Ave. just beyond. 

6.6 2.4 Follow traffic signs around subway sta., keeping ahead. 

7.4 0.8 Circle; curve right around same, leaving trolley just beyond 

and entering Prospect park. 

7.7 0.3 End of road; bear left. 
8.2 0.5 Fork; bear left 

8.5 0.3 Fork, boathouse on right; bear left. 
8.7 0.2 Fork; bear left. 

9.4 0.7 Fork; bear left out of park. 

9.5 0.1 Circle at far side of park; curve right around, same. 
9.7 0.2 Fork; bear left onto Ocean parkway. 

Right fork is Route 162 at mileage 11.4 to Coney Island via Ft. 
Hamilton. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 11.4. 
15.1 5.4 Brighton Beach. Turn right onto Surf Ave. 
15.9 0.8 CONEY ISLAND,* Surf Ave. & 17th St. 

Route 165— Coney Island (L. I.) to New York City, 
N.Y.— 15.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ocean parkway, Prospect park, Flatbush Ave., Manhattan bridge, Lafayette St. 
and Broadway. Macadam and pavement all the way. 

This is the shortest and most popular route to Coney Island and is easily followed. 
Routes 161 and 163 offer less preferable options. 

.-MILEAGE-^ 

T»tai VSSSSi Detail Route Map, pages 144-145. 

Mileage Point* 

0.0 0.0 CONEY ISLAND, Surf Ave. & 17th St. Go east with trolley 

.on Surf Ave. Trolley leaves to left 0.6. 
0.8 0.8 Brighton Beach. Turn left onto Ocean parkway. 
6.2 6.4 Fork; bear right. 

6.4 0.2 Circle at Prospect park; curve right three-fourths way around 

same, entering park. 

7.5 1.1 Pork; bear left. 

8.2 0.7 Right-hand road; "bear right, leaving park. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99 

9.2 1.0 Circle at far side of park; bear right around same, joining 

trolley on Flatbush Ave. Pass subway sta. on left 9.3, coming 

onto Manhattan bridge beyond. 
1J.7 2.5 4-corners at far side of bridge; turn left. Under the Bowery 

elevated. 
11.9 0.2 Pork; bear right with trolley— still on Canal St. 
12.0 0.1 Lafayette St. ; turn right away from trolley. Avoid right-hand 

street 12.3, which leads to Williamsburg bridge. 

13.0 1.0 9th St., just beyond trolley and statue of Lafayette in open 

square, Wanamaker's on left; turn left. 
13.4 0.4 5th Ave.; turn right. 

14.1 0.7 Madison square, just beyond Flat Iron building; bear left 

on Broadway. 
14.6 0.5 Greeley square (6th Ave.) ; follow traffic signs, keep ahead 

on Broadway, joining trolley. 
15.1 0.5 Times. square (7th Ave.); follow traffic signs, keeping ahead 

on Broadway. 
15.9 0.8 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus Circle, Broadway & 59th St. 



Island, N. Y., is world -famed as an Coney Island is said to have taken its name 

amusement resort and is visited by prac- from an isIand in SIi *°» Inland. As early as 

.. M 4 . " A . A . . . . A , 1829 a hotel was erected here, but the place 

hc.uy erery tourist entering the vicinity of did not bccomc ^ amu8cmcnt resort w , 

New York City. During the summer months xg^ ^ number of quaint old houses wil 1 

hundreds of thousands of citizens and visitors seen in the nearby vicinity, relics of 

'Hfrft'ilMft recreation and diversion here. early days of settlement. 



Poughkeepsie City Map Page 182 Poughkeepsie Section 



Poughkeepsie Section 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 

Poughkeepsie (pop. 35,000, alt. ISO ft.).— The 
largest city and principal route center of 
the East Hudson valley, halfway between 
New York City and Albany. The name is 
said to be derived from the Mohegan, "Apo- 
keep-sinck," meaning a safe and pleasant 
harbor. Thru the eastern and northern parts 
of the city flows Fallkill creek, so named 
by the Dutch because of the number of falls 
or cascades in the stream. 

Poughkeepsie was first settled by the 
Dutch in 1696. It was incorporated as a city 
in 1854. Gen. Lafayette visited here in 182* 
and Henry Clay, then a presidential candi- 
date, in 1844. While yet an artist, Samuel 



POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 
F. B. Morse, inventor of the telegraph, lived 
at Locust Grove, two miles below the city, 
and in the process of his experiments built 
wires into Poughkeepsie, two years before 
they were extended to New York City. Just 
below Locust Grove was the eastern terminus 
of- the old horse-propelled ferry across the 
Hudson to Milton, which ceased operations 
about the middle of the last century. At 
the eastern end of the ferry, Theophilus 
Anthony, blacksmith, forged the immense 
chain stretched across the river at Fort 
Montgomery to obstruct the British fleet. 
The most conspicuous landmark in the vi- 
(Continued on page 184) 



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Page 183 



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Route 171 



Page 184 Poughkeepsie Section 



Route 171 — Poughkeepsie to New York City — 74.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Wappingers Falls, FishkiU Village, Peekskill, Croton, Osslning, Tarrytown, 
Irvington, f>obbs Ferry* Hastings, Yonkers and Riverside drive. Macadam, brick, con- 
crete and wood block all the way. 

This route follows the east side of the Hudson river, of which very few views are 
obtainable until reaching Tarrytown. From Poughkeepsie to Peekskill it goes thru a 
fine farming section. From Fishkill to Peekskill the route goes inland from the river 
thru a wooded hilly section, sparsely settled. From Peekskill to Yonkers it passes many 
fine estates and farms, following Broadway to Riverside drive, from which a fine view 
of the Hudson river and the Palisades may be obtained, passing many fine apartment 
houses and private residences. 

^MILEAGE-. 
Distance 
Total Between 
Mileage Point* 



For this and other exits see City Map, page 182. 



0.0 POUGHKEEPSIE, Market & Main Sts., court house and P. O. 

on right. Go south on Market St. 
0.2 Fork, soldiers' monument in center; bear left with trolley, 

onto South Ave. 
4.7 Fork; bear right upgrade, away from trolley. 
0.7 4-corners ; meeting trolley, turn right onto Main St. 
2.1 Wappingers Falls** left-hand road. Turn left across concrete 

bridge, leaving trolley. 
0.2 3-corners, park on right; bear left. 

hilL l*he. Mesier park and homestead, built 
in 1766, the residence of Peter Mesier, a 
New York merchant who settled here about 
the close of the revolution, has been pur- 
chased by the village for preservation in 
its original shape. 

Wappingers Falls is the home of Sweet, 
Orr & Co., Inc., originators and largest 
manufacturers of overalls in the world; also 
of the Garner Print Works and Bleachery, 
owning one of the most modern bleachery 
establishments in the country. The Wap- 
pingers branch of the National Aniline & 
Chemical Co. was one of the first to turn 
out dyes after the beginning of the European 
war; the local plant employed (1918) over 
500, and is the largest manufacturer of sul- 
phur colors in the United States. 



0.0 

0.2 

4.9 
5.6 
7.7 

7.9 

•Wappingers Falls, N. Y. (pop. 3,820, alt. 
110 ft.), was named from the Wappingers or 
Wappingi Indians, a branch of the Mohicans 
who once lived among the highlands. Here 
Wappingers creek goes over a series of high 
ledges, forming picturesque cascades and 
furnishing considerable waterpower. 

The Post road crosses the creek by a red 
sandstone bridge much admired by tourists. 
In plain sight, about an eighth of a mile 
north of the bridge, is the dam. The lower 
falls, where the water tumbles over the 
rocks for over eighty feet, are directly south 
of the bridge; during spring and fall freshets 
these falls are worth stopping to see. 

Zion P. E. church is a fine structure of 
stone set in the park at the top of the 



(Poughkeepsie Points of Interest, continued from page 182) 



cinity is the Poughkeepsie bridge across the 
Hudson, a short distance north of the busi- 
ness center. This great structure is 6,738 ft. 
in length and 212 ft. above the river at the 
center, the highest in the world over navi- 
gable waters. 

Poughkeepsie has always been noted for 
its educational facilities. Vassar college, 
which occupies 800 acres, is the largest wo- 
men's college in the country. It was founded 
by Matthew Vassar, in 1861, and stands on a 
considerable elevation just off Main street 
about two miles east of the business center. 

The Eastman business college is one of the 
most noted of its kind in the country, with 
attendance from all over the U. S. and many 
students from foreign countries. The Pough- 
keepsie public school system is said to be one 
of the best in the nation. 

The Adriance Memorial library is one of the 



largest and most complete in its part of the 
state. Among the historical spots in Pough- 
keepsie is the residence of former Gen. 
George Clinton, a stone structure located 
at the corner of N. White and Main streets. 
This house, which was visited on many occa- 
sions by Washington and other contemporary 
leaders, contains many relics of revolution- 
ary days. 

One of the sights of the city is the circular 
panoramic view of the Hudson river valley 
obtained from the top of College Hill park. 
The automobile roadway to the summit, 
which is practically 200 feet above the Pough- 
keepsie bridge, is on North Clinton St. The 
grades are easy. The Catskills . and Adiron- 
dack 9 are visible in the distance on a clear 
day. 

Poughkeepsie is prominent industrial 

center, manufacturing farm machinery, auto- 
mobiles, iron castings, player pianos, etc. 



Holland Hotel 

J. B. HYATT. Manager 

Beacon New York 



60 Rooms. Many Private Baths 

European $2.00 Up 

American $5.00 Per Day Up 

Famous Cuisine 



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Poughkeepsie Section Page 185 



Route 171 



12.8 4.9 Fishkill,* end of road. Turn left. 

Right is Route 34 to Newburgh via Beacon -New burgh Ferry. 

13.0 0.2 3-corners, garage ahead; bear right. Caution for blind RR 

crossing 18.1. 

25.1 12.1 Garrison (outskirts). Straight thru. 

31.0 5.9 Fork, at foot of grade ; bear right across iron bridge upgrade 

onto Highland Ave., coming onto Division St. 

Peekskiii City Map and Points of Interest, page 84. 

82.2 1.2 Peekskiii, South & Division Sts., P.O. ahead. Turn right with 

trolley onto South St. 
82.4 0.2 Washington St.; bear left with branch trolley. 
33.7 1.3 Right-hand road; turn right with trolley. 

34.1 0.4 End of road; turn left with trolley. 

84.7 0.6 Buchanan, 4-corners. Turn left with trolley. Thru Montrose 

85.4. 

39.3 4.6 Fork; bear right downgrade on brick. 

89.8 0.5 Croton,* 4-corners, bank on right. Straight thru. Thru 

Harmon 40.9. Cross iron bridge over Croton river 41.4. 

Points of Interest, page 83. 

British from turning the American works 
waste beyond it. 

•Croton, N. Y. (pop. 2,243, alt. 209 ft.), 
situated on the eastern edge of Haveritraw 
bay, on the widest part of the Hudson river, 
was named for Chief Croton, of the Kitche- 
wan Indians, whose home and castle were 
on Croton Point, west of Harmon. This is 
the nearest point on the Post road to Croton 
lake and reservoir system, formerly the chief 
source of water supply for New York City. 
From Hessian Hill, immediately north of the 
village, fine views may be had of the Hudson, 
Croton Point, Haverstraw and the mountains 
across the river near that city. 



•Fishkill, N. Y. (pop. 525, alt. 8 ft.). Old 
Dutch church, erected here in 1731, housed 
provincial convention of 1776; was used by 
Americans as military prison during revolu- 
tion. Blacksmith who forged Washington's 
sword lived and worked here. 

Wharton house, along roadside, just south 
of Fishkill village, was local headquarters for 
continental army during most of revolution- 
ary war; also the house referred to in 
Cooper's "Spy." Interesting bronze tablet in 
Wicopee Pass, 4 miles south of Fishkill vil- 
lage. Wicopee pass was carefully guarded 
during the revolutionary war to prevent the 



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Route 171 



Page 186 Poughkeepsie Section 



41.9 2.1 End of road ; turn right. 

43.6 1.7 Ossining,* diagonal 4-corners, bank on left. Straight thru 

across trolley. 
45.6 2.0 Scarboro,* stone church on left. Straight thru. Go under 

narrow stone arch 46.6. 

Sleepy Hollow Cemetery on left 48.3. 

Tarrytown City Map and Points of Interest, page 81. 

Right on Central Ave. 49.7 leads to Ferry for Nyack, and is Route 54 

to Suffern. 

49.8 4.2 Tarrytown, Broadway & Main St. Straight thru across trolley. 



•Ossining, N. Y. (pop. fc,000, alt. 8 ft.). An 
Indian name meaning "stone upon stone." 
It was originally called Sing Sing until 1901 
when the people decided to change the name. 
Here is located the New York state prison. 
Off Tellers Point, which extends into the 
Hudson about 1J4 miles, the British man -of- 
war "Vulture" lay at anchor awaiting the 
return of Major Andre from a conference 
with Benedict Arnold; a party of Americans 
fired upon her and she dropped down the 
stream. Later Andre made an attempt to 
cross the Hudson at Kings Ferry and reach 



New York by land, which resulted in his cap- 
ture. There is an interesting civil war monu- 
ment here. 

*Scarboro-on-Hudson, N. Y. (pop. 106). The 
church at the intersection of the Post road 
and the Briarcliff road was erected by Mrs. 
Elliott F. Shepard, daughter of Cornelius Van- 
derbilt, to the memory of her husband. On 
the west side of the Post road, opposite the 
church is "Beechwood," the home of F. A. 
Vanderlip. The former Elliott F. Shepard 
residence, between the Sleepy Hollow and 
Briarcliff roads, to the east of the Post road, 
is now the Sleepy Hollow country club. 



The most pleasant part of a motor trip through Westchester County as a southern chicken dinner a* 

THE DIXIE, Dobt> 8 Ferry-on-Hudson ^JESfL** 
A la Carte— All Hours — Rooms for Tourists 



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Route 171 



Page 188 Poughkeepsie Section 



60.3 0.1 Yonkers,* Getty square. Bear right thru open square onto 
Broadway, joining trolley. Go under elevated section of sub- 
way at southern boundary of Van Cortlandt park 68.5. Cross 
long iron drawbridge over Harlem river 64.7. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest &, Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

65.Q 4.7 Fork; keep right on Broadway where elevated leaves to left. 

65.9 0.9 5-corners; yellow church over to right; bear right onto River- 
side drive, coming along bank of Hudson river. 

68.6 2.7 6-corners; turn right. Still on Riverside drive. Cross long 
concrete viaduct 69.8. 

70.2 1.6 Fork at end of viaduct; bear right. Pass Grant's tomb on 

left 70,6. 
73.1 2.9 End of drive; turn left onto 72d St. 

73.3 0.2 Broadway at subway sta. ; meeting trolley, turn right. 
74.0 0.7 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, Broadway & 59th St. 



•Yonkers, N. Y. (pop. 85,000, sit. 10 It.). 
One of the earliest settlements along the 
Hudson; name supposed to he derived from 
the Dutch, "Yonkers." The Phillipse Manor 
house, long known as the "Manor Hall," 
the original part built probably in 1682, with 
an addition in 1745, is an excellent specimen 
of Colonial architecture. It has a balus- 
traded hip-roof, dormer windows, pillared 
porticoes and solid wooden shutters. Its front 
door opens in two halves after the old fash- 
ion of the Dutch. The beautiful winding stair- 
way, the great fireplace and the fine old 
paneling still remain. There are still great 
horse-chestnuts around the door of the house, 
box bushes and a privet hedge, but the gar- 
den that ran down to the Hudson river dis- 
appeared long ago. In front of it is a hand- 
some soldiers' monument. Here Mary Phil- 



lipse, who is said to have refused an offer of 
marriage from George Washington, was born 
and lived. During the revolution the prop- 
erty was confiscated, as Frederick Phillipse, 
the owner, was regarded as a loyalist. 

Yonkers has several important industries, 
among them the Alex. Smith & Sons Carpet 
Co., said to be the largest in the world; the 
Otis Elevator Co., Waring Hat Co., and huge 
plants of the American and Federal Sugar 
Refining companies. There is also a great 
deal of general manufacturing on a smaller 
scale. Nearness to the New York city mar- 
kets has added greatly to the prosperity of 
the city. 

Among points of special interest are the 
Carnegie library, and one of the New York 
state armories. The city and its environs are 
covered with homes, some of them among 
the finest in the Metropolitan district. 



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F. A. MUSCHENHEIM 



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Garage, Inc. 

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and Depot 

146-154 West 30th St., New York City 



Fireproof building; accommoda- 
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Only 4 blocks from Hotels Mc- 
Alpin, Martinique, Waldorf, 
Breslin and Herald Square sec- 
tion. Night service; storage; 
supplies; reliable repairing. 



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Poughkeepsie Section Page 189 Routes 172-173 

Route 172 — Poughkeepsie to Newburgh, N. Y. — 16.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Wappingers Falls, Hughsonville, Beacon and Beacon-Newburgh ferry. Macadam 
all the way. 

Thru a hilly farming country along Hudson river, crossing the river by ferry. 

^MILEAGE-. 

T«tai VitSiSl For this and other exits see City Map, page 182. 

Mile&ie Points 

0.0 0.0 POUGHKEEPSIE, Market & Main Sts., city hall on right. Go 

southwest on Market St. with trolley. 
0.2 0.2 Fork, monument in center; bear left with trolley onto South 

Ave. Trolley leaves to left 4.8. 
5.5 5.3 4-corners; meeting trolley, turn right. 

7.5 2.0 Wappingers Falls,* left-hand road. Turn left across stone 

bridge away from trolley. 
7.7 0.2 Right-hand road at farther side of park; turn right. 
9.1 1.4 Hughsonville, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Beacon-Newburgh City Map and Points of Interest, page 205. 

15.2 6.1 Beacon, 5-coraers, bank on far left. Bear right onto Ferry St., 

turning immediately right downgrade with trolley. Still 

Ferry St. 
15.7 0.5 Right-hand road; turn right oyer RR bridge. 
15.9 0.2 Beacon-Newburgh Ferry. (Ferry runs all year from 6 a. m. 

to 11 p. m. 

From ferry landing, turn right one block, and then left and 

next left onto Colden St. 

16.1 0.2 Fork; bear right with trolley. . 

16.2 0:1 Right-hand street: turn right upgrade, with trolley onto 

Broadway. 

16.3 0.1 NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand Ave., city hall on far left. 

Route 173— Peekskiil, N. Y., to Norwalk, Conn. — 41.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Yorktown, Katonah, Cross River, So. Salem, Ridgefleld and Wilton. Tar mac- 
adam all the way. Thru hilly farming country. 

This route connects at Ridgefleld with Route 22 to Danbury. 
,-MILEAGE-^ 

Total Between For this and other exits see City Map, page 84. 

Mlleete Folate 

0.0 0.0 PEEKSKILL, Main & Division Sts. Go southeast on S. Divi- 
sion St., upgrade. 
0.3 0.3 5-corners; bear slightly left, upgrade, onto Crompond St., 

5.6 5.3 Fork; bear left upgrade. Thru Yorktown 6.4. Avoid right- 

hand road 8.2. 
8.6 3.2 Left-hand road; sign "Danbury"; turn sharp left. Cross RR 
at Amawalk Sta. 9.7. Avoid left-hand road 10.0. 

Left at 10.0 is Route 38 (at mileage 22.9) to Carmel and Plttsfield. 

Cross long iron bridge over reservoir 14.2. 

*Wappin*ere Falls, N. Y. (pop. 3,820, alt. hill. The Meiser park and homestead,, built 

110 ft.), was named from the Wappingers or in 1766, the residence of Peter Meiser, a 

Wappingi Indians, a branch of the Mohicans New York merchant who settled here about 

i. - r -a ...-—„ *u- vin^ion/i. u-w» the close of the revolution, has been pur- 

who once lived among the highlands. Here » r , 

... . , . , . chased by the village for preservation m 

Wappmgers creek goes over a series of high .^ ^ 8hape 

ledge.', forming picturesque cascades and Wa pp ingcr8 Falls is the home of Sweet, 

furnishing considerable waterpower. 0rr & Co Inc . f or igi nat ors and largest 

The Post road crosses the creek by a red manufacturers of overalls in the world; also 

sandstone bridge much admired by tourists. of the Garner Print Works and bleacher/,. 

In plain sight, about an eighth of a mile owning one of the most modern bleacher? 

ooftft of the bridge, is the dam. The lower establishments in the country, The Wap- 

(alls, where the water tumbles over the pingers branch of the National Aniline & 

rocks for over eighty feet, are directly south Chemical Co. was one of the first to turn 

of fbe bridge; during spring and fall freshets out dyes after the beginning of the Europe, 

these falls are worth stopping to see. war; the local plant employed (1918), 

Zkm P. E. church is a fine structure of 500, and is the largest manufacturer 

set in the park at the top of the phur colors in the United States. 



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Route 174 Page 190 Poughkeepsie Section 

14.3 5.7 End of road beyond bridge; turn left. 

14.8 0.5 3-corners ; turn left along reservoir. 

15.0 0.2 Right-hand road before iron bridge; turn right. 

15.6 0.6 Katonah, 4-corners at flagpole. Turn left on double-drive. 

Cross RR at sta. 15.9. 
16.5 0.9 End of road ; turn left. Avoid left-hand road 16.6. 

16.7 0.2 Right-hand road just beyond iron bridge; turn right. 

19.3 2.6 End of road; turn right. 

19.9 0.6 Fork; bear left with poles. 

20.4 0.5 Cross River, P. O. on left. Bear left. Avoid right-hand road 

23.4. 

24.3 3.9 So. Salem, N. Y., end of road. Turn right. Cross New York- 

Connecticut state line 26.2. 

27.2 ?.9 Fork, wooden school on right; bear left onto Olmsted lane, 

coming onto West lane. 
28.0 0.8 Ridgefield, Conn., end of road, stone church on right. Turn 
right. 

Left is Route 22 to Danbury. 

28.4 0.4 Right-hand diagonal road, grass plot on right; bear right onto 

Wilton road West and follow Route 373 from mileage 17.6 
balance of way (13.0 miles) to Norwalk. 

Route 174— Peekskill to Port Chester, N. Y.— 41.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Yorktown, Mt. Klsco, Armonk and Purchase. Macadam all the way. 

This is a very beautiful trip thru the heart of the reservoir district of Westchester 
county. It is the best and shortest connection from Peekskill to any point on Long 
Island sound. 
<-MILEAGE^ 

Total Between Por this and other exits see City Map, page 84. 

MHeate Potato 

0.0 0.0 PEEKSKILL, Main & Division Sts. Go southeast on Division 

St. 
0.2 0.2 5-corners ; bear left upgrade onto Crompond St. 
5.6 5.4 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

6.4 0.8 Yorktown, P. O. on right. Straight thru. Avoid right-hand 

road 8.1. 

8.5 2.1 Left-hand road; turn left. Cross RR at Amawalk Sta. 9.7. 
10.0 1.5 Fork; bear right — sign "Katonah." 

Left fork is Route 38 to Pittsfield. 

13.5 3.5 Prominent 4-corners; turn right. Cross iron bridge 14.1.. 

16.3 2.8 End of road; turn left. 

18.4 2.1 3-corners; turn left — sign "Ossjning." 

Right leads to Yorktown Heights. 

18.8 0.4 Irregular 4-corners just beyond Pines Bridge; turn left — 

sign "Mt. Kisco." 

Right is Route 363 to New York City. 

203 1.5 Right-hand road beyond small bridge; turn right. 

21.9 1.6 End of road ; turn right. 

22.8 0.9 End of road ; turn left across RR. 

22.9 0.1 Mt. Kisco, Main St. & Moyer Ave. at fountain. Keep ahead 

on Main St. 
23.7 0.8 Fork; bear right. Avoid left-hand road 24.1. 

24.4 0.7 Fork; bear left. Thru Armonk 29.7. 

31.5 7.1 Fork; keep left upgrade. 

32.9 1.4 Fork; bear right with pavement. 

34.9 2.0 Fork; bear left upgrade. Thru Purchase 36.7. 

39.3 4.4 Fork; bear left onto Westchester Ave. 

Right fork leads to Rye. 

Thru diagonal 4-corners 40.2, and irregular 4-corners 40.7. 
41.3 2.0 PORT CHESTER,* Westchester Ave., King & Main Sts. 

Right on King St. is Route 9 to New York. 
Diagonally left on Main St. is Route 1 to Stamford. 

•Port Chester, N. Y. (pop. 17,000, alt. 34 ft.), of the town rise rather abruptly, affording 
is a prosperous residence suburb, with con- many views of Long Island sound and sev- 
iderable manufacturing. The hills just north eral nearby villages. ^ 

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Poughkeepsie Section Page 191 Routes 175-177 

Route 175 — Tarrytown to Port Chester, N. Y.— 13.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Elmsford and White Plains. Macadam, wood-block, brick and concrete roads. 
Thru a hilly country, passing many fine estates. 

This is a good connection from Tarrytown or Hudson river points to the shore roads, 
connecting at Port Chester with Kpute 1 to New Haven. 
,-MILEAGE-^ 

T»tai BetwM? For this and other exits see City Map, page 81. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 TARRYTOWN, S. Broadway & Main St., park on right. Go 
south on S. Broadway. 

1.0 1.0 White Plains road; turn left. Join trolley 2.3. 

3.6 2.5 Elmsford,* just beyond RR at sta. Straight thru with trolley 

upgrade. 
3.6 0.1 Fork; keep left with trolley, onto Central Ave. 

White Plains City Map and Points of Interest, page 112. 

6.4 2.8 Hamilton Ave. ; turn left away from trolley across concrete 
bridge and under RR. 

7.1 0.7 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto S. Broadway 

one block. 

7.2 0.1 White Plains, N. Broadway, Main St. & Westchester Ave., 

soldiers' monument over to left. 

Bear left with trolley on Westchester Ave. Avoid left-hand 

diagonal road 8.1. Bear right with concrete 11.2. 
11.5 4.3 Fork; bear left onto Westchester Ave. Thru diagonal 4-cor- 

ners 12.4 and irregular 4-corners 12.9. 
13.5 2.0 PORT CHESTER, Westchester Ave., King & Main Sts. 

Points of Interest, opposite page. 

Route 177 — Cold Spring, N. Y., to Danbury, Conn. — 34.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Carmel, Brewster and Mill Plain. Macadam to Carmel; then 17 miles dirt and 
sandy dirt; balance gravel. Summary: 17 miles dirt and sandy dirt; 14.8 miles mac- 
adam; 3 miles gravel. 

A very picturesque drive over the Fishkill Mts., skirting several of the reservoirs 
and winding thru some very wooded sections. 

^-MILEAGE— x This road should not be attempted early in the year or during very 

-■■-■-I BlU^SS? wet weather, as it is narrow (often with grades) and soft in many 
Mileage Point. places. 

0.0 0.0 COLD SPRING, Main & Fair Sts. Go northeast on Main St. 

0.8 0.8 Nelsonville, water-trough on right. Straight thru. 

i.2 0.4 Fork, stores on right; bear right upgrade. Thru McKeeTs 

Corners 2.8. 
4.2 3.0 Fork; keep right thru Fishkill Mts. 
5.4 1.2 Fork; keep left. Road is winding, wooded and rocky, with 

many steep grades. 

12.4 7.0 Mead Corners, irregular 4-corners. Turn right. 

13.5 1.1 Right-hand road at reservoir; turn right across small wooden 

bridge. 
14.7 1.2 Kent Cliffs, fork. Bear left. 
16.7 2.0 3-corners; bear left along lake. 

18.6 1.9 3-corners; bear right across causeway. 
18.9 0.3 End of road; turn left along lake. 

'Elmsford, N. Y. (pop. 2,000, alt. 173 ft.). included among the treasures of this home. 
Here is located the beautiful home of Col. The memory of Isaac Van Wart, one of the 
J. C. L. Hamilton, great grandson of Alexan- captors of Major Andre, is perpetuated by a 
der Hamilton and Cornelius Van Tassell. A monument located in the old Dutch church- 
most worthy collection of historic relics are yard. 



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Route 180 Page 192 Poughkeepsie Section 

19.9 1.0 Carmel,* end of road at court house. Turn right. 

Left is Route 38 to Pittafleld. 

20.0 0.1 Left-hand road at concrete church; turn left. Under RR 20.3. 

20.4 0.4 Left-hand diagonal road; turn left with macadam downgrade. 

21.5 1.1 Left-hand diagonal road ; bear left over RR bridge. 

21.7 0.2 Right-hand diagonal road ; bear right with poles. Bear right 

over causeway 22.1. Under RR 22.6. Bear right 24.3. 
24.4 2.7 End of road, just beyond RR bridge; turn right onto Rail- 
road Ave. 

24.6 0.2 Brewster, Main St. & Railroad Ave., sta. on right. Turn left 

onto Main St. 

Straight ahead before this last turn is Route 372 to New York City. 

25.4 0.8 End of road, beyond iron bridge; turn left. Cross RR and 
go under RR 25.6. 

25.8 0.4 Sodom (outskirts), fork. Bear right. Avoid right-hand diag- 

onal road 27.4. Cross New York-Connecticut state line 29.3. 
80.6 4.8 3-corners; bear left over RR bridge. Thru Mill Plain 30.8. 

Danbury City Map and Points of Interest, page 53. 

34.3 3.7 3-corners, water-trough in center; bear right onto West St. 
34.8 0.5 DANBURY, CONN., West, Main & Liberty Sts., city hall on 
right. 

Route 180— Poughkeepsie to Ellenville, N. Y.— 51.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via New Paltz, Lake Mohonk and Napanoch. Macadam to New Paltz, then 10 miles 
of gravel with some clay (bad when wet) ; balance macadam. 

Hilly road with sharp turns and very heavy grades from New Paltz. 

This is the shortest connection between New Paltz and Ellenville. A better, tho 
longer way, would be to take Route 181 to Ellenville. 

At Mountain Rest a delightful side-trip may be taken to Lake Mohonk (see mileagre 
12.4). 
,-MILEAGE-> 

Tobd bSwS!? For this and other exits see City Map, page 182. 

Miliar Prints 

0.0 0.0 POUGHKEEPSIE, Main & Market Sts. Go northwest on Main 

St. downgrade. 
0.6 0.6 Poughkeepsie-Highland Ferry. 

Ferriage 60te. Runs every 30-40 mln. 

From ferry landing, keep ahead upgrade with trolley. 
1.5 0.9 Highland, right-hand road. Turn right with trolley. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 1.7. Thru Centerville 4.3; 
Loyd 4.9 and Ohio Ville 7.3. 

New Platz City Map and Points of Interest, page 218. 

9.0 7.5 New Paltz, Main & Chestnut Sts. 

•Carmel, N. Y. (pop. 2,737, alt. 425 ft.). Rev. Nathan Cole, on the site of the present 

Located on the eastern shore of Lake Glenida Smalley Inn, when they were overtaken by 

is the county seat of Putnam county, and an a British captain and company of men. 

important point on the old highway between Watching their opportunity, they emerged 

Danbury and Peekskill. from hiding and took their enemies prisoners. 

Enoch Crosby, who, while posing as a Crosby, who was the original of "Harvey 

Tory, was in fact in the confidential service Birch" in Cooper's "The Spy," died in Carmel 

of congress and acting under the general in 1838 and is buried in the churchyard here, 

direction of Washington, was a native of the Drew seminary for young women, founded 

town. At one time Gen. Israel Putnam, one by Daniel Drew, New York financier, is on 

Jay, a member of the Committee of Safety, College Hill, in the southern part of Carmel 

and Crosby had sought refuge at the house of village. 



Lake Mohonk Garage Conducted by the P»°n« New Paltx 4 

LAKE MOHONK MOUNTAIN HOUSE MOHONK LAKE, N. Y. 

At MOUNTAIN REST on the Mohonk Estate, Big, new, concrete garage partly in use. Cor- 

13.4 miles west of Poughkeepsie and 4.3 miles rugated iron garages also. Chauffeurs' quarters, 

west of New Paltz. Nearest motor approach to Carriage service between garage and house all 

the famous resort. week days. Cars not received Sunday. 

SEASON MAY 14 TO NOVEMBER 



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Poughkeepsie Section Page 193 Route 181 

Straight thru with trolley on Main St. Cross RR at sta. 9.2 
and iron bridge over Walkill river just beyond. 

9.3 0.3 3-corners; bear right. 

9.8 0.5 Left-hand road; turn left. Ascend steep winding grade 11.0 

using caution for curves. 
13.4 3.6 Mountain Rest 

Left leads to Lake Mohonk Mountain House Garage, where excellen 
facilities will be found for storage of cars and carriage service pro 
vided to Mohonk Lake. 

Straight thru, descending winding mountain road, using cau 

tion f or curves. 
14.0 0.6 Caution, 3-corners; turn sharp left downgrade. 
14.4 0.4 End of road; turn right downgrade. 
14.9 0.5 End of road, at foot of mountain; turn left across bridge. 
15.8 0.9 3-corners, stone house on right; bear right upgrade. 

16.2 0.4 3-corners; bear right; bear right and immediately left down 

grade 16.5. 
16.7 0.5 Fork; bear left. 

17.0 0.3 Right-hand diagonal road ; bear right. Cross iron bridge 17.1 
17.7 0.7 4-corners; turn left. 

20.7 3.0 Accord, 3-corners (center of town to left). Bear right. 

24.8 4.1 Kerhonkson, 3-corners. Bear right. 

28.3 3.5 Wawarsing, 3-corners, just beyond iron bridge. Bear right 

28.4 0.1 Left-hand diagonal road ; bear left. Bear left 29.7. 

29.9 1.5 Napanoch. Straight thru. 

31.8 1.9 Fork; bear right onto Main St. 

31.9 0.1 ELLENVILLE,* Main & Canal Sts. 

Right on Canal St. is Route 219 to Liberty. 

Straight ahead on Main St. is Route 266 to Port Jervls. 

Route 181— New Paltz to Ellenville, N. Y.— 31.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Rosendale, High Falls and Kerhonkson. Macadam with a short stretch of dir 
between TiUson and Rosendale. 

Longer but much better than Route 180. 
r-MILEAGE-> 

Tetei BrtwtM For this and other exits see City Map, page 218. 

MltoM* Ftiate 

0.0 0.0 NEW PALTZ, Main & Chestnut Sts. Go north on Chestnu 
St. 

5.4 5.4 Left-hand road; turn left across covered bridge — leavinj 

macadam. 

6.5 1.1 Irregular 4-corners; turn left. 

6.9 0.4 Tilteon, end of road. Turn right. Cross RR 8.0. 

8.2 1.3 End of road ; turn left. 

8.3 0.1 3-corners, just beyond iron bridge; bear left. 
9.1 0.8 Rosendale. Straight thru. 

11.3 2.2 High Falls. Straight thru. Cross long bridge 11.8. 

18.1 1.8 End of road; turn left. 

24.2 11.1 Kerhonkson. Straight thru. 

27.7 8.5 Wawarsing, 3-corners. Bear right. 

27.8 0.1 Pork beyond iron bridge; bear right. 

27.9 0.1 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

29.1 1.2 Fork, water-trough in center; bear left. 
29.8 0.2 Napanoch. Straight thru. 

31.2 1.9 Fork; keep right. 

31.4 0.2 ELLENVILLE, Canal & Main Sts. 

*EllenvHl«, N. Y. (pop. 3,000, alt. 317 ft.), is ing distance of numerous waterfalls, lak< 
a mountain summer resort within easy walk- and ice caves. 



Bf Fo^Lis 

m Accoft 



sm& 



For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



r 



Route 182 



Page 194 Poughkeepsie Section 



Route 182— Poughkeepsie to Albany, N. Y. — 75.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Hyde Park, Rhinebeck, Red Hook, Hudson, Kinderhook, Valatie and Rensselaer. 
Macadam, brick and concrete all the way. 

This route follows the east side of the Hudson river thru a fine farming country, 
passing many fine estates and farms. 

,-MILEAGE-^ 

Total bSwmh For this and other exits see City Map, page 182. 



0.0 0.0 POUGHKEEPSIE, Market & Main Sts. Go north on New 

Market St. under arch of store. 
0.1 0.1 End of street; turn left onto Mill St. and immediately right 

onto Washington St. 
6.2 6.1 Hyde Park,* P. O. on left. Straight thru. 



•Hyde Park, N. Y. (pop. 1,000, alt. 100 ft.). 
In Dutchess county, originally settled by the 
Dutch and named for the Vanderbilt estate 
(Hyde Park). Among the points of interest 
are St. James Episcopal church at the north 



end of the village, over 100 years old; F. W. 
Vanderbilt estate; Dutch Reformed church, 
oldest in the village; Town Hall; home of 
ex- Senator Thomas Newhold and Asst. Secre- 
tary of the Navy, Franklin D. Roosevelt. 



THE BEEKMAN ARMS 



The first piece sold off the Beekman grant, 
about the year 1700, was the corner on which 
BEEKMAN ASMS, called the oldest hotel in 
America, now stands. The original stone portion 
of the building with its walls three feet thick 
has been used continuously as an inn for more 
than two hundred years. Situated on the Al- 
bany Post Boad at its intersection with the 
Catsklll Mountain route via the Bhinecliff -Kings- 
ton ferry, and the short route to the Berkshlres. 
BEEKMAN ARMS is at the touring center of 
the Hudson Valley. The building has been 
completely remodeled and extensive additions 
have been made, so that every comfort and mod- 
ern convenience is now offered to the traveler. 



At this famous old hostelry George Washing- 
ton was a guest in the days following the Revo- 
lution. His Surgeon-General, Thomas Tillotson, 
who later became Secretary of State for New 
York, lived a short distance south of the old inn 
on a part of the Beekman grant inherited by 
his wife. General Richard Montgomery, an 
other of the famous men of his day, who had 
married into the Beekman family, often stayed 
at the inn, and his house may still be seen in 
the village. 

Robert R. Livingston, Aaron Burr, General 
Philip Schuyler. Dewitt Clinton, Gen, John 
Armstrong, Martin Van Buren and other well 
known men of their day have been registered as 
guests at BEEKMAN ARMS. 



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Poughkeepsie Section 

10.2 
15.8 
16.3 
16.7 
21.7 



Page 195 



Route 182 



4.0 Staatsburg, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

5.6 3-corners; bear right downgrade, passing cemetery on left. 

0.5 Rhinebeck,* Post & Market Sts. Straight thru. 

0.4 Fork; bear right away from poles. Cross RR 21.2. 

5.0 Red Hook, stores on right. Straight thru. 



Right at 21.7 is Route 295 to Mlllerton. 



•Rhinebeck, N. Y. (pop. 1,580, alt. 203 ft.), 
is interesting not only for the beauty of its 
scenery, but because it is one of the oldest 
settlements in the Hudson valley. The site 
of the village was once part of the great 
grant of land made to Henry Beekman in the 
latter part of the 17th century. It was settled 
largely by people brought over from the 
Rhine valley by Beekman for that purpose. 
The name of Rhinebeck is a combination of 
part of Beekman's name and that of the 
river Rhine. The Astors, Livingstons, Schuy- 
lers, Montgomery s, Rutsens, Garret sons, Til- 
lotsons, Suckleys, Armstrongs, Lewis, Duers, 
and other prominent New York families are 
descended from Col. Beekman. History re- 
cords many gatherings of notables at Rhine- 
beck in Revolutionary days. Important con- 
ferences were held at the tavern of Evardus 
Bogardus, now Ihe Beekman Arms, and here 
plans were formulated to further the cause 
of the colonies. During the Revolution and 
after its close, Washington was a visitor at 
the tavern and also at the home of Dr. 
Thomas Tillotson, a few miles south of the 
village, on the estate still known as "Lin- 
wood." Dr. Tillotson served on Washington's 
staff during the Revolution and was later 
a state senator and Secretary of State. The 
present Dutch Reformed church was erected 



in 1809 on the site of the little red church 
built in 1732 under the supervision of Col. 
Beekman on two acres which he had given 
for church purposes. It is a matter of history 
that at the time this church was built the 
elders could not agree as to the structural 
material so they compromised by building 
two walls of brick and two of stone. 

Rhinebeck is the center of the largest 
violet growing industry in this country and 
most of the violets used in the large cities 
of the south and west come from the green- 
houses which may be seen dotted over a 
radius of five miles about the village. 

There are a number of fine estates im- 
mediately bordering on the village. That of 
Levi P. Morton, at one time governor of the 
state, and vice-president of the United States, 
is south of the village and extends over many 
miles. The large estate of Vincent Astor 
runs north from the village line for miles 
along the old Post road. The finely culti- 
vated acres of these estates, with the pros- 
perous and well-kept village, combine to give 
Rhinebeck the name of "The Parlor of 
Dutchess County." Within the village limits 
is "Holiday Farm," a new and model insti- 
tution for the care of convalescent children, 
which was built as a memorial to the late 
John Jacob Astor. 



T'D TT7 , m7TT , /^A'DAZ^T? Fireproof. On State Road. Day and 

1 Kl DD EiLL O KjAKAKj E4 Night Service. Expert Repairing. 

and MACHINE SHOP Goodyear, U. S. and Firestone Tires 

RED HOOK, N. Y. Phone 77 Fl-2 Nash, Overland and National Cars 



HUB GARAGE, Rhinebeck, New York 

Up-to-date Machine Shop Expert Mechanics Quick Service 

•FIREPROOF STRUCTURE Cylinder Grinding a Specialty ON STATE ROAD 

Day and Night Services Phone 42 TURTON & SNYDER, Prop. 



Community Garage 

East Market Street 

RHINEBECK, N. Y. 

B. H. HEPBURN, Prop. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



Tourists receive special attention with facili- 
ties to handle all their requirements. New, 
modern, fireproof building. Completely 
equipped machine shop with expert me- 
chanics. Storage, overhauling, and battery 
service. Tires and other accessories. Day 
and night service. Telephone 244. 



KJ >'L 



HOFFMAN INN 

RED HOOK NEW YORK 

An Inn That Meets All Wants of the Tourists 



t^apceialty, Chicken Dinners, Good Rooms, Running Water. Table 
lit* from our own farm. H. A. HOFFMAN, Prop. 



Hudson City Map 



Page 196 Poughkeepsie Section 



Hudson (pop. 12,000, alt. 96 ft.), command- 
ing a fine view of the Hudson river and the 
Catskill mountains, situated on the east 
bank of the river, is a city marked by many 
incidents of early history and offers many 
points of interest to the tourist and visitor. 
, Henry Hudson landed at the spot which 
is now the city of Hudson from his ship the 
Half Moon in 1609. Leaving his vessel here 
he ascended the river in canoes. Hudson was 
then and is today, the natural head of navi- 
gation. A light house marks the landing 
point. 

Hudson was at first known as Claverack 
Landing and was settled by Nantucket 
whalers in 1785. For many years it was a 
prominent whaling port. It is the third old- 
est city in the state and many of the early 
landmarks are still in existence. It is the 
county seat of Columbia county which has 
a population of 43,000. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, HUDSON, N. Y. 



Hudson is a road center and improved high- 
ways lead in every direction. A ferry con- 
nects with the west bank 'of the Hudson. 
Motorists visiting Hudson are advised to 
leave the main route of travel and going 
down Warren street, follow the main busi- 
ness thorofare to the end of Promenade Hill 
where one of the best views of the Hudson 
river and Catskill mountains to be found 
anywhere in the section is available. 

From Mount Ray where the city reservoirs 
are located, the Berkshires, the Catskills and 
the White mountains are visible. A mag- 
nificent view of the Hudson, north and south 
stretches away and the boundary lines of 
four states can be counted. 

Industrially Hudson is prominent because 
of its two large cement plants, knitting mills 
manufacturing underwear, ice and elevating, 
conveyors ship equipment, and other indus- 
tries of a varied nature. 



THE HOWARD 

FORMERLY GRACELAND HOUSE 
214-216 Warren Street 

HUDSON, NEW YORK 



EUROPEAN 

RATES $1.50 AND UP. RUNNING 
WATER IN EVERY ROOM 

ALSO ROOMS WITH BATH 



WM. PETRY, INC. 

HUDSON GARAGE 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUPPLIES 
724-742 Columbia St. Established 1 90 1 

HUDSON NEW YORK 



SERVICE and SALES 

CADILLAC, BUICK and DODGE BROTHERS CARS 

Exide Battery Service. Goodyear and 
U. S. Tires. Always open. Special Atten- 
tion to Tourists. Ladies' Waiting Room. 

Bell Phone 800-801— Columbia Phone 24 



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Route 183 



Page 198 Poughkeepsie Section 



left. Cross trolley 52.8. 
54.9 3.2 Kinderhook,* 4-corners, bank on right. Straight thru. 
56.0 1.1 Valatie, fork, trolley sta. ahead. Bear left with trolley. 

Right at this fork is Route 303 to Great Barrlngton. 

66.8 10.8 End of road at small triangle green; turn left. 

Cross iron bridge 67.3. Thru E. Greenbush 70.0. 

Right at 71.2 is Route 183 to Troy. 

74.2 7.4 End of street; turn right onto Broadway. 

Albany City Map, page 260; Points of Interest, page 259. 

74.4 0.2 Rensselaer, 4-corners. Meeting trolley, turn left onto Bridge 

St. across long iron bridge over Hudson river. 
74.7 0.3 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto Broadway. 

75.3 0.6 ALBANY, Broadway & State St., P. O. on far right. 

For enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 260. 

Route 183— Poughkeepsie to Troy, N. Y.— 81.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

'" Distance Via Rhinebeck, Hudson, Kinderhook and Defreestviile. AH mac- 

Total Between adam, concrete and brick. Direct route to Troy, avoiding Albany, 
tftlleeoe Prints *■-•.* 

0.0 0.0 POUGHKEEPSIE. See Route 182 for directions to 
71.2 71.2 Right-hand road, sign "Troy"; turn right. Cross RR 71.3. 
75.0 3.8 Defreestviile, 5-corners. Straight thru. 

75.9 0.9 Left-hand road, cemetery on left ; turn left with poles. 
77.0 1.1 Fork; keep left. 

Right at this fork is optional route to Troy and, although longer, is 
somewhat better than regular route. — 

Start descent of steep grade on rough macadam 78.6. 

Troy City Map, page 267; Points of Interest, page 268. 

78.9 1.9 End of road ; meeting trolley, turn left across concrete bridge, 
onto Mill St. 
0.4 End of road; turn right onto Burden Ave. 



79.3 

•Kinderhook, N. Y. (pop. 900, alt. 200 ft.), 
It was discovered and named by Henry 
Hudson in 1609. There are at least a 
dozen pre- revolutionary houses in or near 
the village. Opposite the Dutch Reformed 
church is the Newcomer mansion, built in 
1774. General Burgoyne, after his defeat at 
Saratoga, was entertained in this mansion. 
About two miles south of the village is "Lin- 
denwald," where Washington Irving served 
as a tutor and where Martin Van Buren, 
spent his last days; the great entrance hall 



still retains the picturesque wall paper of 
olden days. Van Buren was born in Kinder- 
hook. Near the center of the village is the 
very old house belonging to Isabel Schnop- 
per, built 1721, and used both as a dwelling 
and a fort during the raids of the marauding 
Indians. A short distance south of the vil- 
lage is located the schoolhouse where Jesse 
Merwin (Ichabod Crane), Washington Irv- 
ing's friend, taught his pupils. He is buried 
in the village cemetery near the grave of Van 
Buren. 




When in Albany Stop at . . . . 

The Hampton 



Two Hundred Rooms, each with 
Bath. European Plan $2.50 Up. 

On the Empire Tours 

On the REAL TOUR 

DELIGHTFUL ROOF GARDEN 

New . Hampton . Annex 

100 ROOMS 100 BATHS 

Corner North Pearl and Steuben 
Under Same Management 




The Modern Hotel of Albany 

Most Desirable for Autoists 

Beautiful Dining Rooms 

SERVICE A LA CARTE 

Unusual Table oVHote 

Dinner $1.50 

Luncheon 80 Cents 

The Hampton is absolutely fireproof 

D. M. PEPPER, Manager 

Albany, New York 



l,i 



I I Under Same Management I A I D A W Vc^^ # 



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Poughkeepsie Section Page 199 

79.6 0.3 



Route 185 



Fork; large stone church on right; bear left with trolley onto 
First St. 
79.7 0.1 Fork; keep left, leaving trollejr. 

81.2 1.5 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto River St. 

81.3 0.1 TROY, River St. & Broadway, monument on right. 



Route 185 — Hudson, N. Y., to Great Harrington, Mass. 

— 27.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Claverack, Craryville, Hillsdale and S. Egremont. All macadam except 1.6 miles, 
which is gravel. 

This route traverses a hilly farming country and is the best connection from Hudson 
river points between Albany and Poughkeepsie to Berkshire Hill resorts. 
^ MILEAGE-^ 

Total SotweVn* For this and other exits, see City Map, page 196. 

Ml low Points 

0.0 0.0 HUDSON, Park PI. & Warren St., park on left. Go north on 

Park PI. 
0.1 0.1 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto Columbia St. 
0.2 0.1 Diagonal left-hand street; bear left onto Green St. away 

from trolley. Thru 4-corners 0.6. 
3.4 3.2 Claverack, 4-corners, library on left. Straight thru. 
4.3 0.9 Fork of three roads ; take right-hand road. 

Extreme left-hand road is Route 186 to Pfttsfield. 

Thru Hollowville 6.3, Martindale 9.7, and Craryville 13.5. 

16.6 12.3 Hillsdale, N. Y., green on right. Straight thru. 

23.4 6.8 Fork; bear right away from trolley. 

23.5 0.1 So. Egremont, Mass., left-hand road beyond iron bridge. Turn 

left. Trolley comes in from left 23.6. 

23.7 0.2 Right-hand" diagonal road, sign "Great Barrington" ; bear 

right away from trolley. 

24.8 1.1 Fork; bear right. 

25.8 1.0 Fork; bear left with poles. Cross iron bridge 25.9. 
26.4 0.6 Fork, green in center; bear left onto Maple Ave. 

Cross RR 26.7. 
27.0 0.6 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Main St. 
27.2 0.2 GREAT BARRINGTON,* MASS., Main, Bridge & Castle Sts., 

town hall on left. 



'Great Barrington, Mass. (pop. 7,000, alt. 
725 ft.), is situated on both sides of the upper 
Housatonic river. A large boulder with in- 
scription, "Town Incorporated 17*1," stands 
on the court house grounds. 

William Cullen Bryant practiced law in 
Great Barrington from 1815 to 1825, and was 
town clerk for several years. Here he mar- 
ried Miss Frances Fairchild, and wrote some 
early poems, among them "Monument Moun- 
tain" and "Green River." 

After their defeat at the battles of Ben- 
ningt' n and Saratoga, General Burgoyne, with 
his r maining army of British and Hessian 
soldi' 's, marched thru Great Barrington. On 
the r fht of October 25, 1777, the general was 
enter airied by Col. Elijah Dwight in the 
Hend rson house. 

In 1 ont of the town hall and court house 
is an imposing soldiers' monument and 
mounted cannon captured from a British 
man-of-war by the frigate "United States." 
A rough stone on the same grounds is in- 
scribed, "Near this spot stood the first court 



house of Berkshire county, erected in 1764. 
Here on August 16, 1774, occurred the first 
open resistance to British rule in America." 
Eight months before the battle of Lexington, 
armed men prevented the crown judges from 
holding court, and defined English authority 
in Massachusetts province. 

Great Barrington has been the birthplace 
or home of several noted people. Here the 
alternating current was first Used for elec- 
tric lighting by William Stanley, who was 
the inventor of means for its use. A point 
of interest is the newsboys' fountain at Sil- 
ver and Maple avenue, erected by Col. W. L. 
Brown. 

On the east side of Main street, just south 
of the town hall, are the extensive grounds 
of the Hopkins-Searles estate, now known as 
"Barrington House," formerly called "Kellogg 
Terrace." The massive stone residence, built 
of native blue dolomite in the French chateau 
style, by Mrs. Mark Hopkins, afterwards 
Mrs. Searles, is 180 ft. long and 100 ft. deep, 
and has seven towns. 



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Routes 186-187 Page 200 Poughkeepsie Section 

Route 186— Hudson, N. Y., to Pittsfield, Mass.— 39.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Claverack, Ghent, Chatham, E. Chatham and Shaker Village. First 10 miles 
macadam; then 16.6 miles gravel; balance 8 miles macadam. Thru a rolling farming 
country. 

Route 185 to Great Barrington. combined with Route 38 to Pittsfield, offers an all 
macadam option, 8 miles longer. 
^ MILEAGE^ 

Total BeiwMn For this and other exits see City Map, page 196. 

M Kraft Points 

0.0 0.0 HUDSON, Park Place & Warren St., park on left. Go north 

on Park PL 
0.1 0.1 End of street, meeting trolley; turn right oh Columbia St. 
0.2 0.1 Left-hand diagonal street. Bear left onto Green St. away 

from trolley. Cross trolley 0.5. 
3.3 3.1 Claverack, P. O. ahead on left. Straight thru. 
4.2 0.9 Fork; keep left— sign "Chatham." Cross RR 5.5-7.2. 
7.6 3.4 Mellenville, left-hand diagonal road. Turn left across RR. 
8.6 1.0 Fork; bear left. Pass cemetery on right 12.6. 
13.5 4.9 Fork; keep right. Cross RR in Ghent 13.6. 

14.1 0.6 Fork; bear left across bridge 14.3. 

16.0 1.9 Chatham, 4-corners, brick church ahead on right Straight 
thru, along RR. 

16.4 0.4 Fork, just beyond RR at sta.; keep right. Thru 5-corners 

at bandstand 16.5. 

16.7 0.3 Right-hand road; turn right under RR. 

19.5 2.8 Left-hand road; turn left across RR and bridge. Bear right 

under RR 20.7. 

21.8 2.3 E. Chatham, irregular 5-corners, green ahead. Bear slightly 

left. Over RR 22.7. Avoid left-hand road 22.8. 

23.5 1.7 Fork; bear right— sign "Pittsfield." 

26.2 2.7 Canaan, N. Y., 5-corners. Straight thru. Thru Queechy 27.4. 

27.7 1.5 Right-hand road; turn right — sign "Stockbridge." 
28.4 0.7 Left-hand diagonal road; turn left— sign "Pittsfield." 
31.4 3.0 End of road; turn left. 

35.0 3.6 Shaker Village, Mass., end of road ; turn right. 
39.2 4.2 5-corners; bear slightly right, leaving trolley, onto Housa- 
tonic St. 

Pittsfield City Map and Points of Interest, page 73. 

39.4 0.2 4-corners, meeting trolley; turn left on South St. 

39.6 0.2 PITTSFIELD, MASS., North, East, South & West Sts. 

Route 187 — Poughkeepsie, N. Y., to Pittsfield, Mass. 

—78.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via S. Millbrook, Millbrook, Amenta, Great Barrlngton, Stockbridge and £*enox. All 
macadam except 10 miles of gravel. Thru a hilly farming country. 

This is the best connection from Hudson river points to the Berkshire hills. 
^MILEAGE-^ 

T»tsi bSSSH For this and other exits see City Map, page 182. 

Ml lew Point* 

0.0 0.0 POUGHKEEPSIE, Main & Market Sts., city hall on right. Go 

east on Main St. with trolley. Trolley leaves to right 1.6. 
1.8 1.8 3-corners, store in center; bear left. Go over RR bridge 2.4. 
7.1 5.3 Pleasant Valley, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

11.8 4.7 Washington Hollow, fork at stores. Bear left. 

15.0 3.2 So. Millbrook, 4-corners, P. O. on right. Turn left. 

15.7 0.7 Millbrook.* Right-hand road beyond RR sta.; turn right 

across RR. 

*Milbrook, N. Y. (pop. 1,200, alt. 566 ft.). old brick meeting house, built in 1780, the 

Many wealthy and prominent families, nota- Memorial school, erected by Samuel Thome 

bly the Thornes, Wings, Dietrichs and Davi- and family, the Bennett school for girls, and 

ms, have their homes in this village or in the Hayes memorial library, erected by Mrs. 

- immediately surrounding country. The P. S. Hayes, are points of local interest. 

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Route 190 Page 202 Poughkeepsie Section 

ford." Caution for curves 35.4-35.8. 
35.9 0.7 Fork; bear left. Thru Boardman, Conn., 39.2. 

39.4 3.5 Left-hand road; turn left across bridge and RR — caution. 

Cross another RR 39.6. Caution for RR underpass 40.5, and 
sharp left curve 40.7. 
41.6 2.2 Left-hand road beyond iron bridge; turn left under RR and 
immediately right. 

41.8 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; turn right onto Main St. 

42.1 0.3 New Milford,* Conn., Main & Bridge Sts., monument in green 

on left. Turn right onto Bridge St. across RR and iron bridge. 
42.3 0.2 Left-hand road just beyond iron bridge; turn left. 

48.9 6.6 Brookfield, 4-corners ; straight thru. 

Left leads to Brookfield Center. 

53.9 5.0 End of road; turn right. 

54.2 0.3 Fork; bear left— sign "Danbury." Go under RR 54.6. 
54.8 0.6 End of road at small green; turn right. 

Left 54.9 is Route 23 to Waterbury. 

55.5 0.7 Irregular 4-corners at small park; bear right. Join trolley 

and follow same over RR bridge into White St. Cross RR 
at sta. 56.5. 

Danbury City Map and Points of Interest, page 53. 

56.8 1.3 4-corners at water trough; turn left with cross-trolley on 

Main St. 
57.0 0.2 DANBURY* Main & West Sts. at monument. 

Route 190 — Poughkeepsie, N. Y., to Danbury, Conn, 

— 53,5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via New Hackensack. Hopewell Junction, E. Fishkill, Stormville, Poughquag, Stone- 
house, Patterson and Mill Plain, all hard surfaced road except 9 miles of gravel. 

Thru hilly farming country. 
Best way to Danbury is via Route 171 to Fishkill, Route 226 to E. Fishkill and 
Route 190 to Danbury. 
r- MILEAGE-^ 

Total SeiwMR For this and other exits see City Map, page 182. 

Ml lew Pelntt 

0.0 0.0 POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y., Market & Main Sts., city hall op 
right. Go southwest on Market St. with trolley. 

0.3 0.3 Fork, monument in center; bear left with trolley. 

0.4 0.1 Hooker Ave.; turn left with branch trolley. Bear right with 
trolley. Trolley leaves to left 1.8. 

5.0 4.6 Left-hand road, sign "Manchester," turn left. 

5.1 0.1 Fork; bear right across bridge. * 
7.4 2.3 New Hackensack, 3-corners, store in center; bear left. 

8.8 1.4 Right-hand road ; turn right. Cross two iron bridges 10.1. 

10.3 1.& Fishkill Plains. Straight thru across RR at station. 

11.2 0.9 Fork, sign "Hopewell"; bear right. Cross RR 12.3. 
13.0 1.8 End of road; turn right. Cross RR 13.1. 

13.3 0.3 Hopewell Junction, end of road, store on left. Turn right. 

13.4 0.1 Fork; bear left. Cross iron bridge 14.0. 

15.5 2.1 East Fishkill, end of road, town hall ahead. Turn sharp left. 

Cross RR 17.9. 
18.5 3.0 Stormville (outskirts), left-hand road, sign, "Pawling." Turn 

left on macadam. Thru Green Haven 20.9. 
22.8 4.3 End of road beyond small concrete bridge; turn left. 

' *New Milford, Conn. (pop. 5,200, alt. 275 ft.). state road to Lake Waramang, largest lake 

Settled in 1703, largely by people from Mil- in the state. 

ford, Conn., who had purchased lands from New Milford is a manufacturing coram li- 
the Indians. This district was the principal nity and leading center of agricultural pro* 
ancient seat of the Indians of what is now duct ion, notably tobacco. A silver mine in 
Litchfield county; the castle of their sachem the neighborhood was worked as early as 
was at the Great falls of the Housatonic. 1790. Considerable granite and slate are quar- 
bere are many beautiful lakes and streams ried. Other industries include the manufac- 
Ncw Milford, and it is but a few miles over ture of hats, lime, silica and silverware. 

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Poughkeepsie Section Page 203 



Route 192 



23.4, 0.6 Poughquag, fork, grass plot in center. Bear right on macadam. 

25.5 2.1 Stonehouse, right-hand road at sta. Turn right across RR. 
31.1 5.6 Holmes, end of road at store. Turn left. Avoid right-hand 

road 33.2. Cross RR at Patterson sta. 33.9. 

34.6 3.5 End of road; turn right. 

Left is Route 38 to Pawling and Pittsfield. 
uii at these 4 -corners Is Route 38 to Pittsfield. 

44.3 9.7 Sodom, N. Y. (outskirts), end of road, sign, "Danbury." Turn 

sharp left. Go over RR bridge 44.6. 

Right at 45.5 is Route 373 to Norwalk. 

49.4 5.1 Mill Plain, fork at P. 0. Bear right. 

52.0 2.6 Fork; bear right. Trolley joins 52.5. Now on Lake Ave. 

Danbury City Map and Points of Interest, page 53. 

53.0 1.0 West Ave., water-trough ahead; turn right away from trolley. 

53.5 0.5 DANBURY, West, Main & Liberty Sts., city hall on right. 



For this and other exits see City Map, page 53. 



Route 192 — Danbury to Norwalk, Conn.— 22.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Branchville, Wilton and South Wilton. All tar macadam except 8 miles of state 
gravel. 

Thru a hilly farming country; no steep grades. 

This is the best way between the two cities. 

This route, used in conjunction with Route 9, makes a very good connection between 
Danbury and New York City. 
^MILEAGE^ 
Dlstanee 
Total Between 
Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 DANBURY, West, Main & Liberty Sts., city hall on left. Go 

west with trolley on West St. 
0.3 0.3 Fork, small green in center; bear right and turn left at end 

of green onto Division St. 
0.4 0.1 Park Ave. ; turn right upgrade. 
1.6 1.2 Fork; bear left with trolley. 
2.3 0.7 End of road; turn right. 
2.5 0.2 Left-hand road, store ahead on left; turn left. 
6.0 3.5 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left with one line of poles. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 26 to New York City. 

Thru Branchville* 10.5. Cross RR 10.9. 



11.1 
15.3 
16.3 



21.8 
22.0 



Cross RR 10.3. 

5.1 Right-hand road; turn right. 

4.2 End of road, beyond RR bridge; turn right 

1.0 Wilton,* large stone church on left. Straight thru. 
Thru So. Wilton 18.4. Bear left with trolley 21.2. 

Norwalk City Map and Points of Interest, page 44. 

5.5 Right-hand road; turn right with trolley onto Main St. 
0.2 NORWALK, Main & Wall Sts. 



'Branchville, Conn. (pop. 2,503). Notable 
as location of "farm" left by the late Edwin 
Gilbert, where about 1,000 children are sent 
by the publishers of New York "Life" during 
each summer. Large feldspar quarry in vi- 
cinity, once considerably worked. 



•Wilton, Conn. (pop. 2,000), has much of 
colonial and revolutionary history. Parts of 
the statue of George III, torn down in New 
York City, were brought here to be run into 
bullets. Some were hidden in a house op- 
posite St. Matthew's church, and other pieces 
in the Sloan house. 



For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 




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Route 194 Page 204 Poughkeepsie Section 

Route 194 — Danbury to Stamford, Conn. — 30.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ridgefield, New Canaan and Noroton. All macadam and concrete except 2.8 
miles of state gravel. Thru a hilly farming: country. 
,-HILEAGE^ 

Trial bUSSS For this and other exits see City Map, page 53. 



0.0 0.0 DANBURY, West, Main & Liberty Sts., city hall on left. 

Go west with trolley on Main St. 
0.3 0.3 Fork, small green in center; bear right and turn next left at 

end of green onto Division St. 
0.6 0.3 Park Ave.; turn right upgrade. 
1.7 1.1 Fork; bear left, leaving trolley. Bear left 2.7. 
6.2 4.5 Fork; keep right. 

Left is Route 192 to Norwalk. 

9.0 2.8 End of road; turn left onto Main St. 

9.6 0.6 Ridgefield,* 4-corners, bank on left. Keep ahead. 

10.2 0.6 West Lane Ave., large stone church ahead on right; turn 

right. 

10.4 0.2 Fork; bear right onto Bedford St. 

12.3 1.9 Left-hand road; turn left. 

18.0 5.7 End of road; turn left. 

18.1 0.1 End of road; turn right with poles. 

19.3 1.2 3-comers; bear right with poles. Avoid right-hand road 

beyond small concrete bridge 20.3. 
20.9 1.6 New Canaan, East & Forest Aves. & Main St. 

Turn right onto East Ave. and immediately left onto Main St. 

21.0 0.1 Railroad Ave.; turn right. 

21.1 0.1 South Ave.; turn left. 
22.9 1.8 End of road; turn right. 

24.5 1.6 8-corners, small green in center; bear right onto concrete. 

Left leads to Darien. 

24.7 0.2 3-corners; turn left onto concrete. 

25.9 1.2 End of road; turn right. 

26.5 0.6 Left-hand road ; turn left. Pass soldiers' home on left 26.9. 
27.7 1.2 Noroton, end of road, church ahead. Meeting trolley, turn 

right. Go under RR 29.7, coming onto Main St. 

Stamford City Map and Points of interest, page 34. 

30.2 2.5 Right-hand diagonal road, green ahead on right; bear right 

with trolley onto Main St. 

30.6 0.4 STAMFORD, Main & Atlantic Sts., city hall on' left 

'Ridgefield, Conn. (pop. 2,500, alt. 800 ft.). feasible in its original form. A cannon ball, 

An historic village, deeded by Catoonah and which was fired into the tavern, is still pre- 

other Indian proprietors in 1708 to settlers, served and gives it the name, "Cannon Ball 

mostly from Norwalk', Conn. The immediate House." 

locality was the scene of much fighting dur- , ******** *• exclusively a residential vil- 

ing the revolutionary war; in the battle of ? gc ' . con " dcd to b * ™ of the m OSt attrac 

t>-j~ c *j o . v ,«*» V* ur . tlve m the ea8t - Many wealthy and noted 

Ridgefield, September, 1777, Gen. Wooster was peop , c havc cWn Ridgeficld or the immcdi . 

mortally wounded. ately 8Urrounding COU ntry for a permanent or 

Many of the houses of the village are summer home; and have erected handsome 

very old; chief among these is the old residences. Four miles from the village, on 

Keeler tavern, now owned by the distin- the North Salem road, is the Ridgefield school 

guished architect, Cass Gilbert, who has en- for boys, which has a beautiful site on the 

deavored to retain the building so far as hillside overlooking Lake Mamanasco. 



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Newburgh Section Page 205 Newburgh City Map 

Newburgh Section 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 
Newburgh (pop. 29,023, alt. 94 ft.) was set- 
tled in 1788 by fugitives from the Rhenish- 
Palatine war. It contains several academic 
institutions and has important industries. 
The surrounding country is not*d for its 
extensive dairies and the splendid quality 
of the butter produced therein. The most 



NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

historic point of interest in this city is the 
Hasbrouck house — Washington's headquar- 
ters in 1783-84, which contains many relics of 
Washington and Lafayette. The Tower of 
Victory was erected by congress to com- 
memorate the closing of the revolution, and 
(Continued on next page) 



f 



^PALATINE HOTEL 

!>fie Igadind Hotel offfcHudsvnlallcy 

NEWBURGH NEW YORK 



Headquarters for 
Auto Tourists 

Grand Street 

Corner of Third 

67 Miles from New York 

City via Tuxedo 

Member of the Empire 

Tours Association 

Booklet sent on 
application 

The best point from 
which to plan automo- 
bile tours into Orange 
or Dutchess County. 

H. N. BAIN CO., Inc. 

Proprietors 
Carl Willmsen, Mgr. 



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Route 201 Page 206 Newburgh Section 

Route 201— Newburgh to New York City, N. Y.— 57.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. v 
Via Central Valley, Southfleld, Tuxedo, Suffern, Ramsey, Paramus road, Areola. 

Englewood and Dyckman St. ferry. Asphalt-macadam all the way. 

An attractive drive thru the picturesque valley of the Ramapo river to Suffern and 

thence thru suburban communities and intervening farm areas. 

s-MILEAGE-n 

Tstai SfftMMN For this and other exits see City Map, page 205. 

MIImm Feints 

0.0 0.0 NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand St. Go west with trolley 

on Broadway. 
0.5 0.6 Mill St. at brick church; turn left away from trolley. 
3.0 2.5 End of road; turn right. Thru 4-corners 2.3. 
4.8 1.& Vailsgate, irregular 4-corners. Turn left. Under BR 6.1. 
6.4 1.6 Fork; bear right. Caution for right and left curve under RR 

12.2. Thru Highland Mills 13.9. 
15.1 8.7 Central Valley, opera house on left. Straight thru. 

Left is Route 91 to West Point. 

15.6 0.5 Fork; bear right. 

17.1 1.5 Harriman,* 3-corners, at outskirts, just beyond RR bridge. 

Sharp right at 17.5 is Route 83 at mileage 40.2 to Port Jervlt. 

Bear left. Pass Arden over to left 19.6. 
22.0 4.9 Southfleld at flagpoles. Curve left along RR. 

23.0 1.0 Fork; bear left along RR. 

Right fork to 23.4, where turn left over RR bridge, connects with 
Route 90 at mileage 2.5 to Bear Mountain, Palisades park. 

23.8 0.8 8-corners at open space; bear left. 

26.1 2.3 Tuxedo,* sta. on left. Straight thru (south), passing P. O. 

on left. 

28.9 2.8 Sloatsburg. Straight thru across concrete bridge. 

Cross RR 29.3. Pass Sterlington Sta. on left 29.6. Pass 
Ramapo Sta. (town over to left) on left 80.7. Cross RR 81.5. 

32.6 3.7 3-corners ; bear right across RR onto Orange Ave. 

32.7 0.1 Suffern, Orange & Lafayette Aves. 

Points of Interest, page 212. 

Diagonally left on Lafayette Ave. is Route 202 to Tarrytown. 

Straight thru (south) with trolley on Orange Ave. Avoid 
right-hand road 33.4. 

84.8 1.6 Mahwah, N. J., fire bell on left. Straight thru. Cross trol- 

ley 34.6. 

•Harriman, N. Y. (pop. 680, alt. 558 ft.). erected memorial tablet to late E. H. Har- 

Just west of Erie RR. station is bronze riman on east end of station, near under- 

tablet on stone foundation commemorating P ass » and in partial sight from road. The 

first telegraphic message directing movement Harriman mansion is located on the top of 

of trains, sent 1851 by Charles Minot. then the Ramapo mountains east of the village. 

Gen. Supt. N. Y. & Erie RR., to agent and ^ ' a ' " * beaU f t,f | ul . #| a,ld ^7* 

_ , ^ , ' __ winter and summer resort, laid out by the 

operator at Goshen. Pedestal hewn on Ham- noted p . errc LoriUard> Tht parkf which ig 

man estate and presented by Mrs. Harriman. privat ely owned by the residents, is mag. 

Andrew Carnegie, one of pioneer telegra- nificently laid out with picturesque drives 

phers on Penna. RR., was largest general around the lake. No admittance except by 

, contributor. Directors of Erie RR. have also letter from a resident. 

(Newburgh Points of Interest, continued from page 205) 

it was here that the American army was chain which was to have been stretched 

formally disbanded on June 23, 1783. In the across the river, and many other re vol u- 

rauseum are autographed letters of Wash* tionary relics. Newburgh was the home of 

ington, Martha Washington's watch, hair Gen. George Clinton, governor of New York, 

from the heads of Washington and La Fay- and W. H. Seward, Lincoln's secretary of 

ette, samples of Hessian boots, parts of the state, also lived here. 

POINTS OF INTEREST, BEACON, N. Y. 

Beacon (pop. 11,500, alt. 119 ft.) takes its army at Newburgh, in the latter part of the 

name from Mt. Beacon, on the summit of revolution, supplies from New England and 

which fires were lighted as signals during elsewhere were brought across the river here 

the revolution. In summer a cable railway for the troops in Newburgh and New Jersey. 

carries passengers to the top, 1,200 ft. above The state hospital for the insane, where 

the Hudson. Harry K. Thaw was confined for a considera- 

The river front at Beacon was one of the ble time, is located in the eastern part of 

lest landings along the Hudson. During the city, on the higher ground part-way to 

ae encampment of part of the Continental Fishkill village. 



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Newburgh Section Page 207 Route 201 

36.8 2.6 Ramsey,* sta. over to right. Straight thru. 

88.8 2.0 Allendale, wooden church on left. Straight thru. 

40.2 1.4 Waldwick, wooden school on right. Straight thru. Gross 

trolley 40.8. 
41.4 1.2 Hohokus, irregular 4-corners, P. O. on right. 

Straight thru. Cross trolley 41.5. 

41.7 0.3 Fork; bear right on Franklin turnpike. Pass cemetery on 

right 42.5. 

42.9 1.2 Fork; bear right. 

Areola Golf Club on left at 46.6. 

46.9 4.0 Areola,* old water wheel on right. 

Sharp right is Route 75 to Dlngmant Ferry. 
Straight thru. Cross trolley at Areola Sta. 47.4. Thru Rochelle 
Park 48.4. 
49.1 2.2 Maywood, Passaic St. & Maywood Ave. Straight thru on 
Passaic St. Cross RR 50.3. 

Hackensack City Map and Points of Interest, page 134. 

50.4 1.3 Hackensack, Passaic & Union Sts., sign on right. 

Straight ahead on Passaic St. leads to center of town. 

Turn left onto Union St. 

50.5 0.1 End of street, stone church on right; turn right onto Ander- 

son St. Cross trolley 50.6 and bridge over Hackensack river 

50.8. Cross RR 51.7. 
52.4 1.9 Irregular 4-corners; bear left. 
63.1 0.7 Teaneck, right-hand street, school on left. Turn right onto 

Forest Ave. 

53.8 0.7 Left-hand street; turn left onto Lafayette Ave. 
64.4 0.6 Fork; bear left. 

54.6 0.2 5-corners, school over to left; bear right onto Palisade Ave. 

Cross RR and trolley 55.0. 
55.1 0.5 Englewood, N. J., Palisade, Engle & Grand Aves., bank on left. 

Right on Grand Ave. is Route 203 to New York. 

Straight thru on Palisade Ave. 

Right on Lemoine Ave. 66.5 is Route 205 at mileage 16.9 to New 
York. 

•Ramsey, N. J. (pop. 1,960, alt. 410 ft.). Here owned by and was the home of the late Mr. 

is the fine estate of Emerson McMillan, for- Easton, president of the Columbia Grapho- 

merly owned by the late George Crocker, also phone Co. The picturesque waterwheel, 

the estate of Joseph Wycoff. which may be viewed here, is one of Jersey's 

* Areola, N. J. This place was principally old Dutch relics. 



HOTEL ASTOR 

Follow Broadway to 45th Street Garage One Block 

Times Square f. a. muschenheim New York 



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Routes 202-203 Page 208 Newburgh Section 

Descend long winding grade 56.7. 
56.9 1.8 3-corners in middle of downgrade; bear right. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

57^6 0.7 Englewood-Dyckman St. ferry across Hudson river. 

Rates — 20c to 30c, car and driver; passengers 5c each. Service every 
15 minutes, 5 a. m. to 11 p. m.; Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, 
5 a. m. to midnight. 

57.6 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Dyckman St., at ferry landing. 

Route 202— Suffern to New York City, N. Y.— 38.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Nyack, Tarrytown, Dobbs Ferry, Yonkers and Riverside drive. All macadam. 

Thru a region of small farms and summer residential towns to Tonkers; balance 

^tMILEAOE-n along Broadway to Riverside drive, where a fine view of the Hudson 

T«t*i SlffiSSr river and the Palisades may be obtained, and past many fine apartment 

MtNsM rSSti houses and private residences. 

0.0 0.0 SUFFERN, Lafayette & Orange Aves. Go east on Lafayette 

Ave. 
0.3 0.3 3-corners, green in triangle; bear left with Lafayette Ave. 

Thru Tallman 8.0. Cross RR 4.5. 
4.6 4.8 Monsey. Straight thru. 

6.1 1.5 Spring Valleyr Straight thru. 

7.2 1.1 4-corners; turn left with asphalt. 
8.8 1.1 Nanuet. Straight thru. 

Cross RR 8.6. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 8.8. 
Thru Brookside 10.4. Cross RR at West Nyack 10.9. 

Right on Highland Ave. 12.8 is Route 203 to New York. 
Nyack-Tarrytown City Map and Points of Interest, page 81. 

13.4 5.1 Nyack, Main St. & Broadway, bank on right. Turn right onto 
Broadway one block and next left onto Burd St. 
Thru irregular 4-corners 13.6. 

13.7 0.3 Nyack-Tarrytown ferry across Hudson river. 

Rates, 50c to $1.65. 

There are two boats, which alternate, thereby giving half-hourly 

service. 

Leaving ferry, keep ahead on Main St. Cross RR at sta. 13.9. 

14.0 0.3 Orchard St. ; turn left away from trolley one block. 

14.1 0.1 Central Ave.; turn right. 

14.4 0.3 End of street; turn right onto N. Broadway. 

14.5 0.1 Tarrytown, N. Broadway & Main St., park on right. Straight 

thru (south) on Broadway and follow Route 171 from mile- 
age 49.8 balance of way (24.2 miles) to New York City. 

Route 203— West Point to New York City, N. Y.-^49.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Palisades Park, edge of Haverstraw, Nyack, Orangeburg, Tappan, Closter, 
Englewood, Leonia and Fort Lee. All macadam or asphalt-macadam roads except 2 
miles out of Highland Falls. 

A very scenic trip partly along the west shore of the Hudson river, with the Palisades 
rising up on the right-hand side of the road, and partly thru a suburban section. 

Motorists going to New York will have better road conditions by taking ferry to 
Tarrytown and then Route 171 to New York, or by following this route (203) to West 
Haverstraw and then using Route 208 to Suffern and Route 288 to New York. 
Route 204 offers an option via east side of Hudson river. 

Motorists bound for eastern Jersey should use Route 208 from West Haverstraw to 
/-MILEAGE-> Montclair, or Route 208 from West Haverstraw to Suffern and then 
... 2JJ22J? Route 238 to Englewood. 
Ml leas* PoKti Route 205 offers a shorter but not as good an option from Nyack. 

0.0 0.0 WEST POINT, at statue of Washington and West Point hotel. 
Go south, passing parade grounds. Avoid right-hand diagonal 
road 0.9. 



SDCDNY 

REG. U.S. F*T. OFF 

MOTOR GASOLINE 



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Newburgh Section Page 209 Route 203 

1.8 1.8 Highland Falls, P. 0. on left. Straight thru. Avoid right- 

hand diagonal road at store 1.9. 

4.9 8.1 Fork; keep right with asphalt-macadam, thru Interstate Pali- 

sades Park.* 
6.4 1.6 Fork, just beyond footbridge; bear left downgrade. 

Right fork leads to Bear Mountain, Palisades park,- connecting with 
Route 207 to Tuxedo. 

8.9 2.5 Jones Point, sta. on left. Straight thru along RB. 

12.4 8.5 Tomkins Cove, just beyond P. O. and' school. Straight thru. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 14.8. 

14.6 2.2 Stony Point, irregular 4-corners. Straight thru downgrade. 
16.0 1.4 West Haverstraw, irregular 4-corners, sta. on right. Straight 

thru. Thru diagonal 4-corners at cemetery 17.2* 

17.7 1.7 Haverstraw,*. Congers Ave. & New Main St. 

Left on New Main St leads to business center. 

Straight thru on Congers Ave. along RR. 

18.8 1.1 Fork, in middle of grade; bear left. 

21.5 2.7 Irregular 4-corners, wooden church on right; turn left. l 

21.7 0.2 Congers. Straight thru across RR at sta. Cross RRs 22.2-22.6. 
28.5 1.8 Rockland Lake Village, at wooden church. Curve right, con- 
tinuing along Rockland lake. 

Nvjick City Map and Points of Interest, page 81. 

24.7 1.2 8-corners; bear left with asphalt-macadam, ascending grade. 

26.5 1.8 Irregular 4-corners at foot of grade; bear right onto Midland 

Ave. 

27.6 1.1 Nyack, Midland Ave. & Main St., at Carver gravestone. 

Left 0.4 mile leads to center of town. 

Turn right (west) onto Main St. 

27.8 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; turn sharp left onto Highland Ave. 

Straight ahead on Main St. before this turn is Route 94 to Suffern. 

28.0 0.2 Fork; keep right on Highland Ave. upgrade. 

28.2 0.2 4-corners; turn right with travel, continuing upgrade. Cau- 

tion for sharp right curve upgrade 28.5. 
29.8 1.6 End of road; turn left. 

31.6 1.8 Fork; keep left. 

32.0 0.4 Orangeburg. Straight thru. Cross RRs 32.2-32.4. 

33.3 1.3 Fork; bear left. Cross RR 33.4. 

33.7 0.4 Fork, just beyond cemetery; bear left. 

33.8 0.1 Tappan,* N. Y., irregular 4-corners. Keep ahead. 

•*76 stone house" — Major Andre's Prison on right. 

33.9 0.1 3-corners; bear right. Pass wooden church on left 34.0. 

35.6 1.7 Norwood, N. J. (outskirts). Keep ahead. 

35.9 0.3 Diagonal 4-corners, covered wooden well on left; bear left. 

Straight ahead before this turn leads to Harrington Park. 

36.7 0.8 8-corners, just beyond bridge; bear left. 

36.8 0.1 Right-hand road, just beyond RR; turn right. 
37.5 0.7 Closter, end of road, RR on right. Turn left. 

37.8 0.8 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left. 

37.9 0.1 Right-hand road; turn right. 

38.7 0.8 Demarest, irregular 4-corners, sta. over to right. Keep ahead. 

"Palisades Park is a great natural park, splendid picnic and Camping privileges, 
covering 22,000 acres. In 1900 it was decided * Haverstraw, N. Y. (pop. 5,669, alt. 103 ft.), 

by legislative action of the states of New is popularly known as "Brick Town," as it 

Jersey and New York to set aside a large sec- manufactures brick for the entire Eastern 

tion of land for an interstate park similar to market. Near West Haverstraw is Treason 

the great natural parks of the west. Large hill, at which place Benedict Arnold had 

sections of land were contributed together planned to surrender West Point to the 

with $8,000,000 in cash. In 1910 Mrs. E. H. Har- enemy in September, 1780, and where he met 

riman, widow of America's railroad king, pre- the spy, Major Andre. 

seated to New York state as an addition to •Tappan, N. Y. (pop. 700), was one of the 
the interstate park 10,000 acres of land to- first Dutch settlements on the west shore 
gether with $1,000,000 for its development and of the Hudson. In the Tappan Dutch Re- 
maintenance. There are seven chains of lakes formed church the court-martial that co- 
in the park, some artificial and some natural, detuned the British spy. Major Audrl, 
affording good fishing. This is a very held. The M 76 Stone House," now a 
popular rttreation resort in summer, offering in the center of town, was his prison 

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Routes 204-205 Page 210 Newburgh Section 

88.9 0.2 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left. Avoid left-hand road 
89.5, curving right immediately beyond. 

40.7 1.8 4-corners, store on right; turn left upgrade. 

41.0 0.3 Tenafly (outskirts), right-hand road at top of grade. Turn 

right. 

43.8 2.8 Englewood, Engle, Palisade & Grand Aves., bank on left. 

Straight thru on Grand Ave. 

Diagonally left on Palisade Ave. It Route 246 to New York. 
Sharp right on Palisade Ave. Is Route 76 to Ding mane Ferry. 

46.1 2.8 Leonia, Grand & Central Aves. Turn left onto Central Ave. 

Same thorof are becomes Main St. 
47.6 1 5 Fort Lee,* Main St. & Lemoine Ave. Straight thru on Main 
St. Descend grade 47.8 and curve right onto River road. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

49.6 2.0 Edgewater, N. J., 4-corners, bank on right. Turn left and take 

Fort Lee Ferry across Hudson river. 

Ferriage, 20c to 75c, passengers 5c; service every 15 to 20 minutes. 

49.7 0.1 NEW YORK CITY, 130th St., at ferry landing. 

Route 204— West Point to New York City, N. Y.-^50.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Garrison Ferry, Peekskill and Tarrytown. Macadam aJL the way. 
A very scenic trip thru a hilly country, following several small valleys. The road 
goes thru alternate stretches of wooded vales and passes many attractive summer 
homes and follows Broadway to Riverside drive, where a fine view of the Hudson river 
,-MILEAGE— ^ and the Palisades may be had, and past many fine apartment houses 
_ . ?'$■■•• and private residences. 

MHmm PoSS" A good option to New York is via Routes 203 or 212. 

0.0 0.0 WEST POINT, at statue of Washington. Go south, passing 

parade grounds. 
0.5 0.5 Reverse fork; turn sharp left downgrade. 
0.8 0.3 West Point-Garrison ferry across Hudson river. 

Ferriage 60c, car and driver; passengers 15c. 

Boats leave about fifteen minutes previous to the departure of New 

York Central trains. Special trips at special rates. 

0.9 0.1 Garrison, at ferry landing. 

Leaving ferry, keep ahead across RR, turning right with road 
just beyond. Thru irregular 4-corners 1.3. 

Highland Country Club on right 1.2. 

4.5 8.6 Fork; bear left with pavement. 

Peekskill City Map and Points of interest, page 84. 

7.4 2.9 3-corners ; bear right across iron bridge, ascending grade. 

Bear right at soldiers' and sailors' monument onto N. Division 
St. 8.3, joining trolley. Thru diagonal 4-corners 8.4. 

8.5 1.1 Peekskill, N. Division & South St. Turn right onto South St. 

and follow Route 171 from mileage 32.2 balance of way (41.8 
miles) to New York City. 

Route 205— Nyack to New York City, N. Y.— 21.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Sparkill, Alpine and Fort Lee. Macadam roads practically all the way. 

The route follows the west shore of the Hudson, passing numerous summer resi- 
dences, estates and a few small farms. 

Route 203 furnishes a longer option. 

Motorists going to New York will have better road conditions by taking ferry to 
Tarrytown and then following Route 171 to New York. 
^•MLEAGE-, 

Total Bfjwean For this and other exits see City Map, page 81. 

Milts** Point* 

0.0 0.0 NYACK, Broadway & Main St., bank on right. Go south on 
Broadway, and at 4-corners at bank just beyond, turn left 
onto Burd St. 

•Fort Lm, N. J. (pop. 6,000, alt. 310 ft.), is Brown, the famous American painter of street 
one of the oldest towns along the Palisades. urchins. The studios of many of the prin- 

A monument marks the site of the old revo- c ' pa J! ™ tion pi ' tu " "T^?? ?* ,OCat "! 

at Fort Lee, and it is said to1>e the second 
lutionary fort which stood here. Among its largest motion picture center in the United 
former residents are numbered Dr. Thomas States. Some of the first hill climbing con- 
D. English, author of "Ben Bolt," and J. E. tests took place at Fort Lee. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Newburgh Section Page 2li Routes 207-208 

0.1 0.1 Piermont Ave., St. George hotel on right; turn right. Avoid 
right-hand road 0.3. 

3.6 8.5 Piermont, store on right. Straight thru on Piermont Ave. 

Gross RR 3.7. 
3.8 0.2 End of road; turn right and take first left-hand road just 
beyond and cross iron drawbridge. Avoid left and right-hand 
roads 4.1. 

4.7 0.9 Sparkill, N. Y., S-corners. Bear right, passing golf links on 

left. 
9.6 4.9 Second irregular 4-corners ; turn left with macadam. 

11.6 2.0 Alpine, N. J„ P. O. on left. Keep ahead. 

11.8 0.2 Diagonal 4-corners; bear right onto Sylvan Ave. Thru diag- 
onal 4-corners 16.9, coming onto Lemoine Ave. 

Left on Palisade Ave. 19.9 leads to Dyckman St. ferry. 

19.2 7.4 Fort Lee, Lemoine Ave. & Main St. Descend grade 19.5, and 
curve right onto River road. 

Points of Interest, opposite page. 
N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

21.2 2.0 Edgewater, N. J., 4-corners, bank on right. Turn left and 
take Fort Lee Ferry across Hudson river. 

Ferriage, 20c to 76c; service every 15 to 20 minutes. 

21.8 0.1 NEW YORK CITY, 130th St, at ferry landing. 

Route 207 — Bear Mountain (Palisades Park) to Tuxedo, 

N. Y.— 18.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Asphalt-macadam all the way. 

MILEAGE— % The road goes over wooded hills and along many pretty lakes. 

"" — - — • • - • ... ... - . ~~~ ~ .. , tiv 



_ . . Ba - — This route used in conjunction with Route 238 offers an attractive 

MllraU PoTnte" way t0 New York City - 

0.0 0.0 BEAR MOUNTAIN (Palisades Park), inn on right. Go south 
0.4 0.4 End of road; turn right. Curve sharp left 0.6, ascending long 
winding grade. 

11.2 10.8 End of road; turn right. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 12.6 

and ascend grade. 

16.3 5.1 End of road, just beyond RR bridge; turn left. 

Right at this turn connects with Route 83 at mileage 34.1 to Port 
Jervls and Route 88 at mileage 33.8 to Newburgh. 

16.6 0.3 3-corners, at open space; bear left. 

Right is Route 87 to Warwick. 

18.8 2.2 TUXEDO, sta. on left. 

Straight ahead is Route 238 to New York. 

Route 208 — Haverstraw, N. Y., to Montclair, N. J. — 38.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Laden town. Suffern. Oakland. Pompton and Singac. Macadam And asphalt - 
macadam roads. The road from Haverstraw to Ladentown, over the hills, is thru a 

/-MILEAGE—* wooded section and affords many picturesque views; balance is a very 

▼-*-• SlSS^!? attractive drive thru residential areas. 
MllMfl« PoSato Route 210 offers an option via Patterson. 

0.0 0.0 HAVERSTRAW, Conger Ave. & New Main St., RR on right. 

Go north on Conger Ave. 
0.3 0.3 Irregular 4-corners, cemetery on left; bear left upgrade. 

Straight ahead is Route 93 to West Point. 

Avoid right-hand road 1.4. 
1.7 1.4 West Haverstraw, at outskirts, store on right. 

Right leads to center of town. 

Straight thru, avoiding right-hand road. 



BE SURE YOU'RE FULLY EQUIPPED 

In the front of this 'volume you will find a careful analysis by the Editor of What to 
Take on the Tour and Horw to T^reparefor It ^ad this advice. You'll find it 
helpful and instructive. We recommend the articles illustrated as reliable products. 




Digitized by 



Route 209 Page 212 Newburgh Section 

4.2 2.5 Right-hand road; turn right. Cross RR at Mt. Ivy sta. 4.3. 
6.2 2.0 Ladentown, fork. Keep right. 

Avoid left-hand diagonal road 11.5. 

12.8 6.6 3-corners ; turn left across RR onto Orange Ave. 

1?.9 O.i Suffern,* Lafayette & Orange Aves. Keep ahead (south) on 

Orange Ave., joining trolley. 
13.6 0.7 Right-hand road, just beyond trolley; turn right under RR. 
14.0 0.4 3-corners at open space; bear right. 

21.5 7.5 Oakland, N. J. Straight thru across RR at sta. 

22.6 1.1 End of road; turn right. Avoid right-hand road leading to 

Pompton lakes 24.0, 
25.2 2.6 Pompton, end of road, P. O. on left. Turn left. 

Right is Route 75 to Dlngmans Ferry. 

26.0 0.8 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right downgrade. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 245 at mileage 49.6 to New 
York City. 

27.2 1.2 3-corners; bear right with poles. 

28.9 1.7 End of road; turn left. Cross RR and bridge 81.0. t 

31.1 2.2 Mountain View, diagonal 4-corners, school on right. 

Straight thru. Cross RR 32.9. 

33.3 2.2 Singac Straight thru across trolley. 

Left with trolley is Route 73 to Paterson. 

36.6 2.8 Cedar Grove, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 
87.5 1.9 Verona, diagonal 4-corners. Bear left. 

37.7 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; meeting trolley, bear left onto Bloomfield 

Ave. 

Sharp right with trolley is Route 67 tt> Morrlstown. 

38.7 1.0 MONTCLAIR, Bloomfield Ave., Church St. & Glenridge Ave. 

Route 209— Suffern, N. Y., to Newark, N. J.— 32.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ramsey, Hohokus, Areola, Hackensack, Rutherford and Belleville. Macadam 
^ttlLEAGE-N arid pavement all the way. 

T«tai SiSSSSf Thru suburban communities and intervening farm areas to Hack- 

MlltMt Ptlwtt ensack, then over city streets practically all the way. 

0.0 0.0 SUFFERN, N. Y,, Orange & Lafayette Aves. Go south with 
trolley on Orange Ave. Avoid right-hand road 0.7. 

1.6 1.6 Mahwah, N. J., fire bell on left. Straight thru. Cross trol- 

ley 1.9. - 

4.1 2.5 Ramsey,* sta. over to right. Straight thru. 
6.1 2.0 Allendale, wooden church on left. Straight thru. 
7.5 1,4 Waldwick, wooden school on right. Straight thru. Cross 

trolley 7.6. 

8.7 1.2 Hohokus, irregular 4-corners, P. O. on right. 

Straight thru. Cross trolley 8.8. 
9.0 0.3 Fork; bear right on Franklin turnpike. Pass cemetery on 
right 9.8. 

10.2 1.2 Fork; bear right. 

Areola Golf Club on left at 13.9. 

14.2 4.0 Areola, old water wheel on right. 

Sharp right is Route 75 to Dlrqmana Ferry. 

•Suffern, N. Y. (pop. 3,500, alt. 394 ft.). during the revolutionary war was manufac- 

This prosperous village is situated in the tured at Augusta Forge near Tuxedo. The 

Ramapo valley and surrounded by the Ram- ore from which the chain was made came 

apo mountains, noted for their beauty. Suf- from the iron ore mines at Sterlington, a 

fern was first settled by an old revolutionary J*?* ? sta /f [ r ™ *"**? Fort Skidman, 

.... .... . «x . . built to defend the Hudson valley from 

family, for which it was named. During the British invasion 8tood about mileg ^ 

revolutionary war, Generals Washington and yond the village and remains of entre nch. 

Rochambeau spent a winter here in a house ments can still be seen. This site was also, 

which is still standing on Lafayette avenue a camp of the Tuscarora Indians. . 

-cupied by the Methodist Episcopal •Ramsey, N. J. (pop. 1,960, alt. 410 ft.). Here 

Directly in front of the parsonage is the fine estate of Emerson McMillan, for- 

non of the revolution. The chain merly owned by the late George Crockef , also 

etched across the Hudson river the estate of Joseph Wycoff. 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



Newburgh Section Page 213 £out$ ?10 

. Straight, thru. Cross trolley at Areola Sta. 14.7. , Th*u 
Rochelle Park 15.7. 
16.4 2.2 Maywood, Passaic St. & May wood Ave. Straight thru on 
Passaic St. Cross RR 17.6. Thru irregular 4-corners at sign 
<17.7. 

Left on Union St 17.7 is Route 238 to New York. 

17.9 1.5 Main St. ; meeting trolley, turn right. Cross RR 18.3. 

18.7 0.8 Hackensack, Main & Court Sts., court house on far left. Keep 

ahead (south) with trolley on Main St. 

18.8 0.1 Right-hand street; turn right away from trolley onto, Essex 

St., passing large bell on left. Cross RR 19.1. 

19.3 0.5 Terrace Ave.; turn left. 

21.4 2.1 Hasbrouck Heights, fork. Bear left with travel — still on Ter- 

race Ave. 

22.1 0.7 Woodridge, brick school on right. Straight thru on Hacken- 

sack St. ' 

23.3 12 Carlstadt,* Hackensack St. & Paterson Ave. 

Left on Paterson Ave. is Route 238 to New York. 

Straight thru with trolley on Hackensack St. 

23.7 0.4 Union Ave.; turn right away from trolley. 

23.9 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; bear left across RR and immediately 

left again onto Erie St. 
24.0 0.1 Rutherford,* at sta. square. Bear right onto Park Ave. Thru 
6-corners 25.1, leaving trolley. 

25.8 1.8 Lyndhurst, end of road. Bear left onto Riverside Ave. 

27.2 1.4 4-corners; turn.right onto Rutgers St. across long iron bridge 

over Passaic river. Cross RR 27.5. 
27.6 0.4 Belleville,* Rutgers St. & Washington Ave. Meeting trolley, 
turn left onto Washington Ave., passing town hall on left one 
block beyond. 

Right at town hall is Route 67 to Morrlstown. 

30.5 2.9 Left-hand street at far side of cemetery; turn left away from 

trolley onto Harvey St. and immediately right onto Broad St. 

Newark City Map, page 100. 

31.5 1.0 Fork; bear left with branch trolley under RR — still on Broad 
St. Avoid right-hand diagonal street 31.8, passing Washing- 
ton park on right. 

32.0 0.5 Fork; bear right with branch trolley — still on Broad St. 

82.4 0.4 NEWARK, Broad & Market Sts. 

Route 210— Haverstraw, N. Y., to Montclair, N. J. — 34.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ladentown, Monsey, Hohokus, Ridgewood and Paterson. Asphalt macadam 
roads practically all the way. 

,-MILEA6E^ An attractive drive thru country residential district to Montclair; 

Tatei SiSSSST balance over city streets. The road over the hills from Haverstraw to 
Mitoses Folate Ladentown is thru wooded sections and affords many pretty views. 

0.0 0.0 HAVERSTRAW, Conger Ave. & New Main St., RR on right. 
Go north on Conger Ave. ^ 

*CarUUdt» N. J. (pop. 4,000, alt. 52 ft.). The Here, on the Belleville turnpike, may be seen 

army o! Washington in retreating from Fort an old copper mine opened prior to the revo- 

Lee passed thru this town. A battle-scarred lotion. This mine was discovered thru a 

gate taken at Berry Hill, which is practically slave of Colonel Schuyler. The old colonial 

the summit upon which Carlstadt is built. |? OU8e of * he . lat , ter l \ 9%m in u fai ?J y «?* ~ n ' 
. . k^_ ^ t * , A . . dition and is located on the Passaic river 

ha. been placed in the museum, known as near Be|levM|e . ^ Dutch Rcformed churchf 

the Hasbrouck house, Washington's head- the first charge of the Rcv T ^^ Tal . 

quarters in 1783-84, at Newburgh, N. Y. magC( may also bt scen a9 you cro89 thc 

•Rutherford; N. J. (pop. 8,347, alt. 77.5 ft.), Passaic river over the Belleville turnpike 

was settled by Dutch farmers and gardeners from New York. The street on which this 

and first called Boiling Spring. The name church is located was the route taken by 

later was changed in compliment to one of Washington's army in its retreat thru Jersey, 

the earliest and most distinguished families The engine for Robert Fulton's steamboat 

* the township. "Clermont" was built in Belleville on Mill 

*PeH*vine, N. J. (pop. 14,500, alt. 20- 1^0 ft). street. 



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Route 210 Page 214 Newburgh Section 

0.3 0.8 Irregular 4-corners, cemetery on left; bear left upgrade. 

Avoid right-hand road 1.4. 
1.7 1.4 West Haverstraw, at outskirts, store on right. 

Right leads to center of town. 

Straight thru, avoiding right-hand road. Cross RR at Mt. 
Ivy Sta. 4.3. 
6.1 4.4 Ladentown, left-hand diagonal road. Bear left 

Straight ahead is Route 208 to Montclair. 

Caution for RR at Erie Sta. 11.4. 

11.5 5.4 Monsey, N. Y., end of road. 

Left is Route 202 to New York. 
Right is Route 54 to Suffern. 

Turn right and at 4-corners immediately beyond, turn left 

17.3 5.8 End of road; turn right across stone bridge. 

17.4 0.1 Saddle River, N. J., irregular 4-corners, P. O. on right. Turn 

sharp left. Cross trolley 19.5. 
19.9 2.5 Hohokus, end of road at P. O. 

Left is Route 238 to Now York. 

Turn left and take right-hand road immediately beyond, cross- 
ing stone bridge — now on N. Maple Ave. 
21.2 1.3 Ridge wood,* N. Maple & Ridgewood Aves. Keep ahead on S. 
Maple Ave. Thru diagonal 4-corners 21.5. 

22.2 1.0 Glenrock, fire sta. on right. Straight thru on Maple Ave. 

Cross RR 22.7. Cross concrete bridge over Passaic river 24.3. 
Cross RRs 25.1-25.8. 

26.3 4.1 Irregular 4-corners; meeting cross-trolley, bear left onto 

Bridge St. 

26.6 0.3 End of street; meeting cross-trolley, turn right onto Broad- 

way. 

26.7 0.1 5-corners ; meeting cross-trolley, bear left onto Main St. 
26.9 0.2 Paterson,* Main & Market Sts., bank on left. 

Keep ahead (south) with trolley. 

27.3 0.4 Slater St., church on left; turn right away froga trolley. 

27.4 0.1 Marshall St.; turn left, passing brick school on left. 

28.1 0.7 Irregular 4-corners (Barclay St.) ; turn right across small 
wooden drawbridge. Cross RR at sta. 28.2. Thru Great Notch 
80.4. 

32.7 4.6 Upper Montclair,* Valley road & Bellevue Ave., bank on right. 
Straight thru with trolley on Valley road. 

38.7 1.0 Fork; bear right with pavement on Valley road. 

34.7 1.0 Diagonal 4-corners, municipal bldg. on left; meeting cross- 
trolley, bear left onto Bloomfield Ave. 

84.9 0.2 MONTCLAIR,* Bloomfield Ave., Church St. & Glenridge road. 

*Ridgewood, N. J. (pop. 8,000, alt. 250 ft.)* This city was originally settled thru a grant 

is situated among the foothills of the Ramapo to Alexander Hamilton and his associates, 

mountains and upon the western edge of the known as the Society of Useful Manufactures, 

fertile Paramus valley. Across this valley whosc ob i ect was the industrial emancipa- 

from north to south runs the historic Para- tion . of the United States from Europe. This 

mus road, along which in the early days soc ' cty . ,tlU e * 18ts and u V?. 1 ?^ ******* 
A . - ,. A . . . A . A . -, .,. , . , in business. During the British occupation 

the Indian, the colonist and the British had of Ncw Yofk |he ^ 8Urrounding ^ t , 

many an encounter. The original Dutch erjkQn were OQCUpied by Washington's army. 

homesteads were built along this route and Garret and Prcakness mountains afford splen- 

along here also in \7tS was founded the old did views from their summits. The falls of 

historic Paramus Dutch reformed church, and th Passaic are another interesting feature of 

in 1776 the commissary department of the the city. 

American army. At this latter point many *U*per Montclair, N. J. (pop. 5,000), is on 

noted personages stopped 'from time to time, the «ast slope of the Orange mountains, and 

among them being General Washington. The contains many fine residences. It is a part of 

old church and many of the homes of the Montclair. 

early colonists may still be seen. "Montclair, N. J. (pop. 28,810, alt. 341 ft.), 

•Paterson, N. J. (pop. 136,000, alt. 100 ft.), one of New York's most charming suburbs. 

is the ritost important siljc manufacturing contains many beautiful homes. A state 

city in the United States. It also has various normal school and military academy art 

other thriving and important manufactories. located hert. 



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Newbiirgh Section Page 215 Routes 212-213-215 

Route 212— West Point to Tuxedo, N. Y.— 25.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Central Valley, Harriman Sta. and Southfleld. Asphalt-macadam practically 
all the way. A very good connection. 

mil FAfiF A very pretty drive. To Central Valley the road goes over the 

*"" Distent* mountains thru woods and lake regions to Central Valley; balance is 
Total Between down the Ramapo valley — small farms in the bottom, while the hillsides 
Mileage Points are wooded. 

0.0 0.0 WEST POINT, at statue of Washington. Go south, passing 
parade grounds. Avoid right-hand diagonal road 0.9. 

1.8 1.8 Highland Falls, P. 0. on left. Straight thru. 

1.9 0.1 Right-hand road, store on right; turn right upgrade. 

14.1 12.2 Central Valley, 4-corners, opera house on left. Turn left. 

Right 'is Route 88 to Newbiirgh. 

14.6 0.5 Fork, sign in center; bear right. 

16.1 1.6 Harriman Sta., 3-corners, just beyond RR bridge. Bear left. 

Sharp right at 16.5 is Route 83 at mileage 40.2 to Port Jervis. 

Pass Arden over to left 18.6. 
21.0 4.9 Southfleld, at flagpoles. Curve left along RR. 

22.0 1.0 Fork; bear left along RR. * 

22.8 0.8 3-corners at open space; bear left. 

Right is Route 87 to Warwick. 
Tuxedo Golf Club on right 23.1. 
Entrance to Tuxedo Park on right 24.9. 

25.1 2.3 TUXEDO,* sta. on left. 

Straight ahead is Route 201 to New York. 

Route 213— Central Valley to Warwick, N. Y.— 17.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns. Back of Book. 

Total Between V * a Harriman an <* Monroe. Macadam to Monroe; balance dirt. 
Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 CENTRAL VALLEY. Go south on main road. 
0.5 0.6 Fork; bear right. 

2.1 1.6 Harriman, right-hand road, beyond RR underpass. Turn 
right. 

Straight ahead is Route 201 to New York. 

4.0 1.9 Fork at cemetery; bear right. 

4.6 0.6 Monroe, 4-corners (center of town to right). Turn square 

left. Pass Walton lake on left 7.6. 

Straight ahead at 4.6 is Route 83 to Port Jervis. 

7.7 3.1 Right-hand road at foot of lake; turn right. 
8.7 1.0 End of road; turn left up long easy grade. . 

10.6 1.8 End of road; turn right. 

11.2 0.7 Left-hand road; turn left. Cross RR at Lake Sta. 

11.9 0.7 End of road ; turn right, coming onto Main St. 
17.0 5.1 WARWICK,* Main & West Sts. 

Route 215— Newburgh to Port Jervis, N. Y.— 44.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Campbell Hall, Goshen and Slate Hill. Asphalt-macadam to 6 miles west of 
Goshen, then 3.5 miles gravel to Slate Hill; balance asphalt-macadam. 

A very pretty drive thru rolling farming country. 
^-MILEAGE-x 

T»t»i Between F° r this and other exits see City Map, page 205. 

"<mT 'o.'o NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand Ave., city hall on left. Go 
west with trolley on Broadway. 

1.5 1.5 4-corners, trolley leaves to right; turn left onto Wisner Ave, 
1.7 0.2 End of street; turn right. 

2.6 0.9 Fork; bear left with poles. 

•Tuxedo, N. Y., is a beautiful and exclusive wood lake, is a dairy and farming center, 

winter and summer resort, laid out by the Baird's tavern, an old stone house, where 

noted Pierre Lorillard The park, which is Washington was entertained, the residence of 

privately owned by the residents, is mag- Gen. John Hathorn of revolutionary fame, 

nificently laid out with picturesque drives and the "Old Shingle house/' built in 1763, are 

around the lake. No admittance except by still preserved. The Hewitt family of New 

letter from a resident. York owns a large part of the adjacent 

•Warwick, N. Y. (pop. 2,350, alt. 502 ft.), a country between the lake and the Sterling 

residential and resort town in the Warwick mines, which are the oldest iron mines in 

ralley, Orange county, southwest of Green* America. 



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Routes 217-218 Page 216 Newburgh Section 

7.2 4.6 Little Britain, church on left. Straight thru. 
10.9 8.7 3-corners, just beyond RR bridge; bear right. 

12.2 1.3 Burnside, right-hand diagonal road. Bear right. Cross RK 

12.3. 

14.7 2.5 3-corners; bear right across iron bridge. 

15.0 0.3 Campbell Hall, fork. Keep left across RR at sta. 

15.8 0.8 3-corners ; bear left under RR. Cross RR 19.3. 

Goshen City Map and Points of interest, page 126. 

20.4 4.6 Fork, soldiers' monument in center; bear right onto E. Main 

St. 

20.5 0.1 Goshen, Main St., Church St. & Greenwich Ave., at fountain. 

Straight thru (west) on Main St. and follow Route 83 from 
mileage 53.7 balance of the way (23.6 miles)' to Port Jervis. 

Route 217— Goshen, N. Y., to Newfoundland, N. J.— 28.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns', Back of Book. 

Via Warwick. Macadam and gravel to Warwick; balance dirt, with some stretcheii 
of macadam. 

An attractive drive over slightly hilly country with numerous prosperous farms to 
Warwick; balance of road is narrow and winding with short rough stretches, requir- 
ing caution. 

/-MILEAGE-^ 

t«ui bSSJmV For this and other exits see City Map, page 126. 

Mlltatt P«Tntt 

0.0 0.0 GOSHEN, Greenwich Ave., Church & Main Sts. at fountain. 

Go southwest on Greenwich Ave. across RR. 
3.1 8.1 Fork, roadhouse on left; bear left. 

4.1 1.0 Fork; bear right. 

5.2 1.1 End of road; turn right. Avoid right-hand road 5.4. 
5.8 0.6 Florida,* church on left. Straight thru. 

7.0 1.2 Fork; bear left. Same thorofare becomes Maple Ave. Curve 
left at bandstand onto Main St. 11.2. 

11.5 4.5 Warwick, N. Y., Main & West Sts. & Oakland Ave. Straight 

thru onto Oakland Ave.; cross RR. Avoid left-hand road 12.1. 

Points of Interest, page 215. 

13.6 2.1 Left-hand road; turn left upgrade. Thru Moes 19.0. 
27.0 13.4 Fork; keep left, passing wooden church on left. 

Right fork is Route 7fi, at mileage S4.8, to Digmens Ferry. 

28.3 1.8 End of road; turn left. 

28.9 0.6 NEWFOUNDLAND, sta. on right. 

Straight ahead is Route 246 to New York City. 

Route 218— Newburgh to Wurtsboro, N. Y.— 27.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Montgomery and Bloomingburg. Asphalt-macadam to Bloomingburg, dirt to 
Montgomery; balance macadam. Thru hilly farming country, with long ascent and 
descent between Bloomingburg and Wurtsboro. 

Route 216 to Goshen, combined with Route 86 to Wurtsboro, gives an all macadam 
option. 
,-MILEAGE-n 

T«tai Bt&Sm For this and other exits see City Map, page 205. 

Mllrag* Points 

0.0 0.0 NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand St., city hall on left. Go 
west with trolley on Broadway. Thru East Coldenham 5.6 and 
Coldenham 7.9. Thru 4-corners 10.8. Cross RR 12.2. 

+ t% /» 1A/< TUT A. 3 _.« :J.J m — •__1~A • 1- _ • J J 



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Newburgh Section Page 217 Routes 219-221 

23.5 4.1 Bloomingburg,* diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. Curve 

right upgi^de thru High View 25.0. Cross RR at sta. 27.1. 
27.9 4.4 WURTSBORO, 4-corners, at store. 

Right is Route 281 to Kingston. 
Left is Route 266 to Port Jervls. 
Straight ahead is Route 86 to Binghamton. 

Route 219— Newburgh to Liberty, N. Y.— 56.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Walden, Ellenville and Woodburne. First 10 miles macadam; then 3 miles con- 
crete to Walden; 6 miles macadam; balance alternating stretches of macadam gravel 
or rough dirt. 

The route to Walker Valley is over a rolling, farming country; then steep grades are 
encountered over the mountain to Ellenville; balance of route is thru a hilly farming 
country, — a popular summering district. 

Route 215 to Goshen combined with Route 86 to Liberty furnishes the best way 
between Newburgh and Liberty. 

^-MILEAOE^ 

Total Bftwea? For this and other exits see City Map, page 205. 

Mlleose Points 

0.0 0.0 NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand St. Go west with trolley 
on Broadway. Thru East Coldenham 5.6 and Coldenham 7.9. 

10.6 10.6 Prominent 4-corners; turn right. 

13.4 2.8 Walden, irregular 4-corners, bank on right. Bear left with 

trolley onto Main St. Bear right, where trolley leaves to left, 
across long iron bridge over Wallkill river 13.8. Bear right 
onto Montgomery St. 13.9. 

14.5 1.1 Fork; bear left. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 19.7. Cross 

RR at sta. 20.7. 
20.9 6.4 Pine Bush. Straight thru. 

23.2 2.3 Ulsterville, diagonal 4-corners, P. O. over to left. Turn sharp 

right. Avoid right-hand diagonal road 24.0. Thru Walker 
Valley 25.5. 
28.8 5.6 Fork; bear left. Caution for sharp left curve downgrade 29.7 
and sharp right curve 30.2. 

34.3 5.5 Fork; bear left onto East Canal St. Cross RRs 84.5. 

34.8 0.5 Ellenville,* Canal & Main Sts. Straight thru on Canal St. 

Right is Route 231 to Kingston. 
Left is Route 266 to Port Jervls. 

36.5 1.7 Fork; bear left along creek. Thru Greenfield 40.4. 

47.4 10.9 Woodburne,* 8-corners beyond long iron bridge. Turn left 

And next right upgrade. Thru Loch Sheldrake 50.7. Avoid 
right-hand diagonal road 51.5. Same thorofare becomes Main 
St 
66.4 9.0 LIBERTY, Main & Chestnut Sts. 

Straight ahead is Route 86 to Binghamton. 

Route 221— Newburgh to Kingston, N. Y.— 36.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Platteklll and New Paltz. First 6 miles macadam; then 5 miles dirt to Platte- 
kill; balance macadam. This is the best way between the above terminals. 
A pretty drive on a winding road thru hilly farming country. 
Route 222 via Highland furnishes an all macadam option. 
,-MILEAQE-^ 

Total Bote*? For ti" 8 an< * other exits see City Map, page 205. 

•Moose Potato 

0.0 0.0 NEWBURGH, Grand St. & Broadway, city hall on left. Go 
north on Grand St. Bear left onto N. Water St. 1.1, joining 
trolley. Thru irregular 4-corners, leaving trolley 1.2. 
1.5 1.5 Fork; keep right. 
' 5.2 3.7 4-corners; turn right. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 7.3. 

•Bloomin#burg, N. Y. (alt. 752 ft.), it an old •Woodbourne, N. Y. (alt. 1,400 ft.), on. the 

historic town in Sullivan county offering ex- Neversink river, affords good boating and 

cellent boating, bathing and fiihing facilities. fishing The 8Urrounding country abounds in 

? ^and .tteant eHght8 " WmUmf "* mountains, forests and stream. There are 

^H: (pop. 3,000, alt. 317 ft.), is ««■««»• ,ak « *■ **■ j} ™'*™ ** "*'* 

a mouniafa summer Resort within easy walk- «• ** We, Lock Sheldrake, Alton lake and 

ing distance of numerous waterfalls, lakes Kiamesha lake, the latter being stocked with 

tod ice taves. Mack bass. 

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Route 221 



Page 218 Newburgh Section 



9.8 4.6 

16.6 6.8 

20.1 8.5 

20.4 0.8 

20.6 0.1 

20.6 0.1 



32.1 11.5 
33.4 1.3 



Plattekill, left-hand road, store on right. Turn left. Bear 

right upgrade 10.1. Cross RR 13.3. Thru Modena 14.4. 

3-corners; bear right. 

Right-hand road; turn right. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 

at brick school 20.8. 

Left-hand road; turn left. 

End of road ; turn right on Chestnut St. 

New Paltz, Chestnut & Main Sts., at trolley line. 

Left on Main St. is Route 180 to Mountain Rett, where facilities will 
be found for storage of cars and carriage service to Mohonk Lake. 

Jog left and right across trolley, keeping straight ahead on 

Chestnut St. Thru Rifton 27.6 and St. Remy 30.9. Cross long 

iron bridge over Rondout Creek 31.8. 

Eddyville, left-hand road. Turn left. 

Wilbur. Keep ahead along creek on Abell St. Go under RR 

83.8. 

Kingston City Map, page 238; Points of interest, page 239. 




POINTS OF INTEREST, 
New Paltz (pop. 1,300, alt. 267 ft.), on the 
Wallkill river, was settled in 1677 by the 
Huguenots. Old houses built by the early 
settlers include the Memorial house, built 
1712, by Jean Hasbrouck; it is open to visitors 
from 9 to 5 and contains interesting old rec- 
ords and relics. The Elting homestead was 
built in 1740 by Capt. Josiah Elting, the most 



NEW PALTZ, N. Y. 
prominent man of Dutch ancestry in the com- 
munity. From the old Du Bois house the 
wife and children of Du Bois were carried off 
by the Indians and taken up the Wallkill 
creek, subsequently rescued by the husband 
and father. New Paltz is the seat of a state 
normal training school for teachers. Lake 
Mohonk is 5 miles out of New Paltz and 
Lake Minnewaska 10 miles. 



JOHNSTON'S GARAGE, Inc. 



NEW PALTZ, N. Y. 



PHONE 16 



GEO. E. JOHNSTON. Pres. 



Ask for Route Cards. On Direct 
Routes »nd Nearest Garage to 
Lakes Mohonk and Minnewaska. 

Accommodates 60 cars. 

Agents for Ford and Overland. 



Lake Mohonk Garage Conducted by the 

LAKE MOHONK MOUNTAIN HOUSE 



Phone New Paltz 4 

MOHONK LAKE, N. Y. 



At MOUNTAIN REST on the Mohonk Estate. 
13.4 miles west of Poughkeepsle and 4.3 miles 
west of New Paltz. Nearest motor approach to 
the famous report. 



Big. new, concrete garage partly In use. Cor- 
rugated iron garages also. Chauffeurs' quarters. 

Carriage service between garage and house all 
week days. Cars not received Sunday. 



SEASON MAY 14 TO NOVEMBER 



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Newburgh Section Page 219 Routes 222-226 

34.8 1.4 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Broadway. 
Cross RR at sta. 36.0. Bear left onto Pearl St. 36.6, keeping 
right along park. 

36.7 1.9 Irregular 4-corners; meeting trolley, turn right onto Clinton 

Ayp f 

36.8 0.1 KINGSTON, Clinton Ave. & Main St. 

Route 222— Newburgh to Kingston, N. Y.— 33,3 m. 

For Accommodations isee Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Marlboro, Milton, Highland, Esopus and Rondout Ferry. Brick and macadam 
all the way. Following west bank of Hudson river, thru rolling farming country: hilly, 
but no steep grades. 

For option via New Paltz see Route 221. 
.-MILEAGE-^ 

T«tai b*w«m For this and other exits see City Map, page 205. 

MIImm Prtjrtt ^"™" 

0.0 0.0 NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand St., city hall on left. Go 
north on Grand St. Bear left onto N. Water St. 1A, joining 
trolley. 

1.2 1.2 Diagonal 4-corners ; bear right with trolley, passing Country 

club on left 1.8. 

2.3 1.1 Fork, large elm tree in center; bear left. Thru Middle Hope 

4.3. 
5.5 3.2 Fork; bear left. 
6.1 0.6 Fork; bear right with travel. 
7.9 1.8 Fork; bear right. 
8.0 0.1 Marlboro, bank on left. Straight thru, downgrade. 

12.0 4.0 Milton, P. O. on left. Straight thru. Over RR bridge 15.9. 

Points of Interest, page 241. 

16.3 4.3 Fork, monument in center; bear left, downgrade. 

16.4 0.1 Highland, end of road. Turn right. 

16.5 0.1 Left-hand road ; meeting trolley, turn left. 

16.8 0.3 Fork; bear right, leaving trolley. Cross RR 21.7. 

Left fork 16.8 is Route 180 to Ellenvllle. 

24.3 7.5 Esopus, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 

Points of Interest, page 241. 

26.7 2.4 Ulster Park, 3-corners. Bear right. 

30.1 3.4 Port Ewen, P. O. on left. Straight thru, descending steep 

Points of Interest, page 241. 

grade to 

31.0 0.9 Sleightsburg-Rondout Ferry (charges, 25c). From ferry land- 

ing keep ahead across trolley. 

31.1 0.1 4-corners ; turn left on E. Strand St. 

Kingston City Map, page 238; Points of Interest, page 239. 

31.2 0.1 Broadway; meeting trolley, turn right upgrade. Bear left 

with trolley 31.6 past city hall on right 32.1. Cross RR 32.4. 
Trolley leaves to left 33.0. Bear left onto Albany Ave. 33.1. 

33.2 2.0 Clinton Ave. ; meeting trolley, turn right. 

33.3 0.1 KINGSTON, Main St. & Clinton Ave. 

Route 226— Newburgh to Pawling, N. Y.— 35.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Newburgh-Beacon, Ferry. Beacon, Fishklll, East Fishklll, Stormvllle and 

Poughquag. All hard surfaced road. 

Thru hilly farming country with some wooded sections. 

This route connects at Pawling with Route 38 to Pittsfleld and 190 to Danbury. 
s-MILEA6E-> 

T«taJ BfteftM For this and other exits see City Map, page 205. 

MIImm Points 

0.0 0.0 NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand St. Go east on Broadway 
with trolley. 



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Route 228 Page 220 Newburgh Section 

0.2 0.2 End of street; turn left with trolley onto Colden St. 

0.4 0.2 2d St.; turn right with branch trolley. 

0.5 0.1 Newburgh-Beacon Ferry. (Runs from 6 a. m. to 11 p. m. all 

year.). Leaving ferry, curve right and left with trolley over 

RR bridge. 

0.6 0.1 3-corners, beyond RR bridge ; bear left with trolley onto Ferry 
St., avoiding left-hand road just beyond. 

1.0 0.4 End of street; turn left with trolley; still Ferry St. 

1.1 0.1 Beacon, 5-corners, bank on right. Turn right with trolley 

onto Main St. 
1.9 0.8 Fork; bear left with trolley. 

2.2 0.3 Left-hand street; turn left with trolley. 

2.3 0.1 Right-hand street; turn right with trolley. Still Main St. 

2.4 0.1 End of street; turn right with trolley onto Fishkill Ave. 

6.3 3.9 Fishkill, small wooden church on left. Keep ahead. 

Left is Route 48 to Poughkeepsie. 

6.6 0.2 3-corners beyond small wooden church on right; bear left. 

Right at this 3-corners is Route 172 to New York City. 

8.1 1.6 Brinckerhoff, right-hand diagonal road beyond cemetery on 
left. Bear right. Cross RR 8.3. 

8.4 0.3 End of road ; turn left on macadam. Thru Wiccopee 9.6. 

12.8 4.4 3-corners; bear left. 

12.9 0.1 East Fishkill, 3-corners, P. O. on right. Keep right. 

14.1 1.2 Fork of 3 roads; take right-hand road. Gross RR 16.3. Avoid 

left-hand road 15.4. Curve right with road 16.8. 
15.9 1.8 Stormville (outskirts), left-hand road. Turn left. 
16.5 0.6 Fork; bear right. Thru Green Haven 18.3. 

20.2 3.7 End of road; turn left. 

20.8 0.6 Poughquag, fork, grass plot in center. Bear right. 
v 22.9 2.1 Stonehouse, right-hand road at sta. Turn right across RR. 
28.5 5.6 Holmes, end of road at store. Turn left. Avoid right-hand 
road 30.6. Cross RR at Patterson Sta. 31.3. 

Right at 30.6 is Route 363 to Carmel and New York. 

32.0 3.5 End of road; turn left. 

Right at 32.0 is Route 190 to Danbury. 

35.7 3.7 PAWLING, 3-corners, stores on right. 

Points of Interest, page 302. 
Right is Route 38 to Pittsfield. 

Route 228 — Newburgh to Poughkeepsie, N. Y. — 16.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Newburgh-Beacon Ferry. Beacon, Hughsonville and Wappingere Falls, Macadam 
all the way. 

Thru a hilly farming country along Hudson river. (Ferry charges 40 -50c; 7c each 
passenger.) 

r-MILEAGE-^ 

Total b55m? For this and other exits see City Map, page 205. 

Ml l«M t Prints 

0.0 0.0 NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand Ave. Go east on Broad- 
way with trolley. 

0.1 0.1 End of street; turn left with trolley onto Colden St. 

0.3 0,2 2d St.; turn right with branch trolley to Newburgh-Beacon 
Ferry. (Ferry runs all year from 6 a. m. to 11 p. m.) Leaving 
ferry, turn right and then left over RR bridge. 

0.6 0.3 End of street; turn left with trolley upgrade onto Ferry St. 

1.1 0.5 Beacon, 5-corners. Bear slightly left away from trolley onto 
North St. Thru Hughsonville 7.2. 

8.6 7.5 End of street, park on left; turn left downgrade. 

8.8 0.2 Wappbigers Falls, end of street. Meeting trolley, turn right. 

10.8 2.0 4-corner8; turn left downgrade, leaving trolley. Rejoin trol- 

ley 11.5 — now on South Ave. 

Poughkeepsie City Map and Points of Interest, page 182. 

, POUGHKEEPSIE, Market & Main Sts., city hall on left. 

Digitized byLjOOQlC 



Port Jervis Section Page 221 Port Jervis City Map 
Port Jervis Section 

POINTS OF INTEREST. PORT JERVIS, N. Y. 
Port Jervis (pop. 10,179, alt. 470 ft.), has pic- tenant-governor of Illinois; William S. Ben- 

tnresque location at the confluence of the nctt » born one mi,e »°« th of «*• cit 7» an <* *>- 
M . . , «. , T .; . . Witt Clinton, whose birthplace was eight 

Neversink and Delaware rivers. In its vicin- .. - . . 4 * t • m £ 

miles away. Other interesting features of 
ity many well-known men have been born tne town are: 
and lived, among them being William Bross, Matamoras fort (across the river), the last 



i^__j _* 



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Route 231 Page 222 Port Jervis Section 

Route 231— Port Jervis to Kingston, N. Y.— 57.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Cuddebackville, Wurtsboro and Bllenville. 

First 8.7 miles gravel; then 17.5 miles gravel and shale; 3.8 miles gravel to Ellenville; 
balance macadam. Summary: 27.6 miles macadam; 17.5 miles gravel and shale; 12.6 
miles gravel. 

Road is winding, following a valley practically all the way thru a fine farming 
country, with some splendid views of the Shawaugauk and Catskill mountains. 

A pleasant side trip may be made to Lake Mohonk at mileage 41.5. 

Connects at Cuddebackville with Route 234 to Middletown and Goshen, and at Wurts- 
boro with Route 86 to Bingham ton. 
s-MILEAGE-^ 



Totml BrtrSm For this and other exits see City Map, page 221. 

Mlltat* Point* 

0.0 0.0 PORT JERVIS, Pike & Front Sts. Go northeast with trolley 

on Pike St. 

0.3 0.3 Irregular 4-corners at water-trough; turn right onto Main St. 

0.5 0.2 Diagonal 4-corners; turn left onto Kingston Ave. 

1.0 0.5 Fork; keep right on Kingston Ave. 

1.2 0.2 Irregular 4-corners; turn right. Cross RRs 1.3-4.2. 

4.7 3.5 Huguenot, irregular 4-corners, P. 0. on left. Bear left and 

immediately right. 

5.8 1.1 Fork; bear left. 

7.0 1.2 Fork; bear left downgrade under RR 7.8. 

7.9 0.9 End of road, jog right and left across iron bridge. 

8.7 0.8 Cuddebackville, fork at grass plot; bear left. 

Right is Route 234 to Goshen. 

8.8 0.1 Right-hand road, inn on left; turn right. Avoid right-hand 

road at flagpole 12.0. Thru Haven 15.5. 
18.5 9.7 Wurtsboro,* irregular 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Left is Route 86 to Blnghamton. 

Right is Route 659 to Goshen and 661 to Newburgh. 

22.2 3.7 Summitville, 3-corners, P. 0. on left; bear left. Cross RRs 

22.3-23.1. 

23.5 1.3 3-corners at church ; bear right. Thru Phillipsport 23.6. 
25.8 2.3 Spring Glen, fork, P. 0. on left; bear right. 

28.4 2.6 3-corners ; bear right across wooden bridge. ' 

29.7 1.3 Fork; bear left onto Main St. 

30.0 0.3 Ellenville,* Main & Canal Sts. Straight thru on Main St. 

32.0 2.0 Napanoch,* 4-corners. Straight thru. 

32.3 0.3 Fork; bear left. 

33.6 1.3 Wawarsing, 3-corners; bear left across bridge. 

•Wurtsboro, N, Y. (pop. 500, alt. 720 ft.), •Ellenville, N. Y. (pop. 3,000, alt. 317 ft.), is 

at the foot of the Shawangunk mountains, a mountain summer resort within easy walk- 

was first inhabited in 1660 by Dutch traders. ind distance of numerous waterfalls, lakes 

Nearly is Mamakating Park, a private reser- and ice caves. 

vat ion of more than 2.000 acres and at an *Napanoch, N. Y. (pop. 600, alt. 750 ft.), the 

elevation of 1,600 feet. Mamakating (Masten) site of an old Indian fort, was settled by the 

lake is a beautiful body of spring water, early Dutch and Huguenots. The earliest 

covering more than one hundred acres. The grave here is marked 1671. At the time of 

village is surrounded by trout streams, and the Fautinekill massacre near by, by the 

the Basher Kill, just east, is well stocked Tories and Indians, a feeble-minded girl ran 

with pickerel and perch. Five miles from to Napanoch carrying a 16th century Bible, 

Mamakating Station (the railroad station on which is still preserved. DeWitt Clinton was 

the main line for Wurtsboro) is located Yan- born here, and among the distinguished resi- 

kee lake at an elevation of 1,500 feet. dents today is George Inness, the painter. 

(Port Jervis Points of Interest, continued from page 221) 

standing of the numerous fortifications. Old Stone House (in West Port Jervis). 

Tri-State monument, which marks the June- ™* wa » P artl y destroyed by Brandt and his 

tion of New York, New Jersey and Penn- T v , . . A . "»,.*. 

Indian fort — on northern outskirts, 
sylvania. This point is reached thru the Sidc trip to Lake Marcia, on ridge of Kit- 

Laurel Grove cemetery. tatinny mountains, 6 miles distant. 



Lake Mohonk Garage Conducted by the Phone New Paltz 4 

LAKE MOHONK MOUNTAIN HOUSE MOHONK LAKE, N. Y. 

At MOUNTAIN REST on the Mohonk Estate. Big. new, concrete garage partly in use. Cor- 

13.4 miles west of Poughkeepsie and 4.3 miles rugated Iron garages also. Chauffeurs' quarters. 

vest of New Paltz. Nearest motor approach t> Carriage service between garage and house all 

•lie famous resort. week days. Cars not received Sunday. 

SEASON MAY 14 TO NOVEMBER 



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Port Jervis Section Page 223 Route 232 

37.1 3.5 Kerhonkson,* 3-corners; bear left. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 41.0. 

Right-hand road 41.0 leads to Mountain Rest (9 miles), where 
excellent facilities will be found for storage of cars and carriage 
service provided to Mohonk Lake. 

41.5 4.4 Fork; keep left on macadam. Thru Stone Ridge 47.4. Thru 

Right fork 41.6 is Route 233 to Lake Mohonk and Now Paltz. 

irregular 4-corners at store 54.6. 

Kingston City Map, page 238; Points of Interest, page 239. 

54.8 13.3 Hurley, left-hand road at stone house; turn left onto Hurley 

Ave. Bear right at stone water-trough 56.8 onto Washington 
Ave. 

66.9 2.1 Irregular 4-corners; turn left onto N. Front St., joining trol- 

ley. Avoid right-hand street where trolley leaves 57.2. Bear 
right onto Clinton St. 57.3. 
57.5 0.6 KINGSTON, Clinton & Main Sts. 

Route 232— Ellenville to Poughkeepsie, N. Y.— 31.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Napanoch, Lake Mohonk and New Paltz. First 12 miles macadam; then 10 miles 
gravel with son * 
and steep grades.' 



^ 



of gravel with some clay, bad when wet; balance macadam. Hilly with sharp curves 
-nd steep grades.' 

This is the shortest connection between Ellenville and New Palts. A batter, tho 



^MILEAGE-^ longer way, would be to take Route 233 to New Paltz. 

~ . S££? At Mountain Rest a delightful side trip may be taken to Lake 

anSSLftSST Mohonk. (See mileage 18.5.) 



0.0 0.0 ELLENVILLE, Canal & Main Sts. Go northeast on Main St., 
crossing iron bridge 0.2. Pass cemetery on left 0.9. 

2.0 2.0 Napanoch. Keep ahead. 

2.3 0.3 Fork; bear left. Bear right 3.5. 

3.7 1.4 Wawarsing, 3-corners ; bear left across iron bridge. 

7.2 3.5 Kerhonkson, 3-corners; bear left. 

11.2 4.0 Accord, 3-corners (center of town to right). Bear left 

11.9 0.7 Fork, house in center; bear right. 

Left fork is Route 231 to Kingston. 

14.2 2.3 4-corners; turn right. 
14.9 0.7 Fork; bear right. 

15.4 0.5 Fork, just beyond house; bear left upgrade. 

15.7 0.3 3-corners; bear left. 

15.8 0.1 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right. 
16.1 0.3 3-corners, stone house on left ; bear left. 

17.0 0.9 Right-hand road, just beyond small wooden bridge; turn right 

onto narrow road over mountain. 

17.5 0.5 Left-hand road; turn left, continuing upgrade. 

17.9 0.4 Caution — 3-corners ; turn sharp right. Caution for curve 18.3. 

18.5 0.6 Mountain Rest. 

Right leads to Lake Mohonk Garage, where excellent facilities will 
be found for the storage of cars and carriage service provided to 
Mohonk Lake. 

Straight thru, descending steep winding grade, using caution 
for curves. 

22.1 3.6 End of road; turn right. m 

22.6 0.5 End of road; bear left. Cross iron bridge' over Wallkill River 

and RR at sta. just beyond. 

New Paltz City Map and Points of Interest, page 218. 

•Kerhsaksett, N. Y. (pop. 400, alt. 321 ft.), Ellenville and 21 miles from Kingston. The 
is located in the Rondout valley in the Shar- Readout creek run .through the village. Lake 

Minewaaka ts 6 miles away, and Lake Mo- 
rangenek mountains, the foothills of the honk n milcs . b^ are famous summer re- 

Cat skills, on the state road, 7 miles from sorts with unsurpassed mountain scenery. 



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Routes 233-234 Page 224 Port Jervis Section 

22.9 0.3 New Paltz, Main & Chestnut Sts. 

Straight thru with trolley on Main St. Thru Ohioville 24.6, 

Loyd 27.0 and Centerville 27.6. 
30.4 7.5 Highland, end of road. Turn left with trolley. 

Right is Route 261 to Newburgh. 

31.3 0.9 Highland-Poughkeepsie Ferry. 

Ferriage, 50c. Runs 6.10 A. M. to 8; 40 P. M. every 30-40 min. 
Poughkeepsle City Map and Points of Interest, page 182. 

From ferry landing, keep ahead on Main St., joining trolley. 
31.9 0.6 POUGHKEEPSIE, Main & Market Sts. 

Route 233— Ellenville to New Paltz, N. Y.— 31.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

^ MILEAGE^ Via Kerhonkson, High Falls and Rosendale. Macadam with a short 

_ . . SJhJSS? stretch of dirt between Rosendale and Tillson. 
Milts* Potste 



Longer but much better than Route 232. 



0.0 0.0 ELLENVILLE, Canal & Main Sts. Go east on Main St., cross- 
ing iron bridge 0.2. Pass cemetery on left 0.9. 

2.0 2.0 Napanoch. Straight thru. Bear right at water-trough 2.2. 
2.3 0.3 Fork; bear left, 

3.5 • 1.2 End of road ; turn left across iron bridge. 

3.6 0.1 Wawarsing, 3-corners; bear slightly left. 

7.1 3.5 Fork; keep left. 

7.2 0.1 Kerhonkson. Straight thru. 

18.3 11.1 Right-hand road ; turn right. Cross long bridge 19.6. 
20.1 1.8 High Falls. Straight thru. 

22.3 2.2 Rosendale. Straight thru. 

22.8 0.5 Fork; bear right. 

23.1 0.3 8-corners; bear right across iron bridge. 

23.2 0.1 Right-hand road at church; turn right. Avoid left-hand road 

23.4, crossing RR just beyond. 
23.5 0.3 Tillson, left-hand road; turn left. 

23.9 0.4 Irregular 4-corners at store ; turn right. 

26.0 2.1 End of road, just beyond covered bridge; turn right. 

New Paltz City Map and Points of Interest, page 218. 

30.2 4.2 Fork; bear left onto Chestnut St. Thru 4-corners 31.3. 

31.4 1.2 NEW PALTZ, Chestnut & Main Sts. 

Route 234— Port Jervis to Goshen, N. Y.— 28.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Cuddebackville and Middletown. Asphalt -macadam all the way. 
Thru attractive farming and wooded country* 

Route 238 furnishes a popular and shorter option thru State Hill. 
^-MILEAGE-> 

Total SstweM F° r ti" s and other exits see City Map, page 221. 

Mileags Point* 

0.0 0.0 PORT JERVIS, Pike & Front Sts. Go northeast with trolley 

on Pike St. 
0.3 0.3 End of street at water trough; turn right away from trolley 

onto Main St. 
0.5 0.2 Kingston Ave. ; turn left. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 0.9. 
1.2 0.7 End of road; turn right Cross RRs 1.3-4.2. 
4.6 3.4 Huguenot, irregular 4-corners, P. O. on left. Bear left and 

immediately right. 

5.8 1.2 3-corners; bear left. 

6.9 1.1 Fork, in middle of downgrade; bear left. Bear left 7.0. 

7.8 0.9 Fork; bear right and immediately left across long iron bridge 

over Neversink river. 
8.5 0.7. Cuddebackville, fork at grass plot. Bear right. 

Left fork leads to Wurteboro. 

12.4 8.9 Otisville, end of road, just beyond U. S. A. General hospital. 

Turn left. 
12.5- 0.1 Right-hand road; turn right with macadam. 

Digitized by G00gk 



Port Jervis Section Page 225 Routes 235-2138 

14.5 2.0 Left-hand road; turn left. 

16.5 2.0 Fork; keep right with macadam. 

16.9 0.4 Fork; bear left with macadam. Cross RR 19.0, coming onto 
Monhagen Ave. Bear left onto Main St. 20.0. 

Middletown City Map and Points of Interest, page 129. 

20.2 3.3 End of street ; turn right onto Main St. Pass P. O. on left 20.3. 

20.4 0.2 Middletown, Main & North Sts. 

Left on North St is Route 86 to Blhghamton. 

Keep ahead with trolley on Main St. 

20.6 0.2 5-corners ; bear right with trolley onto Academy St. 

21.2 0.6 Irregular 4-corners; bear left with travel. Cross RR 21.6. 
22.6 1.4 3-corners ; bear left. Cross concrete bridge 22.7. 

24.3 1.7 Denton, diagonal 4-corners. Straight thru. Cross RRs 27.5- 

27.6-27.9-28.2-28.7. 

Goshen City Map and Points of Interest, page 126. 

28.8 4.5 GOSHEN, W. Main St., Church St. & Greenwich. 

Route 235-^Port Jervis to Newburgh, N. Y.— 44.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
r " ll,L mi£ E ~ > Via Slate Hill, Goshen and Campbell Hall. Asphalt- macadam to 

T«t»i SUSS!? Slate Hill, then 3.6 miles gravel: balance asphalt-macadam. 
MIImm PtSfito A ver y P re tty drive thru rolling farming country. 

0.0 0.0 PORT JERVIS. See Route 238 for directions to Goshen, 23.6 
miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 Goshen, W. Main St., Church St. & Greenwich Ave. at foun- 
tain. Keep ahead (east) on Main St. Cross RR 1.2. 

Diagonally right on Church St. is Route 238 to New York City. 

4.7 4.7 3-corners, just beyond RR underpass ; bear right. 

6.5 0.8 Campbell Hall, just beyond RR. Keep ahead. 

6.8 0.8 3-corners, just beyond iron bridge; bear left. Cross RR 8.2. 
8.3 '2.5 Buntside, end of road. Bear left. 

9.6 1.3 3-corners ; bear left over RR bridge. 

13.3 3.7 Little Britain, church on right. Straight thru, 
18.8 6.5 Left-hand diagonal road ; bear left onto Wisner Ave., passing 
large building on right. 

Newburgh City Map and Points of Interest, page 205. 

19.0 0.2 Broadway; turn right, joining trolley. 

20.5 1.5 NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand Ave., city hall on right. 

Route 238— Port Jervis to New York City, N. Y.— 77.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Tri* States, Slate Hill/ Goshen, Chester, Monroe, Harriman, Tuxedo, Suffern. 
Ramsey, Paramus road, Areola, Englewood and Dyckman St. Ferry. Asphalt-macadam 
to Slate Hill, then 3.5 miles gravel; balance asphalt-macadam. Summary: 73.8 miles 
asphalt-macadam; S.5 miles gravel. 

An attractive drive thru a pleasant rolling farming country to Harriman, thence 
following the picturesque valley of the Ramapo river to Suffern; balance thru suburban 
communities and intervening farm areas. The climb over the mountain from, Tri- States 
to South Centerville is very pretty, thru a wooded area 

This is the best connection between the above terminals. 

t*«i bSwwii For this and other exits see City Map, page 221. 

Mlltttt Ptleto 

0.0 0.0 PORT JERVIS, Front & Pike Sts., RR on right. Go south- 
east with trolley on Front St. 

0.1 0.1 Fork; bear right with trolley onto Jersey Ave. Thru 4-cor- 
ners where trolley leaves to left 0.2. Cross RR 0.7. 

0.9 0.8 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto Main St. 

1.2 0.3 Tri-States, irregular 4-corners just beyond bridge over Never- 
sink river. Keep ahead and at fork just beyond, bear right. 

1.5 0.3 Left-hand road; turn left across bridge, ascending long 

winding grade. 

6.6 5.1 End of road; turn left. 

6.8 0.2 Fork; bear right with macadam. 

10.0 3.2 Irregular 4-corners; bear right with macadam away from 
poles. 



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Route 240 Page 226 Port Jervis Section 

10.2 0.2 Fork; bear left with macadam. Pass church on left 10.8. 

11.3 1.1 South Centerville. Straight thru. Cross RR at sta. 13.8. 
13.9 2.6 Slate Hill. Straight thru. 

16.0 2.1 Fork; bear left. 

17.4 1.4 End of road; turn right. Thru New Hampton 19.1. 

Goshen City Map and Points of Interest, page 126. 

21.9 4.5 End of road; turn left. Cross RR 22.3-22.8-23.0-23.5. 

23.6 1.7 Goshen, W. Main St., Church St. & Greenwich Ave., at foun- 
tain. Bear right onto Church St. 
Avoid right-hand road 27.5. 

28.0 4.4 Chester, end of road. Turn right. 

28.3 0.3 Fork at open space; bear left along RR. Caution for right. 
a»d left curves under RR 28.7. 

34.0 5.7 Monroe,* at outskirts. Keep ahead. 

Left leads to center of town. 

34.2 0.2 Pork; bear left. Thru diagonal 4-corners 34.3. Avoid left- 
hand diagonal road 36.4. 

Diagonally left across RR leads to Central Valley. 

36.6 2.4 Harriman,* irregular 4-corners, store on left. Bear right. 

Left at 37.1 is Route 91 at mileage 8.2 to West Point and Route 88 
at mileage 40.2 to Newburgh. 

Pass Arden over to left 39.3. 

41.7 5.1 Southfield at flagpoles. Curve left along RR. 

42.7 1.0 Fork; left along RR. 

Right fork to 43.1 where turn left over bridge connects with Route 
90 at mileage 2.5 to Palisade Park. 

43.5 0.8 3-corners at open space; bear left. 

Tuxedo Golf Club on right 43.8. 

45.8 2.3 Tuxedo,* sta. on left. Straight thru and follow Route 201 

from mileage 26.1 balance of way (31.5 miles) to New. York 
City. 

Route 240— Port Jervis, N. Y., to Delaware Water Gap, Pa. 

—39.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Milford, Dingmans Ferry, Bushkill and Shawnee-on-the-Delaware. Concrete 
to Milford. Shale road with the exception of the last 7 miles gravel. 

A very pretty drive along the Delaware river, winding between the bluffs and river. 
Caution must be used on all curves as the road is very winding and rather narrow. 
Caution must also be used to get the proper turn at mileage 32.5 away from the main 
traveled route. 

Note (a) furnishes a better option from Bushkill via East Stroudsburg. 
,_*IILEAGE-> 

T«tai BtiwiM For this and other exits see City Map, page 221. 

MIImm Paints 

0.0 0.0 PORT JERVIS, N. Y. Pike & Front Sts. Go southwest on 
Pike St. across RRs. Gross long iron bridge over Delaware 

"Monroe, N. Y. (pop. 1,560, alt. 616 ft.), sit- Andrew Carnegie, one of pioneer telegra* 

uated in the heart of the lake region of phers on Penna. RR., was largest general 

Orange county and surrounded by pictur- contributor. Directors of Erie RR. have also 

esque mountains, was named in honor of erected memorial tablet to late E. H. Har- 

James Monroe, who achieved military dis- riman on east end of station, near under* 

tinction in the revolutionary war and who pass, and in partial sight from the road. The 

later become president of the United States. Harriman mansion is located on the top of 

•Harriman, N. Y. (pop. 680, alt. 558 ft.). the Ramapo mountains, east of the village. 

Just west of Erie RR. station is bronze *Tuxedo, N. Y., is a beautiful and exclusive 

tablet on stone foundation commemorating winter and summer resort, laid out by the 

first telegraphic message directing movement noted Pierre Lorillard. The park, which is 

of trains, sent 1851 by Charles Minot, then privately owned by the residents, is mag* 

Gen. Supt. N. Y. & Erie RR., to agent and nificently laid out with picturesque drives 

operator at Goshen. Pedestal hewn on Harri- around the lake. No admittance except by 

man estate and presented by Mrs. Harriman. letter from a resident. 



For List of Desirable * See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 




Port Jervis Section Page 227 



Route 240 



river 0.2 (toll 25c), coming on Pennsylvania Ave. 

0.4 0.4 Matamora, Pa.* Straight thru on Pennsylvania Ave. 

1.7 1.3 End of street at farm; bear left, using caution for curve wind- 
ing along bluffs. Caution for left curve across bridge 6.6. 

7.1 5.4 Milford,* Broad & Harford Sts., P. 0. on righ*> Turn left onto 
Harford St. two blocks. 

7.3 0.2 Mott St.; turn right. Caution for left curve upgrade just 
beyond iron bridge 7.5. Caution for sharp left curve across 
bridge 10.5 and again 12.0. Thru 4-corners 15.6. 
15.8 8.5 Dingmans Ferry, store and P. O. on left. Straight thru. 
24.1 8.3 Egypt Mills, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

27.5 3.4 Bushkill.* Straight thru across RR at sta. 

32.6 5.0 Caution — Fork; bear left across RR onto narrow gravel road. 

Right fork Is Note (a) at mileage 5.0 to Delaware Water Gap via 
East Stroudsburg. 

36.5 4.0 Shawnee-on-the-Delaware,* irregular 4-corners at assembly 

hall. Turn right across small iron bridge up steep grade. 
38.4 1.9 N. Water Gap, store on left. Straight thru across iron bridge. 

38.6 0.2 End of road; turn left. Cross RRs 38.7. 
39.1 0.5 End of road; turn left. 

Delaware Water Gap City Map and Points of Interest, page 114. 

39.6 0.5 End of road; meeting trolley, turn left across small bridge. 
39.8 0.2 DELAWARE WATER GAP, at green. 



Note (a) Route 240— Bushkill to Delaware Water Gap, 16.4 m. 

Reverse . Note (a) Route 6*. 

Via East Stroudsburg. Shale to Marshalls Creek: balance asphalt macadam. 
A pretty drive up the Delaware river valley, winding along foot of bluffs. 



•Matamoras, Pa. (pop. 2,000, alt. 800 ft.), it 
situated on the Delaware river in the foot- 
hills of the Blue Ridge mountains. It is at 
the intersection of three states— Pennsyl- 
vania, New York and New Jersey. It is a 
residential town with rio large industries. 
Matamoras was settled in 1730, while the 
American troops were fighting in Mexico, 
and was named for one of the Mexican cities 
captured by our soldiers. An old stone house, 
still in a good state of preservation, served 
9 as a fort during the revolution and before 
that in the Indian wars of 1755. There are 
excellent facilities here for boating, bathing, 
fishing and mountain climbing. 

•Milford, Pa. (pop. 872, alt. 469 ft.). The 
county seat of Pike county, situated in a 
portion of the Delaware valley noted for its 
beautiful and picturesque scenery. 

In the vicinity are the Sawkill falls and 
cliffs and three miles south are the pictur- 
esque falls of the Raymonds Kill. Near the 
village is a monument erected to Thomas 
Quick, one of the first settlers, who was 
killed by the Indians. His son, swearing 
vengeance, is said to have- killed ninety-nine 
savages in retaliation of his father's death. 

Interesting side trips may be taken to Bush- 
kill falls, Forest park and the Water gap. 

•Bushkill, Pa. (pop. 125, alt. 412 ft.), was 
settled in 1750 'by one Gonzales* who lies 
buried at Wurtsboro, the first man to have 



been buried in this county (Orange). Bush- 
kill falls, known as "The Niagara of Penn- 
sylvania," and Forest park are the town's 
chief attractions. 

•Shawnee-OB-Delaware, Pa. (pop. 200, alt. 
500 ft.), is a popular resort town located a 
few miles above the Delaware Water gap. 
The river is particularly scenic at this point. 
Buck wood park, lying across the river, in 
New Jersey, is one of the most important 
state reservations in the East. It abounds in 
deer and other wild animals and game birds, 
all of which are under the protection of the 
New Jersey fish and game commissioners. 
Buckwood lake, lying upon the top of the 
mountain, and the many peaks, cliffs and 
glens in the vicinity are very attractive to 
the lovers of nature. The town itself has 
much of historic interest, it being the oldest 
permanent settlement in Pennsylvania. It 
also boasts of the first stone dwelling in the 
state. Portions of this house, built in 1680, 
are still in a state of splendid preservation. 
Additions were made to the building in 1783. 
The house was fortified with a stockade and 
withstood numerous attacks of the red man. 
In the Wyoming massacre every white set- 
tler in the vicinity, excepting those who took 
refuge in the stone house, was slain. The 
Shawnee country club, while exclusive in its 
membership extends the privilege of the 
course to visitors properly introduced. 



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Route 242 Page 228 Port Jervis Section 

The following note furnishes an option to the regular route between Bushklll and 
Delaware Water Gap. 
0.0 0.0 BU8HKILL. Go south across RR at eta. 

6.0 6.0 Fork at RR; bear right along same. Cross RR 34.8. 

7.1 2.6 Marshall! Creek, P. O. on right. Straight thru. Avoid right-hand road 11.1. 

Cross RR 11.8, joining trolley. 
12.4 4.8 Irregular 4-corners; jog left and immediately right with trolley onto Crystal St. 
12.6 0.1 East Stroudsburg* Crystal & Washington Sts., trolley leaves to right. Keep 

ahead on Crystal St 
12.8 0.3 End of street; turn left over RR bridge. 

13.0 0.2 End of road; turn right. 

13.1 0.1 4-corners; turn left with travel. 

Straight ahead before this turn is option to Delaware Water Gap. 

13.6 0.4 End of road; turn right. 

13.7 0.2 4-corners; turn left. 

14.6 0.8 Caution — 4-corners; turn sharp right around hill. Avoid left-hand road 16.2. 

Delaware Water Gap City Map and Points of Interest, page 114. 

16.2 1.7 End of road; turn left across small iron bridge. 
16.4 0.2 DELAWARE WATER GAP, store on right. 

Route 242 — Delaware Water Gap to Scranton, Pa. — 50.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Stroudsburg, Bartonsville, Swiftwater, Mt. Pocono, Moscow and Elmhurst. Prac- 
tically all hard surfaced road. Some short sections may be under 1 construction during 
1»21. 

Road winds thru a hilly country to Tannersville; then commences gradual ascent of 
Pocono mountains, reaching summit at Mt. Pocono. From here road winds thru a 
sparsely settled, practically level, wooded section to Moscow; then thru a hilly country. 
^- MILEAGE-^ 

Total Bvtwtra For this and other exits see City Map, page 114. 

Mileage Point* 

0.0 0.0 DELAWARE WATER GAP, at green. Go west downgrade. 

0.3 0.3 Fork, just beyond small iron bridge. Bear right. 

0.7 0.4 Right-hand road; turn right with macadam, curving left with 

road immediately beyond. Cross RR 1.1. Avoid right-hand 

road 1.2. 
1.9 1.2 4-corners; turn sharp left upgrade. 
2.7 0.8 4-corners; turn right downgrade. 
2.9 0.2 Left-hand road in middle of grade; turn left. 

3.3 0.4 E. Stroudsburg, 4-corners, school on right. Turn right. 

3.4 0.1 Left-hand street; turn left onto Ridgeway St. 

3.6 0.2 3-corners, just beyond RR bridge;, bear left. 

3.7 0.1 Fork, small green in center; bear left onto Brown St. Bear 

left across long iron bridge onto Main St. 3.9, joining trolley. 
Cross RR 4.2. 

4.4 0.7 5-corners; bear right with trolley — still on Main St. 

4.6 0.2 Stroudsburg, Main & 7th Sts., bank on left. Keep ahead with 

trolley on Main St. 

4.8 0.2 9th St.; turn right away from trolley. Thru irregular 4-cor- 

ners 4.9. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 5.6. Caution for 
sharp right curve upgrade 7.6. 

8.5 3.7 Fork; bear right upgrade. 

9.7 1.2 Bartonsville, end of road. Turn right, passing P. O. on right. 

12.7 3.0 Fork; bear left. 

12.8 0.1 Tannersville, P. O. on right. Bear right. Thru Scrotrun 14.7. 

15.3 2.5 Fork; bear right. 

17.0 1.7 Swiftwater, store on right, just beyond small iron bridge. 

Keep ahead. 

17.1 0.1 Fork; bear right upgrade. 

Left fork leads to Pocono Manor to Pocono lake and Wilkes- Barre. 

Cross RR at sta. 19.1. 

19.2 2.1 Mt. Pocono,* fork. Bear left. 

19.7 0.5 Fork of three roads; straight thru on middle road. 

Left leads to Pocono Summit. 

Bear left under RR 23.3 and immediately right. Avoid right- 
hand road at school 24.3. Thru Tobyhanna 24.6. Thru Mos- 
cow 37.7. 

41.2 21.5 Elmhurst, sta. ahead. Bear right over RR bridge onto con- 
crete. 

47.7 6.5 Fork; bear left with trolley on Brinker St. 

•Mount Pocono, Pa. (pop. 750. alt. 1.650 ft.). did fishing, hunting and other outdoor sports, 
is a popular summer resort offering splen- 



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Port Jervis Section Page 229 Route 243 

47.9 0.2 4-corners ; bear left with trolley onto Blakely St. Bear right 

with trolley acress RR 48.4. 
48.9 1.0 5-corners; bear left away from trolley onto Clay Ave. 
49.8 0.9 4-corners ; turn right onto Linden St. Jog left and right, still 

on Linden St. 49.9. Cross trolley at 4-corners 50.0. 
50.4 0.6 SCRANTON, Linden St. & Wyoming Ave. 

Route 243— Scranton, Pa., to Binghamton, N. Y. — 64.6 m. 

For Accommodations -see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Reverse Route 667. 

Via Dalton, Factoryvllle, New Milford and Hallstead. Macadam first IS miles, then 

alternating stretches of dirt, gravelly dirt and gravel to Hallstead; balance macadam- 

^-MILEAGE-^ The route winds up a gorge to Clark's Summit, then thru rolling 

. 5jf*T*y farming country to Hallstead; balance of the way along the Susque- 

Mlteae* pSSST hanna valley thru farming district. 

0.0 0.0 SCRANTON, Wyoming Ave. &' Spruce St., at banks. Go north- 



POINTS OF INTEREST, SCRANTON, PA. 
Scranton (pop. 148,000, alt. 800-1,800 ft.) is ing just how coal is mined. Here also is 
the center of one of the greatest anthracite located the Everhart museum of natural his- 
regions in the United States. Within a ra- tory containing one of the best bird and rep- 
dius of ten miles of the city there is mined tile exhibits in the world and the Battleship 
22,000,000 tons of coal annually. It ranks Maine memorial. At Archbald, a few miles 
second at a silk manufacturing city, has the north of Scranton, is the "pothole" formed 
largest button mill in the country and one of in the solid rock— a relic of the glacial period 
the "largest lace mills, beside various other and one of its most interesting evidences, 
thriving manufacturing plants. It is also The Scranton Public library is looked upon 
the home of the International correspondence as one of the most perfect specimens of 
schools, which have instructed by mail dur- Gothic architecture in the United States, 
ing the past twenty years more than 2,250,000 Historically, the city is best known through 
persons in every quarter of the globe. This the Wyoming massacre of July 3, 1778, corn- 
institution is open to visitors daily from 10:00 memorated by a monument erected on the 
A. M. until 4:00 P. M. In the Nay Aug park spot where took place the terrible butchery 
may k* f tea a model anthracite mine, show- 12 miles south of the city. 

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Route 243 Page 230 Port Jervis Section 

east on Wyoming Ave. Cross RRs 0.5-1.0. Thru irregular 

4-corners at end of double drive 1.4. 
1.5 1.5 Green Ridge St., large stone church on far left; turn left. 

Cross RRs 2.0. 
2.5 1.0 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto N. Main Ave. 

2.8 0.3 Providence Square, N. Main Ave. & Market St., at banks. 

Turn sharp left with branch trolley onto W. Market St. dp- 
grade. Cross RR 3.7. Thru Chinchilla 5.9. 

7.9 5.1 Clarks Summit, fork. Keep right with trolley. Avoid right- 

hand road 8.5, crossing RR bridge immediately beyond. 

10.0 2.1 Right-hand road; turn right, avoid right-hand diagonal road 

just beyond. 
10.3 0.3 Left-hand road ; turn left across stone bridge thru Glenburn. 
11.5 1.2 Dalton, irregular 4-corners at store. Bear right. 

13.5 2.0 La Plume, end of road at store. Turn left. 

15.3 1.8 Factoryville. Straight thru. 

19.6 4.3 Right-hand road; turn right across small wooden bridge. 

20.4 0.8 Nicholson,* 4-corners, just beyond iron bridge. Turn left. 

Cross RR 20.9. 

21.1 0.7 Fork at top of grade; bear right downgrade. 

26.5 5.4 Foster (business center to right). Straight thru. 

30.5 4.0 Brooklyn (business center to right). Straight thru. 

32.4 1.9 Right-hand road, barn on right; turn right. Thru diagonal 
4-corners 36.5. 

88.6 6.2 Heart Lake, at sta. Straight thru across RR. 

89.0 0.4 End of road; turn right downgrade. 
41.3 2.3 Fork; keep right downgrade. 

42.8 1.5 New Milford, 4-corners. Turn left. 

49.1 6.3 Hallstead.* Straight thru across long iron bridge over Sub* 

quehanna river. Cross RRs 49.6. 

49.7 0.6 Great Bend, Pa. Straight thru on Main St. Cross RRs 61.4- 

54.1. 

55.2 5.5 Kirkwood, N. Y. Straight thru. 

59.6 4.4 3-corners; bear left across concrete bridge. 

Blnghamton City Map and Points of Interest, page 484. 

64.6 5.0 BINGHAMTON, Court & Chenango Sts., court house on left. 

'Nicholson, Pa. (pop. 900, alt. 767 ft.). Tunk- upon which the solid concrete surface of the 

hannock viaduct, located here, is by several viaduct is carried. 

times the largest concrete bridge in the 'Hallstead, Pa. (pop. 1,538, alt. 1,000 ft.) On 

world. Its length is 2,375 ft.; height above the north side of the river the Tuscarora 

surface of stream, 240 ft.; height from bed Indian village once stood and it is no un- 

rock, 300 ft. It contains approximately 167,000 usual thing today to plow up Indian relics on 

cubic yards of concrete and 2,280,000 lbs. of the surrounding farms. The famous "three 

reinforced steel. All the foundations were apple trees" grew at the north end of the 

carried to solid rock. Two of the piers re- bridge crossing the river. This spot was the 

quired an excavation of 95 ft. in depth from rallying place for the Indians and here also 

the ground surface, while the excavation for 1,600 revolutionary soldiers encamped on their 

the piers in the bottom of the valley were way to join General Sullivan's army in the 

carried thru sand, gravel and boulders to a campaign against the Indians and Tories, who 

depth of 60 ft. below the water level. were devastating this section. 

This viaduct carries the double tracks of Several important glass and chair factories 

the main line of the Lackawanna railroad are located here. The Hallstead Blue Stone 

from mountain to mountain across the valley Co. owns and operates one of the country's 

of Tunkhannock creek. It is constructed en- finest quarries. Also operating here are the 

tirely of reinforced concrete, and consists of only makers of chamois manufactured ac- 

ten spans of 180 ft. each and two spans of cording to French process of tanning. Nu- 

100 ft. each. The large arches or spans are merous scenic drives over good roads may be 

surmounted by small superimposed arches, taken to nearby mountains and lakes. 




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Port Jervis Section Page 231 Route 245 

Route 245— Dingmans Ferry, Pa., to New York City, N. Y. 

—70.1m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Branch vllle, Franklin, Newfoundland, Pompton, Paterson, Areola, Teaneck, 
Englewood and Dyckman St. Ferry. First 14 miles macadam; then 9 miles dirt; balance 
macadam, asphalt-macadam and brick. 

Thru slightly hilly farming country and attractive suburban sections. From New- 
s' MILE AG E-> foundland to Butler the route follows a picturesque river, valley used as 
t^«i BJ5£y,°* P art °* tne Paterson reservoir system. 
Miles** Potato" Route 248 furnishes a better option via Montclair. 

0.0 0.0 DINGMAN'S FERRY, PA^ P. 0. on right. Go east. 
0.6 0.6 Cross long iron toll bridge over Delaware river (Pennsyl- 
vania-New Jersey state line). 

Charges — runabouts, 30c; touring cars, 40c. 

3.5 2.9 Layton, N. J., end of rod. Turn left. Avoid left-hand diag- 
onal road at school 3.7. Pass Culver lake on left 8.4. 

11.5 8.0 Branchville, open space at bank. Keep ahead, bearing left of 
water trough. Cross RR 11.7-13.4. Thru 4-corners 14.3. 

16.4 4.9 Lafayette. Straight thru. 

17.2 0.8 Irregular 4-corners ; turn left away from poles. 

20.3 3.1 Monroe. Straight thru. Curve left across RR 21.2. 

22.2 1.9 ^-corners ; bear right, passing church on left. 

23.7 1.5 3-corners; bear rigfct under RR. Cross RR 23.8. 

23.9 0.2 Franklin, Main & Church Sts., stone church on right. Keep 

ahead , on Main St. 
24.0 0.1 Right-hand diagonal street; bear right onto Church St. Avoid 

right-hand diagonal road 24.2. 

24.3 0.3 4-corners; bear left. Avoid left-hand road 24.5. 

24.8 0.5 End of street; turn right onto Rutherford Ave. 

Left on Rutherford Ave. is Route 71 to Mlddletown. 

25.3 0.5 Left-hand road, jtfst beyond RR; turn left upgrade. 

27.0 1.7 Beaver Lake. Straight thru over RR bridge. Cross RRs 29.1- 
30.2. 

30.4 3.4 Stockholm, end of road. Turn right. 

30.5 0.1 Fork; bear right with asphalt macadam. 

33.4 2.9 Fork; bear left over RR bridge. 
35.3 1.9 Fork, school over to left; bear right. 

35.8 0.5 Newfoundland, sta. over to right. Straight thru along RR. 

Cross RR 37.2. Cross RR at Smiths Mills 41.4. Gross RR 

41.8.. 
42.8 7.0 Butler, store on left. Straight thru. 

43.5 0.7 Bloomingdale, 3-corners. Bear left. Cross RR 44.7. Avoid 

right-hand diagonal road 45.1. Cross RR at Pompton Sta. 
45.4. Avoid left-hand road at church 45.7. 

Left at 45.7 is Route 81 at mileage 1.1 to Greenwood Lake. 

46.0 2.5 Pompton Lakes,* diagonal 4-corners, green with cannon in 

center on left. Bear right. 
46.8 0.8 Pompton, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

Left is Route 72 to Haverstraw. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 47.6. 

Diagonally right at 49.6 is Route 208 at mileage 26.0 to Montclair. 

•Pompton Lakes, N. J. (pop. 2,500, alt. 202 of tke Ryerson furnace, where the chain 

ft.), is one of the oldest towns in New Jer- thrown across the Hudson river at West 

sey. Settled by the Dutch in 1682. Two of Point to prevent the British from going up 

the houses built at that time, the Schuyler the river, was forged. Other points of in- 

and Outwater homesteads, are still occupied. terest are Federal Rock, used by Washington 

The town gets its Indian name, meaning as a signal station between Morristown and 

"Meeting Waters," from its location at the Newburgh, and "Windbeam Mountain," the 

conflux of the Ramapo, Wanaque, and Pequan- land first seen by mariners entering the port 

nock rivers. During revolutionary days of New York. The Maine memorial monn- 

Pompton was noted for its iron furnaces, ment stands on the site of Washington's 

where the iron ore from the Ring wood mines former headquarters in Federal square. It 

was smelted into cannon balls and carried by was erected by the town in memory of two of 

ox teams over mountain trails to West its boys who went down with the battlesh 

Point. Near the Brookside inn are the ruins Maine. 



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rr 



Iterate 24fc Page 282 Port Jervis Section 

62.2 5.4 Irregular 4-corners ; bear left. 
68.8 s ' 1.1 Fork; bear right. 

68.4 0.1 End of road ; meeting trolley, turn right onto Belmont Ave. 

64.5 1.1 End of street; meeting cross-trolley, turn left onto Hamburg 

Ave. Same thorof are becomes West St. 

55.0 0.5 Paterson,* West St., Broadway & Main St. Bear left with 

trolley onto Broadway. Cross RRs 55.2-55.9. Cross bridge 
over Passaic river 67.1. 

North Jersey Country Club on right 67.4. 

58.2 3.2 Warren Point, P. 0. on left. Straight thru across trolley. 

59.1 0.9 Fork, sign in center; bear right. i 

69.4 0.3 8-corners ; be&r left across bridge. 

69.5 0.1 Areola,* end of road. Turn right. Cross trolley at Areola 

Sta.69.9. Thru. Rochelle Park 60.9. 

61.6 2.1 Maywood, Passaic St. & Maywood Ave. Straight thru on 

Passaic St. Cross RR 62.8. 

Hackensack City Map and Points of Interest, page 134. 

62.9 1.3 Hackensack, Passaic & Union Sts., sign on right. 

Straight ahead leads to center of town. 

Turn left onto Union St. 

63.0 0.1 End of street, stone church on right; turn right onto Ander- 
son St, Cross trolley 63.1. Cross bridge over Hackensack 
river 63.2. Cross RR 64.2. # 

66.0 2.0 Irregular 4-corners ; bear left. 

65.7 0.7 Teaneck, right-hand street, school on left. Turn right onto 

Forest Ave. 

66.3 0.6 Left-hand street; turn left onto Lafayette Ave. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 105 to New York. 

Curve right onto Englewood Ave. 66.9. 

67.0 0.7 Fork; bear left. 

67.2 0.2 5-corners, school over to left; bear right onto Palisade Ave. 

Cross RR and trolley 67.5. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

67.6 0.4 Englewood, N. J., Palisade, Engle & Grand Aves., bank on left. 

Right on Grand Ave. is Route 203 to New York. 

Straight thru on Palisade Ave. 

Right on Lemoine Ave. 69.0 is Route 205 to New York. 

Descend long winding grade 69.2. 

69.4 1.8 8-corners in middle of downgrade; bear right. 

70.1 0.7 Englewood-Dyckman St. Ferry across Hudson river. 

Rates — 20-30c, car and driver; passengers 5c each. Service every 
fifteen minutes, 5 A. M. to 11 P. M.; Saturdays, -Sundays and holi- 
days, 5 A. M. to midnight. 

704 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Dyckman St., at ferry landing. 

Route 248— Dingmans Ferry, Pa., to Newark, N. J.— 67.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Branchvllle, Newton, Dover, Denville, Parsippany, Caldwell, Montclair, Bloom- 
field Ave. Macadam and pavement all the way. 

Thru farming and residential districts to Montclair; balance over city streets. 
/-MILCAeE-t Route 245 offers an option via Paterson, but the following 

▼«*-i 22~S? route is the best connection between Dingman's Ferry and 

mhSm pSSST Ncw York Clt y- 

0.0 0.0 DINGMANS FERRY, PA., P. O. on right. Go east. Cross 
long iron toll bridge over Delaware river 0.6. 

Charges — runabouts, 30c; touring cars, 40c. 

•» 4 # Paterson, N. J. (pop. 136,000, alt. 100 ft.), of Ncw York the hills surrounding Pat- 
is the most important silk manufacturing erson were occupied by Washington's army, 
city in the United States. It also has various Garret and Preakness mountains afford splen- 
qther thriving and important manufactories. d * d views . from their summits. The falls of 
This city was originally settled thru a grant *« ^ t ssaic are another interesting feature of 
to Alexander Hamilton and his associates, # ^£ N j ^ ^ princH>al| 
known as the Society of Useful Manufactures, owncd by and wa8 thc fcome o| thc Ute Mf 
whose object was the industrial emancipa- Easton, president of the Columbia Grapho- 
tion of the United States from Europe. This phone Co. The picturesque waterwheel, 
society still exists and is actively engaged which may be viewed here, is one of Jersey's 
in business. During the British occupation old Dutch relics. 



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Fort Jervis Section Page 233 Route 248 

3.5 3.5 Layton, N. J., end of road. Turn left. Avoid left-hand diag- 
onal road at school 8.7. Pass Culver lake on left 8.4. 

11.5 8.0 Branch ville, open space at bank. Keep ahead; bearing left of 
water trough. Cross RR 11.7 and at Augusta 13.4. 

14.3 2.8 4-corners; turn right. 

Cross RRs 14.5-16.5. Same thorofare becomes Water St. 

19.2 4.9 End of street; turn left upgrade onto Spring St. 

19.3 U.l Newton, Spring & Main Sts., at far side of park. Turn right 

onto Main St. 
19.8 0.5 Fork, water trough in center; bear left. Avoid right-hand 

road 23.2. Cross RRs 24.1-24.3. 
25.2 5.4 Andover, fork, church in center. Keep left. 

31.5 6.3 Stanhope, irregular 4-corners at stores. Turn left. 

31.8 0.3 End of road; turn right across bridge. 

31.9 0.1 Netcong, fork at outskirts. Keep left. Thru diagonal 4- 

corners 32.1. 

84.2 2.3 End of road; turn right with trolley. 

35.3 1.1 Ledgewood, left-hand diagonal road. Bear left away from 

trolley. 

Left at 35.8 is Route Note '(a) Route 70 at mileage 4.ft to Lake 
Hopatcong. 

Cross RR 36.4. 

36.6 1.3 Kenvil, diagonal 4-corners, store on right. 

„ Straight thru, joining trolley. Cross RRs 36.9-37.0. 

88.2 1.6 Mine Hill, church on left. Straight thru with trolley. Sami 

thorofare becomes W. Blackwell St. 

40.4 2.2 Dover, W. Blackwell & Sussex Sts., store on right. 

Point* of Interest, page 117. 

Straight thru with trolley on W. Blackwell St. 

43.6 3.2 3-corners at open square ; bear right with trolley. Cross RR 

48.8. 
44.1 0.5 Rockaway. Straight thru across RR at sta. 

Points of Interest, page 117. 

46.7 1.6 Denville, fork. Bear left with trolley. Cross trolley 46.3. 

Avoid left-hand road 47.3. Cross RR 47.4. 

49.1 3.4 Parsippany, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Avoid right-hand road at Boonton reservoir 49.4. 

Right at 49.4 is Route 67 at mileage 27.5 to Morrlstown. 

53.3 4.2 Pine°ftrook. Straight thru. 

66.2 2.9 Irregular 4-corners, just beyond brick school; bear right 

upgrade. Same thorofare becomes Bloomfield Ave. 

57.3 1.1 Caldwell, Bloomfield & Roseland Aves., bank on left. 

Points of Interest, page 117. - •* • 

Straight thru with trolley on Bloomfield Ave. 
59.1 1.8 Verona, bank on left. Straight thru with trollev on Bloom- 
field road. 

Diagonally left on Glenridge Ave. is Route 254 to New York City, 

Pass municipal building on left 60.8. 

Left on Valley road is Route 73 to Paterson. 

61.0 1.9 Montclair, Bloomfield Ave., Church St. & Glenridge Ave. 

Points of Interest, page 214. 

Straight thru with trolley on Bloomfield Ave. 

62.1 1.1 Glen Ridge, sta. on right. Straight thru with trolley. 

62.7 0.6 Bloomfield, Bloomfield & Glenwood Aves. Straight thru with . 
trolley. Cross RR at Bloomfield Ave. sta. 64.3. Bear right 
onto Belleville Ave. 65.8. 

66.1 3.4 End of road; turn right with trolley onto Broad St. 

Newark City Map, page 100. 

66.2 t 0.1 Fork; bear left with branch trolley under BR — still on BroA* 

St. Avoid right-hand diagonal street 66.4, passing Washing- 
ton park on right. 

66.7 0.5 Fork; bear right with branch trolley— still on Broad St. 

67.2 0.5 NEWARK, Broad & Market Sts. 

Left on Market St. is Route 65 to New York. 

Digitized by VjOOvIC 



r, 



Rbute 250 Page 234 Port Jervis Section 

Route 250 — Delaware Water Gap, Pa., to Newark, N. J. 

—69.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Delaware, Hackettstown, Chester, Mendham, Morristown, Madison, Springfield. 
First 5.0 miles macadam, then 7.0 miles gravel, balance asphalt and macadam. 

The road follows the Delaware river to Delaware, a very pretty drive, somewhat roll- 
ing and hilly. From Bridgeville' to Great Meadow It parallels the Pequest river thru 
wooded valley, then thru farming country to Morristown and country residential and 
suburban district to Newark. 

T«ai bSSSSm For tnis and ° tner exits see Cit y Ma P» P a ^ e 114 * 

MIlMf* Ptlatt 

0.0 0.0 DELAWARE WATER GAP, at small green. Go southeast 
with trolley. 

8.5 8.5 Slateford, P. 0. on left. Straight thru with trolley. Cross 
RR 5.1. 

5.2 1.7 Portland, Pa. Straight thru with trolley along RR. Cross 
RR 5.4-5.6-5.7. 

7.1 1.9 Left-hand diagonal road, just beyond small bridge; bear left. 
Cross long iron bridge over Delaware river, Pennsylvania- 
New Jersey state line,. 7.8 — toll 25c. 

8.8 1.2 End of road; turn left under RR. 

8.4 0.1 Delaware, N. J., end of road, church on left. Turn right. 

8.9 0.5 End of road; turn right under RR and take left-hand road 

immediately beyond. Thru diagonal 4-corners 12.0. 
12.2 8.8 End of road; turn left. 

14.0 1.8 Bridgeville. Straight thru. 

15.2 1.2 Buttzville, irregular 4-corners. Bear left. 

21.6 6.4 Great Meadow, wooden church on right. Straight thru. Cross 

RR 21.8. 
22.2 0.6 8-corners; bear right. 

22.8 0.6 Vienna, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

25.2 2.4 Fork, just beyond small iron bridge ; bear left with macadam. 
Same thorofare becomes Hope St. Cross RR at sta. 26.6. 

26.7 1.5 Hackettstown, Hope St., Grand Ave., High & Main Sts. Keep 

ahead onto Main St. 

Points of Interest, page 113. 

27.1 0.4 Fork, soldiers' monument in center; bear right onto Mountain 

Ave. Avoid right-hand diagonal road 28.1. * 
30.7 8.6 Schooleys. Straight thru. Caution for sharp left curve down- 
grade 82.6. Cross RR at sta. 83.0. 

88.2 2.6 Long Valley (formerly German Valley), irregular 4-corners. 

Turn left. Cross RR 37.4. 

37.9 4.7 Chester, 6-corners at stores. Straight thru. 

38.6 0.7 5-corners; turn right with travel. 

43.5 4.9 Mendham, traffic lamp in center. Straight thru. 

44.4 0.9 Fork; bear right. Same thorofare becomes Washington St. 

50.3 5.9 Morristown, Washington & Market Sts., park on left. Keep 

ahead (east) onto South St. 
51.1 0.8 Fork; bear left onto Madison Ave. 
61.9 0.8 Fork, lamp post in center; bear right. 
58.9 2.0 8-corners; bear left. 

64.7 0.8 Fork; bear left under RR. 

54.8 0.1 Fork; bear right, joining trolley. 

55.0 0.2 Madison, bank on right. Straight thru with trolley. 

67.1 2.1 Chatham, drug store on left. Straight thru with trolley. 

59.2 21 Brantwood. Straight thru. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 

60.6. 

61.6 2.4 Springfield, church on left. Keep ahead with trolley. 

61.7 0.1 Fork; bear left away from trolley. 

Right fork is Route 253 at mileage 11.4 to New York City. 

68.5 1.8 Vauxhall. Straight thru, joining trolley. 

66.1 2.6 6-corners at bank; bear right with branch trolley onto Clin- 
ton Ave. 



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Port Jervis Section Page 235 Route 253 

67.9 1.8 Fork; bear left with trolley across RR — still on Clinton Ave. 

Newark City Map, page 100. 

68.6 0.7 Left-hand diagonal street, church on right; bear left away 

from trolley onto High St. 
69.5 0.9 Diagonal 4-corners, bank on left; meeting trolley, bear right, 

onto Springfield St. Bear right onto Market St. 69.6. 
69.9 0.4 NEWARK, Market & Broad Sts. 

Straight ahead on Market St. is Route 65 to New York. 

Route 253— Morristown, N. J„ to New York City, N. Y<— 

26.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Madison, Springfield, Elizabeth, Howland Hook, Staten Island and St. George. 
Pavement and asphalt macadam all the way. 

Thru suburban and country residential districts, then along the north shore of Staten 
Island, past many shipyards and manufacturing plants; a very attractive drive and a 
very good connection. 

Route 254 furnishes an excellent option via Montclair and 42nd St. Ferry. 
^MILEAGE-* 

Total BotwoM For this and other exits see City IVtap, page 113. 

Mlltoto Polite 

0.0 0.0 MORRISTOWN. South & Market Sts.. Dark on left. 60 east 



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Route 254 Page 236 Port Jervis Section 

21.4 1.6 Mariners Harbor, just beyond switch, bank on right. Straight 

thru on Richmond terrace. 
22.9 1.5 Port Richmond, irregular 4-corners, bank on right. 

Points of Interest, page 110. 

Straight thru with trolley on Richmond terrace, avoiding left- 
hand road just beyond. 

Left-hand road leads to Bergen Ferry. 

Cross RR at Port Richmond Sta. 23.0. 
28.1 0.2 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left with branch trolley on 
Richmond terrace. 

24.4 1.3 Right-hand road; turn right away from trolley onto Davis 

Ave. and immediately left onto Delafield place. Same thoro- 
f are becomes Richmond terrace 24.6. 

Sailors' Snug Harbor on right 24.9. 

26.7 1.3 New Brighton, sta. on left. Straight thru with trolley. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

26.6 0.9 St. George, irregular 4-corners at statue, borough hall on right. 

Turn sharp left away from trolley over RR bridge. 
26.9 0.3 Staten Island Ferry. 

... Ferriage, 60c, car and driver; passengers, 6c each; service, 15 to SO 

'**'*' minutes; running time, 22 minutes. '- 

26.9 0.0 NEW YORK CITY, Battery Park, at ferry landing. 

Route 254— Morristown, N. J., to New York City, N. Y.— 

34.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of ,Book. 

Via Morris Plains, Parsippany, Caldwell, Montclalr, Bloomfield, Belleville turnpike, 
Jersey City and Weehawken. Macadam and pavement all the way. 

Thru rolling farming country and residential districts to Montclalr; balance over 
city streets practically all the way. 

■ On account of the very rough condition of John St. and Newark Ave., motorists are 
advised to use Route 248 from Montclalr to Newark and then Route 65 to New York. 
r-MILEAGE-^ 

Total SthvM? For this and other exits see City Map, page 113. 

Ml lew Points 

0.0 0.0 MORRISTOWN, Park PL, Washington & Bank Sts., bank on 

left. Go north with trolley along park. 
0.1 0.1 Irregular 4-corners; bear left with trolley onto Speedwell 

Ave. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 0.5. 

2.3 2.2 Morris Plains, fork, sta. on right. Bear right away from 

trolley. 

2.4 0.1 Fork, just beyond RR underpass; bear right. 
2.9 0.5 Forest Park. Straight thru. 

v 6.6 3.6 Parsippany, edge of town. Straight thru. f> 

7.0 0.5 End of road at reservoir; turn right. 

10.9 3.9 Pine Brook. Straight thru. 

13.8 2.9 Irregular 4-corners, just beyond brick school ; bear right up- 

grade. Same thorof are becomes Bloomfield Ave. 

14.9 1.1 Caldwell, Bloomfield & Roseland Aves., bank on left. Straight 

thru with trolley on Bloomfield Ave. 

16.7 1.8 Verona, bank on left. Straight thru with trolley on Bloom- 

field road. 

Pass municipal building on left 18.4. 

Left on Valley road is Route 73 to Nyack. 

18.6 1.9 Montclair, Bloomfield Ave., Church St. & Glenridge Ave. 

Points of Interest, page 214. 

Bear left (east) onto Glenridge Ave. 

Straight ahead on Bloomfield Ave. is Route 248 to New York. 

19.5 0.9 Left-hand diagonal street; bear left v onto Belleville Ave. 

20.1 0.6 Bloomfield, Broad St. & Belleville Ave., school on right 
Straight thru on Belleville Ave. Same thorof are becomes 
John St. 

22.7 2.6 Washington Ave., town hall on left; meeting trolley, turn left. 

22.8 0.1 Belleville, Washington Ave. & Rutgers St. Turn right away 

from trolley onto Utitgers St. Cross RR 23.0. Cross iron 
bridge over Passaic river 23.1, going thru 4-corners just 



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Port Jervis Section Page 237 Routes 257r?58 

beyond, onto Belleville turnpike. Gross RRs 25.4-26.0-26.8. 

27.0 4.2 End of road, just beyond trolley; turn left onto Newark turn- 
pike. Same thorofare becomes Newark Ave. Cross KR 28.9. 

29.2 2.2 Jersey City, Newark Ave. & Hudson County Blvd. - \{ 
Turn left away from trolley onto Hudson County Blvd. 

33.2 4.0 North Bergen, Hudson Cgunty Blvd. & 3rd St. Turn right 
onto 3rd St. Jog left and right across trolley 33.4. 

33.9 0.7 End of street; turn left and immediately right downgrade. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-99. 

34.5 0.6 Weehawken, N. J., at ferry. Take ferry across Hudson river. 

34.6 NEW YORK CITY, W. 42nd St. at ferry landing. 

Route 257— Port Jervis to Monticello, N. Y.— 23.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Sparrow Bush and Rio. First 10 miles macadam, then 4 miles of gravelly dis- 
balance gravel. 

A very pretty trip along: a ridge, winding: and rolling:, with fine views of the distant 
Catskills. 

Tftai BttwM* For this and other exits see City Map, page 221. 

Mfaagt Points 

0.0 0.0 PORT JERVIS, Pike & Front Sts., at RRs. Go east with 

trolley on Pike St. 
0.3 0.3 Main St. at k water-trough ; turn left with trolley. 
0.4 0.1 End of street; turn left with trolley. 
0.8 0.4 3-corners at RR yard ; bear right away from trolley. 
2.9 2.1 Sparrow Bush. Straight thru. 

3.4 0.5 Right-hand road ; turn right up long winding grade. 
9.6 6.2 Rio, fork, P. O. on left. Bear right. 
22.9 13.3 End of road; turn right downgrade, onto Broadway. 

Left at monument 23.0 is Route 86 to Bfnghamton, \ 

23 A 0.5 MONTICELLO, court house on left. . . [ 

Points of Interest, page 130. -if ' 

Straight ahead is Route 659 to Goshen. 

Route 258^Iiberty to Shandaken, N. Y.^9.7 m. j 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. ? 

A ' north and south connecting route thru the lower Catskills (via Clarjrville). 
The road is rough and narrow, but the trip is one of extreme beauty and presents 
no danger to the. careful motorist. The road is not impassable at any time, but is 
^-mileage— N stony, rough and hilly. There is a very steep grade over Slide moun- 
SSXL * tain, which is long and arduous, but should not cause any difficulty 
Tftai Bfiwten with the modern automobile. 



0.0 0.0 LIBERTY, Main & Chestnut Sts. Go south on Main St. J 

0.3 0.3 Left-hand road, turn left across iron bridge. 

1.2 0.9 Fork, bear right upgrade. 

1.6 0.4 Fork, bear left with travel upgrade. { 

1.9 0.3 End of road, turn left. 

2.9 1.0 Right-hand road; turn right. Pass Bradley P. O. on left 3.9. 

5.8 2.9 Right-hand road, turn right across covered bridge. \ 
7.0 12 Neversink. P. O. on right. Bear left. 

7.3 0.3 Left-hand road beyond iron bridge, turn left. 

7.4 0.1 Fork, keep right. 

7.9 0.5 Fork, keep right. 

11.5 3.6 Left-hand road, turn left upgrade. 

J3.0 1.5 End of road ; turn right. 

16.0 3.0 Claryville, left-hand road. Turn left across wooden bridge. 

16.3 0.3 Right-hand road, just beyond long iron bridge; turn right. 

17.4 1.1 Fork, keep right. Thru Frost Valley 23.0. 

36.5 19.1 Big Indian, sta. on left. Straight thru. Cross RR 36.8. 

37.1 0.6 End of road; turn right. 

39.7 ?.6 SHANDAKEN, 3-corners at hotel, 

Left is Route 270 to Oneonta, 



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Kingston City Map Page 238 Kingston Section 

Kingston Section 



nor Koims ot i merest, see opposite page. 



Stuy vesant Garage 



Largest and Best Equipped Garage in County 

Day and Night Service 
Agents for Wlnton. Maxwell. Stutz, Hupsitblla. 
A. H. and L. E. CHAMBERS Oldtmoblle, Chalmer.. Whit* 4 CMC Trucks 

Official Blue Book Station 
24.8-2 C 2 Clinton Avenue Storage, Bepairs, Supplies, Renting, Vulcanising 

Special Attention given Tourists while stopping at 
KINGSTON - - N Y Stuyvesant Hotel. 

JVllNOOl \JL\ - - IN. X. New York Telephone 1176 



Thf* StllVVPfiflTlt. Kingston. N. Y. 



MOST MODERN HOTEL IN THE HUDSON VALLEY. COMPLETED IN 1911. 

One hundred and fifty rooms, with hot and cold water and long distance telephone 
service. Otis elevator. Electric lights. Seventy-five rooms connected with baths. 
American plan. Cor. John & Fair Sts. Member Empire Tours Ass'n. C, W. Winne. Mgr. 



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Kingston Section 



Page 239 



Points of Interest 



POINTS OF INTEREST, KINGSTON, N. Y. 
Kingston (pop. 26,500, alt. 150 ft.), da the Huguenots, Kingston was the boyhood home 
west bank of the Hudson river and seat of of General George Clinton and DeWitt Clin- 
Ulster county, settled by the Dutch and (Continued on page 241.) 



When in Kingston Stop at Pessenar's 

West Shore Hotel 
and Grill 

J. S. PESSENAR 



A Good Place to Eat. Beat Restaurant 
in Hudson Valley 

LOBSTERS. PLANKED STEAKS AND 
SEA FOODS A SPECIALTY 

European Plan Only 37-39 R.R. Ave. 



Kingston and Rhinebeck Ferry 

The direct connection between the Cat ski 11 Mountain region and routes 
to New York City and New England points. Time tables mailed on application 

Rhiiiebeck & Kingston Ferry Co., Inc., Kingston, New York 



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f , Page 240 



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Kingston Section Page 241 Route 261 

Route 261— Kingston to Newburgh, N. Y.-^33.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Rondout Ferry, Esopus, Highland, Milton and Marlboro. All macadam, wind- 
ing and rolling with attractive scenery. 

For optional way via New Paltz, see Route 262. 
<-MILEAOE-> 

T«tei BfSSw For this and other exits see City Map, page 238. 

MIlMie Pttats 

0.0 . 0.0 KINGSTON, Main St. & Clinton Ave. Go south on Clinton 
Ave. with trolley. 

0.1 0.1 Diagonal 4-corners; turn left on Albany Ave., leaving trolley. 

0.3 0.2 Broadway; turn right, picking up trolley from right just be- 
yond. Cross RR 1.1, passing city hall on left 1.4. 

1.8 1.5 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left with trolley — still on 
Broadway. 

2.2 0.4 E. Strand St. ; turn left away from trolley. 

2.3 0.1 4-corners; turn right to 

2.4 0.1 Rondout-Sleightsburg Ferry (charges 25c). From ferry land- 

ing keep ahead up steep grade. 
3.2 0.8 Port Ewen.* Straight thru. Bear slightly left thru Ulster 

Park 6.6. 
9.0 5.8 Esopus.* Straight thru. Cross RR 11.6. Join trolley from 

right 16.5. 

16.8 7.8 End of road ; turn right away from trolley. 

Left with trolley Is Route 232 to Poughkeepsle. 

16.9 0.1 Highland, left-hand road. Turn left. Over RR bridge 17.4. 
21.3 4.4 Milton.* Straight thru. 

22.1 0.8 Fork; bear left. 

25.3 3.2 Marlboro, P. O. over to right. Straight thru. 

25.7 0.4 Fork; bear right. 

29.0 8.8 Middle Hope, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 
29.9 0.9 Right-hand diagonal road ; bear right with travel. 

30.8 0.9 Fork, at foot of grade; bear left. 

Newburgh City Map and Points of Interest, page 205. 

31.0 0.2 Irregular 4-corners, bear right with trolley. 

•Port Ewen, N. Y., on west bank of Hudson, try residence of Judge Alton B. Parker, 

about 1 mile south of Kingston, at one time whoae place, Rosemont, is a quarter of a mile 

a flourishing village. Just prior to 1860, the from ▼"!***» on road leading to Esopus land- 

Penna. Coal Co. established port for distri- in * Mount Saint Alphonsus seminary, 

bution of coal, transported by Delaware & F athohc """tution, whose large stone build- 

„ . . , tt i j tt j i ln 8 can be seen from the road, is between 

Hudson canal from Hawley and Honesdale, .... . . ^ . ... .. a . . 

„._ .... ... highway and river, one-half mile north of 

Pa. Differences over tolls arising with the Esopus 4-corners. 

D. & H. Co. after lengthy and expensive pro- •Milton, N. Y.'(pop. 1,200, alt. 10 ft.), one 

ceedings, in which its counsel was Samuel J. of last horse-propelled ferry boats on river 

Tilden, the Penn. Coal Co. moved business to was in operation between Milton and Locust 

Newburgh. Grove (below Poughkeepsie) until past middle 

*Eaopus, N. Y. (pop. 275, alt. 116 ft.), coun- of last century. 

(Kingston Points of Interest, continued from page 239.) 

ton, both governors of this state. The first Academy Green, where Governor Nichols of 

state senate met in the senate house, corner New Amsterdam in 1666 entered into a treaty 

Clinton avenue and North Front street, of peace with the Esopus Indians and re- 

erected in 1676. The Centennial house, 97 ceived from them the wampum belt of peace; 

WaU street, is. the only house which was not this belt may be seen at the county clerk's 

destroyed in the burning of Kingston by the office, corner Main & Fair streets. On North 

British in 1777; it is now used as a private Front St., between Green & Crown, is the old 

residence. In the churchyard of the Dutch De Wall tavern; on the northeast corner of 

Reformed church on Main street is buried Fair and Maiden lane is the old Elmendorf 

Governor Clinton, and here also is a monu- tavern, built in 1726; on Wall St. facing 

ment to the 120th Regiment, New York state Franklin is the old Van Steenburg home, 

militia, which fought during the civil war. A very attractive and picturesque drive may 

The Vanderlyn house, corner Green and be taken around the Ashokan reservoir, offer- 

John streets (136 and 138 Green), was the ing an excellent boulevard about 40 miles in 

home of the celebrated artist, John Vander- length. Kingston was the home of S. r 

lyn, who executed the famous painting of Sharpe of civil war fame. Governor O 

Columbus in the capitol at Washington. At was inaugurated in the Ulster county 

the corner pi Clinton and Albany avenues is house on Wall street (see tablet). 



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Route 262 Page 242 Kingston Section 

32.2 1.2 Irregular 4-corners; turn left with branch trolley. 
32.8 0.1 Grand St.; turn right away from trolley* 

Straight ahead with trolley leads to Newburgh- Beacon Ferry. 

33.3 1.0 NEWBURGH, Broadway & Grand St., city hall on far right. 

To reach the Hudson River Ferry: turn left on Broadway to Colden 
St. Turn left to 2nd St. Turn right under RR bridge, jogging left 
and immediately right to Newburgh- Beacon Ferry. 

Route 262— Kingston to Newburgh, N. Y.— -36.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via New Paltz. Macadam to Plattekill; then 5 miles dirt; balance macadam! Thia 
is the best way between the above terminals. 



A pretty drive on a winding. road thru hilly farming* country. 
At New Paltz a pleasant side trip may be taken to Lake Mohon 
Route 261 via Highland offers an all macadam option. 



Total B«tw£!a For this and other exits see City Map, page 238. 

MIlMflt Points 

0.0 0.0 KINGSTON, Main St. & Clinton Ave. Go southeast on Clin- 
ton Ave. with trolley. 

0.1 0.1 Irregular 4-corners; turn left away from trolley on Pearl St. 

0.2 0.1 Right-hand diagonal road ; bear right onto Broadway. Cross 
RR0.8. 

0.9 0.7 Fork; keep right with trolley on Broadway, passing P. O. on 
left. 

1.7 0.8 Left-hand diagonal road, brick school on far left; bear left 

with trolley downgrade. 

2.0 0.3 Right-hand road ; turn right onto Abell St. Go under RR 3.0. 

8.4 1.4 Wilbur. Straight thru along creek. 

4.5 1.1 Fork; bear left. 

4.8 0.3 Eddyville, end of road ; turn right. 

4.9 0.1 Fork, just beyond bridge; bear left across long iron bridge. 
5.9 1.0 St. Remy, fork, P. O. in center. Bear right. 

9.2 3.3 Rifton at fork, P. O. ahead on left. Bear right. 

Right at 11.0 is Route 181 to Ellenville. 

15.1 5.9 Fork; bear left on Chestnut St. 

New Paltz City Map and Points of Interest, page 218. 

16.2 1.1 New Paltz, Chestnut & Main Sts. 

Right on Main St. is Route 180 to Mountain Rest, where splendid 
facilities will be found for the storage fit cars and carriage service 
provided to Mohonk Lake. 

Jog left and right across trolley. 

16.3 0.1 Left-hand road; turn left. 

16.5 0.2 End of road ; turn right. 
16.7 0.2 End of road ; turn left. 
20.2 3.5 3-corners; bear left. . 

21.2 1.0 Fork; bear right. Thru Modena 22.4. 

23.3 2.1 Fork; bear left. Cross RR 23.5. 

26.7 3.4 3-corners ; bear left downgrade. 

27.0 0.3 Plattekill, end of road at store. Turn right. 
30.0 3.0 Fork; bear right. 

31.6 1.6 4-corners ; turn left upgrade. 

Newburgh City Map and Points of interest, page 205. 

34.2 2.6 Fork; bear left. Bear slightly right thru irregular 4-corners 

35.5 onto N. Water St., joining trolley. 
35.6 1.4 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right away from trolley onto 

Grand St. 

36.8 1.2 NEWBURGH, Grand St. & Broadway, city hall on right. 

To reach the Hudson River Ferry: Turn left on Broadway to 
Colden St. Turn left to 2nd St. Turn right under RR bridge. Jog- 
ging left and immediately right (1% m.) to Newburgh- Beacon 
Ferry. Runs summer and winter, 6.00 A. M. to 11.00 P. M. 



Lake Mohonk Garage Conducted by the Phone New Paltz 4 

LAKE MOHONK MOUNTAIN HOUSE MOHONK LAKE, N. Y. 

At MOUNTAIN REST on the Mohonk Estate. Big, new, concrete garage partly in use. Cor- 

13.4 miles west of Poughkeepsie and 4.3 miles rugated iron garages also. Chauffeurs' quarters, 

west of New Paltz. Nearest motor approach to Carriage service between garage and house all ' 

the famous resort. week days. Cars not received Sunday. 

SEASON MAY 14 TO NOVEMBER 






Digitized by 



Kingston Section 



Page 243 



Route 266 



Route 266 — Kingston to Port Jervis, N. Y. — 57.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ellenville, Wurtsboro and Cuddebackville. 

Macadam to Ellenville; then 3.8 miles gravel; 15.6 miles gravel and shale; balance 

" id sh * ■ "- " 



gravel. 



Summary: 27.5 miles macadam; 17.5 miles gravel an< 
Road is winding, " " ... .... 



shale; 12.6 miles gravel 



.._ - following a valley practically all the way thru a fine farming 

country, with some splendid views of the Catskill and Shawaugauk mountains. 
Connects at mileage 10.7 to Lake Mohonk, a pleasant side trip. 
Connects at Wurtsboro with Route 86 to Binghamton. 
,-MILEAGE^ 
Dtstaaot 
Tetal Bet*** 
Mlltase Points 



For this and other exits see City Map, page 238. 

Go northwest on Clin- 



0.0 0.0 KINGSTON, Clinton Ave & Main St. 
ton St. Bear left onto Front St. 0.2. 

0.6 0.6 Irregular 4-corners ; bear right away from trolley onto Wash- 
ington Ave. 

0.7 0.1 Left-hand diagonal street at water-trough; bear left onto 
Hurley Ave. 

2.7 2.0 Hurley, end of road ; turn right. Thru irregular 4-corners at 
store 3.0. Thru Stone Ridge 9.9. 

lieft-hand road at 10.7 leads to Mountain Rest (9 miles), where 
splendid facilities will be found for storage of cars and carriage 
service provided to Mohonk Lake. / 

11.2 8.5 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

12.0 0.8 Fork at wooden school ; keep right upgrade. Avoid left-hand 
, diagonal road 16.7. 

20.4 8.4 Kerhonkson.* Bear right. 

24.0 8.6 Warwarsing, 3-corners, just beyond bridge. Bear right and 
immediately left. Bear left 25.3. 

25.5 1.5 Napanoch,* 4-corners. Straight thru. 

27.3 1.8 Fork; bear right. 

27.5 0.2 Ellenville,* Main & Canal Sts. 

Straight thru on Main St. Thru Spring Glen 31.7. Avoid 

left-hand diagonal road 32.0. 
34.0 6.5 Phillipsport, 3-corners, church on right. Bear left. Cross 

RRs 34.4-35.2. 
35.3 1.8 Summitville, 3-corners at P. O. Bear left under RR. 
35.5 0.2 Fork at Store ; bear left. 



•Kerhonkson, N. Y. (pop. 400, alt. 321 ft.), 
is located in the Rondout valley in the Shar- 
rangenek mountains, the foothills of the 
Catskills, on the state road, 7 miles from 
Ellenville and 21 *miles from Kingston. The 
Rondout creek runs through the village. Lake 
Minewaska is 6 miles away, and Lake Mo- 
honk 12 miles. Both are famous summer re- 
sorts with unsurpassed mountain scenery.^ 

•Napanoch, N. Y. (pop. 600, alt. 750 ft.), the 
site of aa old Indian fort, was settled by the 



early Dutch and Huguenots. The earliest 
grave here is marked 1671. At the time of 
the Fautinekill massacre near by, by the 
Tories and Indians, a feeble-minded girl ran 
to Napanoch carrying a 16th century Bible, 
which is still preserved. DeWitt Clinton was 
born here, and among the distinguished resi- 
dents today is George Innes, the painter. 

•Ellenville, N. Y. (pop. 3,000, alt. 317 ft.), is 
a mountain summer resort within easy walk- 
ing distance of numerous waterfalls, lakes 
and ice caves. 



M/s«i«f AA^^«^^>U/^^> Private estate of 8oo acres; one of the 

I MOUnt I Meenaiiga most attractive resorts in the Shawan- 

i i c r+ Suak Mountains. Miles of walks and 

" rlOUSC CT V^/OttageS drives, steam heat, open fires, private 

JUNE TO OCTOBER baths, golf, tennis, billiards, bowling, 

ELLENVI LLE, N. Y. p. q„ Ellenville, N.Y., Phone, Ellenville 27 



SEASON: JUNE TO OCTOBER 
TWO MILES 
FROM 



SDCDNY 



RE6. iHS. PXX. OFF 



MOTOR GASOLINE 



^S* 



■ <j» 



I 



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Route 270 Page 244 Kingston Section 

39.0 3.5 Wurtsboro,* '4-corners. Straight thru. 

Right at those 4-corners is Route 86 to Blnohamton. 
- £eft Is Route 659 to Goshen and Route 661 to Newburgh. 

Thru Haven 42.0. Avoid left-hand road at flagpole 45.5. 

48.7 9.7 End of road, inn ahead ; turn left. 

48.8 0.1 Cuddebackville, fork at grass plot. Bear right. 

X.eft at wood church is Route 234 to Goshen via Mlddletown. 

49.6 0.7 Fork, just beyond bridge; bear left. 

50.4 0.9 Fork; bear right upgrade. 
51.6 1.2 3-corners ; bear right. 

52.8 1.2 Huguenot, irregular 4-corners at P. O. Bear left and im- 
mediately right. Gross RRs 53.3-56.2. 

56.8 8.5 Irregular 4-corners ; turn left on Kingston Ave. 

57,0 0.7 Diagonal 4-ccrners; turn right onto Main St. 

57.2 0.2 Irregular 4-corners, water-trough on right; turn left onto 
Pike St. 

Port Jervis City Map and Points of interest, page 221. 

57.5 0.3 PORT JERVIS, Pike & Front Sts. 

Route 270— Kingston to Oneonta, N. Y.— 101.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via W. Hurley, Ashokan, Phoenicia, Shandaken, Pine Hill, Fleischmanns. Arkville, 
Margaretvllle, Roxbury, Grand Gorge, Stamford and Davenport. Macadam all the way. 

This is a very pretty trip, winding thru the Catskill mountains, with no very steep 
grades, and is the best connection from Hudson river points to the Catskill mountain 
resorts and v to central New York, going via the north side of the Ashokan reservoir. 

For option via south shore of reservoir see Route 271. 

^MILEAGE-. 

fatal BSSSm For this and other exits see City Map, page 238. 

Ml tag* Palate 

0.0 0.0 KINGSTON, Clinton Ave. & Main St. Go north on Clinton 

Ave. Bear left onto N. Front St. 0.1. 
0.4 0.4 4-corners ; turn right away from trolley onto Washington St. 
2.2 1.8 Fork; bear right. 

5.5 3.3 Fork; bear right upgrade. Under RR 6.5. 
6.8 1.3 W. Hurley, P. O. on right. Straight thru, coming along shore 

of Ashokan reservoir* 8.3. Thru Ashokan 13.2, Shokan 14.1 

and Boiceville 18.0. 
18.5 11.7 3-corners; bear right. 

Left is Route 271 via south side of reservoir. 

21.4 2.9 Mt. Tremper, P. O. on right. Keep ahead. 

21.5 0.1 Irregular 4-corners, mill on left; bear left across iron bridge. 
25.3 3.8 Phoenicia,* 3-corners. Bear slightly left across iron bridge. 

- *Wurtaboro, N. Y. (pop. 500, alt. 720 ft.), at average width about 3 miles; area 11 square 

the foot of the Skawangunk mountains, was miles; capacity 150 billion gallons, from which 

first inhabited in 1660 by Dutch traders. Manhattan may take daily 500 million gallons, 

Nearby is Mamakating park, a private reser- ca " ied ** aqueduct or artificial river 175 

vation of more than 2,000 acres and at an ~ l1 ? 8 ' Mphon «? u " dcr Hudson near Cold 

i *• * , ^~w . w t. *• /w * \ Spring; exceeding Panama Canal in extent 

elevation of 1,600 feet. Mamakating (Mosten) an d magnitude. 

lake is a beautiful body of spring water, •Phoenicia, N. Y. (pop. 450, alt. 801 ft.), a 

covering more than one hundred acres. The motoring and railway center, is in the valley 

voltage id surrounded by trout streams, and of Esopus creek- at the southern end of fa- 

the Basher Kill, just east, is well stocked mous Sjtony Cove. Stony Cove has steep sides, 

with pickerel and perch. Five miles from whose frequent knife -like edges have been 

Mamakating Station (the railroad station on carved out by erosion; on either side are 

the main line for Wurtsboro) is located Yan- crags and high, serrated mountain peaks, 

kee lake at an elevation of 1,500 feet. Slide mountain, about JO miles * southwest 

*Askohan Reservoir, N. Y. In the Cats- from Phoenicia (elevation 4,220 ft.), is highest 

kills; shore line 40 miles, 50 to 200 feet deep, in the Catskills. 



PHOENICIA GARAGE Garage - Repairs - Supply 

H. C. SEGELKEN. Prop. Expert Mechanics 

PHOENICIA NEW YORK Vulcanizing Dept. Phone 18F#[] 



-5 



r Sho^ " ; W«Bt Shokan, N. Y. Overlooking the Ashokan Reaervoh* I ! 

Accommodations Limited 20 mile» from Kingston on Boulevard ^ 

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Page 247 



^ 



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Kingston Section 



Route 270 Page 248 

Avoid left-hand diagonal road 41.1. 
4.8 Arkville,* 3-corners t just beyond sta. Bear left across RR. 

.. Bear right across RR 46.7. 
1.6 Margaretville, end of road beyond iron bridge. Turn right 

X«ft to Route 273 to Unadilla. 

0.1 Fork; bear right on macadam. Cross RR 50.2. Thru Kelley 

Corners 50.8 and Halcottsville 52.4. 
8.2 Fork; bear right upgrade. 
3.5 Roxbury,* 4-corners. Straight thru. 
1.2 4-corners ; turn left over RR bridge. Cross RR 65.1. 
6.2 Grand Gorge,* irregular 4-corners at open square, P. 



45.3 
46.8 
46.9 



55.1 
58.6 
59.8 
66.0 



•Arkrilla, N. Y. (pop. 600, alt. 1372 ft.), is 
situated in Delaware county, on the east 
branch of the Delaware. Its name was de- 
rived from the Pumpkin freshet occurring in 
the fall, at which time pumpkins were 
washed down the stream and accumulated in 
4arge numbers; the house of Colonel Noah 
Dimmick, located upon a high knoll, was 
untouched by the water and his home was 
given the name oi "Noah's Ark/' from which 
the name of Arkville was suggested. The 
summer residence of George J. Gould, Jay 
Idould and Anthony J. Drexel, Jr., are located 
Jicar here. Arkville is also a retreat for ar- 
"tists, one of whom, J. Francis Murphy, the 
noted landscape painter, owns an ideal estate 
jn the woods adjoining the village. The stu- . 
dio of Alexander H. Wyant, who was consid- 
ered one of America's best landscape artists, 
is still to be seen amid its picturesque sur- 
roundings. The work of Indians may be seen 
on the inner walls of high caves, known as 
the Indian Rocks, rudely carved with strange 
hieroglyphics. 



on 



•Roxbury, N. Y. (pop. 500, alt. 1,497 ft.), is 
an attractive village in upper valley, east 
branch Delaware river. It is the brithplace 
of John Burroughs, naturalist and author; 
also of Jay Gould, who in his youth surveyed 
parts of Ulster, Delaware and Albany coun- 
ties. Burroughs occupies his shack, "Wood- 
chuck Lodge," part of each summer. Mr. 
and Mrs. Finley J. Shepard (Helen Gould) 
spend two or three ' months each year at 
"Kirkside," their modest summer home, on 
west side of Main St., near large Gould me- 
morial church just north of village center. 

# Grand Gorge, N. Y. (pop. 175), named from 
gorge one and a half miles below village, 
where Irish mountain and Bald mountain, 
towering 3,000 ft. above sea level, crowd river, 
railroad and highway into a narrow pass. 
The Gilboa reservoir is located three miles 
northeast of the village and the Shandaken 
tunnel three miles east. The purpose of 
both the reservoir and tunnel is to augment 
the great Ashokan supply, j 



PURE SPRING WATER STORAGE FOR AUTOS 

POCANTICO INN, Margaretville, New York 

Rooms with Private Bath, Single or en Suite Excellent Dining Service 

Special Mean •■ Retwst. Gift Saaa ui* Safe Parlar. 0a Stale Raaa\ MYERS t ROOM HOUR, Press. 




ff 



For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, backof book 



ROXBURY, N. Y. 



Half way Kingston to ■ 
Oneonta , 



DELAWARE VALLEY HOUSE '***&£* 



WILLIAM BARRET, Prop. 



9tormge for cars 



■4* 



OPEN 

ENTIRE 

YEAR 



Hotel Fenimore 



UNDER 

NEW 

MANAGEMENT 



Otsego Lake 

GOOPERSTOWN, N. Y. 

"Where Nature Smiles" 

A Home-like Place Moderate Rates .; 

Tourist Accommodations ^ 

Good Food Clean Rooms 

STATE ROADS IN ALL DIRECTIONS 

H. L. KIMBALL, Manager (Formerly of The O-TE-SA-GA) 



g ty" a :-gi^ ' 



y g 




Kingston Section 



Page 249 



Route 271 



73.S 

74.0 



100.3 
101.0 



7.8 
0.2 



26.3 
0.7 



far right. Turn left. Cross RR 67.2-73.6. 
Fork; keep right. Pass P. O. on right 73.9. 
Stamford/ irregular 4-corners at stores. Bear left. 
Thru diagonal 4-corners 74.2. Thru Harpersfield 78.5 
Davenport 87.0. Cross RR at Davenport Center 92.6. 

Oneonta City Map and Points of Interest, page 470. 

Fork; bear right downgrade onto Main St. 
ONEONTA, Main & Chestnut Sts. 



1 



and 



Route 271— Kingston to Phoenicia, N. Y.— 27.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Mt. Tremper and Ashokan reservoir. All macadam. 

Thru a hilly country with fine views of reservoir and aerating plant at foot, of 
the dam. 

,-MILEAGE-, 
Distance 
Tttal Between 
Mlleate Points 

0.0 0.0 



For this and other exits see City Map, page 238. 



KINGSTON, Clinton Ave. & Main St. Go northwest on Clin- 
ton Ave. 

0.6 0.5 Irregular 4-corners; turn right away from trolley onto Wash- 
ington St. Avoid left-hand diagonal street 0.6. 

2.3 1.8 Fork; bear left. Avoid right-hand road 2.9, 

4.1 1.8 Fork; bear right along reservoir. 

9.1 5.0 Fork; bear left. 

10.1 1.0 Fork at grass plot; bear left along aerating plant. Avoid left- 

hand diagonal road 18.4. Thru Brodhead 15.7 and West 
Shokan 17.5. 

20.2 10.1 Fork; bear right. Over RR bridge 20.3. 

20.6 0.4 3-corners, just beyond concrete bridge; turn left. 
23.5 2.9 Mt. Tremper, irregular 4-corners, mill on left. Turn left. 
Cross RR 27.2. 

27.3 3.8 PHOENICA, bridge ahead. 

Straight ahead is Route 270 to Oneonta. 
Right is Route 285 to Windham. 



•Stamford, N. Y. (pop. 1,000, alt. 2,000 ft.), 
situated at the foot of Mount Utsayautha, 
is one of the finest touring centers in the 
Cat skills. It has splendid hotels, a country 
club, golf links, tennis courts, an open air 
swimming pool and many other attractions 
for the tourist and vacationist. On the top 



of Mount Utsayautha, three thousand three 
hundred feet above the sea, is an observation 
tower from which an unobstructed view of all 
the Catskills can be had. Another most beau- 
tiful view of the Catskills is thru Grand 
Gorge, which is one and a half miles east of 
the village of Grand Gorge on the main route 
between Stamford and Kington. 



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Routes 273-274 Page 250 Kingston Section 

Route 273— Margaretville to Unadilla, N. Y.— 50.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Andes, Delhi and Franklin. First 10.5 miles stony dirt and (ravel; then 11. • 
miles macadam to Delhi; balance M.8 miles dirt. 

^MILCAQE-^ Thru a hilly, wooded farming country* 

t^.i Sjgy.? Route 270 to Oneonta combined with Route 601 to Unadilla offers an 

M Heats pSSST aU niacadam option. 22 miles longer, but much better. 

0.0 0.0 MARGARETVILLE, at stores. Go southwest. Thru Dun- 
raven 3.6. 
4.6 4.6 Fork; bear left. 

11.4 6.8 Andes, right-hand road at stores. Turn right. 
23.9 12.5 Left-hand road; turn left on Kingston St. across two iron 
bridges into 

24.1 0.2 Delhi,* Main & Kingston Sts. 

Right Is Route 874 to Oneonta and 667 to Stamford. 

Turn left onto Main St. 

24.2 0.1 Right-hand road; turn right onto Franklin St. 

24.4 0.2 Fork; keep right— still Franklin St. 

25.5 1.1 Fork; bear left across stone bridge. 

34.6 9.1 Treadwell, irregular 4-corners. Straight thru. 
35.0 0.4 Fork; keep right 

41.6 6.6 Franklin. Straight thru. 

43.2 1.6 4-corners beyond iron bridge; turn right upgrade. 

50.2 7.0 End of road beyond iron bridge; turn left. 

50.9 0.7 UNADILLA, irregular 4-corners. 

. , Straight ahead Is Ptouto 601 to Blnohsmton. 

Route 274— Delhi to Oneonta, N. Y.— 18.8 nt. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

*~ DisUao* Via lierldsle. First % miles macadam, then dirt and gravel next 8 

Tstal BttwtM miles; bale ace macadam and brick. 



0.0 0.0 DELHI, Main & Kingston Sts. Go east on Main St. 

0.2 0.2 Left-hand road ; turn left on Meredith St. 

2.1 1.9 Fork, wooden school on right; bear left, crossing several 

small bridges. 
6.5 4.4 Fork; bear left downgrade. 

7.7 1.2 Meridale, end of road beyond concrete bridge. Turn left. 
10.2 2.5 End of road beyond concrete bridge; turn left upgrade. 

12.7 2.5 Caution — right-hand road; turn right. Caution for water- 

bars downgrade 15.3. Caution right and left turns down- 
grade 16.1. 
17.4 4.7 End of road; turn left. 

Oneonta City Map and Points of Interest, page 470. 

18.1 0.7 Fork; bear right — coming onto Main St., avoid right-hand 
diagonal street 18.7. 

18.8 0.7 ONEONTA, Main & Chestnut Sts. 

. 'Delhi, N. Y. (pop. 1,736, alt. 1,363 ft.), on kills to the Susquehanna valley before the 

the Delaware river and western slope of the <***• of railways. About one mile east, on 

„ A .... , . . .. . . . the Bloomville state road, is Watauga falls. 

Catakill mountains, is the business center . . A .. • — ^ . 

' and about one mile southeast over Federal 

lor a rich agricultural aod dairy section. H ill (steep, hard climb) is the famous three 

Delhi was an important point on the old stage valley view, one of the finest scenic outlooks 

route from the Hudson river across the Cats* of the state. 




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Kingston Section Page 251 Routes 277-279 

Route 277— Shandaken to PrattsviUe, N. Y.— 184 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via West Kill and Lexington. Gravel to Lexington; macadam to Prattsvllle. 

Route runs thru a narrow cove In the mountains to Lexington; then follows a valley 
to Prattsvllle. 

Owing to construction work connected with New York City water supply, this route 
Is liable to be badly worn, a tunnel being built thru the mountains, connecting a new 
,-MILEA6E-> reservoir at Gllboa. 

T«*»i oS!S!S Connects at Lexington with Route 621 to Haines Falls and Catskill, 

MlteM piuST and ** Prattsvllle with routes to 'Stamford and Cobbleeklll. 

0.0 0.0 SHANDAKEN. Go north on main road. Thru Bushnells- 
ville 2.6. FoMow direct but hilly and winding road. 

7.1_ 7.1 West Kill, 3-corners, P. 0. on left. Bear left. 

8.9 1.8 End of road, just beyond iron bridge; turn right. 
10J. 1.2 Right-hand road ; turn right across iron bridge. 
10.9 0.8 Left-hand road; turn left. 

11.0 0.1 Lexington, end of road. Turn left. 

18.1 7.1 PRATTSVILLE, 4-corners. 

Straight ahead is Route 288 to Cobblesklll, also Route 280 to Gran* 
Gorge and Stamford. 

Route 279— Kingston to Albany, N. Y.— 57.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Saugertles, Catskill, Athens and Ravena. Alternating stretches of macadam, 
concrete and brick. 



Road winds thru a hilly country, following- the valley of the Hudson river, not far 

om the Catskill mountains. A very pretty trip with splendid views of the Hudson 

river and Catskill mountains; thru a tine farming and apple country, passing large 



cement plants at Cementon. 

Connects at Catskill with Route*286 to Prattsvllle and Stamford in the Catskills; also 
with Route 283 to Catskill Mountain House and Kaaterskill House. 

,-MILEAGE-> 

T«tai bOUSS For this and other exits see City Map, page 238. 

Mil*** P«lRto 

0.0 0.0 KINGSTON, Main St. & Clinton Ave. Go south with trolley 

on Clinton Ave. 
0.1 0.1 Irregular 4-corners ; bear left away from trolley onto Albany 

Ave. Bear left 0.2.— Still on Albany Ave. Cross QR 2.5. 
4.5 4.4 Fork, bear left. Pass Glen Eyrie P. O. on left 7.0. 
8.5 4.0 Fork, bear left. 
10.4 1.9 4-corners; turn left onto Barclay St. and next right on 

Church St. 

10.6 0.2 End of street; turn left onto Hill St., across bridge over Esopus 

creek. 

10.7 0.1 End of street ; turn right on Partition St., keeping right at fork 

just beyond. 
11.3 0.6 Saugerties,* Partition & Main Sts. Turn right onto Main St. 

Left on Main St. Is Route 280 to Phoenicia. 

11.8 0.5 End of street; turn left. 

*Sau*ertles, N. Y. (pop. 3,950, sit. 159 ft.). to Plattckill Cove and Kaaterskill Clove ' 

On west bank of Hudson river near mouth of roads; very steep but picturesque approaches 

Esopus creek. Direct boat from N. Y.; also to Twilight, Sunset and Onteora parks, 

ferry across Hudson to Tivoli, on east side. Hunter, Tannersvtlle, Haines Falls and Kaat- 

Optional entrance to interior Catskill Mta. erskill region. Fine orchards, vineyards and 

via Unionville, Woodstock, Bearsvtlle and farms are frequent in the surrounding 

Mt. Pleasant; also shortest line from south country. 



For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



Open May 1st to October 15th 



YV CS llVlll XTOICI A quiet, refined stop for motorists. An 
GREENE COUNTY ideal spot for rest and recreation. 

West Kill New York E * c <""* c --- c^bi.A™od.ti«,. 



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latskiU City Map Page 252 Kingston Section 



POINTS OF INTEREST, CATSKILL, N. Y. 

Catakill (pop. 5,300, alt. 95 ft.), old village In early days the town had considerable 

11 west side of Hudson, at mouth of Cats- trade, especially with western New York and 

ill creek; gateway to Catskill mountains northern Pennsylvania, but building of Erie 

r northern route thru Cairo and the Wind- canal and completion of first thru railway 

ams. Ferry across Hudson to Greendale on east side of Hudson gradually lessened its 

tation on N. Y. Central, connecting with commercial importance. It was Hudson river 

lain east side route short distance east. terminus of Catskill turnpike, in 1802 most 

rom Jefferson Heights, west of village, fine important stage route across Catskills to 

iews are had of Catskill mountains and' Hud- Susquehanna valley at Unadilla. Thomas Cole, 

on river valley, extending in clear weather artist, who lived at Catskill, did much to 

) Berkshires. make scenery of that section widely known. 



Catskill-Greendale Ferry, Str. A. F. Beach 

THE WAY to CROSS the HUDSON. SHORT ROUTE CATSK1LL>BERKSH1RES 



At the Top of the American Alps 

HOTEL KAATERSKILL 

Catskill Mountain Fine macadam road thru Kaatershill Park leads to hotel. Rooms 

single or en suite, with or without bath. American Plan. Tran- 

KAATERSKILL N Y. sient rates, $7.00 per day and up. Open July to September. Golf 

iv/\/\ l civorvii^, m. i. Tennl8 Billiards. Pool, Bowling. Dancing. Mountain Climbing. 

Canoeing, Fishing. 

GARAGE IN CONNECTION Parent & Richards Co.. Inc.. Props. 



SMITH HOUSE, catskill, n. y. 

Rooms with Bath. Private Phones. Excellent Grill. Convenient and Homelike. 

— Garage Attached. Tourist Rest Room and Information Bureau ■— 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN 



pn a "Ml 1 H O ¥ T m? The Gateway of the Cftt8kill » 



t 



JEFFERSON HEIGHTS. CATSKJDLL, N. T. 

This Celebrated Summer Resort is situated 2 miles from the Hudson River, 88 miles 
south from Albany. 21 miles north of Kingston, 42 miles east from Stamford. N. Y.. 
85 miles west of Great Barrington, Mass. When on east bank of the. Hudson River, 
ferry at Greendale for Catskill. Largest and best hotel In entire region. Magnificent 
views, high elevation, always cool. Pine bath suites. Accommodates '800. 

8TEDMAN & LOWNDES, rropt. 

ORCHESTRA. DANCING. BATHING. GARAGE 

NOTE— Perry at Greehdale. directly opposite Catskill, will run at any time for accommodation of Autos 



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Kingston Section Page 253 Route 280 

12.5 0.7 Fork, bear left. Thru Maiden* 13.4 and Evesport 14.5. 
14.9 2.4 Fork; bear right. Thru West Camp 15.2. Bear right under 

RR 15.7. Thru Cementon* 15.9 and Alsen 17.2. Thru diagonal 

4-corners at brick school 22.2. 
22.8 7.9 Catskill, Bridge & Main Stfi., court house on left. 

Keep ahead across trolley on Bridge St. 
23.1 0.3 Spring St., turn left downgrade. 
27.3 4.2 Fork; bear right. 
27.5 0.2 Athens, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Right leads to ferry for Hudson. 

28.3 0.8 3-corners ; % bear right. 

28.7 0.4 3-corners, just beyond bridge; bear left upgrade. 

34.0 5.3 Coxsackie, irregular 4-corners, Bear left. Cross RR at West 

Coxsackie 34.7. 

35.4 1.4 Prominent fork; bear right. 

36.8 1.4 3-corners ; bear right. 
39.4 2.6 Fork, bear right. 

43.1 3.7 Fork; bear left. 

43.4 0.3 Ravena, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 

44.0 0.6 Fork, keep left downgrade. 

44.4 0.4 Colymans, end of road, stone water-trough on right. Turn 
left. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 48.2. Thru Cedar Hill 
49.6. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 54.8. Cross long iron 
bridge 55.1, joining trolley on Pearl St. 

Albany City Map, page 260; Points of Interest, page 259. 

57.1 .12.7 ALftANY, State & Pearl Sts. 

For enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 

Route 280 — Saugerties to Phoenicia, N. Y. — 30.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Woodstock, Shokan and Mt. Tremper. All macadam. 

Thru a hilly farming country along the north side of Ashokan reservoir. This la 
,- mileage-^ the best way from Saugerties to Tannersville and Haines Falls or Cat* 
x-*.i 8522E skiu Mountain House. 
Mlleats PtuS Connects at Phoenicia with route 270 to Oneonta. 

0.0 0.0 SAUGERTIES, Main & Partition Sts. Go south on Main St., 
passing P. O. on left. 

*Malden-on-Hudson, N. Y., immediately on church, school and dock, opened the first road 

the river, 2 miles north of Saugerties (West and secured the first post office. 

Shore station 1 mile from dock); pleasant •Cementon, N. Y. (pop. 125), one of the 

old village and river port. In 1852 steamer largest cement-producing localities in U. S. 

"Reindeer" exploded and burned in river at Crushed stone is carried in immense quan- 

Malden. John Bigelow, diplomat and author, tities by overhead cable and buckets from 

born here; homestead now occupied by his hills on west side of road to be made into 

son, Poultney Bigelow, author and traveler. cement. Oldest and largest mill is Alpha 

Here was unveiled in 1916 a marble bust by Portland Cement Co., No. 6, formerly Catskill 

Kitson of S< J. Tilden, life-long friend of Cement Co.; daily capacity 4,500 barrels. Next 

John Bigelow. Maiden was settled in 1807 by in size is Alsen plant, in village north of 

John Bigelow's father, who built the first Cementon, daily eapacity, 3,500 barrels. 




THE PREFERRED HOTEL OF ALBANY 

THE HAMPTON 

On the Empire Tours— On the Real Tour 

M OD ER N CONVENIEN T HOME LIKE 

2M Sleeping Rooms Roof Garden • Best Dining Service 

All with Bath D. M. PEPPER, Manager European Plan 



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Route 283 Page 254 Kingston Section 

0.1 0.1 Market St.; turn right 

0.2 0.1 Second left-hand diagonal street, store on left; bear left onto 

Ulster St. 

0.3 0.1 3-corners at water-trough; bear right. Cross RR at sta. 0.8. 

. 3.0 2.7 Fork, house on left; bear right. 

3.7 0.7 Fork; bear left. 

4.4 0.7 Fork, just beyond iron bridge; bear right. 

10.1 5.7 Left-hand road at outskirts of Woodstock; turn left. 

Straight ahead leads to center of town, 0.4 mile. 

10.2 0.1 Fork, just beyond bridge; bear left upgrade. 

12.9 2.7 End of road at outskirts of W. Hurley; turn right along reser- 
voir. Thru Ashokan* 18.7, Shokan 19.6 and Briceville 23.5. 
24.0 11.1 3-corners; bear right. 
26.9 2.9 Mt Tremper, P. O. on right. Keep ahead. 
27.0 0.1 Irregular 4-corners, mill on left ; bear left across iron bridge. 
30.8 • 3.8 PHOENICA, 3-corners. 

Right is Route 627 to Catsklll. 
Right is Route 270 to Oneonta. 
Left at 31.8 leads to Woodland. 

Route 283— Catskill to Prattsville, N. Y.— 58.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Kiskatom, Catskill Mountain house, Haines Falls, Tannersville, Hunter and 
Lexington. First 7.8 miles macadam and stone road; then 1.7 miles shale to foot of 
mountain; 6.3 miles shale and travel, stony, up the mountain; balance (23.8 miles) 
macadam. 

Route runs thru a hilly farming section to foot of mountains (9 miles) ; then ascends 
mountain over long winding road (wooded in some places with rather steep grades and 
sharp turns) to Catskill Mountain house (3.3 miles). From here route goes thru a 
hilly farming country, following a valley all the way to Prattsville. 

Route 286 is shorter and a better option to Prattsville. 

A much better way to Tannersville and Haines Falls and Catskill Mountain house 
and Kaaterskill is via Cairo, E. Windham, Hensonville, Hunter and Tannersville — 
almost all macadam and easy ascent of mountain. 
s-MILEAGB-^ 

Tttai Between For this and other exits see City Map, page 252. 

Mlletae Prists 

0.0 0.0 CATSKILL, Bridge & Main Sts., court house on left. Go west 
on Bridge St. Gross long iron bridge 0.1. Avoid left-hand 
diagonal road at water-trough 0.2. ' 

0.7 0.7 Fork, water trough in center; bear right. 

1.3 0.6 Fork; bear right. 

3.4 2.1 Fork; bear left. 

6.0 2.6 Kiskatom, fork, store on left. Bear right upgrade. 

Bear left thru irregular 4-corners 6.8. 
7.3 1.3 Irregular 4-corners ; bear slightly left. 
7.7 0.4 Right-hand road; turn right downgrade. Thru 4-corners 8.2. 

Start ascent over mountain 9.0, using caution for sharp curves 

and steep pitches. 

12.4 4.7 End of road at summit of mountain, Catskill Mountain House 

on left. Turn right. 
12.8 0.4 Fork, pond on left; bear right upgrade. 

Right at 14.7 leads to Kaaterskill. 

15.8 3.0 Haines Falls, end of road. Turn right. 

17.7 1.9 Tannersville, stores on left. Straight thru upgrade. 

Left at 21.6 is Route 627 to Phoenicia. 

22.5 4.8 Hunter, store on left. Straight thru. 

23.0 0.5 Fork; bear left. 

Right fork is Route 286 to Windham. 

30.9 7.9 Lexington, at store. Bear slightly right along creek. 

Left at store is Route 624 to 8handaken. 

Cross iron bridge 37.0, bearing left just beyond. 

38.1 7.2 PRATTSVILLE, irregular 4-corners. 

Straight ahead is Route 286 to Stamford. 

•Ashokan Reeervoir v N. Y. In the Cats- Manhattan may take daily 500 million gallons, 

kills; shore line 40 miles, 50 to 200 feet deep, «"" h * ■*«■««* or artificial river 175 

miles, siphoned under Hudson near Cold 
average width about 3 miles; area 11 square Spring; exceeding Panama Canal in extent 
miles; capacity 130 billion gallons, from which and magnitude. 



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Mlleafe Potato 



Kington Section Page 255 Routes 285-286 - 

Route 285— Phoenicia to Windham, N. Y.— 23.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Chichester, Hunter and Hensonville. Macadam all the way. 
Route ascends a winding easy grade thru a narrow cove in the mountains to Hunter; 
balance thru a hilly farming country. The best connection from lower route thru 
Catskills to the upper route. 

^MlLEAGE-> Connects at Hunter with Route 621 to Haines Falls; also with Route 

283 to Prattsville, and at Windham with routes to Stamford and 
Catskill. 

0.0 0.0 PHOENICIA, at store. Go north along creek. Thru Chi- 
chester 1.8. 

2.2 2*2 Fork; bear left upgrade along RR. 

5.1 2.9 Lanesville, fork. Bear right. Pass P. O. on left 5.4. Thru 
Edgewood 7.3. Avoid right-hand diagonal road 7.9. Cross 
RR 9.8. 
11.6 6.5 Left-hand road; turn left. Cross RR 12.8. 

13.0 1.4 End of road ; turn left. 

Right at this turn is Route 621 to Catskill. 

14.1 1.1 Hunter, store on left. Keep ahead. 
14.5 0.4 Fork; bear right. 

Left fork is Route 283 to Prattsville. 

20.9 6.4 Hensonville, end of road at foot of grade. Turn left. 

22.4 1.5 End of road, just beyond iron bridge; turn left. 

23.5 1.1 WINDHAM, P. O. on left. 

Straight ahead is Route 286 to Stamford. 

Route 286— Catskill to Oneonta, N. Y.— 76.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Cairo, E. Windham, Windham, Prattsville, Grand Gorge and Stamford. All 
macadam, except 4 miles of gravel and shale between S. Durham and E. Windham 
and 4 miles gravel and shale betwen Windham and Prattsville. 

Thru a hilly farming country with a long easy ascent of mountain to E. Windham — 
wonderful view of valley from this point; then thru a hilly farming country, fol- 
lowing a valley nearly all the way to Oneonta. A very scenic trip thru the Catskill 



mountains. 

Connects at Windham with Route 627 to Phoenicia and is best way from Catskfll to 
Tannersville and Haines Falls. 
,-MILEAtiE-s 

Total bXwwS For this and other exits see City Map, page 252. 

Ml Isaac Points 

0.0 0.0 CATSKILL, Main & Bridge Sts., at court house. Go north on 
Main St. Caution for left and right curves around hill 0.3. 

0.6 0.6 Fork, just beyond high RR trestle; bear left. Thru Leeds 
3.6 and So. Cairo 6.8. 

9.8 9.2 Cairo,* fork. Bear left across iron bridge. 
10.0 0.2 Fork; bear left upgrade. Thru Acra 12.7 and Durham 15.8. 

♦Cairo, N. Y. (pop. 600, alt. 346 ft.), is a and Steuffel Point (Stropel— so called from a 
summer resort, located at the eastern foot ?« ntcr wh ° d *elt in the mountains), which 



of the Catskill mountains. The name of 



is said to be 3,450 feet high. Near the foot 

.«*.,-.. of these mountains is Round Top or Dome 

Cairo was suggested by Asabel Stanley, m mountain> a ndky hm ^ fect high Ff0m 

prominent citizen from Cairo m Egypt. To along the slopea ^ tops c f. these mountains 

the southwest may be seen Black Head moun- a m09 t beautiful and nictureaaue view it 

tain, which rises to an altitude of 3,965 feet, obtained. 



ef&t* 4&tQttlt SiOtCl FivC M ' leS * r0m Catskill by State Road to Leeds 
«t *u u *-r i r . i mi » Transient accommodation**. Larre, comfortable 

"In the Beautiful Catskills rooms. Excellent table. 

LEEDS, NEW YORK geobge badeau, prop. , 



For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, , 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



C_ ^ 9 ^ TT ^ a. ^ 1 Sixty rooms. Electric lights. Sanitary plumbing. Run- 
06 S flOtfil ning spring water. Buckwheat griddle cake.. Honey 
V IP _ **_± t ^ *- ^ X andmaplesynip toble specialties? Rates $3.50 and up\ 

,** the beauty spo 
most pkturssqu 
sted. 

/Google 



v e syrup table specialties. Rates *3.MJ and up. 
O. R. GOB, Prop. Located in the "Gem of the Catskills.** the beauty spot 

nrY«.TrvYY a a m «. -. of all the mountains and on their most pict u res q ue 

WINDHAM N. Y. macadam state road. Garage connected. 



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Route 288 Page 256 Kingston Section 

16.8 6.8 Fork; bear left, continuing upgrade along mountain side. 
19.6 2.8 E. Windham, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 
Bear right thru Brooksburg 28.1. 

Left at 24.4 Is Route 827 to Phoenicia. 

25.6 6.0 Windham, P. 0. on left. Straight thru. Thru Ashland 80.7. 

86.4 10.8 Pratteville,* at stores. Keep ahead. 

86.8 0.4 Left-hand road; turn left across iron bridge. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 288 to Cobbleeklll. 

86.9 0.1 End of road; turn right. 

41.5 4.6 Grand Gorge,* irregular 4-corners at open square. Turn right 

and follow Route 270 from mileage 66.0 balance of the way 
(35.0 miles) to Oneonta. 

Route 288— Prattsville to Cobleskill, N. Y.— 58.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Gilboa and North Blenheim. Some macadam and alternating stretches of 
gravel and dirt (bad in wet weather), then short stretch of macadam entering 

s-mileage-^ Cobleukill. 

t.* • 8S& 00 * A much better, tho longer, option is via Route 286 to Stamford. 

Mltw riBS Route 270 to Oneonta and Route 612 to Cobleskill. This is aU macadam. 

0.0 0.0 PRATTSVILLE, 4-corners. Go north along bank of , creek. 

Ascend steep grade 5.2. Bear left across iron bridge 5.3. 

Fine view of falls below. 
6.4 6.4 Gilboa, left-hand road.' Turn left across long iron bridge, and 

right at 4-corners just beyond across wood bridge. 

7.8 1.4 Fork; bear right. Ascend steep grade 8.4 — stony with water- 

bars. 
9.2 1.4 Fork, beyond small wood bridge; bear left. 
9.6 0.4 End of road; turn right upgrade. 

9.9 0.3 Left-hand road; turn left downgrade. Cross iron bridge 10.2. 

13.8 3.9 Fork; bear left thru covered wood bridge; turning right at 

end of road immediately beyond. Thru North Blenheim 14.0. 

14.7 0.9 Right-hand road; turn right thru covered wooden bridge. 

19.3 4.6 Breakabeen, 3-corners; bear left. Gross long iron bridge over 

Schoharie creek 20,1. Pass Fultonham P. O. on left 22.9. 

26.4 7.1 Fork; bear right. Gross iron bridge 26.6; 

27.4 1.0 Middleburg (outskirts) r 3-corners, at outskirts. Turn left. 

Right across ironjbridge leads into center of town and to Schoharie. 

27.6 0.1 Fork; bear left, bearing right at fork immediately beyond. 

Avoid right-hand road 29.3. 
30.1 2.6 Fork; bear right downgrade across iron bridge, ascending 
grade beyond. Thru E. Cobleskill 83.5. 

34.9 4.8 Fork; bear left. Pass Mineral Springs P. O. on left 36.7. 

36.8 1.9 Fork; bear left. 

38.3 1.5 Right-hand road; turn right onto Grand St. Cross iron bridge 
38.5. Cross RR 38.8. 

38.9 0.6 COBLESKILL, Grand & Main Sts., park on left. 

# Prattavffl«, N. Y. (pop. 1,000, alt. 1,200 ft.). rock and ornamentally carved. In 1842 Pratts- 

Pleasantly situated on Schoharie creek and ville academy was built. Colonel Pratt donated 

named in honor of Colonel Zadock Pratt. The the site and contributed one-half the expense 

Reformed Dutch church, the oldest in the of the building. 

town, was established here in 1802. Devasego 'Grand Gorge, 19. Y. (pop* 175), named from 
falls, located about one mile northwest of the gorge one and a half miles below village, 
village, were named after a French Indian where Irish mountain and Bald mountain, 
who resided in this vicinity. These falls are towering 3,000 ft. above sea level, crowd river, 
almost, a perfect miniature of the great railroad and highway into a narrow pass. The 
Niagara falls. Pratt Rocks at the eastern Gilboa reservoir is located three mites north- 
end of the village, nearly 500 ft. above the east of the village and the Shandaken tunnel 
Schoharie, are worth a visit. Leading to three miles east. The purpose of both the 
these rocks is a zigzag path, along which are reservoir and tunnel is to augment the great 

ree sofas, and an arm chair cut in solid Ashokan supply. 



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Kingston Section Page 257 Routes 289-293-295 

Route 289— Stamford to Delhi, N. Y.— 20.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
,- MILEAGE^ Via Hobart and Bloom ville. First 4.8 miles macadam; 7.7 miles dirt 

t-»-i ""v*— and macadam. 
mi tots PsTiits" Thru a hilly farming country, following a valley all the way. 

0.0 0.0 STAMFORD, irregular 4-corners at stores. Go west. 

0.2 0.2 Second 4-corners ; turn, left. 

3.8 3.6 Hobart, 3-corners at bank. Bear right upgrade. 

Bear left thru irregular 4-corners 5.1. Pass So. Kortright 0.3 

mile to left 7 A Gross RR at ata. 12.5. 
12.7 8.9 Bloomville, 3-corners at P. O. Bear left across bridge. Same 

thorof are becomes Main St. 

Right on Merideth St. 20.4 is Route 274 to Oneonta. 

20.6 7.9 DELHI,* Main & Kingston Sts., at stores. 

Straight ahead and immediately right on Franklin St. is Route 273 
to Unadllla. 

Route 293— Catskill, N. Y., to Great Barrington, Mass. 

—30.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Greendale, Martindale and S. Egremont. Connection from the Catskills to the 
Berkshlres. Dirt and gravel roads first 9.4 miles; balance macadam. 
Thru a hilly farming country. 

_MILEAGE-> v 

Tttai BetwMo For this and other exits see City Map, page 252. 

MIlMte Pslirts 

0.0 0.0 CATSKILL, Main & Bridge Sts. Go south on Main St. 
0.9 0.9 Catskill-Greendale Ferry. 

Ferriage, 50c, car and 2 passengers; extra passengers, 16c. Ferry, 
runs to 7:30 p. m., connecting with N. T. C. trains (see timetable). 

Straight out from ferry land across RR. 1.2. 

1.4 0.5 Fork; bear left. 

3.5 2.1 Greendale, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Left is. Route 182 to Albany. 

Right is Route 301 to Poughkeepsle. 

6.3 2.8 Fork; bear left across Taghkanick creek, avoiding left-hand 

road 6.6. 
7.2 0.9 Fork; keep right. 

8.6 1.3 Fork; bear left. 

•.7 1.2 Hollowville, straight thru and follow Route 185 from mileage 
-6.3 balance of way (20.9 miles) to Great Harrington. 

Route 295— Kingston to Millerton, N. Y.— 34.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via ferry to Rhlnebeck, Red Hook and Pine Plains. First 18 miles macadam; then 
4.2 miles under construction; 8.1 miles macadam; 2.4 miles gravelly dirt: balance (1.7 
miles) macadam. Summary: 28 miles macadam; 4.2 miles under construction; 2.4 miles 
dirt. - - 

Route crosses Hudson river by- ferry, then runs thru a hilly farming country to 
Millerton. A good connection from west side of Hudson to the Berkshire hills. 

In dry weather some distance may be saved by using dirt road from Rhlnebeck to- 
Rock City. 

Ttui SUSS!? ^ or this and other exits see City Map, pfcge 238. 

Mitoses Prists 

0.0 0.0 KINGSTON, Clinton Ave. & Main St. Go south on Clinton 
Ave. and turn next left onto Albany Ave. 

"Delhi, N. Y. (pop. 1,736, alt. 1,363 ft.), on kills to the Susquehanna valley before the 

the Delaware river and western slope of the daTS of railways. About one mile east, on 

„ . .... the Bloomville state road, is Watauga falls, 

Catskill mountains, is the business center ^ ^^ one mflt gouthea8t over Federal 

for a rich agricultural and dairy section. Hill (steep, hard climb) is the famous three 
Delhi was an important point on the old stage valley view, one of the finest scenic outlooks 
route from the Hudson river across the Cat*- of the state* 

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Route 295 



Page 258 



Kingston Section 



0.2 0.2 Right-hand street at end of park; turn right onto Broadway. 
Cross tLR 0.7 and follow trolley. 

1.7 1.5 Left-hand street, brick school ahead on left; turn left — still 

on Broadway. 
2.1 0.4 Strand St., bank ahead on left; turn left. Turn right 2.3 to 
Kingston-Rhinebeck Ferry. 

Charges: 86-42e; 18c each passenger. 

From ferry landing, keep ahead. 

2.5 0.4 Left-hand road, beyond bridge over RR; turn left. 

4.6 2.1 Rhinebeck, 4-corners, at stores. Turn left. 

Right is Route 801 to Poughkeepale. * 

5.0 0.4 Fork; bear right. Cross RR 9.8. 

9.8 4.8 Red Hook, 4-corners, at stores. Turn right. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 182 to Albany. 

Gross RR 10.6. 
18.7 8.9 Rock City, end of road, store on left. Turn left. Thru La- 
fayetteville 18.2. Avoid right-hand road 20.9. 

21.4 7.7 Diagonal 4-corners; turn left. 

24.6 3.2 Pine Plains,* 4-corners, at stores. Straight thru. 
Cross RR 25.1. Thru Pulvers 28.7. 

30.5 5.9 End of road; turn right over RR bridge and left beyond. 
32.9 2.4 3-corners; turn left. 

Right is Route 863 to New York. 

34.4 1.5 Right-hand road, garage on right; turn right across RR onto 
Center St. 

34.6 0.2 MILLERTON, Main & Center Sts., P. O. on left. 

Right is Route 38 to Pittsfield. 



•Pine Plaint, N. Y. (pop. 1,400. alt. 476 ft.). 
Founded in 1740 by Moravian missionaries 
who had a settlement at "Sha-ca-me-co" or 
"Little Mountain/' one of the ranges of hills 
three miles south of the village of Pine 
Plains. No title, however, was given the 
township until October 19, 1744. It is situated 
in a beautiful section of Dutchess county and 



lies on a broad plain. The first house was 
built by Morris Graham, a descendant of 
James Graham, Marquis of Montrose. The 
old stone house built by him in 1772 is still 
standing. Nearby lies Stissing mountain, 
rising 1,000 ft. above the village; at the foot 
are three beautiful lakes around which are 
picturesque drives. 



*^r2 



For List oi Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



SDCDNY 

REG. u.*. PM. Oft 

MOTOR GASOLINE 







Motor Life I 




zMotor Life — oA friend 



whose motoring advice you will find as good 

as it is timely and whose entertainment, sense of humor and 
altogether humanly interesting personality you will enjoy 

(Coupon in Front of Book.) 



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i 



Albany-Troy Section Page 259 Albany Detail Ma 
Albany-Troy Section 

POINTS OF INTEREST, ALBANY, N. Y. 

Albany (pop. 110,000, alt. 18 ft.), capital of Albany was the meeting place of the fii 

New York State, was settled by the Dutch Colonial congress, held 1754, to formulate 

in HS23. Long before Hendrick Hudson sailed p , an fof a uni<m of ^ severa , colonieg< 
up the Hudson the French, working down . .. . A . ... ... 

from Canada, had established a trading post wa8 aUo thc key t0 the pr,mitIve hl * hwa 

at the point where the ancient Indian trail of central » nd northern New York whi 

started west from the present site of Albany the French, and Indian and revolutiona 

thru the Mohawk valley to the St. Lawrence wars brought into new importance. Duri 

river, the lakes of central and western New these conflicts military expeditions frequen 
York and Niagara. (Continued on page 261.) 



The New 






ALBANY. N. Y. 

Every Comfort and 



Cbi 



mvemence 



First Class Service 
at Moderate Rates 

300 Rooms. 150 With Bath 
All with Hot end Cold Water 

European Plan 

We Pay Special Attention 
to Automobiles 

Garage in Connection 

ROBT. P. MURPHY, Prop. North Pearl Street 



^c^% 



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lbany City Map Page 260 Albany-Troy Section 



A r n i n k CJa ra o-e Tnr Fire P roof Dw uM g Vo , r 1< * 

/\rniDK Vjarage, i#6 . Accessories and Supplies 

74 Hudson Avenue OjJfciaJ Garage for 

HOTEL HAMPTON 

ALBANY NEW YORK Telephone.: M.U, 3 M ; Main 3W 



The WELLINGTON "Mr Albany, N. Y. 

Rate f Room With Bath, for One - - - 32.50 and up Near state Capitol and shopping 

t» xir*.i_ r> *l r t« ^ i nn j District. Fireproof Addition of 200 

p J KOOm With £>atn, tor lWO - - 34.UU and Up Rooms. 3-minute ride from Station or 

rer I Room Without Bath, for One, 31.75 and up *jff, MS^-^i^SSSS^^SSSL 

t\ t\ TTT* i r» i r rri a* rt\ i — All Rooms with Running Water — 

Day I Room Without Bath, for Two, 32.50 and up Public Baths & Showers on each floor. 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 261 



Route 301 



Route 301 — Albany to Poughkeepsie, N. Y.— 75.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Rensselaer, Valatie, Kinderhook, Hudson, Red Hook, Rhlnebeck and Hyde Park. 
Macadam, brick and concrete all the way. 

This route follows east side of the Hudson river, thru a rolling farming; section 
passing many fine estates and farms. 

Routes 357 to Kingston, 262 to Newburgh and 201 to New York offers an excellent 
option via west side of Hudson for those going thru to New York. 

_MILEAGE-> 

T«»i Bttween For enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 

Mlteats Points 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY, Broadway & State St., P. O. on left. Go south west 

with trolley on Broadway. 
0.6 0.6 Bridge St.; turn left with branch trolley across long iron 

bridge ove* Hudson river. 
0.9 0.3 Rensselaer,* 4-corners at end of bridge. Turn right onto 

Broadway. «, ' 

1.1 0.2 Left-hand street; meeting trolley turn left onto Columbia St. 

Go over RR bridge 1.5. Thru East Greenbush 5.3. 
8.5 7.4 Fork, small triangle green in center; bear right. 

Left at 8.5 is Route 305 to Pltttfleld. 

17.5 9.0 Fork; bear left on macadam. 

19.3 1.8 Valatie, right-hand road, trolley sta. on left. Turn right. 

20.4 1.1 Kinderhook,* 4-corners, bank on left. Straight thru, 

23.6 3.2 Stuyvesant Falls, fork. Bear right. . 



•Rensselaer, N. Y. (pop. 11,000, alt. 25 ft.), 
is located on the Hudson river opposite Al- 
bany. It is devoted principally to manufac- 
turing interests. Fort Cralo, one of the old- 
est buildings in the United States, erected 
in 1642 as protection against Indians is on the 
River roa'l at Broadway and Columbia St. 
It was a military rendezvous during the 
French and Indian wars and used to some 
extent during the revolution. In cantonment 
back of the main building an English sur- 
geon is said to have composed "Yankee 
Doodle" in 1758 when the British and Col- 
onials were fighting together in the old 
French war. 

•Kinderhook, N. Y. (pop. 900, alt. 200 ft.), 
is one of the oldest villages In New York 
state. It was discovered and named by 
Henry Hudson in 1609. There are at least 
a dozen pre- revolutionary houses in or near 
the village. Opposite the Dutch Reformed 
church is the Newcomer mansion, built in 

(Albany Points of Interest, 
passed thru en route to lake George, lake 
Champlain, Canada, lake Ontario and the 
Niagara frontier. Burgoyne's expedition of 
1777 was directed ' primarily against Albany, 
which he hoped to capture with the aid of 
forces from Oswego and New York, and crush 
the revolution in the north— a plan frustrated 
by his defeat -at old Saratoga (SchuylervUle). 

Nearly all departments of the state capitol 
are open to the public several hours a day; 
also the state museum. 

In the Educational building (Washington 
avenue, nearly opposite Capitol) is the state 
library, one of the best schools for librarians 
in the U. S. 

The Philip Schuyler mansion, built in 1761. 
at the' head of Schuyler street, corner Cath- 
erine and Clinton streets, was purchased by 
the state and is open to visitors. 

The State normal college occupies an at- 
tractive site in an angle of Washington and 
Western avenues, one mile west of the Capi- 
tol. 



1774. General Burgoyne, after his defeat at 
Saratoga, was entertained in this mansion. 
About 2 miles south of the village is "Lin- 
denwald," where Washington Irving served 
as a tutor and where Martin Van Buren, 
eighth president of the United States, spent 
his last days; the greatest entrance hall still 
retains the picturesque wall paper of olden 
days. Near the center of the village is the 
very old house belonging to Isabel Schnopper; 
built 1721, and used both as a dwelling and a 
fort during the raids of the marauding In- 
dians. A short distance south of . the village 
is located the schoolhouse where Jesse Mer- 
win (Ichabod Crane), Washington living's 
friend, taught his pupils. He is buried in the 
village cemetery near the grave of Van Buren. 
The turreted academy on Albany avenue, 
where Martin Van Buren was educated is 
now Lindenwald grange, where the farmers 
gather Friday nights to discuss corporate in- 
terests. Van Buren was born in Kinderhook. 

continued from page 259.) 

Fort Cralo, one of the oldest buildings in the 
U. S., was erected in 1642 as protection 
against the* Indians. 

On the river road, a short distance south 
of Rensselaer, was a military rendezvous 
during the French and Indian wars, and 
Was used to some extent during the revolu- 
tion. In a cantonment back of the main 
building an English surgeon is said to have 
composed "Yankee Doodle" in 1758, when 
the British and Colonials were fighting to- 
gether against the French and Indians. 

"Wolfert's Roost," formerly residence ol 
J. K. Emmett, the actor, afterward home oi 
Governor and United States Senator David B, 
Hill, is located about two miles out on 
Northern boulevard. 

Albany has an extensive park system; 
most of the parks have monuments and his- 
toric tablets. The Albany academy for boya 
is one of the historic schools of the Empire 
state. 



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Route 301 Page 262 Albany-Troy Section 

2G.2 2.6 4-corners; turn left. 

27.0 0.8 Columbiaville, 5-corners. Bear right. Gross iron bridge 27.4. 

Avoid left-hand diagonal macadam road 27.5. Thru Staffville 

29.4. 

Hudson City Map and Points of Interest, page 196. 

32.4 ,5.4 4-corners, water trough on right; turn right onto Green St. 

away from trolley. 

32.8 0.4 End of street; meeting trolley, bear right onto Columbia St. 

32.9 0.1 Left-hand street, at near side of park; turn left onto Park 

place. 

33.0 0.1 Hudson, Warren St. & Park place, park on right. Turn left, 

onto Warren St. 

33.1 0.1 Irregular 4-corners; turn right onto Worth Ave. Under and 

across RR 34.2. < 

35.8 2.7 Fork; bear left away from poles. Thru 4-corners 37.5. 

Right at fork 35.8 leads to Catsklll Ferry. 

38.8 3.0 Fork; bear rfght. Thru Livingston 41.8, Blue Stores* 44.5, 

Clermont 46.4, Nevis* 48.3 and Upper Red Hook 50.9. 
53.6 14.8 Red Hook, stores on left. Straight Ihru. Cross RR 54.1 
59.0 5.4 Rhinebeck, Post & Market Sts. Straight thru. 

Points of Interest, page 195. 

59.5 0.5 3-corners, just beyond cemetery ; bear left. Thru Staats- 

burg 65.1. 

Right at this 3-corners leads to Rhlnecliff- Kingston Ferry. 

•Blue Stores, N. Y. (pop. 50, alt. 136 ft.), domain of the Livingston family. Their 

was named from a blue store which stood manor, Clermont, on river 6 miles west of 

here more than a hundred years ago. Blue Post road, burned by British 1777; afterward 

is still the prevailing color of the place. The rebuilt by Robert R. Livingstpn, first chan- 

hotel at Blue Stores is one of the few old cel,or of New York state - Its name walletf 

stage coach taverns now standing on Post by vi r lla * e of Clermont. Robert Fulton mar- 

, ried Livingston s niece and named the first 

successful steamboat after Clermont, where 

*Nevi», N. Y. (pop. 50.). Just south of he stopped 24 hours from New York City on 

Nevis, in Columbia county, is the ancient first voyage New York to Albany. 



Beekman Arms 

17( 

Oldest Hotel in America '. W: FOSTER, Prop. 

16 miles north of Poughkeepsie. All modern conveniences, 
rooms with running water, bath, telephone. 

Member Empire Tours Assn. Officially appointed by The Automobile Club of America 

HUB GARAGE, fireproof, opposite the Inn 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 263 Routes 303-304 

69.1 9.6 Hyde Park,* P. 0. on far right. Straight thru. 

Poughkeepsie City Map and Points of Interest, ^age 182. 

Under RR 74.9 — now on Washington St. 

75.2 6.1 Main St.; meeting trolley, turn left 

75.3 0.1 POUGHKEEPSIE, Main & Market Sts., city hall on right. 

Route 303 — Albany, N. Y., to Great Barrington, Mass. 

—47.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
,-aiLEAGE-> via Chatham and N. Egremont. Macadam and gravel roads. 

t.*.i S2S"V Route 306 to Pittsfleld, combined with Route 863 to Great Barrington. 

miiSmm rStau forms a preferable option. 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY, State St. & Broadway. See Route 301 for direc- 
tions to Valatie, 19.3 miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 Valatie, end of road, trolley sta. on left; turn sharp left 
across iron bridge. 

0.4 0.4 Right-hand road; turn right across concrete bridges. 

4.0 3.6 Left-hand road; turn left. 

5.3 1.3 Left-hand road, school on left; turn left. 

6.4 1.1 Right-hand road;. turn right. Cross RR (%6. 
6.7 0.3 End of road; turn left. 

6.9 0.2 Chatham, irregular 4-corners beyond RR. 

Jog left and right past church on left. 

7.0 0.1 Fork; keep left. Bear right 8.4. 

11.2 4.2 Spencertowiu fork; bear left. 

11.4 0.2 Fork; bear left. Thru Austerlitz 15.3 and Green River 18.8. 
20.1 8.7 Fork; keep right. Cross state line into Massachusetts 20.9. 
23.6 3.5 N. Egremont, Mass. Straight thru. Bear left 24.8. 

27.5 3.9 Fork; keep left. Cross RR 47.1, on Maple Ave. Bear left 

onto Main St. 28.0. 

28.4 0.9 GREAT BARRINGTON, Main & Castle Sts., at court house. 

Route 304 — Albany, N. Y., to Stockbridge, Mass. — 36.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Nassau. EL Chatham. Old Chatham and W. Stockbrldge. Macadam to Nassau; 
gravelly dirt to state line: balance (2.6 miles) macadam. 

Winding road thru a hilly farming country. Should not be used in wet 
—mileage-. weather. 

t-».i 252!? Route 305 to Pittsfleld, combined with Route 863 to Stockbrldge offers 

MitSst PriiS an &u macadam option. 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY. See Route 305 for directions to 

12.5 12.5 Nassau, 5-corners, bandstand ahead on left; turn diagonally 

right (not square right) past P. O. on right. 

15.3 2.8 Fork: keep right. 

15.6 0.3 Left-hand road; turn left. Bear leftrl5.9. 

16.1 0.5 Maiden Bridge, P. O. on right. Straight thru across bridge. 

♦Hyde Park, N. Y. (pop. 1,000, alt. 100 ft.). end of the village, over 100 year* old; F. W. 

In Dutchess county, originally settled by the Vanderbilt estate; Dutch Reformed church; 

Dutch and named for the Vanderbilt estate oldest in the village; Town Hall; home of 

(Hyde Park). Among the points of interest ex-Senator Thomas Newhold and Asst. Secre- 

are St. James Episcopal church at the north tary of the Navy, Franklin D. Roosevelt. 



POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. 

NEW HOTEL WINDSOR 

COP. MAtNANO CATHMRiNE STS. 
MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT 
European Plan 120 Rooms 120 Baths Single $1.50 and up 

Double $2.50 and up A la Carte Service at all Hours 

KING & ROSEN 



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Route 305 Page 264 Albany-Troy Section 

Thru irregular 4-corners at church 16.3. Thru Old Chatham 
18.4. 
18.7 2.6 Right-hand road, beyond RR; turn right. 

21.5 2.8 E. Chatham, 5-corners beyond RR bridge. Straight thru. 

21.6 0.1 Fork; keep left across bridge. Avoid left-hand road 22.4. 

23.5 1.9 Fork; bear left 

25.4 1.9 Fork; bear right. Cross RR 28.5'. 

29.3 3.9 State Line, N. Y., right-hand road; turn right across RR and 
immediately left past sta. on left. 

29.6 0.3 Fork, school ahead on right; keep left. Cross RR 31.9. 

32.0 2.4 W. Stockbridge, Mass., irregular 4-corners, water trough on 

left; turn right. 

32.1 0.1 Fork; bear left. 
34.0 1.9 Fork; keep right. 

34.9 0.9 Fork; keep right and left at fork immediately beyond. Thru 
4-corners 35.1. Bear right 35.9. 

36.5 1.6 End of road, cemetery ahead on left; turn left. 
36.9 4 STOCKBRIDGE, 4-corners. 

Route 305— Albany, N. Y., to Pittsfield, Mass.— 36.0 m. . 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Rensselaer, Nassau, West Lebanon and New Lebanon. Macadam all -the way. 

This is the best route between the above terminals. Thru a hilly farming country 
with a long, easy ascent and descent over the Taconic mountain. Some very fine 
views. 

^ MIL Mrt"S For this and other exits see City Map, page 260. 



iwidjt'rSSff 1 ^ or enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 269. 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY, Broadway & State St., P. O. on left. Go south 
with trolley on Broadway. 

0.5 0.5 Bridge St.; turn left with branch trolley across long iron 
bridge over the Hudson river. 

0.8 0.3 Rensselaer, Broadway & 3rd Ave. Turn right onto Broad- 
way. 

0.9 0.1 Left-hand street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Columbia 
St. Trolley leaves to right 1.2. Over RR bridges 1.5-1.6. 
Cross RR 2.4. Thru East Greenbush 5.2. 

8.4 7.5 3-corners; bear left. 

Right at this 8-corners is Route 301 to Poughkeepsle. 
Cross RR 12.4. 



HOTEL ST ELMO Half way between Alban y and Pittsfieia 

Chicken and Steak dinners: also a la 
West Lebanon N. Y. Carte Service. Phone 123 



HOTEL ASPEWALL For *%£%* See 

LENOX, MASS. Mso Managers Princess 

HOWE St TWOROGER, Mfn. Hotel, Bermuda 



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Route 308 Page 266 Albany-Troy Section 

1.8 * 0.6 Right-hand road, beyond RR bridges; turn right with branch 

trolley onto Partition St. 
1.4 0.1 Left-hand road ; turn left away from trolley onto 2nd St. 

1.7 0.3 4-corners; turn right onto Catherine St. 

1.8 0.1 4-corners, wooden church ahead on right; turn left with 

trolley onto 3rd St. Bear right where trolley ends*2.3. Thru 
4-corners 2.4. 
4.0 22 Defreestville, 5-corners. Turn left 

6.0 1.0 Left-hand road at cemetery on left; turn leu. 

6.1 1.1 Right-hand road; turn right with poles and macadam. 

7.2 1.1 Right-hand road; turn right with poles. Bear right 8.1. 
9.0 1.8 Right-hand road; turn sharp right. 

12.6 8.6 West Sand Lake, 4-corners, store ahead on left. Turn left. 

15.7 3.1 Averill Park, end of road at stores. Turn right. 

16.5 0.8 Sand Lake, 4-corners at store. Turn right. Pass Glass lake 

and Creeked lake on right. 
19.4 2.9 Fork; bear left. 

Right fork la Route 860 to Plttsfleld. 

Thru Alps 19.9 upgrade. 
25.7 6.3 Stephentown Center, wooden church on left. Turn right 
, downgrade. Cross RR at sta. 28.0. Thru Stephentown, N. Y., 
28.1. 

29.7 4.0 3-corners at foot of grade; bear left. Thru Hancock, Mass., 

30.8. 
31.1 1.4 3-corners; turn left. 
32.4 1.3 Fork, beyond small wooden bridge; bear left. 

39.8 7.4 Diagonal 4-corners ; bear left with travel. 

40.0 0.8 So. Williamstown, P. O. on right. Straight thru, coming onto 

Water St 
45.3 4.7 End of street at top of grade ; turn left onto Main St. 

45.9 0.6 WILLIAMSTOWN,* Main & North Sts. 

Right on Main St. is the Mohawk Trail — to North Adams and Green- 
field. 

Route 308— Troy, N. Y., to Williamstown, Mass.— 42.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
^-MlLEAGE-> Via N. Petersburg and the Pownals. Firat mile cobble atones, then 

_. . S'k?" 66 21 miles macadam; balance gravel, with some dirt Attractive scenery. 
miimm pSKS Route 809 offers an excellent option. 

0.0 0.0 TROY. See Route 309 for directions to 
24.9 24.9 Potterhill, 4-corners just beyond P. O. on right. Straight 

thru upgrade. 
28.7 3.8 Fork; bear right — sign "Williamstown." 

Left is Route 309 to Bennington, Vt. 

'Williamstown, Mass. (pop. 3,981, alt. 604 tectural authorities one of the most beauti- 

ft.), grew up jiear Fort Massachusetts, one ful churches in this country. Grace Hall 

of the frontier defenses of the state, built auditorium, costing over a million dollars, 

by the colony in 1745. The builder of that is another building of note. The college ob- 

fort, Col. Ephraim Williams, lost his life servatory is said to be the oldest one in 

in the expedition against Crown Point. the United States. 

On the main street, which is more like In Mission park is the famous Haystack 

a long narrow park, are the principal build* monument, marking the birthplace of for- 

ings of Williams college, one of the most eign missions, a spot visited by tourists from 

famous of the smaller New England insti- all over the world. A tablet on Main St., 

tutions, and the village churches. Thomp- near the western edge of the village, marks 

son memorial chapel is considered by archi* the site of Fort Hoosac. 



Motor Car Service Works 



Immense plant, exceptional equipment, picked 
workmen, tremendous stock of repair material. 
We operate on a unique plan under a mechanical 

engineer to 

274-284 Second Street, at Jefferson SERVE THE MOTORISTS-NOT ROB THEM 

We make permanent repairs to any car; Painting. 
_ _ _ __ tops, thorough overhauling, battery repair, welding. 

Troy* W. I • new Agings, etc. No tire work. Sell no care. 

'* Phone 947 



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IT 

Route 309 Page 268 Albany-Troy Section 

81.1 2.4 N. Petersburg, N. Y./ irregular .4-corners, store on right. 
Turn left — sign "Williamstown," across RR 31.2. Cross RRs 
33.9-34.2. 

34.7 3.6 N. Pownal, Vt., fork beyond small iron bridge. Bear right 
past P. O. on right— sign "Williamstown." Cautin for sharp 
left curve 36.0. 

37.9 3.2 Pownal, Vt., 4-corners, wood church ahead on left. Turn 
left upgrade. 

38.1 0.2 End of road; bear left. Pass Massachusetts State Line mon- 
ument on right 40.3. Cross trolley 41.0. 

41.9 3.8 Fork; bear right— sign "Williamstown." 

42.3 0.4 End of road; bear left. 

42.5 0.2 Fork; bear right on Central St. 

42.7 0.2 WILLIAMSTOWN, Main & North Sts, park on right. 

Left an Main St. is Mohawk Trail — to North Adams and Greenfield. 

Route 309 — Albany and Troy, N. Y., to Bennington, Vt 

—37.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Troy, Raymertown, Boyntonville, Hoosick and Old Bennington. Macadam to 
Hoosick; balance dirt and gravel. Thru a hilly farming country. 
For option to Troy via Lathams, see Route 816. 

'~ l,IL Dte£££ For this and other exits see City Map, page 260. 



MuSU^pSEtl" For enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY, Broadway & State St. P. O. on right. Go north- 
east with trolley on Broadway. 

0.4 0.4 4-corners ; jog left and right with trolley. Still on Broadway. 

4.7 4.3 Fork; bear right with trolley onto 3rd St. Cross eanal bridge 
5.2. 

5.3 0.6 End of street, beyond bridge; bear left with trolley onto 
Broadway. Pass city hall on left 6.0. 

6.2 0.9 Watervliet, 4-corners. Turn right with trolley across long 
iron bridge over Hudson river. (Toll, 10-13c.) 

6.5 0.3 River St. Meeting cross-trolley, turn left. 

Troy City Map, page 396; Points of Interest, page 397. 

6.7 0.2 Troy, River St. & Broadway. Monument on right. 

0.0 0.0 TROY, Broadway to River St. Go east on Broadway with 

trolley. 
0.2 0.2 4-corners; turn left on 5th Ave., leaving trolley. Cross RRs 

0.4. 
0.8 0.6 4-corners, meeting trolley; turn right on Hoosick St. 
4.7 3.9 Center Brunswick, 5-corners; bear slightly right. 
5.7 1.0 Fork, church ahead; bear left. Thru Raymertown 10.7. 
• Avoid left-hand road 11.9. 

This left-hand road is Route 312 to Manchester. 

13.8 8.1 Pittstown, 5-corners. Bear slightly right on macadam. Thru 

Boyntonville 16.0. 
18.2 4.4 Potter Hill, 4-corners, P. O. on right. Straight thm. 
22.0 3.8 Fork; bear left with macadam. 

Right is Route 308 to Williamstown. 

POINTS OF INTEREST, TROY. N. Y, 

Troy (pop. 72,013, alt. 35 ft.), is the county river, while the residential district spreads 

seat of Rensselaer county and head of Hudson over the hill country east and northeast. 

river navigation, also the eastern terminus Among educational institutions of national 

of barge canals from the west and north. reputation are the Rensselaer polytechnic 

During the revolution, the continental army institute; Emma Willard school, the latter 

camped on the islands in the delta of the largely endowed by Mrs. Russell Sage, and 

Mohawk river opposite this city to oppose the Russell Sage college. In Oakwood ceme- 

Burgoyne's contemplated march to Albany. tery is a monument to General Geo. H. 

Remains of some of the old earthworks Thomas, known as "The Rock of Chicka- 

-ected on these islands are still visible. mauga." Troy is particularly noted for the 

business and manufacturing sections of manufacture of collars and shirts, also rail- 

y are principally along, or near the road cars, machinery and brushes. 

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Albany-Troy Section Page 269 Route 310 

22.7 0.7 3-corners; bear right across covered bridge. 

Left is Route S16 to Rutland. 

Gross another covered bridge 22.9 and RR at sta. 23.1. 
23.3 0.6 Hoosick, N. Y.,* P. O. Straight thru. Avoid left-hand road 
25.2. Cross RRs 25.7-26.4-27.1. 

30.0 6.7 End of road; turn left along green. 

30.1 0.1 Old Bennington, Vt, right-hand road at stone water trough; 

turn right downgrade. Gross RR 30.3 and join trolley from 
left 30.8. Follow tracks on W. Main St. across RR 30.9. 

31.0 0.9 BENNINGTON,* Main, North & South Sts. 

Route 310 — Albany and Troy, N. Y., to Bennington, Vt. 

—51.9 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
,-MlLEAGE-> via Melrose, Valley Falls, Eagle Bridge and N. Hoosick. Macadam, 

•-* . 2I5** 00 * some rough, to state line, balance gravel. Longer and not as good as 
JgZrtSff R°»te 309. 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY. See Route 312 for directions to 

25.8 25.8 Eagle Bridge. End of road beyond bridge, turn right on 

macadam. 

26.1 0.8 Fork, keep right on gravel. 

Left is Route 316 to Cambridge and Rutland. 
Cross covered bridge and RR 26.2. 

26.6 0.5 End of road ; turn right on macadam. 

28.8 2.2 End of road, turn right across long iron bridge into 

29.2 0.4 N. Hoosick. Straight thru, joining trolley from left. 

80.3 1.1 Walloomsac, N. Y. Straight thru with trolley which leaves 

to right 80.7. Cross RR 31.6. 

31.7 1.4 End of road, meeting trolley; bear left under RR bridge. 

Go thru eovered bridge 32.5 and under RR 32.6. 
" 33.2 1.5 End of road at State Line House; turn right with trolley 
into Vermont. 

33.7 0.5 Fork; bear left with trolley across RR 34.3. 

34.4 0.7 4-corners at white house, turn right. Cross RR 34:8. 

35.1 0.7 N. Bennington, Vt., 4-corners at P. O.; turn right with 

trolley, curving right with tracks at 5-corners 35.2. 
36.4 1.3 4-corners; turn left with trolley. 
38.4 2.0 4-corners ; straight thru across iron bridge. 

Right leads to Old Bennington, 1 mile. 
Note Battle Monument in the distance. 

38.8 0.4 Right-hand road; turn diagonally right, leaving trolley. 

39.2 0.4 Left-hand road; turn left across iron bridge and RRs 39.4. 
40.4 1.2 BENNINGTON,* Main & North Sts. 

"Hoosick, N. Y. (pop. 9,000, alt. 433 It.), is Campaign by British was for the capture 

divided into almost two equal parts by the of military supplies stored about where Ben- 

Hoosick river, which runs thru its center. n i„gton monument now stands, but most of 

This is an old historic stream, whose valley the battleground was across the line in New 

was the war path along which the French York ^^ Monument is m fcct and 10 ^ 

and Indians marched on their way to New . TT » ol. # 

-, , . •* • *u ' i »• •* inches high; designed by J. P* Rhiner of 

England. During the revolutionary war it • * * J 

was also a strategic point and the battle of Boston and erected m 1888 " 91 at a C08t of 

Bennington was actually fought in the town S155.0O0, paid by Vermont, New Hampshire, 

of Hoosick, about 2H miles from Hoosick Massachusetts and the federal government. 

Falls. The state of New York has purchased Many markers and monuments indicate 

about 200 acres of the ground on which this location of historic battle sites. Among 

battle was staged, intending to make a beau- other points of interest are the Walloomsac 

tiful park of it. Fonda Hill, to the south- inn, which has continued. as a public house 

west of town, is said to have the highest for more than 150 years; Vermont Soldiers' 

peaks in this vicinity. Home, on the grounds of which is Hunt's 

'Bennington, Vt. (pop. 10,000, alt. 682 ft.), fountain with a single jet projection of 196 

. derives its greatest fame from the battle of feet; the old home of Gov. Isaac Tichenor, 

Bennington, fought August 16, 1777, in which and several other old houses. Bennington is 

Gen. Stark, with the aid of reinforcements a diversified and extensive manufacturing 

led by Col. Scth Warner, defeated two de- center, using mostly water or hydro-elect r 

ttchments of Gen. Burgoyne's army. power from adjacent mountains. 



^ 



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Route 312 Page 270 Albany-Troy Section 

Route 312 — Albany and Troy, Nl Y., to Manchester, Vt. — 

67.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Lathams, Troy, Valley Falls, Eagle Bridge, Cambridge and Arlington. Mac- 
adam and concrete to Cambridge; balance gravel thru a hilly farming country* 
Route 309 to Troy offers a shorter option. 
Route 316 offers a longer but better option to Cambridge. 

"""^DteSaoe For ^is an( * otner exits see City Map, page 260. 

M T nilt« B pSnS n F° r enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY, State St. & Broadway. Go wesjb on State St. with 
trolley. 

0.3 0.3 End of street at State Capitol; turn right and next left with 
trolley onto Washington Ave. 

0.9 0.6 Fork, water trough in center; bear right with trolley. 

1.0 0.1 4-corners; turn right across long iron viaduct, leaving trol- 
ley, onto Northern Blvd. 

1.7 0.7 End of boulevard; turn left. 

1.8 0.1 Right-hand road; turn right. Cross long iron viaduct over 

RR 2.0. 
2.6 0.8 4-corners, sign— "Troy" ; turn left. Thru Loudenville 4.7. 
Thru Newtonville 6.0. 

7.8 5.2 Latham, 4-corners, meeting trolley turn right. Trolley 

leaves to right 8.8. Join trolley from right 10.3, crossing RR 
10.5. Trolley leaves to left at brick church 10.6. 

11.0 3.2 Watervliet, 4-corners. Straight thru. Cross long iron bridge 
over Hudson river 11.1 (toll, 10c-13c). 

11.3 0.3 River St.; meeting cross-trolley, turn left. 

Troy City Map, page 267; Points of Interest, page 268. 

11.5 0.2 Troy, River St. & Broadway. 

Turn right on Broadway and set odometer at 0.0. 
0.0 0.0 Troy, Broadway & River St., at monument. Start east on 

Broadway with trolley four blocks. 
0.3 0.3 4-corners, turn lefir on 5th Ave. Cross RRs 0.5. 
0.9 0.-6 4-corners, turn right on Jay St. and second left — still on 5th 

Ave. 

Left on 12th St. 2.8 leads to Cohoes. 

3.9 3.0 Stone watering trough at 5-corners; turn diagonally right 

under RR 4.3. 
4.4 0.5 Fork; turn left with poles; macadam ends 6.6. 
8.9 4.5 Melrose, flagpole and tree in fork; bear left, keeping straight 

ahead under RR 9.3 ; thru covered bridge 12.0 onto macadam, 

which follow across long wood bridge over RR 12.8. Cross 

long iron bridge (Hoosick river — 13.2) . 

13.3 4.4 End of road just beyond ; turn square left. 

13.4 0.1 Schaghticoke,* fork, brick church on left. Bear right on dirt 

road. 
13.7 0.3 Right-hand diagonal road; turn right, bearing right at end of 
street 14.3. 

14.6 0.9 Fork; bear right. 

15.0 0.4 Right-hand road; turn square right on macadam. 
15.4 0.4 End of road; turn right across iron bridge (Hoosick river) 
and cross RR into 

15.6 0.2 Valley Falls., P. O. on right at 4-corners ; turn square left on 

macadam along RR and river. Cross RR 18.1. 
18.3 2.7 End of road, turn left on gravel. Go under two RRs 18.6. 

18.7 0.4 Johnsonville. End of road, turn right on gravel. Cross RRs 

19.0-19.1, keeping left at fork beyond. 

*Schaghticoke, N. Y. (pop. 1,000, alt. 276 ft.). the first town meeting was held on April 7, 

Situated in Rensselaer county and originally 1789, at the home of John Carpenter. The 

the home of the Mohican Indians. This town first permanent settler was Lewis Viele in 

vas organized by law on March 7, 1788, and 1668. 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 271 



Route 313 



19.7 1.0 4-corners; turn left. Go under RR 19.9. Cross RRs 20.8-21.4- 

23.3. Cross long iron bridge over Hoosick river 25.7. 

26.8 6.1 Eagle Bridge. End of road beyond bridges. Turn right on 

macadaih. 
26.1 0.3 Fork, bear left with macadam. 

. Right is Route 310 to Bennington, Vt. 

Cross RR 26.6. 

26.7 0.6 3-corners ; bear left with macadam across iron bridge 27.6. 
31.4 4.7 Fork; keep left. 

31.8 0.4 Cambridge, N. Y., 4-corners. Turn right. Cross RR 32.0. 

Straight ahead is Route 316 to Rutland. 
Left Is Route 39 to Saratoga Springs. 

32.6 0.8 Irregular 4-corners — sign "Manchester" ; turn left. 

34.0 1.4 Fork, small wooden school on left; bear right away from poles. 

Avoid right-hand road 38.9. Thru covered bridge 40.0. 

40.1 6.1 End of road; turn right on narrow winding road along foot of 

mountain, Avoid left-hand road beyond small bridge 41.3. 
48.0 7.9 Arlington, Vt.,* end of road, cemetery on right. Turn left. 
Thru covered bridge 48.9. 

50.0 2.0 End of road, beyond wooden bridge; turn right. 

56.1 6.1 MANCHESTER,* monument in green on right. 



Route 313— Manchester, Vt., to Glens Falls, N. Y.— 51.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 



-MILEAGE-^ 
Dlttaaet 
Total Between 
Mileage PelRte 



Via Dorset, Pawlet, Granville, Middle uranvllle, Com stock and 
Hudson Falls. First 22 miles macadam; 26 miles gravel; 3 miles graded 
dirt. Thru a hilly farming country. 



0.0 0.0 MANCHESTER, monument in green on right. Go north on 

State road. 
0.1 0.1 4-corners at library; turn right. 

1.3 1.2 Manchester Center, fork, brick church in center. Bear left. 
2.9 1.6 Left-hana diagonal road; bear left. 
3.8 0.9 Fork; bear right. 
4.6 0.8 Fork; keep right across small iron bridge. Cross RR 4.9. 

Thru So. Dorset 5.8. 



•Arlington, Vt. (pop. 1,307, alt. 689 ft.), is so 
situated, by reason of a break or gorge in 
the mountains* that it has sunlight for al- 
most an hour later than points half a mile 
north or south. There is fine trout fishing 
in the Battenkill river, which flows thru the 
town. Ethan Allen lived in Arlington for 
several years; his first wife and two children 
are buried here. # 

'Manchester, Vt. (pop. 2,100, alt. 1,000 ft.), 
is a summer residence and resort town, made 
notable by frequent visits in former years 
of Mrs. Abraham Lincoln and Mrs. U. S. 
Grant. Robert T. Lincoln, son of Abraham 



Lincoln, and president of the Pullman Co., 
has a home here, as have many other per- 
sons of prominence. Mount Equinox, nearby, 
rises to a height of 3,816 feet. 

First session of Vermont legislature was 
held at Manchester in 1788. In 1777 ^the 
"Council of Safety" met here, and Ira AlUn 
propounded the plan of confiscating the prop 
erty of Tories to pay Vermont's share of the 
cost of the revolution. 

Points of interest include a "rocking stone" 
weighing 35 tons, and a "disappearing 
stream," the outlet to which has never been 
traced. Has one of the best and most widely 
known golf links in the U. S. 



WO RTH Y Manchester in 
...INN the Mountains 

An Inn of Perfect Appointment 

ROOMS WITH BATH EN SUITE. ACCOMMODATING 200. PURE 
SPRING WATER. GARAGE ACCOMMODATING 1 00 CARS. CUISINE 
UNEXCELLED. SPORTS OF ALL KINDS. SEASON OPENS JUNE 1 

MANCHESTER HOTEL COMPANY, James T. Brown, Manager 



Route 314 Page 272 Albany-Troy Section 

5.9 1.3 Left-hand road; turn left across RR. 

7.5 1.6 Dorset.* Straight thru. 

9.5 2.0 East Rupert, end of road. Turn right. Thru No. Rupert 11.9. 

Cross iron bridge over Mettowee river 14.4. 
15.9 6.4 Pawlet,* irregular 4-corners, band stand in green on left. 

Bear left across small bridge. 
19.4 3.5 No, Pawlet, Vt, 3-corners. Bear left. 

20.6 1.2 Left-hand road; turn left. Pass slate quarries over to left 
21.7. 

22.6 2.0 4-corners ; turn right. 

22.8 0.2 End of road at RR; turn right. 

23.2 0.4 Granville,* N. Y., end of street at stores. Jog right and imme- 
diately left. " 

23.4 0.2 Fork; bear left. Cross RR 23.8. 

25.4 2.0 Middle Granville, 5-corners, beyond iron bridge. Turn very 
sharp left around store. 

25.7 0.3 Right-hand road; turn right. Bear left 27.4. Avoid left-hand 

road 27.5. Thru Truthville 28.1 and North Granville 28.9. 

30.1 4.4 West Granville Corners. Keep ahead. 
30.4 0.3 Fork; bear right. 

31.2 0.8 End of road; turn left. Pass N. Y. state prison over to left 

34.2. 
34.7 3.5 Comstock, end of road, beyond iron bridge over canal. Turn 
left and follow Route 455 from mileage 17.6 balance of the 
way (16.3 miles) to Glens Falls. 

Route 314— Manchester to Rutland, Vt.— 42.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Pawlet, Mlddletown Springs and West Rutland. Gravel road all the way. 
^-MILEAGE-. winding and narrow in places. 

•r-A-i 2!5**i!? Route runs thru a hilly farming country, following a valley nearly 

JXSmttSff *• entir « distance. 
0.0 0.0 MANCHESTER. See Route 313 for directions to Pawlet, 15.9 

miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 
0.0 0.0 Pawlet, irregular 4-corners. Bear right past church on right. 
1.3 1.3 Left-hand diagonal road, house on right. Turn left. Avoid 
left-hand road 5.6: Thru 4-corners 6.0. Avoid right-hand 
road 7.8. 

11.3 10.0 Middletown Springs, 4-corners, monument ahead on left. Turn 

right upgrade. 

12.1 0.8 Fork; bear right. Avoid right-hand road 13.6. 

18.2 6.1 Fork; bear right across wooden bridge. 
20.2 2.0 End bf road; turn left. 

Rutland City Map and Points of Interest, page 274; 

22.4 2.2 W. Rutland, 3-corners at green. Meeting trolley, bear right 

across RR. Cross RR 24.0. Under RRs 24.2-24.4. 

•Dorset, Vt. (pop. 1,472, alt. 940 ft.). The than a hundred years old are still occupied, 

first convention to declare Vermont, which and in a good state of preservation. Met- 

had been for many years and was still the towee river, starting in Dorset, Hows through 

subject of dispute between New York and Pawlet. Haystack mountain, north of the 

New Hampshire, "a free and independent village, has an altitude of 1,960 feet. 

state," was held here July 24, 1776. 'Granville, N. Y. (pop. 5,000, alt. 416 ft.), is 

The chief industry of this town is marble the shipping point for the Vermont sea 
quarrying and finishing. Dorset marble was green roofing slate, which is produced just 
used extensively in the New York public over the line in Vermont. Upon entering 
library, the Harvard medical School and Granville ,frora the south the masts that 
other buildings of note. Brown hematite support the cableways are conspicuous, 
iron ore exists in considerable quantities. These are the only quarries of their kind in 
Dorset mountain, which extends north and the world and the product is the only mate- 
south thru the town, reaches an elevation rial nature seems to have provided for roofing 
of 3,148 feet. purposes that can be used indefinitely in its 

•Pawlet, Vt. (pop. 1,990, alt. 530 ft.). Points natural state. Lake St. Catherine, 4 miles 

of local interest include the Congregational from Granville via Wells and Poultney, Vt., 

church, organized August 8, 1781, and M. E. over gravel road, it a very picturesque and 

'rch, organized 1826. Several houses more attractive spot. 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



Albany-Troy Section Page 273 Route 316 

25.5 3.1 4-corners ; turn right with trolley onto State St. 

26.0 0.5 End of street ; turn right with trolley onto Grove St. 
26.3 0.1 RUTLAND, Center & Wales Sts. 

Route 316— Albany and Troy, N. Y„ to Rutland, Vt. 

—103.1m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Raymerstown, Hoosick Falls, Cambridge, Salem, Middle Granville/ Poultney, 
Fair Haven, Castleton and W. Rutland. First '60 miles macadam; 7 miles brick; 27 
miles gravel and S.5 miles gravelly dirt. Thru a hilly farming country. 

.-MILEAGE-, Routes 322 and 381 to Glens Falls, combined with Route 397 to Rut- 

t«».i S!£?!L'? land, offers a longer option to this route. 

*{£*• PoliK Route S12 offers a less preferable option to Cambridge. 

0.0 * 0.0 ALBANY. See Route 309 for directions to 

22.7 22.7 3-corners at covered bridge; bear left along stream. 

25.6 2.9 End of road; turn right across iron bridge and two RRs onto 

River St, 

26.0 0.4 End of street; jog right and left onto Williard St. 

26.1 0.1 End of street; meeting trolley, turn left onto Main St. 

26.5 0.4 Hoosick Falls,* Main & Classic Sts., end of road. 

Turn right with trolley onto Classic St. 

26.6 0.1 Left-hand street at water-trough ; turn left upgrade away 

from trolley. Bear left, joining trolley just beyond. 

28.5 1.9 3-corners; turn left with trolley across iron bridge. 

28.6 0.1 No. Hoosick, end of road. Turn left away from trolley. 

29.0 0.4 Left-hand road, beyond iron bridge; turn left. Avoid left- 
hand road 32.7. 

36.8 7.8 Cambridge, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Right is Route 312 to Manchester. 

Cross RR 37.3. Bear right at cemetery 37.7. Thru covered 
wooden bridge 45.3. Cross RR 45.9. Thru Salem 48.1. Cross 
RR 48.3. Thru Hebron 55.0. 

63.0 26.2 End of road; turn right. 

65.3 2.3 Right-hand road, school on right; turn right onto W. Main St. 

65.7 0.4 Granville,* Main & North Sts. Turn left onto North St. 

65.9 0.2 Fork; bear left. Cross RR 66.2. 

67.6 1.7 Middle Granville, 5-corners, P. O. on right. Straight thru; 

Sharp left is Route 313 to Glens Falls. 

69.9 2.3 Right-hand road; turn right. 

70.6 0.7 Raceville, N. Y., church on right. Bear left. 

74.5 3.9 Left-hand road at small green; turn left. 

74.6 0.1 Poultney,* Vt. (outskirts), monument on left. Straight thru 

with trolley. 

•Hoosick Fall*. N. Y. (pop. 6,tM0, alt. 433 ft.), rial nature seems to have provided for roofing 

is noted for its great industry, the Walter A. purposes that can be used indefinitely iu its 

Wood Mowing & Reaping Machine Co., which natural state. Lake St. Catherine, 4 miles 

originated here in 1852. In 1876, at the centen- from Granville via Wells and Poultney, Vt., 

nial exhibition, Mr. Wood took the highest over gravel road, is a very picturesque and 

awards for his harvesters. The total number attractive spot. 

of gold medals and other important prizes *Poultney, Vt. (pop. 3,644, alt. 430 ft.), 

taken by him in competition with all the Bordered on south by Lake St. Catherine, 

various makes of reapers, mowers and bind- popular summer resort. Ethan Allen lived 

crs in the world now exceeds 1,200. A visit to here in 1773; his brother, Huber Allen, was 

the Wood plant would no doubt prove of the first town clerk. Another member of 

much interest. The Hoosick river, which the family, Maj. Ebenezer Allen, with his 

supplies valuable water power, runs thru the Rangers, captured Mount Defiance from the 

village in a .serpentine manner, giving it a British late in 1777. 

picturesque appearance from the hi!!*. Horace Greeley learned his trade as printer 
HkmnvJU^ N. Y. (pop. 5,000, alt. 403 ft.), is * in the office of the "Northern Spectator," 
point for the Vermont sea 4 of which Amos Bliss was then editor and pro- 
slate, which is produced just prietor. In 1826, when about 15 years old, he 
in Vermont. .\tJpott entering i> t took a position as "devil," remaining in t^ 
C f r«m the south the masts that office four years and two months. 
: t£f iyibleways are conspicuous. Troy Conference academy, located 1 
tjfiiMsnly quarries of their kind in was established in 1834; its certificates a 
and the product is the only mate- to any New England college^ 

\ Digitized by GOOgle 



^ 




Route 316 Page 274 Albany-Troy Section 

75.4 0.8 Hampton, end of road, beyond iron bridge. Turn right. 

78.2 2.8 End of road, beyond iron bridge; turn left. Cross RR 80.0. 

80.3 2.1 Fair Haven, P. O. on right, green on left. Keep to right of 

green. 
80.8 0.5 4-eorners at small green; turn right. Thru Hydeville* 82.3. 
83.6 2.8 Castleton Corners (Bomoseen P. O. on right), 4-corners. 

Left at Castleton Corners leads to Lake Bomoseen and is Route 398 
to MJddlebury. 

Straight thru with trolley. Cross RR 84.1. 

•Hydeville, Vt. (pop. 700, alt. 406 ft.), is where the first stream flowing into Lake 

built near site of the eastern terminus of the Bomoseen was reached. Indian relics were 

_,,_,. .' formerly often found in village and vicinity. 

historic portage used by Indians and early T i r> • . j * 

K • * * Lake Bomoseen is noted as a summer resort 

travelers between Carver's falls, in Poultney and Hydeville for slate products of every 
river, near Fair Haven, Vt., and the point description. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, RUTLAND, VT. 
Rutland (pop. 16,000, alt. 562 ft.) is the During the revolution Fdrt Ranger wai 
center of the greatest marble producing sec- built hcre# It inc i uded an area c f 2 acres, 
tion in the world, being widely known as ^ . , , . . , .... 
i«»# li ^«* »» t* u -j ut j« w *» stockaded and had a blockhouse at one 
"Marble City." It has considerable diversi- 
fied industry, including the Howe Scale s » d *. The military road from Crown Point 
Works, whose plant covers 16J4 acres. to the Connecticut river passed thru here. 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 275 Routes 317-318 

85.2 1.6 Castleton,* P. O. on right. Straight thru. 

85.6 0.4 Fork; keep left across RR. Cross trolley and small iron 
bridge 88.7. / 

92.5 6.9 W. Rutland, 3-corners. Bear left with trolley. Cross RRs 

92.9-94.1. 

95.6 3.1 4-corners ; turn right with trolley onto State St. 
96.1 0.5 End of street; turn right with trolley onto Grove St. 

96.3 0.2 Left-hand road ; turn left onto Center St. away from trolley. - 

96.4 0.1 RUTLAND, Center & Wales Sts. 

Route 317 — Manchester, Vt., to Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

— 50.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
^MILCAGE-n Via Arlington, Cambridge, Greenwich and Schuylerville. Gravel 

t-* i SlSSSf* wltn some dirt to Cambridge; balance ntacadam and gravel. Thru a 
Mlltilt PriSti nilly ' armin S country. 

0.0 0.0 MANCHESTER, monument in green on left. Go south. 

6.1 6.1 Left-hand road; turn left across wooden bridge. Thru cov- 
ered bridge 7.2. • 

8.1 2.0 Arlington, Vt., right-hand road, cemetery on far right. Turn 
right. 

8.6 0.5 Fork; bear right on narrow winding road along foot of moun- 
tain. Avoid right-hand road 14.8. Cross Vermont-New York 
state line 15.5. 
16.0 7.4 Left-hand road; turn left. Thru covered bridge 16.1, curv- 
ing right . immediately beyond. Avoid left-hand road 17.2. 
Bear left at small wooden school 22.1. ^ Avoid right-hand 
road 23.1. 

23.5 7.5 Irregular 4-corners, store on right ; turn right. Thru promi- 

nent 4-corners 23.7. Cross RR 24.1. 
Left at 23.7 is Route 405 to Plttifleld. 

24.3 0.8 Cambridge, 4-corners. Keep ahead and follow Route 39 from 

Left is Route 461 to Albany and Troy. 

mileage 29.0 balance of the way (26.2 miles) to Saratoga 
Springs. 

Route 318 — Manchester, Vt,, to Ticonderoga, N. Y. — 58.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Pawlet, N. Pawlet, Poultney, Fair Haven, Orwell and Montcalm auto ferry. 
Macadam to N. Pawlet; gravel to Fair Haven; then 14.6 miles graded gravelly dirt 
to Montcalm ferry. A good connection from Manchester to west side of Dake Cham- 
_mLEAGE-> plain. 

»_* . SiS** -00 For option from Orwell to Ticonderoga via Larrabee Point ferry see 

Tttol BttwtM Note (a) Route 401. 



0.0 0.0 MANCHESTER. See Route 313 for directions to 
19.4 19.4 N. Pawlet, 3-corners. Bear right, downgrade. 
21.8 2.4 Wells, at stores. Straight thru. 

23.8 2.0 Irregular 4-corners, school on far left; turn right. Cross 
iron bridge over Lake St. Catherine, curving left just beyond. 
28.4 4.6 Fork; bear left downgrade. 
29.6 1.2 End of road, just beyond covered bridge; turn left. 

29.8 0.2 4-corners at water-trough ; turn right. 

29.9 0.1 Poultney,* Vt., 4-corners, town hall on left. Turn left. Cross 

*Castleton, Vt. (pop. 2,000, alt. 500 ft.), was the family, Maj. Ebcnczer Allen, with his 

the assembling point for troops for the at- Rangers, captured Mount Defiance from the 

tack on Ticonderoga in 1775 and here Benedict British late in 4777. 

Arnold was refused command of the expedi- Horace Grec, *y l ear ° cd *»» *™ d * as printer 

tion. General St. Clair's army repeated from in , ^. e u °f ce °' the "N^**™ Spectator," 

_. . . r« .i . • iw °f which Amos Bliss was then editor and pro- 

Ticonderoga to Castleton in 1777. . 4 T , D/> ^ . , . ,_ .. . 

® prietor. In 1826, when about 15 years old, he 

Vt. (pop. 3,644, alt. 430 ft.). took a position a8 "devil," remaining in the 

on south by Lake St. Catherine,. office four ycar8 and two mon ths. 
summer resort. Ethan Allen lived Troy Conference academy, located her* 

her£iLl776; his brother, Hiiber Allen, was was established in 1843; its certificates adn 



thc nBtr town clerk. Another member of to any New England college. 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



Route 319 Page 276 Albany-Troy Section 

RR at sta. 30.1. 
30.2 0.3 End of road at monument; turn right with trolley. 

Bear left with trolley 30.7. . 
31.0 0.8 Hampton, N. Y., end of road, just beyond bridge. Turn right. 

33.8 2.8 End of road, just beyond bridge; turn left. Cross RR 35.6. 

35.9 2.1 Fair Haven, green and cannon on left. Keep ahead along park. 

36.0 0.1 Left-hand street; turn left onto West St. 

36.1 0.J 4-corners at far side of park; turn right. 

51.1 15.0 Orwell, Vt.,* 4-corners at outskirts. Turn left. 

Right leads to center of town. 

Avoid right-hand road 51.4. 

Right at 51.4 is Note (a) Route 401 to TJconderoga via Larrabee 
Point Ferry. 

52.0 0.9 Fork; bear right. Caution for sharp curve upgrade 56.2. . 

56.6 4.6 Montcalm Auto Ferry across Lake Champlain. 

Perry runs oji signal from opening of navigation until June 15th, 
7 a. m. to 6 p. m. From' June 16th to close of navigation, daylight 
until dark. Rates: Car and passenger, 60c to $1.26, according to 
size of car. 

From ferry landing keep ahead across RR. 

56.7 0.1 Montcalm, end of road. Turn ♦right. Recross RR 57.3. Bear 

left across switch onto Exchange St. 58.3. 
58.7 2.0 TICONDEROGA,* Exchange & Main Sts. 

Route 319— Troy to Glens Falls, N. Y.-49.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Mechanicsville, Schuylervllle, Fort Edward and Hudson Palls. First 80 miles 
macadam and brick, then 13 miles dirt and gravel; balance state road. The IS miles 
of dirt road will probably be under construction during 1920. 

Thru a rolling, farming country following the Hudson river all the way. 

The following route to Mechanicsville, combined with Routes 321 and 381 to Saratoga 
Springs and Glens Falls, offers an all macadam option. 
,-MILEAGE-> 



Total Betweea 



For this and other exits see City Map, page 267. . 

0.0 0.0 TROY, Broadway & River Sts., at monument. Go east with 

trolley on Broadway four blocks. 
0.2 0.2 4-corners; turn left away from trolley onto 5th Ave. Cross 

RR 0.5. 

1.0 0.8 4-corners ; turn right onto Jay St. two blocks. 

1.1 0.1 4-corners ; turn left onto 5th Ave. 
4.1 3.0 4-corners; turn left onto 24th St. 

4.4 0.3 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto 2nd Ave., cross- 
ing long iron bridge over Hudson river and coming onto 

♦Orwell, Vt. (pop. 942, alt. 385 ft.), was Champlain at the Montcalm ferry. Part of 

originally part of the Ticonderoga military Benedict Arnold's fleet, with which he fought 

works, laid out by Thaddeus Kosciusko, the the British late in 1776, was puilt here, 
famous Polish officer and engineer who fought *Ticonderoga, N. V. (pop. 3,000, alt. 277 ft.), 

with the colonies during the revolution. Here is the outlet of Lake George, which falls 

Mount Independence, on the Vermont side, 150 feet in iy£ miles and affords excellent ,■ 

was christened July 28, 1776, after news of water power. This town figured prominently 

the Declaration of Independence reached here during the colonial and revolutionary periods. 

and was read to the troops by Colonel (after- The' French erected a fort here in 1755 and 

ward General) St. Clair. Remains of the old called it Fort Carrillon. In 1759 Lord Amherst 

breastworks can still be seen on the Mount; forced the French to evacuate it, and the 

a fine granite monument has been erected English after coming into this fortress 

there by the Hands Cove Chapter D. A. R. strengthened and enlarged it at heavy ex- 

The works at Orwell, completed under direc- pense. In 1775 it was taken from the English 

tion of Colonel, afterwards General, Wayne, under Colonel Ethan Allen and two years 

were connected with Ticonderoga by a float- later it was recaptured by General Burgoyne. 

ing bridge 400 yards long. The location of Aft$r the war it became a picturesque ruin, 

the Mt. Independence works and the restored but since has been rebuilt and is located on 

fortifications of the Ticonderoga works can a high bluff about two miles south of the 

be seen from waterside in crossing Lake town. 



k$[ For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
1 ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



Albany-Troy Section Page 277 



Route 319 



Broadway. Cross RR 4.8. 
4.9 0.5 Waterford,* Broad & 3rd Sts. Turn right with branch trolley 

onto 3rd St. Cross RRs 5.3-11.1-12.0*. 
12.2 7.3 Fork; bear right with trolley onto Main St. 
* 13.2 1.0 Mechanicsville,* Main St. & Saratoga Ave. 

Left on Saratoga Ave is Route 321 to Saratoga Springs. 

Straight thru with trolley. Cross RR 13.&. 

16.1 2.9 Fork, cannon in center; bear right with trolley across bridge. 

16.4 0.3 Stillwater, P. 0. over to left. Straight thru with trolley. 
19.0 2.6 Bemis Heights. Straight thru, leaving trolley. 

19.2 0.2 Fork; bear left— sign "Schuylerville." 

20.0 0.8 Fork ; bear right. Pass Fort Neilson monument on right 20.3. 

21.2 1.2 Fork, water-trough in center; bear right between two monu- 
ments, marking Saratoga battle line. Thru Quaker Springs 
24.3. 

26.6 5.4 3-corners, school ahead on right; bear right. 

27.5 0.9 End of road; turn left. 

28.2 0.7 Right-hand road, beyond RR bridge; turn right. Thru Victory 

Mills 29.4. Cross RR 29.9. 
30.0 1.8 Fork; bear right. Join trolley from right 80.3, coming onto 

Broad St. 
30.5 0.5 Schuylerville,* Broad * Ferry Sts., at P. O. 



•Waterford, N. Y. (pop. 3,500, alt. 39 ft.), 
the oldest village in New York state, is situ-, 
atcd where the Hudson and Mohawk rivers 
unite. Its Dutch origin is still easily trace- 
able In the older houses with their little 
stoops built close to the sidewalks. Just 
south of the town are the old earthworks, evi- 
dences of revolutionary activity. The build- 
in a that is now Masonic hall has been hon- 
ored by Lafayette as an over- night guest 
during one of his trips thru the town. Water- 
ford is the eastern terminal of the barge 
canal, whose five huge locks here lift boats 
to a greater height in a shorter distance than 
any other locks in the world. 

•Mechanicsville, N. Y. (pop. 10,000, alt. 61 
ft.), lays claim to the largest book paper mill 
in the world. Immense piles of wood, con- 
taining thousands of cords, may be seen on 
both sides of Main St., near the mill; also 
visible .from Saratoga Ave. en route to Sara- 
toga Springs. The waste from this pulp 
mill is utilized by other plants in the town 
to make acetone, which is used to varnish 
airplane wings, alcohol and land plaster. 

Just south of the city is the plant of the 
Adirondack electric power corporation, the 
concrete storage dam of which is said to be 
the first of its kind (concrete) built in the 
northern states. 

Col. Ellsworth, the first officer killed in the ' 
civil war, lies buried in Mechanicsville. A 
monument dedicated to his memory may be 



seen upon entering the city from the south. 

•Schuylerville, N. Y. (pop. 2,000. alt. 172 ft.), 
on the north side of Fish creek, was named 
after Philip Schuyler, one of the wealthiest 
men of the colonies at the time of the revolu- 
tion, and who more than once risked all his 
fortune in their cause. He was not only a 
great general, but a high type of patriot. 
His old home, known as the Schuyler man- 
sion, may be seen on the south end of the 
village, on the old river road from Albany. 
A little south of the mansion stood the 
colonial forts. Clinton and Saratoga, and also 
the original village of Saratoga, wiped out in 
the massacre of 1745. Five miles south of the 
village by state road is the battle ground of 
the two battles of Bemis Heights. The cele- 
brated Battle monument is up Burgoyne 
street, on Prospect Hill. It has a square 
base, a shaft of 155 ft., and above each en- 
trance is a niche, three of them containing 
statues of Gates, Schuyler and Morgan. The 
fourth one would have had a statue of Bene- 
dict Arnold had he not' forfeited his right by 
turning traitor. 

Burgoyne came down from Canada by the 
Lake George -Lake Champlain route with the 
largest and best equipped British army ever 
sent to America, expecting to join with two 
other divisions, converging at Albany, and 
crush the revolution in the north. He was 
opposed upon the battlefield at Bemis Heights 
by an army of about 17,000, made up mainly 
(Continued on page 278.) 



"MACECKRON'S" 

Tourist Accommodations 



193 Broadway 

Schuylerville, New York 



Red Lion Inn 

Open All the Year 
SCHUYLERVILLE, N. Y. 



A Dellghtlu: 

Excellent cuisine. First-class Accommoda 



Stopping Place for Tourists. 

First-class Accommoda- 

Fishing. American Plan. 



tions. Boating, 
$2.50 and up. 

Telephone No. 38-J 
A. E. SCULLY 



Proprietor 



uoo<r~" 



Digitized by 



Route 321 Page 278 Albany-Troy Section 

Straight thru on Broad St. Cross Spring St. 30.8. 

Left on Spring St. S0.8 is Route 39 to Saratoga Springs. 

Cross RR 31.7.' 
32.6 2.1 Northumberland, right-hand road. Turn right across long 
iron bridge over Hudson river, bearing left beyond. 

35.3 2.7 Fork; bear left across iron bridge. Thru Fort Miller 35.5. 

36.6 1.3 Right-hand road; turn right — sign "Fort Edward." Cross sev- 

eral small bridges over old canal. 
43.5 6.9 4-corners; turn right with trolley onto Broadway. 

43.7 0.2 Fort Edward.* Straight thru on Broadway aeross RR. Cross 

canal bridge 44.1. Over RR bridge 44.2. 
46.2 2.5 Hudson Falls, fork, monument and fountain in center. Bear 
left away from trolley. 

Right with trolley at monument is Route 397 to Rutland. 

Cross canal bridge 47.6. Join trolley 47.8. Cross RR 48.2, 
coming onto Warren St. 

Glens Falls City Map and Points of Interest, page 312. 

49.4 3.2 GLENS FALLS, Glen, Ridge & Warren Sts. 

Route 321 — Albany to Saratoga Springs, N. Y. — 38.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Indevof Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Latham, "Waterford and Mechanicsville. Macadam, brick and concrete roadv. 
Thru rolling farming country, part of the route running along the upper Hudson river, 
coming into a congested manufacturing district around Mechanicsville. 

This route is longer and covers more congested section than Route 322 via 
Schenectady. 

r ~ MIL Dhtanot * ?or *^ s and other exits see City Map, page 260. 

M T uew B plJnu n ^ or en l ar g e d map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY, State St. & Broadway. P. O. on right. Go west on 

State St. with trolley. 

0.3 0.3 End of street at State Capitol; turn right and next left with 

trolley on Washington Ave. 

0.9 0.6 Fork, water-trough in center; bear right with trolley 

1.0 0.1 4-corners; turn right on Northern Blvd., leaving trolley. 

1.6 0.6 End of Boulevard; turn left. 

1.7 0.1 Right-hand road ; turn right. Go over RR bridges 2.0-2.1. 

2.6 0.9 4-corners; turn left. Thru Loudenville 4.6. Thru Newton- 

* vil!e6.1. 

7.7 5.1 Latham, 4-corners. Straight thru across trolley. 

Right is Route 316 to Troy and Rutland. 

•Fort Edward, N. Y. (pop. 3,775, alt. 147 ft.). magazine. Barracks and storehouses were 

Named for the fort erected here in 1732, first also erected on an island in the river; 97.000 

known as Fort Lydius. then as Fort Lyman troops rendezvoused around the fort, and 

and finally as Fort Edward, so called in honor from its walls was seen the revolting raassa- 

of Prince Edward of the royal family of Eng- ere of Jane McCrea, who was murdered by the 

land. In ancient times the site of the town Indians on her way to meet her lover, an 

was known as "The Great Carrying Place,*' officer in Burgoyne's army. A monument 

being situated at a point where the Indians commemorates the death of this young 

left the Hudson river and struck across to woman. Her remains are buried in the ceme- 

the headwaters of Lake Champlain. This tery just north of the village, the 'lot being 

fortification was of considerable military im- surrounded by an ornamented iron fence. 

portance. It had six mounted cannon, was Several skirmishes were fought within sight 

1,569 ft. in circumference and had within its of the fort, resulting in more than 200 deaths. 

enclosures barracks, hospital, storehouse and Its evacuation took place in 1776. 

(S'chuylerville Points of Interest, continued from page 277.) 

of farmers, and was defeated. It . was the N. Y„ thus cutting off completely the chances 

turning point in the struggle for independ- of Burgoyne's retreat. The plateau at the 

ence and has since been regarded as one of m( >« th of th « Batten Kill is the site of Bur- 

the sixteen decisive battles of history. *°y ne ' s cam P' from which he s * nt the de " 

«- , « . . , .. . tachment to capture Bennington, Vt. 

Though Gates was in command, the real _. . " A ..«_.« j . 

, .„....,, The plateau between the Tillage and river 

honors were won by Benedict Arnold and u known a§ the „ fieW of ^ ^^ arm% ., 

Daniel Morgan. The men and materials had ag here thc conquered British army laid down 

been largely assembled by Schuylex before their arms. 

Gates took command. At the north end of the village stands the 

A mile and a half north of the village is house, in the cellar of which Madam Reidesed 

"Starks Knob,'* where Gen. Stark took posi- and children, with the wives of British offi- 

tion after the battle of Bennington, which cers, took refuge during the bombardment 

was actually fought in the town of Hoosick, of Schuylerville. 

Digitized by dOOgle 



Albany-Troy Section Page 279 . Route 32* , 

8.7 1.0 Right-hand road; turn right. 

9.9 1.2 Fork at foot of grade ; bear left. • 

10.3 0.4 Fork; bear right onto Columbia St. 

11.3 1.0 Left-hand street, just beyond monument; turn left away from 

trolley one block. % 

11.4 0.1 Right-hand street; turn right onto Younglove Avfe. Turn left 

with street at sta. 11.6. 
11.7 0.3 Right-hand street; turn right under RR and at end of street 
just beyond iron bridge; turn left. Turn right onto Ontario 
St. 11.8- Thru irregular 4-corners 11.9, keeping ahead on 
Ontario St. across small iron bridge. 

12.0 0.3 Cohoes,* Ontario & Ramsen Sts., bank oh far left. Keep 

ahead on Ontario St., joining trolley. 

12.1 0.1 Saratoga Ave., one block beyond RR ; turn left with branch 

trolley. Cross long iron bridge over Mohawk River 12.3. Bear 
right with trolley ^on Saratoga Ave., just beyond iron bridge, 
13.7. Bear right with trolley across canal onto Broad St. 
14.0 1.9 Waterford,* Broad & 3rd Sts. Turn left with branch trolley 
onto 3rd St. Cross RR 14.5. 

21.2 7.2 Fork; bear right with trolley onto Main St. 
22.7 1.5 Mechanicsville,* Main St. & Saratoga Ave. 

Straight ahead is Route 319 to Glens Falls. 

Turn left away from trolley onto Saratoga Ave. Cross RR 
22.9. Cross RR at Willow Glen 24.8. Avoid left-hand diagonal 
road at Maltaville 28.7. Thru Malta 30.6. Same thorofare 
becomes Broadway. 

Saratoga Springs City Map and Points of Interest, page 310. 

38.7 16.0 SARATOGA SPRINGS, Broadway & Church St., town hall on 
far right. 

Route 322— Albany to Saratoga Springs, N. Y.— 37.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Schenectady, Burnt Hills and Ballston Spa. Asphalt, brick, concrete and mac- 
adam all the way. Thru fine farming section. 

Route 321 offers a good but somewhat longer option via Cohoes. 

'""^oittwwt For this an( * other exit ? see City Map, page 260. 

J*** BatwMM For enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY, State St. & Broadway, P. O. on right. Go west 

with trolley on State St. 
0.3 0.3 End of street at Capitol buildings ; turn right and immediately 

left onto Washington Ave. 
0.9 0.6 Fork, green in center} bear right with trolley onto Central 

Ave. 

•Cohoes, N. Y. (pop. 25.000, alt. 94 ft.), is canal, whose, five huge locks here lift boats 

one of the largest knit goods centers in the to a greater height in a shorter distance than 

United States and lays claim to having the *"y other lock? in the world, 

largest knit mill in the country. 1.100 ft. long. : - •Mechanicsville. N. Y. (pop. 10.000. alt. 61 

Cohoe, falls, on the Mohawk river, and the h \}^ s cf ^ m \° the ,ar * e .f bo f »**** mi " 
i.«,«... , ... j m the world. Immense piles of wood, con- 
old Van Schoeck mansion, which was used •• . A . , * . . 

"■•••» taming thousands of cords, may be seen on 

as General Schuyler's headquarters during both Mt% of Main St neaf the mi , |; algo 

the revolutionary war, are local interesting visible from Saratoga Ave. en route to Sara- 

Points. toga Springs. The waste from this pulp 

•Waterford, N. Y. (pop. 3.500, alt. 39 ft.), m m i s utilized by other plants in the town 

the oldest village in New York state, is situ- to make acetone, which is used to varnish 

ated where the Hudson and Mohawk rivers airplane wings, alcohol and land plaster. 

unite. Its Dutch origin is still easily trace- Just south of the city is the plant of the 

able in the older houses with their little Adirondack electric power corporation, the 

stoops built close to the sidewalks. Just concrete storage dam of which is said to be 

south of the town are the old earthworks, evi- the first of its kind (concrete) built in the 

N denccs of revolutionary activity. The build- northern states. 

ing that is now Masonic hall has been hon- CoL Ellsworth, the first officer killed in the 

ored by Lafayette as an over- night guest civil war. lies buried in Mechanicsville. A 

during oie of his trips thru the town. Water- monument dedicated to his memory may b* 

ord is the eastern terminal of the barge seen upon entering the city from the south 



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Route 324 Page 280 Albany-Troy Section 

11.8 10.9 Woodlawn. Straight thru with trolley. 

Schenectady City May and Points of Interest, page 609. 

14.7 2.9 Schnectady, State St. & Nott Terrace, at park, Armory on 
left. Turn sharp right onto Nott Terrace. 

15.0 0.3 End of street at Union College; turn left onto Union St. one 

short block, then right onto Seward Place. 

15.6 0.6 End of street; meeting trolley, turn sharp left onto Nott St. 

15.7 0.1 Caution — right-hand road, just beyond RR at American Loco- 

motive Works ; turn right across RR. 
16.4 * 0.7 Left-hand road; turn left across long iron bridge over Mohawk 
river. 

16.8 0.4 3-corners; bear left. Cross RRs 17.0-17.3. 

21.9 5.1 Right-hand road beyond iron bridge; turn right. 

23.1 1.2 Burnt Hills, 4-corners at flagpole. Turn right. 

24.1 1.0 Ballston Lake, end of road. Turn left. Thru diagonal 4-cor- 

ners 29.9. Now on Church Ave. 

30.7 6.6 End of avenue; turn left onto High St. and immediately right 

onto Low St. 

30.8 0.1 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto Front St. 

30.9 0.1 Ballston Spa,* Milton Ave. & Front St. Turn left with trol- 

ley onto Milton Ave. 

31.4 0.5 Right-hand street just beyond iron bridge; turn right onto 

Saratoga Ave. 

31.5 0.1 3-corners beyond trolley crossing; bear left. Turn left over 

RR bridge 33.1, bearing right immediately beyond. 
35.5 4.0 End of road ; turn right across small stone bridge. 

Saratoga Springs City Map and Points of interest, page 310. 

35.7 0.2 Fork beyond RR and trolley crossing; bear left onto Ballston 
Ave. 

37.2 1.5 5-corners, just beyond trolley crossing; bear left onto Broad- 

way. 
37.7 0.5 SARATOGA SPRINGS, Broadway & Lake Ave., P. O. on far 
left. 

Route 324— Albany to Utica, N. Y.— 94.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Schenectady, Amsterdam, Little Falls, Herkimer and Deerfleld. Macadam roads, 
^irith a few stretches of brick" ' 

One of the main trunk lines, following the N. Y. C. RR and the Mohawk river thru 
rolling: farming country and numerous towns. Very heavily traveled. 

Note (a) furnishes an option between Herkimer and Utica via the south side of the 
river, but we would advise tourists to use the regular route as it offers an easy entrance 
to U1 ica and avoids RR crossings and trolley line. 

^ M,L Dlrtanw For this an( * other exits see £**? Ma P» P*S e 260 ' 

M T itat B Prfiita" For enlar S ed map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 
0.0 0.0 ALBANY, State St. & Broadway, at P. O. Go west on State 

St. up Capitol Hill. 
0.2 0.2 Front of State Capitol; bear right and immediately left with 

trolley onto Washington Ave. 
0.8 0.6 Fork, water-trough and green in center; bear right with 

trolley onto Central Ave. Pass golf club on right 5.5. Thru 

Woodlawn 11.7. Same thorofare becomes State St. 

Schenectady City Map and Points of Interest, page 458. 

"Ballston Spa, N. Y. (pop. 4,500, ait. 320 ft.), at that time the largest in the country. This 

the county seat of Saratoga county, waa in- hotel, which entertained Webster, Clay, Cal- 

corporated in 1807. The first hotel, built in houn, Van Buren, Irving and Cooper, wa^ a 

1787, is still standing though now used as a popular resort until 1887, when it was torn 

private home. Immediately back of the hotel down. 

is "Mohican Hill," made famous by Cooper's Among distinguished citizens of Ballston 

"Last of the Mohicans." In front of the Spa were Hon. John W. Taylor, speaker of 

hotel is the famous "Iron Spring," visited by the U. S. House of Representatives in 1825< 

Sir William Johnson in 1767 and later by the only person ever elected speaker from the 

Washington and Lafayette. Ballston was the state of New York; General Abner Doubleday, 

"watering place" in the United States father of Base-ball; and Timothy Bailey, in- 

« Sana Souci Hotel, built in 1803, was ventor of the knitting machine. 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 281 Route 324 

15.0 14.2 Schenectady, State & Center Sts. Keep head with trolley on 
State St. 

15.3 » 0.3 End of street; meeting cross-trolley* turn right onto Washing- 

ton Ave. Cross long iron bridge over Mohawk river 15.6. 
15.7 0.4 The Dyke just beyond bridge; turn left with branch trolley. 
16.2 0.5 Mohawk Ave. ; bear right with trolley. 

16.4 0.2 Scotia, Mohawk & Ballston Aves. Straight thru on Mohawk 

Ave. 

Turn right over RR 22.5. Thru Hoffmans 24.3. Thru Cranes- 
ville.27.7. Same thorofare becomes Main St. 
30.7 14.3 Amsterdam, Main & Market Sts. Straight thru on Main St. 

33.6 2.9 Fort Johnson,* old Ft. Johnson over to "right. Keep ahead. 

33.7 0.1 Left-hand street; turn left over trolley bridge and imme- 

diately right. Caution for trolley 35.5. 

•Fort Johnson, N. Y. Erected in 1742 by revolution. The fort is now owned by the 

Sir William Johnson. In 1755 he held a meet- Montgomery county historical society, pre* 

ing here with the Iroquois Indians, which Rented to them by the De Peysters of New 

resulted in their following him in a combat York City. It is open daily to visitors, 

against the French at Lake George. The fort Curios and antique relics from the early resi- 

was occupied from 1763 by Sir John Johnson, dents of the Mohawk valley arc on exhibition 

who with his Indian friends and neighbors in the fort, among them the famous Richmond 

played havoc with the Americans during the collection. 



POINTS OF INTEREST, AMSTERDAM, N. Y. 

Amsterdam (pop. 35,000, alt. 264 ft.). In street. Near the Thomas house, one of the 

Montgomery county, on the Mohawk river, oldest in the state, was the residence of 

The oldest building within the boundary lines ^ ,isha A™^- fcther of Benedict Arnold, 

of the city is the Guy Park mansion, recently ^terdam is the first city in the United 

.. . *j j* **i_i*t States in the manufacture of carpets and 

the home of descendant, of the late Jame, rug , and ^ , econd m »„ f ' ct „ e 

Stewart, buUt m 1763 The first town meet- rf knit good ,. lt aUo „„ ^ , arg £, t ™ 

rag waa held in the Vedder house. 12 William button factory in the world. 



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Route 324 Page 282 Albany-Troy Section * 

35.9 2.2 Tribes Hill, 3-corners at store. Bear left. 

Right is Route 325 to Gloversville. 

41.3 5.4 Fonda, Main St. & Broadway, bank on near right. ^ 

Keep ahead with trolley on Main St. 

41.5 0.2 Fork, mill in center; bear left across RR. 
52.8 11.3 Palatine Bridge. Straight thru. 

Left across bridge leads to Canajoharie and is Route 589 to Cobles- 
kill and Route 346 to Cooperttown. 

55.6 2.8 Nelliston, irregular 4-corners, stores on left. Straight thru. 

Left across bridge leads to Canajoharie and is Route (89 to Coblesklll 

61.6 6.0 St Johnsvilte, Main & Bridge Sts. 

Keep ahead on Main St. Caution for sharp curve just beyond 
RR underpass 7Q.0. Thru irregular 4-corners 71.5. 

71.8 10.2 Little Falls,* Main & Ann Sts., at banks. 

Right at these 4-corners is Route 840 to Barneveld. 

Keep ahead with trolley on Main St. Caution for trolley 
crossing 77.4. Same thorofare becomes East Albany St. 

•Little Falls, N. Y. (pop. 12,300, alt. 375 ft.), # Herkimer stood 2J4 miles east of town, and 

of particular interest here is the old Fort * hcr * the general rested upon his return from 

Herkimer church, built close to the site of . 'J* b f a " ,e of 0**skany. V*** a corncr of 

Fort Herkimer itself, in 1756. This little the old barn there is a solid masonry powder 

.- ' . chamber. An historic museum is to be e»- 

church was used by the pioneers as a place toMW|ed on ^ oM home8tead There are 

of refuge during the French and Indian wars, bcautiful drivC8 along the Mohawk river, 

and during the revolutionary war it served The bargc cana , and Lover's Leap offer an 

as a defense and a pla'ce to hold military inspiring view on the south side of this 

supplies. The boyhood home of Gen. Nicholas stream. 



The Palmer House "S£iSft2SK &T 

H. D. McINTOSH, Prop. 

American Plan 

Herkimer N. Y. Rate*-$4.oo and up 



HOTEL WAGNER 

MR. and MRS. CHAS. L. WAGNER, Props. 
ROOMS STORAGE 

with Comfort Without Extravagance F °* RS 

C^^Jy% •• Halfway Between •• \I \Y 

1 OnOa • • New York and Rochester • • IN . Y . 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 283 Route 324 ^ 

Cross long concrete bridge 78.1. Cross switch 79.6. 
78.8 7.0 Herkimer,* Albany & Main Sts., sta. on left. Turn right onto 
Main St. 

Left on Main St. and Immediately right is Note. (a) to Utlea. 

79.1 0.8 Church St., City Hall on right; turn left. 

Straight ahead on Main St. is Route 688 to Speculator. 

92.8 18.7 Fork; bear right with trolley. 

92.9 0.1 Deerfield, 4-corners. Turn left with trolley onto Genesee St. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 673 to Oswego via Roma. 
Right before this turn is Route 678 to Watertown and Route 579 to 
Fulton Lakes. 

94.1 1.2 Fork; bear right with trolley; still on Genesee St. 

Utica City Map and Points Of Interest, page 444. 

94.3 * 0.2 UTICA, Genesee, Bleecker & Lafayette Sts., bank on far right. 

Note (a) Route 324— Herkimer to Utica, N. Y.— 15.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Mohawk, nion and Frankfort. Macadam all the way, alorif the south side of the 
Mohawk river. An option to the regular route for tourists desiring to go thru MohawK, 
Ilion and Frankfort. 

0.0 0.0 HERKIMER, Mohawk & Main Sts., trolley sta. on right. Go west with trolley 
on Mohawk St. Cross bridge over Mohawk river 0.7. Join trolley 0.9 coming 
onto Main St. 
1.4 1.4 Mohawk, Main A Columbia Sts. Straight thru with trolley on Main St. 

Left on Columbia St. is Route 691 to Richfield Springs, Cooperstown 
and Oneonta. 

'Herkimer, N. Y. (pop. 7,520, alt. 406 ft.), tion. The court house stands on the site of 
the seat of Herkimer county* in a picturesque Port Dayton, s revolutionary fortification. 



section of the Mohawk valley, near the The Dutch Reform church is one of the oldest 

I mouth of West Canada creek, and named in the Mohawk valley. There is a statue of 

after Gen. Nicholas Herkimer, hero of the bat- Gen. Herkimer in Myers park. To the west 

tie of Oriskany, and other fights in the Mo- of the town is Fort Herkimer church, on the 

hawk valley. The principal industry is the site of an ancient fortification, which was a 

manufacture of roll top desks. It was settled refuge prior to the revolution, and a base of 

originally by Germans from the Rhine sec- supplies during the war. 



TlMotorLife ]j 

The One Magazine for Motorists — 

ZMotor Life 

— full of practical helpfulness, advice of the money-saving 
sort, entertainment, and self-propelled human interest. 



(See Coupon in Front of Book) 



3^^^^^^^^^^ 



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Route 325 Page 284 Albany-Troy Section 

1.2 1.8 I Hon. Main A Otsego sts., at Remington Arms Co. Straight thru with trolley 
on ICaln St. 

4.1 0.9 t-oorners; bear right with branch trolley across Iron bridge — still on Main St, 
6.6 1.6 Frankfort, Main & Litchfield Sts. Straight thru on Main St. Caution for 

turn under RR 10.7. Cross RR 11.0. 

12.6 6.9 Turner St. at end of pavement ; turn left Cress RR 12.7. 

Utlca City Map and Points of Interest, page 444. 
12.9 0.4 End of street, large factory on left; meeting trolley turn right onto Bleecker 

St. 
16.1 2.4 UTICA, Bleecker, Genesee & Lafayette 8ta, bank on far left 

Route 325— Amsterdam to Gloversville, N. Y.— 14.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Tribes Hill. Macadam road. 

Thru a hilly farming country, connecting at Gloversville with Route 326 to Speculator 
and Lake Pleasant. 

s-MILEAOE-n 

Total BrtweSn For this an( * other exits see City Map, page 281. 

Mlleass Point* 

0.0 0.0 AMSTERDAM, Main & Market Sts. Go west on Main St 

with ttolloy. Thru Fort Johnson 2.8. 
3.0 3.0 Left-hand road ; turn left over RR. Cross trolley 4.8. 

5.2 5.2 Tribes Hill, 3-corners at store. Turn right. 

10.1 4.9 Right-hand road, cemetery on right; turn right on East Ave. 

11.4 1.3 Left-hand road; turn left. Cross trolley 12.4 on Harrison St. 

12.7 1.3 End of street; meeting trolley; turn right on Main St. 
14.0 1.3 GLOVERSVILLE, Main & Fulton Sts. 

POINTS OF INTEREST, JOHNSTOWN, N. Y. 

Johnstown (pop. 14,000, alt. 659 ft.), situated the Old Tice tavern, visited by General La- 

on Cayadutta creek and founded in 1750. Near fayette in 1778, from which the first shot, in 

the southwest corner of Johnstown and O'Neil the revolution, west of the Hudson river, was 

avenues is the site of the battle of Johnstown, fired by a Tory sheriff at one of the Sam- 

fought in 1781, said to be the last battle of the mons. On South Perry street, at the corner 

revolution; a monument has been erected of Montgomery street, is an old jail used 

here by the D. A. R. Johnson hall, located during the revolution, which was known as 

on Hall avenue, was built by Sir William "Fort Johnstown." 

Johnson in 1762 and is the only baronial man- St. John's Episcopal church, located on 

sion now standing in the U. S. the corner of North Market and Church 

The cemetery on Green street contains the streets, was built by Sir William Johnson 

graves of Major Richard Dodge, his wife in 1766; on July 13, 1774, he was buried just 

(Anna Sarah Irving), sister of Washington south of the church. On northwest corner 

Irving, and also many graves of soldiers who of West Main and William streets stands the 

fought in the revolution. old court house built J>y Sir William Johnson 

On the southeast corner of Main and Wil- in 1772. 

Ham streets is the site of the first free school On the corner of North William and State 

in the state of New York, established by Sir streets stands what is known as the old 

William Johnson in 1761 On the northeast Drumm house, built by Sir William John- 

corner of West Clinton street is the site of son for the home of his schoolmaster in 1772. 

POINTS OF INTEREST, GLOVERSVILLE, N. Y. 

Gloversville (pop. 23,437, alt. 812 ft.), is a shipped from here to all parts of the world, 
noted glove manufacturing center, located X***n W. Chambers, author, has a summer 

s* j *, i- i_- i_ t • i. i home at Broadalbin, about six miles distant 

on Cayadutta creek, which furnishes excel- _.. A ' . . AA . . , . 

The town is surrounded by attractive lakes, 
lent water-power for the various operations mong which arc Pcck i akCf ^ st Caroga, 

of milling and machinery. Gloves are West Caroga and Canada. 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 285 Route 32< 

Route 326— Fonda to Speculator and Lake Pleasant, N. Y 

50.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Johnstown. Gloversvlue, Sacandaga Park and NorthviUe. Macadam to wells 
then 9.« miles gravel and dirt A beautiful trip with many fine views of mountain 

.-mileage-. and lakes. 

r-*.i 2!&2? ~ Route 128 offers a good option via" Green Lake, 
tf iCtt pSKSi Note (a) furnishes a connection to Indian Lake. 

0.0 0.0 FONDA, Broadway & Main Sts. at sta. Go north on Broad 
way. Cross RR 1.2. Bear right onto Madison Ave. 3.5. 



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Route 326 Page 286 Albany-Troy Section 

4.1 4.1 4-corners, meeting trolley, turn left on William St. 

4.2 0.1 4-corners, turn right on Main St. 

4.3 0.1 Johnstown, Main & N. Perry Sts. Turn left with trolley on 

N. Perry St. 
7.9 3.6 Gloversville, Main & Fulton Sts. Straight thru with trolley 

on Main St. 
8.7 0.8 4-corners at iron monument, turn right into Eighth Ave. 
8.9 0.2 End of avenue, meeting trolley, turn left on Kingsboro Ave. 

Cross RR 9.1. 

9.4 0.5 End of avenue at small park; turn right on E. State St. 
10.7 1.3 Fork, bear left along RR. 

10.9 0.2 End of road, turn left. 

18.5 2.6 Raceville, right-hand road at store; turn right. 

13.7 0.2 Left-hand road, turn left with macadam. 

13.9 0.2 End of road; turn right. Thru Mayfield 14.2. 

17.2 3.3 4-corners at small wood school ; turn right. 

19.0 1.8 Cranberry Lake, fork; bear left. Cross RR 21.3. 

22.7 3.7 4-corners; turn left. 

23.3 0.6 4-corners ; turn right between golf links. 
23.5 0.2 4-corners; turn left. 

23.7 0.2 Sacandaga Park. Straight thru. 

24.4 0.7 4-corners; turn right across iron bridge. 
24.9 0.5 NorthvUle, end of road; turn left. 

25.0 0.1 Left-hand road ; turn left. Thru Hope Valley 27.6. 

28.2 3.2 Fork; bear left — sign "Lake Pleasant." Thru Hope 32.1. 
40.7 12.5 Wells, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

41.3 0.6. Fork; bear left. Follow gravel, winding upgrade. 

44.3 3.0 Alvord. Straight thru, past Lake Charlie on left 44.3, and 

Gilman Lake 46.3. . Caution for left curve 47.0. 

50.3 6.0 SPECULATOR, 4-corners at P. O. 

Straight ahead is Note (a) to Indian Lake. 
For Lake Pleasant turn left % mile. 

Note (a) Route 326 — Speculator to Indian Lake— 26.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Narrow dirt road winding thru woods. Several short, steep grades. 
0.0 0.0 SPECULATOR, 4-corners; go north, upgrade on dirt. Caution for muo 

holes 2.5. Follow hilly, winding road, narrow, but not rough, to 
6.9 6.9 Right-hand road at Camp Perkins; turn right with the travel past Camp 
Lawrence on left 10.0. Caution for sharp, hidden curves and mud holes. 
Cross iron bridge between two lakes 14.8, thru wild country, coming along 
shore of Indian Lake 21.8. Pass Sabael P. O. 22.5, curving left and right 
beyond. 

26.1 19.2 End of road; turn left to 
26.7 0.6 INDIAN LAKE VILLAGE. 

Left Is Route 384 to Long Lake. 

Right is Route 486 to North Creek and Chestertown. 



WELLS GARAGE CO. Ford 'TiZZi Sa,es 

WELLS NEW YORK A Large Stock Repairs Supplies 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 287 Routes 327-328 

Route 327— Northville to Lake George, N. Y.— 36.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Edinburg. Day and Luzerne. Gravel and dirt road to Luzerne; balance mac- 
^mileage-^ adam. 

Tatei S£k!SS? Thru a hilly farming and wooded country, following Sacandaga 

miImm pSKSi river to Luzerne, then thru a hilly wooded section, to Lake George. 

0.0 0.0 NORTHVILLE, flagpole on right. Go southeast on Main St. 

0.6 0.6 Left-hand road beyond small stone bridge; turn left upgrade. 

1.4 0.8 4-corners; turn right. 

2.0 0.6 Left-hand road; turn left. 

3.3 1.3 End of road; turn right. + 

4.4 1.1 End of road ; turn left downgrade. 

4.7 0.3 Edinburg, 4-corners beyond stone bridge ; turn right. 
5.3 0.6 Fork; bear left. Thru West Day 9.7, Thru Day 12.3. 

17.6 12.3 Conklingville, store on left. Turn right across long iron 

bridge over Sacandaga River. 

17.7 0.1 End of road; turn left along river. 

18.8 1.1 Fork; bear left. Turn left across iron bridge 21.9. Cross RR 

. and go thru 4-corners 24.2. Thru Hadley 24.5. 
Right at 24.2 is Route 422 to Saratoga. 

24.6 5.8 Luzerne, irregular 4-corners. Turn left. 

24.9 0.3 Right-hand road beyond iron bridge ; turn right. # 
25.0 0.1 End of road on shore of Lake Luzerne; turn left. 

35.0 10.0 3-corners beyond trolley underpass; turn left. Join trolley 

35.3 and follow same. 
36.5 1.5 LAKE GEORGE. 

For Marion -on -Lake George, see Route 390. 

Route 328 — Fonda to Speculator and Lake Pleasant, N. Y. 

52.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Johnstown, Green Lake and Rudeston. State macadam to Qreen Lake, then 
^MiLEA6E-> gravel to Rudeston; balance state macadam. 

T«t«i S*g**** A picturesque trip thru wooded country, passing numerous lakes. 

miSh PoTbST Route 326 offers a good option via Sacandaga. 

0.0 0.0 FONDA, at N. Y. C. Station. Go north, following macadam. 
Cross trolley 1.2. Curving right 3.6 onto Madison Ave. 

3.8 3.8 4-corners ; meeting trolley, turn left on William St. 

Johnstown City Map, page 285; Points of Interest, page 284. 

4.2 0.4 4-corners ; turn right on Main St. 

4.3 0.1 Johnstown, Main & Market Sts. Turn left on Market St. two 

blocks. 

4.5 0.2 4-corners ; turn left on Washington St. 

4.7 0.2 End of street; turn left on Mill St., and at end of street im- 
mediately beyond, turn, right into W. State St., passing 
monument on right 4.9* 

6.3 1.6 Right-hand branch road; bear right. Caution for left curve 

10.0. 

• 

10.7 4.4 Right-hand road, turn right — sign "Canada Lake." Follow 

winding macadam, using caution for curve across two bridges 
12.5-12.7. Caution for right curve thru Newkirk 15.7. 

18.1 7.4 End of road; turn left along Garoga Lake. 

18.4 0.3 Garoga Lake, 5-corners ; bear diagonally right — sign "Canada 
Lake." Cross bridge in Wheelerville 19.5. Pass Canada Lake 
on left 20.9. 

21.4 3.0 Green Lake, P. O. on right. Straight thru upgrade. Cross 

small iron bridge in Pine Lake 23.3. Pass Central lake on 
right 26.3. Cross iron bridge in Arietta 27.9. Cross iron 
bridge over swamp 29.1. Caution for right curve 33.6 and left 
curve 34.8. 

35.5 14.1 Fork; bear left. Thru Outlet 39.8. 

41.5 6.0. Spy Lake, P. O. on left. Straight thru along Lake Piseco. 



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Routes 330-331 Page 288 Albany-Troy Section 

44.0 2.5 Rudeston, Straight thru across bridge. 

49.5 5.5 Lake Pleasant,* fork, P. 0. ahead on right. Keep left on 

macadam. 
52.8 3.3 SPECULATOR, 4-corners at P. 0. 

Right is Route 332 to Sacandaga Park and Fonda. 
Left is Note (a) on Route 326 to Indian Lake. 

Route 330— Speculator to Utica, N. Y.— 66.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Lake Pleasant, Noblesboro, Prospect, Barneveld and Deerfleld. About one-half 
macadam roads; balance dirt and gravel. 

Thru a sparsely settled woodetl country to Barneveld, then thru a hilly farming 
^mileage-. country. 

»-* i 2!55?" M Owing to construction work on parts of this road Route 332 to Fonda, 

Total Between combined with Route 324 to Utica, will probably be best way for 1921. 



0.0 0.0 SPECULATOR, 4-corners at P. O. Go west on niacadam past 

lake on left 0.4. 
3.3 3.3 Lake Pleasant, P. 0. on left; straight thru. 
8.8 5.5 Right-hand . road on shore of Piseco Lake; turn right with 

poles. Pass Piseco P. O. on left 11.1, following along shore 

of Piseco Lake. Thru Hoffmeister 23.2. Thru Morehouse- 

ville 26.3. 

31.0 22.2 Noblesboro, end of road ; turn left with travel. 

33.8 • 2.8 3-corners ; curve right with poles. Caution not to pass. 
36.7 2.9 Right-hand road ; turn right, leaving poles. 

Straight ahead is Route 331 to Herkimer. 

43.5 6.8 Fork; keep left. Pass reservoir on left 45.9. 
49.5 6.0 Prospect, end of road ; turn left on macadam. 

49.7 0.2 Wood church in fork; keep right under RR 51.1. 

Right-hand road at hotel 52.8 is Route 678 to Watertown. • 

52.9 3.2 Barneveld, 4-corners at water-trough. Turn left. 

Straight ahead is Route 617, longer, but less hilly option into Utloa. 

Thru South Trenton 57.0. 

Left at 63.0 is Route 619 to Little Falls. 

Utica City Map and Points of Interest, page 444. 

65.1 12.2 Deerfield, 4-corners ; straight thru with trolley into Genesee St 

Left at Deerfleld la Route 686 to Albany. 

66.5 1.4 UTICA, Genesee & Bleecker Sts. 

Route 331 — Speculator to Herkimer, N. Y. — 66.3 ro. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Noblesboro, Poland, Newport and Middleville. One-half macadam roads; bal- 
ance sandy dirt. Road will be under construction in 1920, during which time Route 832 
to Fonda, combined with Route 824 to Herkimer, will form the best way between the 
.-mileage-. above points. 

»-* . SUE?*** At Middleville direct connection may be made for Little Falls. (See 

•JUSUWr ^ute 619.) 

0.0 0.0 SPECULATOR, 4-corners at P. O. Go west on macadam, 

past lake on left. 
3.3 3.3 Lake Pleasant, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 
8.8 5.5 Right-hand road; turn right past Piseco P. O. 11.1, running 

along shore of Piseco lake (on left).. Go thru Hoffmeister 

23.3 and Morehouseville 26.3, crossing bridge (W. Canada 

creek 30.9). 

31.0 22.2 Noblesboro, end of road; turn left with the travel to next 

33.8 2.8 Right-hand road ; turn right with poles along creek. 

Right-hand road 36.7 is Route 330 to Utica at mileage 36.7* 

39.1 5.3 End of road ; turn right. 

39.4 0.3 Turn next left becoming narrow and winding. 
41.7 2.3 Fork; bear right. Cross iron bridge 42.4. 

45.9 4.2 4-corners; turn left on dirt. 

47.7 1.8 End of road; turn left downgrade into 

♦Lake Pleasant, N. Y. (pop. 746, alt. 2,000 hemlock and birch trees which make the 

ft.), a summer resort, often called the "Pearl North Woods famous, are found b*re. Every 

of the Adirondack Lakes." The surrounding year thousands of people spend Iht summer 

ountry consists of thousands of acres of months in this region, where camp life may 

te forest lands; the pine, balsam, spruce, be thoroughly enjoyed. 

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Albany-Troy Section Page 289 Route 332 

48.0 0.3 Cold Brook, 4-corners; turn right en macadam, bearing left 

at end of road 49.4. 
49.7 1.7 Poland, end of road; turn left. 

50.4 0.7 Right-hand road beyond cemetery; turn right across irou 

bridge and BR and at once turn left with macadam. 
53.3 2.9 Left-hand road; turn left across RR bridge. 

53.5 0.2 Newport, end of road at water-trough. Turn right. 

Gross iron bridges 55.2-57.3. 

57.7 4.2 Middleville, 4-corners. Turn right. 

Left Is Route 619*0 Little Falls. 

Cross long iron bridge and RR 57.9. 
58.0 0.3 Left-hand road; turn left on macadam. Pass County Home 
(on right 59.5). Cross RR and covered bridge 62.2. 

62.8 4.8 End of road; turn right.across iron bridge and RR at Kent 

Bridge Sta. Cross RRs 64.4 — 65.2—65.6 to 
65.8 3.0 4-corners; turn left on Main St. 
66.3 0.5 HERKIMER,* Main & Albany Sts. 

Route 332— Speculator to Fonda, N. Y.— 50.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Northville, Sacandaga Park, Gloversvllle and Johnstown. First 41 miles mac- 
^MILEAGE-. adam; balance gravel. A beautiful trip, with fine views of mountains 
x ♦ i 85k?" m and fc- 1 "* 8 - 
(Mease Potato Route 838 offers a good option via Qreen Lake. 

0.0 0.0 SPECULATOR, 4-corners at P. O. Go south along shore of 
Lake Pleasant— sign "Northville." Caution for right curve 
downgrade 3.3 past Gilman lake on right 4.0 and Charlie lake 
5.9. Thru Alvord 6.0. Cross covered wood bridge 9.2. 
. 9.6 9.6 Wells, P. O. on right. Straight thru along Sacandaga river. 
Thru Hope 18.2 and Hope Valley 22.7. 

25.3 15.7 End of road; turn right. 

25.4 0.1 Northville, right-hand road at flag pole. Turn light. 

Straight ahead before turn is Route 334 to Saratoga and Route 327 
to Lake George. 

25.9 0.5 4-corners just beyond iron bridge, -turn left on macadam. 

26.6 0.7 Sacandaga Park. Straight thru. 

26.8 0.2 4-corners, turn right. 

27.0 0.2 4-corners, turn left. 

27.6 0.6 4-corners, turn right, crossing RR 29.0. Thru Cranberry 

Lake 31.3. 
33.4 5.8 4-corners, small wood school on right, turn left. 

36.1 2.7 Mayfield. P. O. on left, straight thru. 
36.4 0.3 Left-hand road, turn left. 

36.6 0.2 End of road, turn right. 

36.8 0.2 Raceville. End of road; turn left. 

39.4 2.6 Right-hand road at RR; turn right — coming into E. State St. 

40.9 1.5 Left-hand road at park, turn left on Kingsboro Ave., joining 

trolley and following tracks. Cross RR 41.1. 

Gloversville-Johnstown City Map, page 285; Points of Interest, 
page 284. 

41.4 0.5 Right-hand street; turn right on 8th Ave., leaving trolley. 
41.6 0.2 4-corners at monument; turn left into Main St., joining 

trolley. 
42.4 0.8 Gloversville; Main & Fulton Sts. 

Straight thru with trolley on Main St. Cross RR 43.0 on N. 

Perry St. 

Left at 43.6 on Harrison St. Is Route 333 to Amsterdam. . 

•Herkimer, # N. Y. (pop. 7,520, alt. 400 ft.), tion. The court house stands on the site of 

the seat of Herkimer county, in a picturesque Fort Dayton, a revolutionary fortification, 

section of the Mohawk valley, near the The Dutch Reform church is one of the oldest 

mouth of West Canada creek, and named in the Mohawk valley. There is a statue of 

after Gen. Nicholas Herkimer, hero of the Gen. Herkimer in Myers park. To the west 

battle of Oriskany, and other fights in the of the town is Fort Herkimer church, on the 

Mohawk valley. The principal industry is the site of an ancient fortification, which was a 

manufacture of roll top desks. It was settled refuge prior to the revolution, and a base of 

originally by Germans from the Rhine sec- supplies during the war. 

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^ 



Routes 333-334 Page 290 Albany-Troy Section 

46.0 3.6 Johnstown; Main & No. Perry Sts. Turn. right with trolley 

on to Main St 

46.1 0.1 4-corners, turn left on William St. 

46.6 0.4 4-corners, turn right on Madison Ave., following macadam. 

50.3 3.8 FONDA, Main St. & Broadway, at station. 

Route 333 — Gloversville to Amsterdam, N. Y. — 14.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Tribes Hill. Macadam road thru a hilly farming country. 
^MILEAGE-* 

Total SSwX For this and other exits see City Map, page 285. 

tfllaaa* Prints 

0.0 0.0 GLOVERSVILLE, Main & Fulton Sts. Go east on Main St. 

with trolley. ♦ 

1.3 1.3 Left-hand street; turn left away from trolley on Harrison St. 

Cross trolley 1.6-1.8. 

2.6 1.3 End of street; turn right onto East Ave. 
3.9 1.3 End of Ave.; turn left upgrade. 

5.5 1.6 Fork; school in center; bear right. 

8.8 3.3 Tribes Hill, end of road at store. Turn' left downgrade. 

Cross trolley 9.2. Bear left over RR 11.0 and right beyond. 

Thru Fort Johnson* 11.2. 

12.1 3.3 Fork; bear right with trolley. 

Amsterdam City Map and Points of Interest, page 281. 

12.2 0.1 Fork; bear right with branch trolley onto Main St. 
14.0 1.8 AMSTERDAM, Main & Market Sts. 

Straight ahead Is Route 685 to Albany, 
i 

Route 334— Northville to Saratoga Springs, N. Y.— 37.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Galway and Ballston Spa. Sand and dirt to Scott's Church; balance macadam. 
Thru a hilly farming section. The shortest way between the above terminals. 

"~ Distance Route 332 to Fonda, combined with Route 585 to Scotia and Route 

Total Between 322 to Saratoga, offers an all macadam option. 

Mlleate Palate 

0.0 0.0 NORTHVILLE. Go south. (A right turn if coming from 
Sacandaga. Straight ahead if from Speculator.) 

5.7 6.7 End of road, turn right across iron bridge, wood bridge and 

covered bridge. Thru Northampton 6.2, avoiding right-hand 
road beyond. 

Points of Interest, page 340. 

11.7 6.0 Hagedorns Mills, left-hand road beyond bridge. Turn left. 

13.4 1.7 4-corners, turn right. 

13.9 0.5 Left-hand road at wood school, turn left-rsign "Saratoga." 

14.4 0.5 Right-hand road opposite wood church, turn right. 

17.9 3.5 Galway, 4-corners at park. Straight thru. 

21.0 3.1 Scott's Church, 4-corners. Turn left and follow Route 586 

from mileage 10.1 balance of way (16.7 miles) to Saratoga # 

Springs. 

•Fort Johnson, N. Y. Erected in 1742 by revolution. The fort is now owned by the 

Sir William Johnson. In 1755 he held a meet- Montgomery county historical society, pre- 

ing here with the Iroquois Indians, which sented to them by the De Peysters of New 

resulted in their following him in a combat York City. It is open daily to visitors, 

against the French at Lake George. The fort Curios and antique relics from the early resi- 

was occupied from 1763 by Sir John Johnson, dents of the Mohawk valley are on exhibition j 

who with his Indian friends and neighbors in the fort, among them the famous Richmond 

played havoc with the Americans during the collection. * I 



i 



SDCDNY 

REG. V*. WkT. OFF 

MOTOR GASOLINE 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 291 Routes 335-338 

Route 335 — Gloversville to Saratoga Springs, N. Y. — 41.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Vails Mills, Perth, Oalway and Ballston Spa. Macadam to Perth, then dirt to 
Scott's Church; balance macadam. Over rolling: country* 

s-MILEAGE-N 

toui BfltSSSfT For this an< * other exits see City Map, page 417. 

Mlltam Matt 

0.0 0.0 GLOVERSVILLE; Main & Fulton Sts. Go south on Main St. 
with trolley. Cross trolley and RR 0.6 — coming into S. Main 
Street 

1.2 1.2 Harrison St.; turn left, leaving trolley. Cross RR 1.7. 
2.5 1.3 End of street; turn left. Cross RR 9.0. 

9.5 7.0 Vails Mills. End of road, turn right. Cross RR 9.7. 
12.1 2.6 Perth. 4-corners ; turn left — sign "Saratoga." 

Thru Hills Corners 13.2. 
13.9 1.8 Fork just beyond small bridge, bear right. 

17.0 3.1 End of road, turn right downgrade. 

17.5 0.S Left-hand road, turn left upgrade — sign "Saratoga." 

21.1 3.6 Galway. 4-corners at wood church; turn right. 

24.3 3.2 Scott's Church, 4-corners; turn left and follow Route 586 

from 10.1 balance of way (16.7 miles) to Saratoga Springs. 

Route 338— Speculator to Fonda, N. Y.— £2.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Rudeaton, Green Lake and Johnstown. State macadam to Rudeston, then gravel 
^-■•iLEAGE-x to Green Lake; balance state macadam. A picturesque trip thru wooded 
▼«•.! 2!2iff* country, passing numerous lakes. 
Miieajf Points Route 332 offers a good option via Sacandaga. 

0.0 0.0 SPECULATOR, 4-corners at P. 0. Go west on macadam, past 
lake on left 0.4. 

3.3 3.3 Lake Pleasant, P. 0. on left. Straight thru on macadam. 

Pass Oxbow lake on right 7.2. 

8.6 5.3 Fork, bear left. 

8.8 0.2 Rudeston. Straight thru, passing Lake Piseco on right 11.1. 
Pass Spy Lake P. O. on right 11.3. Cross bridge in Outlet 
13.0. Caution for right curve 18.0 and left curve 19.2. Cross 
several small bridges. 
24.9 16.1 Arietta. Straight thru. Pass Central lake on left 26.5. Cross 
small bridge in Pine Lake 29.5. 

31.4 6.5 Green Lake. P. O. on left; straight thru, past Canada Lake 

on right 31.9. Cross small bridge in Wheelerville 33.3. 
34.4 3.0 Garoga Lake, 5-corners. Bear slightly left. 

34.7 0.3 Right-hand road, turn right. Caution for left curve down- 

grade in Newkirk 37.1. 
39.1 4.4 Fork, bear right on macadam. Follow winding road using 

caution at curve across three small bridges 39.5-40.2. 
42.1 3.0 End of road; turn left. Caution for right curve 42.8. 

Follow macadam — coming onto W. State St. 

Johnstown City Map, page 285; Points of Interest, page 281. 

48.1 6.0 Mill St., at water trough ; turn left, and next right on Wash- 
ington St. 
48.3 0.2 4-corners ; meeting trolley turn right onto Market St. 

48.6 0.2 Johnstown, Market & Main Sts. 

Turn right with trolley onto Main St. 
48.6 0,1 4-corners; turn left on William St. 
49.0 0.4 4-corners ; turn right on Madison Ave. 

52.8 3.8 FONDA, N. Y. C. sta. on left. 



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Routes 340-343-345 Page 292 Albany-Troy Section 
Route 340— Little Falls to Barneveld, N. Y.— 28.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Fairfield, MiddlevUle, Newport and Poland. All macadam. Thru a hilly dairy 
,-IIILEAGE-n farming country. 

Tutai ?«&!!!? " Thte route provides a connection for Piseco and Speculator. At 
MIImm Ptints Barneveld connection is made with Route 578 to Watertown. 

0.0 0.0 LITTLE FALLS, Main & Ann Sts. Go north on Ann St. up- 
grade. 
0.2 0.2 End of street; turn right up long winding grade. 
1.2 1.0 Fork; bear left upgrade. 

7.5 6.3 End of road; turn left. 

8.2 0.7 4-corners; turn right. 

8.3 0.1 Fairfield. P. 0. on left Turn left. 

11.2 2.9 MiddlevUle, 4-corners. Turn right. 

15:6 4.3 Newport, left-hand road at water trough. Turn left. Cross 
stone bridge and RR 18.6. 

16.7 0.2 End of road; turn right. 

18.6 2.9 3-corners; turn right across RR and bridge and left* beyond. 

19.5 0.9 Poland, 3-corners at fountain. Bear left. 

Right is Route 688 to Speculator. 

Cross RR 20.1. Bear right across long iron bridge 21.1. 

23.3 3.8 Gravesville, left-hand road. P. O. on left. Turn left. 

25.6 2.3 Fork; bear right, across iron bridge. Thru 4-corners 26.8. 

28.4 2.8 * End of road ; turn right. 

28.6 0.2 BARNEVELD, 4-corners at water-trough. 

Right is Route 678 to Watertown. 

Route 343— Schenectady to Cobleskill, N. Y.— 31.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Duanesburg and Central Bridge. Macadam road. Thru a hilly farming country. 
Connects at Cobleskill with Route 350 to Oneonta. 
^MILEAGE-s 

Total BetSS? F <> r this and other exits see City Map, page 458. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 SCHENECTADY, Center & State Sts. Go south with trolley 
on Center St. Bear right at end of street 0.6 with trolley. 
Avoid right-hand road 1.2. 

1.4 1.4 Fork; bear right with trolley. 

2.7 1.3 5-corners; bear left. Cross RR 3.5. 

3.6 0.9 Fork; bear right. Thru Princeton 7.6. Thru Duanesburg 11.3. 

14.8 11.2 Quaker Street, 5-corners; bear right. Thru Central Bridge 

22.6. Cross RR 30.5 and bear left onto Main St. 
31.4 16.6 COBLESKILL, Main & Grand Sts. at park. 

Straight ahead is Route 350 to Oneonta. 

Route 345 — Palatine Bridge to Cooperstown, N. Y. — 32.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Canajoharie and Springfield. Gravel and macadam first 10 miles, then rock 
/-*ILEA6e-n and gravel to East Springfield; balance macadam. Thru a hilly farm- 
».*.• 5i£?J!£ in & country. Connects at Springfield with Route 351 to Richfield 
£&[**&&* Springs. 

0.0 0.0 PALATINE BRIDGE, P. O. on right. Go south across long 
iron bridge over Mohawk river 0.1. Cross another iron bridge 
on Church St. 0.3. 

0.4 0.4 Canajoharie,* 5-corners, bank on left. Bear right onto Rock 
St. upgrade. 

0.6 0.2 Diagonal 4-corners ; turn left on Otsego St. 

0.7 0.1 4-corners ; turn left upgrade on Reed St. — sign "Cooperstown." 

3.7 3.0 Fork, cemetery on left ; turn left. 

4.6 0.9 Fork; bear right — sign "Sprout Brook." 

'Canajoharie, N.'Y. (pop. 2,500, alt. 306 ft.), Van Alstyne house; it was known as Fort 

lies on the south bank of the Mohawk, and Rensselaer, built in 1749, now known as the 

derived its name from the Indians. One of Fort Rensselaer club house. Canajoharie is 

the fortified dwellings, utilized as a place of the home of the Beech Nut Packing Company 

defense during the revolution, was the old and several other large corporations. 

* Digitized by Lj( 



Albany-Troy Section Page 293 Routes 348-350 

7.2 2.6 End of road; turn right. Thru Buel 7.9. 

8.6 1.4 Fork; bear right— sign "Cherry Valley." 

9.2 0.6 Sprout Brook, end of road; turn left, keeping left, then right. 
Cross RR 12.9. 

14.0 4.8 End of road; turn right. 

14.5 0.5 Cherry Valley. Straight thru. Thru E. Springfield 19.1. 
21.2 6.7 Springfield, fork; bear left— sign "Cooperstown." 

Right at 21.2 is Route 351 to Richfield Springs. 

22.6 1.4 Springfield Center, fork just beyond iron bridge; bear left. 
23.6 1.0 Fork; keep left — coming along shore of Ostego lake. 

Pass Five Mile Point 27.3, descending into Lake St. 

Cooperstown City Map and Points of Interest, page 466. 

32.2 8.6 4-corners; turn right on Chestnut St. 

32.3 0.1 COOPERSTOWN, Main & Chestnut Sts. 

Route 348— Ilion to Unadilla, N. Y.— 66.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via the Ilion Gorge, West Winfield, Burlington, Gilbertsville and Mt. Upton. First 
8 miles macadam, next 5 miles gravel and dirt road, 12 miles macadam, 16 miles dirt, 
,~iiileage-> balance macadam. Thru a hilly farming country following a valley 

t.*.i £!&!!? most of the wa y- 

Mltai* Prints Route 693 offers an option from West Burlington via New Berlin. 

0.0 0.0 ILION, Otsego & Main Sts. Go south on Otsego St. Follow 
macadam thru the Ilion gorge across numerous culvert and 
bridges. Thru Cedarville 8.0. 

8.7 8.7 Left-hand road; bear left on gravel road. 

12.1 3.4 4-corners; turn right. 

18.6 1.6 West Winfield, 4-corners. Turn left. Cross RR 14.4. 

16.7 2.1 Fork; bear left on macadam up long easy grade. 

19.2 3.6 End of road; turn right on macadam. Thru West Exeter 21.2. 
25.6 6.4 Burlington. Flats, store on right. Turn left downgrade. 
26.9 0.3 Right-hand road at church and cemetery; turn right. 

28.8 2.9 W. Burlington, left-hand road, wooden church ahead on left; 

turn left, ascending grade beyond. 

Straight ahead is Route 693 to Unadilla via New Berlin. 

33.1 4.3 Garratsville, end of road ; turn right across small iron bridge. 

36.3 3.2 Fork, wooden school in center; keep right on dirt and gravel. 

41.6 6.2 Morris, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

41.7 0.2 Fork, school in center; keep left. 

48.6 6.8 Gilbertsville, water trough on right. Straight thru. 
53.6 5.0 Mt Upton, 4-corners. Turn left and follow Route 593 from 
mileage 62.3 balance of the way (13.3 miles) to Unadilla. 

Route 350 — Albany to Oneonta, N. Y. — 85.1 ro- 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Delmar, ClarksvUle, E. Berne, Berne, W. Berne, Gallupvllle, Central Bridge, 
Coble8kill, Warnerville, Richmondville, Worcester, Schenevus, Maryland and ColUers- 
viile. Macadam all the way, with short stretches of brick and concrete. 

This route traverses a hilly farming 1 country, with a long easy climb over Holder* 
berg mountain, and is the best route from Albany to towns in the southern tier. 

For option to Berne via Altamont see Note (a). 

^^DteUMt For this anci other exits see City Ma P» P ft S e 260 « 

MiNaw^PolnSr For enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY, State St. & Broadway, P. O. on right. Go west on 
State St. with trolley. 

0.3 0.3 End of street, capital buildings ahead; turn left and imme- 
diately right. Still State St. 

0.8 0.5 Lark St. ; meeting trolley, turn left. 

1.1 0.3 5-corners, water trough on far left; bear slightly left with 
trolley onto Delaware Ave. Thru 5-corners 2.3. 

2.9 1.8 Right-hand diagonal road, cemetery on left; bear right down- 
grade ; curve right across concrete bridge 3.4. Cros^ RR 4.9. 

5.4 2.5 Delmar, P. O. on far left. Straight thru. Cross RR 8.8. 

9.4 4.0 Fork; bear left, upgrade, on winding road. Thru Clarksville 
13.5. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Route 350 



Page 294 Albany-Troy Section 



14.0 4.6 4-corners beyond small iron bridge; turn right on winding 

road along hillside. Start along winding ascent over Helder- 

berg mountain 15.7. Caution for several sharp turns. 
17.9 3.9 Fork at top of mountain ; bear right. 
21.0 3.1 End of road beyond small iron bridge; turn left. Thru East 

Berne 21.2. Avoid right-hand macadam road 21.6. 
25.0 4.0 Berne, end of road, P. O. ahead. Turn left across small iron 

bridge. 

Fork; bear right. Thru West Berne 27.8. 

Gallupville, fork, store in center. Bear right. 

Vroman's Corners, end of road, large brick house on right. 

Turn sharp right, with poles. 

Left leads to Schoharie and Mlddleburg. 

Left-hand diagonal street, bear left with poles. 

End of road ; turn left over RR bridge and across iron bridge 

over Schoharie river. 

Central Bridge, small wooden school on left. Straight thru. 

3-corners, beyond RR ; bear left onto E. Main St. 

Cobleskill, Main & Grand Sts., bank on right. 

Bear slightly right of park on Main St. Cross RR 47.8. 

Fork; bear left. 

Warnerville, 4-corners, P. O.. ahead. Bear right downgrade. 

Richmondville, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

End of road ; turn right under RR. Cross RR 59.2. 

East Worcester, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 

Worcester,* P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

Schenevus, P. O. and bank on right. Straight ahead. Avoid 

right-hand road 70.0. Thru Maryland 73.2. 

78.6 8.8 Cooperstown Junction, P. O. on right. Bear left across RR. 

and under RR. Cross RR 78.8. Thru covered bridge 79.6. 

79.7 1.1 Colliersville, P. O. on left. Straight thru. 

Right la Route 606 to Cooperstown. 

Oneonta City Map and Points of Interest, page 470. 

ONEONTA, Main & Chestnut Sts. 



25.1 
31.7 
35.6 



37.0 
38.3 

39.0 
46.5 
47.3 

48.5 
49.1 
52.8 
59.1 
59.8 
64.5 
69.8 



0.1 
6.6 
3.9 



1.4 
1.3 

0.7 

7.5 
0.8 

1.2 
0.6 
3.7 
6.3 
0.7 
4.7 
5.3 



85.1 5.4 

•Worcester, N. Y. (pop. ,1.100, alt. 1,500 ft.), 
village on Schenevus creek, in western" foot- 
hills of Catskill mountains. Good trout fish- 



ing in locality. The grandparents of James 
A. Garfield resided in Worcester and are 
buried there. 



Central Hotel and Garage 

Midway between 
Albany and Blnghamton 



WORCESTER 



NEW YORK 



American Plan— $3 00 & $4 00 per day. 
European Plan— $1 00 & $2.00 per day. 

Rooms with private bath. Garage always 
open. Expert mechanics. Stock Tires and 
.Accessories. Dodge Bros. Agency. 



HOTEL AUGUSTAN, Cobleskill, n. y. 

CHAS. BRADY, Owner and Proprietor 
HOME FOR TOURISTS LARGE, FIREPROOF GARAGE 



V 



United States Hotel 30 Room8 - ^ rage in con " 

nectaon 
A. J. Becker The only fint^j^. Hotel in 

COBLESKILL N. Y. Cobleskill 



Digitized by 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 295 Route 351 

Note (a) Route 350— Albany to Berne, N. Y.— 25.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Altarmont. Macadam all the way. 

Thru rolling farming country to Altamont and then thru the Helderberg mountains. 
A beautiful drive. 

This note offers an excellent option to the regular route. 

For this and other exits see City Map, page 260. 
For enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 
0.0 0.0 ALBANY, State St. and Broadway, P. O. on right. Go northwest with trolley 

on State St. 
0.2 0.2 End of street at State Capitol; turn left and immediately right along same. 
0.8 0.6 Lark St., large apartment /house on far left; meeting trolley, turn left. 
1.1 0.3 6-corners; turn square right with trolley onto Madison Ave. Bear left with 

trolley onto Western Ave. 2.7. Thru Gullderland 9.4. 
9.9 8.8, Prominent left-hand road; turn left with macadam. Cross RR at sta. 11.9. 
12.3 2.4 Gullderland Center, store and P. O. on left. • Straight thru. 

13.6 1.2 End of road; turn left across small bridge. 

Right leads to Schenectady. 
16.2 2.7 Altamont, fork just beyond RR at sta.; bear right, shortly asoending long 
grade over Helderberg mountains. Caution for sharp curve 17.7. Avoid left- 
hand road at church 19.6. 

Left at 19.6 leads to Thomsons Lake. 
Thru Knox 21.9. 

22.7 6.6 Fork at top of slight grade; bear left. 

26.8 3.1 BERNE, P.O. on right 

Straight ahead is Route 350 to Oneonta. v 

Route 351— Cobleskill to Syracuse, N. Y.— 101.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Sharon Springs, Richfield Springs, Bridgewater, Madison, Bouckvllle, Cazenovia 
and FayettevUle. 62 miles macadam; 11 worn stone; 1.6 concrete and 27 miles dirt. 

Ttoru a hilly farming country with some long (but not steep) grades. Follows the 
OM Cberry Valley turnpike. 

Connects at Sharon with route to Palatine bridge; at Bridgewater with route to 
,-«ML£A£E-. Utica and at Cazenovia with route to Portland. 

... ?J!*f l,e • Route 352 to Palatine bridge combined with Route 324 to Utica and 

JfiSJL fSSSi Route 671 to Syracuse offers a longer option but all stone and macadam. 



0.0 0.0 COBLESKILL, Main & Grand Sts., at park. 

See Route 352 for directions to 
12*4 12.4 Sharon Springs, 4-corners. Keep ahead. 
12.6 0.2 Left-hand diagonal road at water trough; bear left. 

Cross RR 12.8. 
13.3 0.7 Fork; bear right. 

19.8 6.5 Cherry Valley, 4-corners at monument. Straight thru. 

Thru East Springfield 24.4. 
.26.5 6.7 Springfield. Straight thru. 

Left at 26.6 is Route 345 to Cooperstown. 

Thru Warren 30.1. 

Richfield Springs City Map and Points of Interest, page 465. 

1 332 6; 7 Richfield Springs, Main & Church Sts., park on right. Keep 

ahead. , 

33.6 <0.4 Fork; bear right upgrade. Cross RR 34.2. Thru Winfield 
42.0. Cross RR 42.4. 

Right at 4-corners 42.9 is Route 654 to I lion. 

44.3 10.7 West Winfield, 4-corhers. Straight thru, . 

Left is Route 593 to Unadilla. 

, . Cross RR 47.1. 

53L4 3.1 Bridgewater, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Right is Route 663 to Utica. 

57.9 $,6 Sangerfield, 4-corners at park. Bear right half way around 

park, keeping straight ahead. 
57.2 0.2 Right-hand diagonal road, beyond RR ; bear right. 
61.8 4.6 Fork; bear right. Thru Madison 64.1. Cross RR at sta. 66.0. 
66.1 4.3 Bouclprille, 4-corners. Straight thru across iron bridge. 
Left is Route 896 to Blnghamton. 

>t67.8 1.7 Fork; bear left across RR. Cross RR at sta. 69.0, ascending 
long easy grade. Descend grade 70.2. Thru Morrisville* 

*fforrisville, N. Y. (pop. 650, alt, 1,267 it.), buildings and equipment, including a pro- 
«iituat«d in the center of Madison county, on <*"««** farm °* tw <> hundred acre*, 
-the Ghorry Valley pike, is noted for its wide ««• •» the -south bank of the Mohawk, and 

derived its name from the Indians. One of 
the fortified dwellings, utilized as a place of 

_ „ defense during the revolution, was the old 

-of the New York State school of agriculture. Van Alstyne hou8e . |t wa8 knowQ M Fort 

.one of the foremost secondary agricultural Rensselaer, built in 1749. Canajoharie is the 
.institutions of the state. Several hundred home of the Beech Nut Packing Compar > 
thousand dollars have been expended in and several other large corporations. 

Digitized byLjOOQlC 



-streets .a&d public parks, lined with long 
rrows of beautiful old maples. It is the home 



Route 352 Page 296 Albany-Troy Section 

71.1, and Nelson 78.3. Bear left across RR 82.3. 

82.4 14.6 Cazenovia, Albany & Mill Sts. Keep ahead. 

Left Is Route 597 to Cortland. 

82.7 0.3 4-corners on shore of lake; turn left. 

83.0 0.3 Fork, beyond small concrete bridge; bear right. 

84.8 1.8 Right-hand road, beyond RR; turn right upgrade. Avoid 

right-hand road 85.1. Caution for blind RR crossing 86.8. 
Thru Oran 88.7. 

Left at 88.7 is Note (a) Route 597 to Tully. 

91.0 6.2 Fork; bear left with trolley. 

91.3 0.3 Manlius, 4-corners, P. O. on right. Keep ahead with trolley. 

91.5 0.2 Turn right- with trolley. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 91.9. 
93.7 2.2 Fayetteville, 4-corners at small green. Bear left with trol- 
ley. 

94.2 0.5 Left-hand road at foot of grade; turn left with trolley onto 
Genessee St. Trolley leaves to right 99.5. Bear left, join- 
ing trolley, 100.1. 

101.3 9.1 State St. at end of park; turn right and left with branch 
trolley — still on Genessee St. 

Syracuse City Map and Points of Interest, page 418. 

101.5 0.2 4-corners; meeting cross-trolley, turn right onto S. Salina St. 

Cross iron bridge over canal. 

101.6 0.1 SYRACUSE, Salina & James Sts. at Clinton square. 

Route 352— Cobleskill to Palatine Bridge, N. Y.— 23.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

^~ MIL oitUao« Via LawyersviUe, Sharon, Sharon Springs and Canajoharie. Mac- 

Total BttweM adam and atone road, some badly worn. Thru a hilly farming country. 
M lleas» Point* 

0.0 0.0 COBLESKILL, Main & Grand St?., at park. Go north on 
Grand St. 

2.0 2.0 Fork, park in center; bear right, curving left at church. 

2.1 0.1 LawyersviUe. End of roa<f, turn right. 
4.1 2.0 End of road; turn left. 

4.7 0.6 Fork, keep right. Bear right 5.7. 

6.5 1.8 Left-hand road; turn left. 

12 0.7 Sharon. Diagonal 4-corners. Turn left. Thru Sharon Center 

10.3. % 

12.4 5.2 Sharon Springs, 4-corners. Turn right. 

Straight ahead is Route 351 to Richfield Springs. 



SHARON SPRINGS, New York 

Pavilion Hotel and Cottages 

Open June 29th, 1921 

Superb View of the Mohawk 
Valley with Adirondack Moun- 
tains in the distance 



THE ANNEX *pffi> 

Adjoining the famous White Sul- 
phur Springs and Bathing 
Establishment 

White Sulphur Springs Co. 
of Sharon Springs, New York 

T. J. PHELAN. Manager 



)igitized by 



GoogI 



Albany-Troy Section Page 297 Route 357 

15.2 2.8 Fork; bear left across small wooden bridge. Thru Ames 16.4. 

18.6 3.4 End of road; bear right. Bear right at cemetery 19.5. 

22.5 8.9 4-corners, turn right on Otsego St., downgrade. 

22.6 0.1 Diagonal 4-corners ; turn right on Rock St. 

22.8 0.2 Canajoharie,* Mohawk, Rock & Church Sts. at bank. Bear 
left onto Church St. Cross long iron bridge over Mohawk 
river and RR 23.1. 

23.2 0.4 PALATINE BRIDGE, end of road at P. 0. 



Right is 
Left is I 



Route 686 to Albany. 
Route 324 to Utlca. 



Route 357— Albany to Kingston, N. Y.— 57.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index t>f Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ravena, Athens, Catskill and Saugerties. Alternating: stretches of macadam, 
concrete and brick. 

Road winds thru a hilly country, following the valley of the Hudson river, not far 
from Catskill mountains. A very pretty trip offering splendid views of the Hudson 
river and Catskill mountains, thru a fine farming and apple growing country, passing 
large cement plants at Cementon. 

Connects at Catskill with Route 286 to Stamford and Route 283 to Catskill Mountain 
house and Kaaterskill house; also at Saugerties with Route 280 to Phoenicia via 
Ashokam dam. 

/ " MIL DiiSSw ^ or **"* and other exits see City Map, page 260. 

Mi^UVoTnto For en * ar g e d map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 

0.0 0.0 ALBANY, Pearl & State Sts. Go south with trolley on Pearl 
St. 

2.1 2.1 Fork, just beyond long iron bridge; bear left. 

3.4 1.3 Fork, bear left. Over RR bridge 3.8. Thru Cedar Hill 7.5. 
12.4 9.0 Fork; bear right across iron bridge. 

12.7 0.3 Coeymans, right-hand road at water trough. Turn right 

upgrade. 

13.8 1.1 Ravena, fork. Bear left. 

14.1 0.3 Fork, bear left. 

16.6 1.4 Fork, bear right downgrade. 

Left across RR bridge leads to New Baltimore. 

17.4 1.9 Fork, bear left. Cross RR at W. Coxsackie 22.6. 
22.6 5.2 Fork; bear right. 

23.1 0.5 Coxsackie. Irregular 4-corners at churches. Bear right. 

Bear right across wooden bridge 28.7. 
29.6 6.5 Athens, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Left leads to ferry for Hudson. 

Catskill City Map and Points of Interest, page 252. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 33.6. 
34.0 4.4 End of street, turn right onto Bridge St. 
34.3 0.3 Catskill, Bridge & Main Sts., court house on right. 

Left on Main St. leads to ferry for Greendale. 
Right on Main St. is Route 286 to Stamford. 

Straight thru across trolley on Bridge St. across bridge 34.4. 
Avoid left-hand diagonal road 34.5. Thru diagonal 4-corners 
at brick school 35.0. 

35.5 1.2 Fork; bear left downgrade. Thru Alsen 39.9; Cementon* 41.2; 

West Camp 41.9; Evesport 42.6 and Maiden* 43.7. 

"Canajoharie, N. Y. (pop. 2,500, alt. 306 ft.), Cement Co.; daily capacity 4,500 barrels. Next 

lies on the south bank of the Mohawk, and in size is Alsen plant, in village north of 

derived its name from the Indians. One of Cementon, daily capacity, 3,500 barrels, 

the fortified dwellings, utilized as a place of *Malden-on-Hudson, N. Y., immediately on 

defense during the revolution, was the old the river, 2 miles north of Saugerties (West 

Van Alstyne house; it was known as Fort Shore station 1 mile from dock); pleasant 

Rensselaer, built in 1749, now known as the old village and river port. In 1852 steamer 

Fort Rensselaer club house. Canajoharie is "Reindeer" exploded and burned in river at 

the home of the Beech Nut Packing Company Maiden. John Bigelow, diplomat and author, 

and several other large corporations. born here; homestead now occupied by his 

'Cementon, N. Y. (pop. 125), one of the son, Poultney Bigelow, author and traveler, 

largest cement-producing localities in U. S. Here was unveiled in 1916 a marble bust by 

Crushed stone is carried in immense quan- Kitson of S. J. Tilden, life-long friend of 

titles by overhead cable and buckets from John Bigelow. Maiden was settled in 1807 by 

hills on west side of road to be made into John Bigelow's father, who built the fir 

cement. Oldest and largest mill is Alpha church, school and dock, opened the first 

Portland Cement Co., No. 6, formerly Catskill and secured the first post office. 

O 



Routes 359-360 Page 298 Albany-Troy Section 

45.3 9.8 Right-hand road; turn right onto Main St. 

45.8 0.5 Saugerties,* Main & Partition Sts. 

Turn left onto Partition St. 

46.4 0.6 Left-hand street; turn left onto Hill St. Cross long iron 

bridge, bearing right just beyond. Turn right onto Church 
, St. 46.5 and left onto Barclay St. 46.6. 
46.7 0.3 4-corners, turn right. 

47.9 1.2 Fork; bear right. 

Left fork is option to Kingston. 

48.9 1.0 Fork; bear left. Thru Glen Eyrie 50.1. Cross RR 54.6. 
56.7 7.8 Fork; bear right onto Albany Ave. 

Left fork are Routes 261 and 262 to Newburgh which avoids going 
Into center of town. 

Bear right with Albany Ave. 56.9. 

Kingston City Map, page 238; Points of Interest, page 239. 

57.0 0.3 4-corners, meeting trolley; turn right on Clinton Ave. 

57.1 0.1 KINGSTON, Clinton Ave. & Main St. 

Route 359— Troy to Poiighkeepsie, N. Y.— $1.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Defreestville, Kinderhook, Hudson and Rhinebeck. All macadam, concrete and 
brick. Direct route, avoiding Albany. 

^MILEAGE-, 

Total Betwee? For tn i s an< * other exits see City Map, page 267. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 TROY, River St. & Broadway, monument in green on left. Go 

west on River St. with trolley one block. 
0.1 0.1 Left-hand street; turn left onto 1st St. Cross RR O.8. 1 

Trolley comes in from left 1.6. Bear right with trolley 1.7 

onto Burden Ave. 
2.0 1.9 Left-hand street; turn left with trolley onto Mill St. 
2.4 0.4 Right-hand road beyond concrete bridge; turn right up stfeep 

grade. 
5.4 3.0 End of road, cemetery on right; turn right. 
6.3 0.9 Defreestville, 5-corners. Straight thru. Cross RR 10.0. 
10.1 3.8 End of road; turn left, and follow Route 301 from mileage 

4.1 balance of way (71.2 miles) to Poughkeepsie. 

Route 360— Troy N. Y., to Pittsfield, Mass.— 39.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Averin Park, Sand Lake, E. Nassau, W. Lebanon, New Lebanon Center and 
Shaker Village. First 14.2 miles macadam; then 6 miles gravel; balance 19.5 miles mac-' 
adam. A very pretty trip thru hilly farming: country. 

Route 359 to B. Greenbush combined with Route 305 to Pittsfield offers an all mac- 1 
adam option. 
^MILEAGE-. 

Total B«twell? For this and other exits see City Map, page 267. 

Mlleao* Points 

0.0 0.0 TROY, Broadway & River St., monument on left. Go east 

with trolley on Broadway. 
0.3 0.3 5th Ave. ; turn right away from trolley, two blocks. 

*Saugertie*, N. Y. (pop. 3,950, alt. 159 ft.). to Plattekill Clove and Kaaterskiil Clove 

On west bank of Hudson river near mouth of roads; very steep but picturesque approaches 

Esopus creek* Direct boat from N. Y.; also to Twilight, Sunset and Onteora parks, 

ferry across Hudson to Tivoli, on east side. Hunter, Tannersville, Haines Falls and Kaat- 

Optional entrance to interior Catskill Mts. erskill region. Fine orchards, vineyards and 

via Unionville, Woodstock, Bearsville and farms are frequent in the surrounding 

,'Mt. Pleasant; also shortest line from south countrv. 



HOTEL JCIRKLAND "the home 

Cor. QjntQfi Avp.^nd Main St. THF TOI IR JCT" 

VT GSTON NEW YORK SAMUEL SAULPAUCH. Prop. 



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Albany/Troy Section Page 299 Route 362 

0.4 0.1 Congress St.; turn left, upgrade. 

0.5 0.1 Irregular 4-corners ; bear left, upgrade. Join trolley 0.6. 
1.3 0.8 Right-hand street, fire sta. on far right; turn right with trol- 
ley across iron bridge. 
1.7 0.4 Fork; bear right with trolley. Thru diagonal 4-corners 2.5. 

Avoid right-hand road 4.3. 
5.3 3.6 Right-hand road; turn right. 
9.0 3.7 Fork, at foot of grade; bear right. 
10.4 1.4 Averill Park, 5-corners, store on left. Bear slightly left. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 10.6. 
11.2 0.8 Sand Lake, diagonal 4-corners, P. O. on right. Turn right. 

Thru Glass House 1&0. Pass Crooked lake on right 12.5. 
14.2 3.0 Fork— sign "Pittsfield" ; bear right. 

Left fork Is Routo 307 to Wllllamstown. 

Thru Hoags Corners 17.4. 

20.4 6.2 End of road; turn left. Cross concrete bridge 20.5. 

21.0 0.6 E. Nassau, right-hand road. Turn right across iron bridge. 
21.9 0.9 End of road; turn sharp left. Cross RR 22.1. Thru W. Leb- 
anon 24.7 and West Lebanon Center 27.4. 
28.8 6.9 New Lebanon, N. Y., fork, church on right. Bear left. 
29.8 1.0 Right-hand road, concrete school on left; turn right, upgrade. 

Left leads to Lebanon Warm Springs. 

Ascend long winding grade over Taconic mountain. 

35.0 6.2 Shaker Village, Mass. 41 Straight thru. 

36.1 1.1 Left-hand road; turn left. Join trolley 36.4. 

37.8 1.7 Fork; bear left with trolley on Woodleigh St. Under RR 
bridge 38.7. 

39.2 1.4 5-corners; bear slightly right onto Housatonic St., leaving 

trolley. 

Pittsfield City Map and Points of Interest, page 73. 

89.3 0.1 South St. ; meeting trolley, turn left. 

39.5 0.2 PITTSFIELD, North, East, South & West Sts. 

Route 362— Pittsfield, Mass., to Hudson, N. Y.— 39.6 m. 

% For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Quaker Village, B. Chatham, Ghent and Claverack. First 8 miles macadam, then 

20.6 miles gravel; balance (10.7 miles) macadam. Thru a hilly farming country. 
Route 363 to Great Barrington combined with Route 364 to Hudson offers an all mac- 
adam' option — 8 miles longer. 

^MILEAGE-. 

Total SrtwM? For ^is anc * ot ^ er exits see City Map, page 73. 



0.0 0.0 PITTSFIELD, North, East, South & West Sts. Go. south with 

trolley 2 blocks on South St. 
0.2 0.2 4-corners; turn right on Housatonic St., leaving trolley. 
€.4 0.2 5-corners, meeting trolley; bear diagonally left. Go under 

RR 0.9. Trolley ends 3.2. 
1.6 4.2 Shaker Village,* Mass., left-hand road at small grass plot. 

Turn left — sign "Richmond." 

Straight ahead is Route 43 to Albany. 

8.2 3.6 Right-hand road; turn right. 

.10.8 2.6 Fork; bear slightly right — sign "Albany." 

11.2 0.4 End of road; turn right. 

11.9 0.7 End of road; turn left. 

12.2 0.3 Queechy, fork; keep left. 

13.4 1.2 Canaan, N. Y., 4-corners. Straight thru. 

16.3 2.9 Fork; bear left. 

*Shak«r Village, Mass. Settled at an early there are few Quakers left, most of the 

-date by Quakers, who carried on fanning on houses having been sold or leased and culti- 

a large scale. The women made "Shaker vation of land is not maintained at former 

cloaks" and other fancy articles. There was high standard. It is understood that no new 

also a chair factory and a factory for weaving members are being received, and as most of 

upholstery plush. Jellies, marmalades and the present members are advanced in year* 

-candies were also made for the market. Prop- the extinction of the society is a questio 

erty was held by the community. At present of comparatively short time. 



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Route 363 Page 300 Albany-Troy Section 

17.8 1.5 E. Chatham, 5-corners at small grass plot. Bear right along 

BR. 

18.9 1.1 Left-hand road beyond RR underpass; turn left. 

20.1 1.2 End of road beyond RR; turn right. Avoid left-hand road 

22.3. Thru 5-corners 22.7. 
23.1 3.0 Fork; keep left across RR. 

23.6 0.5 Chatham, 4-corners, church on left. Straight thru. 

Right across RR is Route 46 to Albany. ' 

26.0 2.4 Ghent, fork beyond RR. Bear left. 
26.4 0.4 Fork; bear left. 

27.4 1.0 Fork; bear right on macadam. 

31.8 4.4 Fork; bear left across RR, bearing right at end of road 32.0. 

32.1 0.3 Mellenville, fork, P. O. ahead on right; keep left. Cross RRs 

32.4-34.1. 

36.2 4.1 Claverack, library on left. Straight thru. 
37.0 0.8 Fork; bear right with poles. 

38.7 1.7 Fork, store in center; bear right. Cross trolley 39.0. 

Hudson City Map and Points of Interest, page 196. 

39.4 0.7 End of street, meeting trolley; bear right onto Columbia St. 

39.5 0*1' Park place, park ahead ; turn left. 

39.6 0.1 HUDSON, Park place & Warren St:, park on right. 

Route 363— Pittsfield, Mass., to New York City, N. Y. 

— 145.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Lenox, Stockbridge, Great Barrington, South Egremont, Salisbury, Lakeville, 
MiUerton, Amenia, Wassaic, Dover Plains, Pawling, Carmel. Lake Mahopac, Yorktown 
Heights, Bratrcliff, Scarboro, Tarrytown, Irvington, Yonkers and into New York via 
Broadway. Macadam and gravel roads. 

This is a main route thru the Berkshire Hills, passing many fine estates and farms. 
Winding and hilly thru farming country to Carmel, passing numerous reservoirs of 
the New York City water works system. From Scarboro to New York, route follows 
Broadway thru thickly settled section, passing many fine estates. 

For option from Lakeville to Amenia, see Note (a). 

,-MILEAQE-^ 

Total b«&!m ^ For t^is an( ^ other exits see City Map, page 73. 

MIImm Points 

0.0 0.0 PITTSFIELD, Main, West & East Sts., park on left. Go 
south on Main St. with trolley. Over RR bridge 1.0. 

6.6 6.6 Lenox,* 4-corners, at monument. Turn left. 

6.8' 0.2 Right-hand diagonal road, large stone church ahead on right; 

bear right. Bear right 9.8. 
12.7 5.9 Stockbridge,* 4-corners, monument in green. Turn left. 
Avoid left-hand road 12.9. Cross iron bridge 13.0. 

*Lenox, Mass. (pop. 3,000, alt. 1,270 ft.), oc- ihip; their memory is commemorated by a. 

cuptes a slightly elevated plateau in the rough stone monument on West Main St., 

midst of a scenic highland section, mostly inscribed, 'The Ancient Burial Place of the 

covered with forests, sprinkled with attrac Stockbridge Indians, the Friends of our 



tive lakes and traversed by several pictur- 



Fathers.' 
John Sergeant, a tutor of Yale, became 

esque streams. missionary to the Indians in 1735, but died 

In and about Lenox are some of the finest in V47; and wag 8UCCC eded by Jonathan 
and best kept estates in the country. Dor- Edwards, the elder, who came from* North- 
ing September and October, just after the ampton in 1751, and remained until called to 
height of the season at the seashore and the the presidency of Princeton College in 1757. 
mountains, is the favorite social rendezvous. Here, in a house since removed to make way 
Several decades ago it was the home or fre- for a private residence, the eminent divine 
quent summering place for authors and ar- wrote his most famous work, "The Freedom 
tists. of the Will." A sun-dial marks the founds- 

Among local points of interest are the tion of the Sergeant and Edwards home. The 

Trinity school for boys and girls, established Field Chimes Clock tower, the gift of the late 

in 1803, the Lenox Congregational church, David Dudley Field, now identifies the site 

founded in 1805, Lenox library, founded in of the original Indian mission church; nearby 

1855 and the Lenox and Brotherhood clubs. is the Jonathan Edwards monument. 

'Stockbridge, Mass. (pop. 1,901, alt. from Rev. David Dudley Field, D.D., minister 

P -1,000 ft.). Located on the ancient lands of the First Congregational church from 1819 

Rockbridge Indians, who were con- to 1837, was the father of the celebrated Field 

ristianity and given full citizen- brothers, Cyrus W., who laid the first Atlan- 

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Albany-Troy Section Page 301 Route 363 

13.8 1.1 Fork; grass plot in center; bear left. 

15.4 1.6 Fork; bear right. Bear left 17.1. 

19.1 3.7 End of road; turn right with trolley. 

19.6 0.5 End of road beyond iron bridge ; turn left with trolley. 

20.2 0.6 Great Barrington,* Main, Bridge & Castle Sts., town-hall 

ahead on right. Straight thru with trolley. 

20.5 0.3 Maple Ave. ; bear diagonally right away from trolley. Cross 

RR 20.8. 

21.7 1.2 Fork; bear right. 

22.1 0.4 Fork; bear left. Cross trolley 23.0. , 

23.8 1.7 End of road; meeting trolley, bear left. 

23.9 0.1 Fork, green in center. Bear left, leaving trolley. 
24.0 0.1 S. Egremont, Mass., end of road; turn right. 

24.5 0.5 Fork; bear left downgrade. 

Right fork Is Route 364 to Hudson. 

24.7 0.2 Fork; bear left. 

33.0 8.3 Right-hand road, small white house on left; turn right. 

33.3 0.3 Fork; keep right. Pass lake on left 33.4. 

37.4 4.1 Salisbury, Conn., monument on left. Bear right. 

39.1 1.7 Lakeville, Cram., fork. Bear right upgrade. 

Left fork is Note (a) to Amenla via Sharon. 

39.6 0.5 Fork; bear left. 

40.2 0.6 Fork; bear right. Cross RR 40.9. Pass Ore Hill, P. O. on 

right 41.0. 
42.9 2.7 Irregular 4-corners, wooden church on left; jog left and 

immediately right onto Main St. 
43.0 0.1 Millerton, N. Y., Main & Dutchess Sts., P. O. ahead on left. 

Bear left — still on Main St. across RR. 
43.2 0.2 End of street; turn left. 

44.8 1.6 3-corners; bear left. 

46.9 2.1 End of road ; bear left. 

49.2 2.3 3-corners; bear right. Bear left 50.8 and right 51.0. 

tic cable; David Dudley, the eminent jurist; nington and Saratoga, General Burgoyne, with 

Henry M., clergyman, traveler and author, h»s remaining army of British and Hessian 

and Stephen J., chief justice of the Califor- soldiers, marched thru Great Barrington. On 

nia supreme court and afterward associate the « of ° ct <*« r *• }777. ******** "as 

justice of the United States supreme court. «tert*ined by Col. Elijah Dwtght in the 

' . ,„..... A . * i_ i. Henderson house. 

During the Field ministry the present church In fwmt of ^ town ^ and €mt hoU8e 

edifice at Stockbridge was erected. St. Paul s . g an imposing 90 \ dim * monument and 

Episcopal church, designed by McKim, the mounted cannon captured from a British 

gift of the late Charles E. Butler, was conse- man-of-war by the frigate "United States." 

crated in November, 1884. A rough stone on the same grounds it in- 

Monument mountain, south of the village, scribed. "Near this spot stood the first 
is the subject of Bryant's poem of that name, court house of 'Berkshire county, erected in 
which charmingly recounts the old legend of 1764. Here on August 16, 1774, occurred the 
the Indian maiden who leaped to her death first open resistance to British rule in Amer- 
from its summit; the spot is marked by a ica." Eight months before the battle of Lex- 
cairn of stone placed by the Indians. Stock- ington, armed men prevented the crown 
bridge Bowl (Lake Mahkeenac), famed in song judges from holding court, and defied English 
and story t i> north of the village; Nathaniel authority in Massachusetts Province. 
Hawthorne lived for about 18 months near its Great Barrington has been the birthplace 
shores. The village and environs contain or home of several notel people. Here the 
many of the finest homes in the country. alternating current was first used for elec- 
Jackson library and Soldiers' monument are trie lighting by William Stanley, who was 
other points of interest. the inventor of means for its use. A point 

'Great Barrington, Mass. (pop. 7.000, alt. of interest is the newsboys' fountain at Sil- 

725 ft.), is situated on both sides of the upper ver and Maple avenues, erected by Col. W. L. 

Housatonic river. A large boulder with in- Brown. 

scription, "Town Incorporated 1761," stands On the east side of Main street, just south 

on the court house grounds. of the town hall, are 'he extensive grounds 

WHliam Cullen Bryant practiced law in of the Hopkins -Searles estate, now known as 

Great Barrington from 1815 to 1825; and was "Barrington House," formerly called "Kel- 

town clerk for several years. Here he mar- logg Terrace." The massive stone residence, 

ried Miss Frances Fairchild, and wrote some built of native blue dolomite in the Fr" 

early poems, among them "Monument Moun- chateau style, by Mrs. Mark Hopkin* 

tain" and* "Green River." wards Mrs. Searles, is 180 ft. long a 

After t**ir defeat at the battles of Ben- deep, and has seven towers. 



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r. 



Route 363 Page 302 Albany-Troy Section 

62.0 2.8 Amenia,* water-trough on left. Straight thru. 
Right is Route 371 to Poughkeepsle. 

Cross RR 52.5. Thru Wassaic 55.4. 

56.2 4.2 Right-hand road, blacksmith shop on right. Turn right. 
59.8 3.6 Fork; bear left. 

61.0 1.2 Dover Plains.* Straight thru. Bear left 62.9. 

67.3 6.3 So. Dover. Straight thru, joining trolley. 

Left-hand road 67.8 Is Route 189 to Danbury. 

68.4 1.1 3-corners, brick house in center; bear left away from trolley. 
72.8 4.4 Right-hand road; turn. right with travel on macadam. < 
75.0 2.2 Pawling,* 3-corners, store ahead; bear slightly left. 

*Amenia, N. Y. (pop. 1,000, alt. 600 ft.). There are many natural curiosities in the 

Settled about the middle of the 18th century, vicinity, particularly the "stone church," a 

mostly by slow migration from New England. spacious cavern, ribbed and walled by mas- 

Capt. Henry Brush, who, while leading a M { vc rocks, whose arched opening resembles 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 303 



Route 363 



78.7 3.7 



80.1 1.4 



80.3 


0.2 


82.3 


2.0 


82.4 


0.1 


84.0 


1.6 


88.3 


4.3 



88.7 0.4 



91.0 


2.3 


91.6 


0.6 


93.7 


2.1 


93.8 


0.1 


93.9 


0.1 


95.0 


1.1 


97.4 


2.4 


99.4 


2.0 


99.7 


0.3 


103.6 


3.8 


103.7 


0.2 



103.9 0.2 



104.2 


0.3 


104.4 


0.2 


106.7 


2.3 



Right-hand road, farmhouse' on right; turn right. 

Straight ahead before this turn Is Route 190 to Danbury. 
Cross RR at Patterson Sta. 79.4. 
Left-hand road; turn left. 

Straight % ahead is Route 34 to Newburgh. 

Fork; bear right. Bear left 80.7. 

Irregular 4-corners; turn left. 

End of road; school on left; turn right upgrade. 

End of road; bear left downgrade. Bear left 87.5. 

Carmel,* P. O. on right. Keep ahead. 

Left-hand road at church 88.7 is Route 374 to Brewster and Danbury. 

Fork, store on left; bear right along Lake Glenida. Cross 

RR 89.4. Go over RR 89.6, descending sharp grade beyond. 

End of road beyond causeway; bear right. 

3-corners ; bear left with macadam. 

Fork on shore of Lake Mahopac ; bear right with travel. 

Lake Mahopac* Keep ahead along lake. 

Fork, sta. in center; bear right along lake. 

Fork; bear left away from lake. Caution for RR crossing 

95.8. Cross RR 97.3. 

Baldwin Place, 4-corners; turn right. 

Right-hand diagonal road beyond causeway ; bear right. 

3-corners; bear left with macadam along reservoir. Cross 

RR at Amawalk Sta. 102.5. 

Fork; bear left on macadam. 

End of road; bear left. 

Sharp right is Route 80 to Peeksklll. 

Right-hand diagonal ro^d, store on left; bear right. 

RR at Yarktown Heights, 104.0. 

End of road; bear right. 

Fork; bear left with macadam. 

End of road at reservoir; turn left. Cross RR at Croton 



Cross 



hill, wrote most of "Ben Hur" on a little 
piazza on the north side of that house. 

Friends' meeting house on Quaker hill, 
erected in 1764, and still in good repair, was 
the scene in 1767 of the first public protest 
in America against slavery* During the revo- 
lution it was used by continental troops as 
a hospital, particularly during the campaign 
of 1778; many soldiers are buried in its 
churchyard. Lafayette stopped at the church 
on his way from Rhode Island to consult 
Washington; it is said that on the general's 
visit to the United States in 1824 he inquired 
about Quaker hill and expressed a strong 
desire to visit it again. 

In the cemetery is a monument to Mehitabel 
Wing-Prenderghast, heroic wife of William 
Prenderghast, erected by the Wing family, 
one of the most prominent in the early his- 
tory of this section. Admiral Worden of 
Monitor fame is buried here. The historical 
society museum in the library on the hill 
contains many old records and objects of 
historic interest. On the south end of 
"Purgatory," a hill east of the village, are 
still found the stone remains of ovens used 
by the soldiers who were encamped there 
during the revolution. 

A half mile north of the village, just beyond 
the cemetery, on the east side of the main 
north -and- south road, are the campus and 
buildings of the Pawlinv school for boys, of 
which Frederick Luther damage, D.C.L., is 
headmaster. 



•Carmel, N. Y. (pop. 2,737, alt. 425 ft.). 
Located on the eastern shore of lake Glenida 
is the county seat of Putnam county, and an 
important point on the old highway between 
Danbury and Peek skill. 

Enoch Crosby, who, while posing as a 
Tory, was in fact in the confidential service 
of congress and acting under the general di- 
rection of Washington, was a native of the 
town. At one time Gen. Israel Putnam, one 
Jay, a member of the Committee of Safety, 
and Crosby had sought refujre at the home of 
Rev. Nathan Cole, on the site of the present 
Smalley Inn, when they were overtaken by 
a British captain and company of men. 
Watching their opportunity, they emerged 
from hiding and took their enemies prisoners. 
Crosby, who was the original of "Harvey 
Birch" in Cooper's "The Spy," died in Carmel 
in 1838 and is buried in the churchyard here. 

Drew seminary for young women, founded 
by Daniel Drew, New York financier, is on 
College hill, in the southern part of Carmel 
village. 

•Lake Mahopac, N. Y. (pop. 400, alt. 641 ft.), 
is composed principally of a summer popu- 
lation, living in cottages or bungalows. The 
lake, \y 2 miles long and 6 miles in circum- 
ference, is surrounded by a good road. This 
locality was once the hunting and fishing 
grounds of the Indians, who held their last 
council on Washington Head rock, on an 
island in the lake, before moving west. Boat- 
ing and fishing are the popular sumnv 
recreations. 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 305 Route 364 

128.1 0.2 Hastings-on-Hudson.* Straight thru with trolley across 

long concrete viaduct, along bank of Hudson river. 

132.3 4.2 Dock St., soldiers' monument on right; turn left away from 

trolley, one block. 

132.4 0.1 End of street; turn right onto N. Broadway. 

Caution for traffic regulations in Yonkers. 

132.5 0.1 Yonkers, &etty square. 

Bear slightly right onto Broadway, joining trolley and ascend- 
ing grade. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 133.0. Go under 
elevated section of subway at southern boundary of Van 
Cortlandt park 185.6. Cross irbn bridge over Harlem river 
137.0. 

N. Y. C. Map, Points of Interest & Accommodations, between pages 98-09, 

137.2 4.7 Fork, where elevated leaves to left; keep right on Broadway. 
138.0 0.8 6-corners; straight thru on Broadway with trolley. 

Sharp right on Dyckman St. leads to Englewood ferry. 
Diagonally right is option into city via Riverside drive. 

139.8 1.8 Diagonal 4-corners; bear right on Broadway away from trol- 

ley. 

142.9 3.1 Fork; keep left on Broadway with trolley. 
144.8 1.9 Fork; bear left with trolley, still on Broadway. 

145.6 0.7 NEW YORK CITY, Columbus circle, Broadway & 59th St. 

Note (a) Route 363 — Lakeville, Conn., to Amenia, N. Y. — 11.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Sharon. 8.7 miles macadam; 3 miles gravelly dirt. Thru a hiUy farming section. 
One mUe shorter than regular route, but not as good. 
0.0 0.0 LAKEVILLE. 3 -corners at green. Go southeast (a left turn if coming from 

Pittsfleld). 
0.2 0.2 Fork, wooden church in center; bear right. 
•6.6 6.4 Sharon, Conn., end of road at green. Turn left along green. 
6.8 0.2 4-corners at end of green; turn right. Cross RR 10.6. 
11.7 4.9 AMENIA, N. Y., 4-corners, bank on right. 

Straight ahead is Route 371 to Poughkeepsle. 
Left is Route 363 to New York City. 

Route 364 — Great Harrington, Mass., to Hudson, N. Y. 

—27.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via So. Egremont, Hillsdale, Craryville and Claverack. All macadam except 1.6 

miles, which is state gravel. 

^-M ileage-s This route traverses a hilly farming country and is the best conneo- 

»-*-• D !£? llaa tlon ^om Berkshire Hill resorts to points on the Hudson between 

MilMMPoTiits" Albany and Poughkeepsle. 

0.0 0.0 GREAT BARRINGTON, Main, Bridge & Castle St»., town hall 
on right. Go south on Main St. with trolley. 

0.2 0.2 Right-hand diagonal street; turn right onto Main St. away 
from trolley. Cross RR 0.5. 

' *Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. (pop. 5,570). Hastings was the residence of John Wil- 

Principally a residential suburb, consider- Ham Draper, MD., LL.D., long time profes- 

ably elevated above the Hudson and opposite sor oi chemistry and physiology at the uni- 

the greatest heights reached by the Palisades varsity of the City of New Yorlc Working 

. , T , . , -.. . along lines similar to Daguerre, the French 

on the New Jersey side. Fine views up and ° . A .*> . . . A 

. . pioneer in photography, Draper is said to 

down the river. have made Jmd deve i oped the first §ucce ss. 

Surrounding lands were once part of the ful portrait negative, and also the first photo- 

old Post estate. During the revolution, a graph of the moon. 

troop of Sheldon's Light Horse cavalry and The large manufacturing plant of the Na- 
a company of infantry belonging to Wash- tional Conduit & Cable Co., Zinsser & Co. and 
ington's command at White Plains ambushed the Hastings Pavement Co. are among the 
a force of Hessians at this point, killing, manufacturers here doing a national and in- 
wounding or routing all but one. ternational business. 



HOTEL ASTOR 

Follow Broadway to 45th Street Garage One Block 

Times Square f. a. muschenheim New York 



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Routes 365-370 Page 306 Albany-Troy Section 

1.4 1.2 Fork; bear right with poles. 

1.8 0.4 Fork; bear left. Bear left, joining trolley 3.5. Trolley leaves 

to right 3.6. 
3.7 1.9 So. Egremont, Mass., end of road. Turn right across iron 

bridge. 
4.3 0.6 Fork just before iron bridge; bear right with poles. 

Left Is Route 363 to New York City. 

10.6 6.3 Hillsdale, N. Y., monument in green on left. Straight thru. 

Thru Craryville 13.7. Over RR bridge 15.6. Thru Martindale 

17.5 and Hollowville 20.9. 
21.2 10.6 Fork; bear right. • 

Left is Route 365 to Cateklll. 
23.8 2.6 Claverack, 4-corners, library ahead on right. Straight thru. 
Thru 4-corners 26.6. 

Right at this 4-corners is Route 182 to Albany. 
Hudson City Map and Points of Interest, page 196. 

27.0 3.8 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto Columbia St. 

27.1 0.1 Left-hand street at near side of park; turn left on Park PI. 

27.2 0.1 HUDSON, Warren St. & Park PL, park on right. 

Route 365— Great Barrington, Mass., to Catskill, N. Y. . 

—30.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via S. Egremont, Martindale and Greendale. Connection from the Berkshires to 
^-MlLEAGE-v the Catskllls. First 21.2 miles macadam; balance gravel and dirt 

ouumm road. 
M T iiuLM B h R Thru a hilly farming country. 



0.0 0.0 GREAT BARRINGTON. See Route 364 for directions to 

21.2 21.2 Fork; bear left— sign "Catskill." 

22.4 1.2 Fork, school in center; keep left. 

22.6 0.2 Fork; keep right. Cross bridge over Taghkanick creek 24.3. 

24.5 1.9 Fork; keep left. % 

25.9 1.4 Diagonal 4-corners; bear slightly left. 

27.1 1.2 Greendale, 4-corners. Straight thru. Cross RR 29.4. 

Left at 27.1 is Route 301 to Poughkeepsle. 
Catskill City Map and Points of Interest, page 252. 

29.7 2.6 Greendale-Catskill ferry. 

Ferriage, car and driver, 40c; passengers, 10c each. Ferry runs to 
7:50 p. m. 

From ferry landing, keep ahead on Main St. 

30.6 0.9 CATSKILL, Main & Bridge Sts. 

Route 370— Millerton to Kingston, N. Y.— 34.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Pine Plains, Rock City, Red Hook, Rhinebeck and ferry to Kingston. First 1.7' 
miles macadam; then 2.4 miles gravelly dirt; 8.1 miles macadam; 4.2 miles under con- 
struction; balance 18.2 miles macadam. Summary: 28 miles macadam; 4.2 miles under 
construction; 2.4 miles dirt.. 

^-MILEAGE-^ Route runs thru a hilly farming: country to "Rhinebeck and crosses 

i. +-t SiS*? 11 * Hudson river by ferry. A very good connection from the Berkshires to 
Mlieait PoKS" west 8lde of tne Hudson river - 

0.0 0.0 MILLERTON, Center & Main Sts., P. 0. on right. Go south- 
west on Center St. Cross RR 0.1. 
0.2 0.2 End of road; turn left. 
1.7 1.6 S-cornera; turn right. 

IJeft is Route 363 to New York. 

4.1 2.4 Right-hand road; turn right over RR bridge and immediately 

left. Thru Pulvers 5.9. Cross RR 9.5. 
10.0 5.9 Pine Plains,* 4-corners. Straight thru. Cross RR 10.6. 

•Pine Plains, N. Y. (pop. 1,400, alt. 476 ft.). in a beautiful section of Dutchess county and 

Founded in 1740 by Moravian missionaries lies on a broad plain. The first house was 

who had a settlement at "Sha-ca-me-co" or built by Morris Graham, a descendant of 

"Little Mountain/' one of the ranges of hills James Graham, Marquis of Montrose. The 

three miles south of the village of Pine old stone house built by him in 1772 is still 

lains. No title, however, was given the standing. Nearby lies Stissing mountain, 

nship until October 19, 1744. It is situated rising 1,000 ft. above the village. 

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Albany-Troy Section Page 307 Routes 371*372 

12.2 2.2 Fork; bear left, keeping left at fork just beyond. 

13.2 1.0 Diagonal 4-corners; turn right across small iron bridge. 

15.8 2.6 Fork; bear right upgrade. Thru Lafayette 16.4. 

20.9 5.1 Rock City, right-hand road at store. Turn right. 

21.0 0.1 Fork, beyond small stone bridge; bear left. Cross RR 24.0. 

24.8 3.8 Red Hook, 4-corners at store. Turn left. Cross RR 25.3. 

Right at Red Hook Is Route 182 to Albany. 

30.0 5.2 Rhinebeck, 4-corners at stores. Turn right. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 301 to Poughkeepsle. 
. 32.1 2.1 End of road; turn right over RR bridge to 

32.3 0.2 Rhinebeok-Kingston ferry. 

Charges: 36- 42c; 13c each passenger. 

From ferry landing, keep ahead, turning left just beyond onto 
Strand St. 

32.5 0.2 Broadway; meeting trolley, turn right. 

32.9 0.4 End of street; turn right upgrade; still on Broadway. Cross 

RR 33.9. 

Kingston City Map, page 238; Points of Interest, page 239. 

34.4 1.5 End of street; turn left onto Albany Ave., keeping right of 

park. Bear right, joining trolley 34.5 onto Clinton Ave. 

34.6 0.2 KINGSTON, Clinton Ave. & Main St. 

Route 371 — Pittsfield, Mass., to Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

—78.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Lenox, Stockbrldge, Great Barrington, Amenia, Millbrook and S. Millbrook. All 
/-mileage-^ macadam road except 10 miles of gravel. 

▼-*.! Si**? nce This is the main thorofare from the Berkshire hills to Hudson river 

Total Between nn i n f S 

Mileage Points points. 

0.0 0.0 PITTSFIELD, MASS. See Route 363 for directions to Amenia, 

52.0 miles, where reset odometer at 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 Amenia, N. Y., 4-corners, bank on left. Turn right. 

2.0 2.0 Fork; bear left with poles. Thru Lithgow 5.0. 

8.3 6.3 Mabbettsville, 4-corners, store on right. Straight thru. 

9.6 1.3 Left-hand road, large stone gate on right; turn left. 

10.5 0.9 Millbrook,* end of road beyond RR crossing. Turn left. 
11.2 0.7 So. Millbrook, 4-corners, P. O. on far right. Turn right. 
14.4 3.2 Washington Hollow, 3-corners, inn on right. Befix left. 

19.1 4.7 Pleasant Valley, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 

25.2 6.1 Fork, water-trough in center; bear right with trolley on Main 

St. 

Poughkeepsie City Map and Points of Interest, page 182. 

26*2 1.0 POUGHKEEPSIE, Main & Market Sts., city hall on left. 

Route 372— Pawling to New York City, N. Y.— 69.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Brewster, Canton Falls, Purdy, Golden Bridge, Katonah, Bedford hills, Mt. 

Kisco, Ghapnaqtia, Pleasantville, Elmsford, Harts Corners and Central Ave. This is 

all tar macadam and concrete. 

^-MILEAGE-s a very pretty trip on a winding road thru hilly farming country, pas- 

_ . , SSSSS sm * several reservoirs of the New York City water works system. Not 

IHtoait PoJnS as ^°° d as Route 363 via, Carmel and Tarrytown. 

0.0 0.0 PAWLING, 3-corners, store on left. Go south (a slightly left 

turn in coming from Pittsfield). 
6.0 6.0 Right-hand road; turn right on macadam. 
10.0 4.0 Fork; bear right with poles. 

12.7 2.7 3-corners at foot of grade ; bear left across iron bridge. 
13.2 0.5 Sodom (outskirts), end of road. Turn right. 

Left leads to Danbury. 

♦Milbrook, N. Y. (pop. 1,200, alt. 566 ft.). old brick meeting house, built in 1780, the 
Many Wealthy and prominent families, nota- Memorial school, erected by Samuel Thorne 
bly the Thornes, Wings, Diet rich s and Davi- and family, the Bennett school for girls, and 
sons, have their homes in this village or in the Hayes memorial library, erected by Mrs 
the immediately surrounding country. The P. S. Hayes, are points of local interest. 

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Route 373 Page 308 Albany-Troy Section 

Curve left under and across RR 13.4. 
13.6 0.4 Right-hand road; turn right across iron bridge. 
14.4 0.8 Brewster, end of road, bank on left Turn left. 

18.4 4.0 3-corners ; bear left. 

18.6 0.2 Canton Falls, left-hand road. Turn left under RR. 

18.7 0.1 End of road; turn right. 

19.3 0.6 End of road at small green; turn right onto macadam. 

20.5 1.2 Purdy, 3-corners, large stone pile in center. Bear right, 

across iron bridge. Thru Golden's Bridge* 23.2. Avoid left- 
hand macadam road 25.4. 

25.6 5.1 Right-hand road; turn right upgrade. Cro&s RR at sta. 26.1. 
26.2 S).6 Katonah, 4-corners, flagpole in center. Turn left onto double , 

drive. 
28.2 2.0 Diagonal 4-corners; bear left with poles. Cross RR 28.3. 

28.4 0.2 Bedford Hills, right-hand road at top of grade; store ahead 

on right. Turn right. 
30.4 2.0 End of road; turn right across bridge onto Moger Ave. 
30.9 0.5 Mt. Kisco, Main St. & Moyer Ave., stone water-trough ahead. 

Turn left onto Main St. 

31.8 0.9 3-corners, green in center; bear right. Avoid left-hand mac- 

adam roads 32.1-32.3. 
33.8 2.0 Left-hand road at small green; turn left. 

35.4 1.6 Chappaqua, large concrete school on right. Straight thru. 
37.1 1.7 Pleasantville,* 3-corners, store ahead. Bear slightly left onto 

Broadway. 

Right is Route 28 to Tarrytown. 

Thru Thorn Wood 38.4. 

39.5 2.4 Hawthorne; straight thru. Cross RR at sta. 39.6. 

40.0 0.5 Fork; bear right on concrete. 

40.1 0.1 Left-hand road just before small iron bridge; turn sharp left. 

42.6 2.5 End of road, hospital on left; turn left. 

44.8 2.2 Elmsford,* 4-corners. Meeting trolley, turn left. 

Right is Route 19 to Tarrytown. 
45.0 0.2 Right-hand diagonal road; turn right upgrade. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 176 to Port Chester. 

47.2 2.2 Left-hand road, large stone church ahead on left; turn left. 
'47.7 0.5 Harts Corners, 4-corners. Turn right onto Central Ave. and 

follow Route 26 from mileage 41.4 balance of the way (21.6 
miles) to New York City. 

Route 373 — Carmel, N. Y., to Norwalk, Conn. — 30.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Brewster, Ridgefleld, North Wilton, Wilton and South Wilton. 23.3 miles brick; 
,-MlLEAQE-s 7.3 miles dirt and gravel. This route traverses a hilly farming country, 
DUtanot and while somewhat shorter is not as good as Route 374 to Danbury 
MiffiU B pSK8T combined with Route 192 to Norwalk. 

0.0 0.0 CARMEL, stone church on right. Go east (a left turn if 

coming from Pittsfield). Under RR 0.3. 
0.4 0.4 Left-hand diagonal road ; turn left with macadam downgrade. 
1.5 1.1 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left over RR bridge. 

*Golden's Bridge, N. Y. (pop. 600, alt. 1,000 a farm home here, which was known as 

ft.). Before New York City bought the sur- "Greeley Swamp." The original house was 

rounding land for the Croton reservoir, an destroyed by fire, but another was shortly 

old wooden bridge carried the highway across ™*£ on the same site and occupied by his 

the Croton river at the point where the long ^^ N . Y. (pop. 2,000, alt. 173 ft.). 

iron bridge now crosses the lake. This old Ktn _ u , ocatcd th# beautifu , homc of ^ 

bridge was called "Golden's Bridge, from a j c L Hamilton, great grandson of Alexan- 

farmer named Golden who lived near there der Hamilton and Cornelius Van Tassell. A 

many years ago; when the village sprang into mos t worthy collection of historic relics are 

being it was named Golden's Bridge. included among the treasures of this home. 

•asantville N. Y. (pop. 2,207, alt 420 ft.), The memory of Isaac Van Wart, one of the 

settlement renowned for its splendid captors of Major Andre, is perpetuated by a 

of apples and cucumbers. Horace monument located in the old Dutch church- 

sitor of the New York Tribune, had yard. 



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Albany-Troy Section Page 309 Route 376 

1.7 0.2 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right with poles. Bear right 
over causeway 2.1. Under RR 2.6. Bear right 4.3. 

4.4 2.7 End of road, just beyond RR bridge; turn right onto Railroad 
Ave. 

4.6 0.2 Brewster, N. Y., Main St. & Railroad Ave., sta. on right. 

Turn left onto Main St. 

Straight ahead before this last turn is Route 372 to New York City. 

5.4 0.8 End of road, just beyond iron bridge ; turn left. Cross RR 

and go under RR 5.6. Avoid left-hand road 5.8. 
6.9 1.5 Right-hand road, at far end of reservoir; turn right upgrade. 

10.7 3.8 3-corners ; turn left with one line of poles. 

10.8 0.1 Fork; bear right. Cross New York-Connecticut state line 11.8. 

Pass reservoir on right 13.6. Bear left 14.8. 

Sharp right 14.8 leads to The Port of Missing Men. 

15.7 4.9 Titicus, Conn., 3-corners, water-trough on right. Bear left 
across small concrete bridge. 

16.7 1.0 Ridgefield, 4-corners, water-trough on right. Keep ahead. 

Right on West Lane Ave. 17.2 is Route 26 to New York. 

17.6 0.9 Right-hand diagonal road, small grass plot ahead on right; 
bear right onto Wilton road West. Avoid right-hand roads 
18.0-18.2. Thru No. Wilton 20.7. 

23.3 5.7 Fork; bear left with poles. 

24.5 1.2 3-corners, store on right. Bear right. Cross RR 24.8. 

24.9 0.4 Wilton,* end of road, stone church ahead on left. Turn right. 

25.8 0.9 Fork; bear right. Thru So. Wilton 27.0. Bear left onto Main 

St. 29.8. 

Norwaik City Map and Points of interest, page 44. 

30.4 4.6 3-corners; bear right with trolley. 

30.6 0.2 NORWALK, Main & Wall Sts. 

Route 376— Troy to Schenectady, N. Y.— 14.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Latham. Macadam all the way, thru pretty rolling farming and suburban 
country. 
,-NILEAGE-o 

Total B$l£!£ For this and other exits see City Map, page 267. 

M Ileal* Points 

0.0 0.0 TROY, River St. & Broadway, monument on left. Go south- 
west on River St. with trolley. 

0.2 0.2 4-corners ; turn right on Congress St. Cross long iron bridge 
over Hudson river (toll, 10-13c). Join trolley from right at 
brick church 0.8. Cross RR 1.0. 

3.7 3.5 Latham, brick power sta. on left. Straight thru with trolley. 

Right is Route 321 to Saratoga Springs. 

Thru Colonade 6.4. Thru Niskayuna 7.6. Same thorofare 
becomes Union Ave. Straight thru irregular 4-corners 12.8. 

Schenectady City Map and Points of Interest, page 458. 

13.9 10.2 Nott terrace, Union college grounds on right; turn left with 

trolley. 

Tourists going west keep ahead on Union St., joining Route 324 
at end of street. 

14.3 0.4 End of street at Armory; turn right with trolley onto State St. 
14.6 0.3 SCHENECTADY, State & Center Sts. 

•Wilton, Conn. (pop. 2,000), has much of York City, were brought here to be run into 

... . , . .. A t»*x bullets. Some were hidden in a house op- 

colon,»l and revolutionary hwtory. Part, of po-|t gt Matthew ., church> , nd other piece , 

the statue of George HI, torn down in New in the Sloan house. 



SDCDNY 



REG. U.S. PAT. OFF 



MOTOR GASOLINE 

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Section 



Page 311 



Route 381 



Route 381— Saratoga Springs to Elizabethtown, N. Y. 

—96.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

VUt Glens Falls, Lake George, Chestertown and Schroon Lake. Macadam roads. 

The shortest and best way between Saratoga Springs and Elizabethtown. A very 
pretty drive thru the Adirondacks, passing Schroon Lake and several other small lakes; 
winding and rolling thru the woods. 

Route 390 via Ticonderoga and Crown Point furnishes an option from Lake George 
/— MlLEAGE-> to Elizabethtown. This is more scenic tho longer and with less favor - 
t«*.i dIH^H^ a °le road conditions, and necessitates taking the boat from Lake 
MllSie pSBST George or Bolton Landing. 

0.0 0.0 SARATOGA SPRINGS, Broadway, Lake Ave. & Church St. 

Go north on Broadway. 
0.2 0.2 4-corners just before RR crossing; turn right on Van Dam St. 
. 0,3 0J End of street; turn left on Maple Ave. Cross RR 0.5. 
2.9 2.6 Fork; bear right with macadam across trolley. 
7.4 4.5 Wilton, fork, store on left. Bear right downgrade. Trolley 

comes in from right 17.2. 



The New Worden 



Broadway 6- Division St. 



Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 



On main trunk line to the Adirondacks, in the center of New York 
State Mineral Springs Reservation-. Accommodations for two hundred 
and fifty guests. Fifty rooms with private baths. Hot and cold running 
water. Elevator. Steam Heated. Electric Lights. New Grill. Privilege 
of 1 8-hole golf course to our guests. Garage connected. American Plan. 



Always Open. 
Member Empire Tours Associations 



E. C. SWEENY, Proprietor 

Booklet on Application 



\ Champlain Transportation Co. 

The Historic Gateway 

Passenger and Automobile Ferry Service. 

Three commodious steel steamers operating 
between principal New York and Vermont 
State Ports on Lake Champlain. 

We take you off the State Road and put you 
on the State Road via the safest, quickest and 
nearest route. 

SERVICE 

In effect about May I'st to November 15th. 
Additional service from about June 13th to Sep- 
tember 17th. Complete summer service from 
about July 1st to September 6th. 

The Lake George Steamboat Company 

See picturesque Lake George. Automobiles 
carried to and from all Lake ports. Direct con- 
nections thru Lake Champlain. Six mile high- 
way between the two lakes. Ample time allowed 
to make connections in either direction. 

Automobiles of all types (except limousines exceeding seven feet in 
height) handled on both lakes. 

Cars are allowed to run on and off steamers under their own power. 

for rates, routes and other information write 




D. A. liOOMIS. Gen. M*r.. The C. T. Co. 
Burlington, Yt. 



M. J. POWERS, G. P. A., The C. T. Co. 
Albany, N. Y. 



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Glens Falls City Map Page 312 



Saratoga Springs 



POINTS OF INTEREST, 
Glens Falls (pop. 18,000, alt. 350 ft.), "The 
City of Elms," situated on the Hudson river, 
south of Lake George. This locality was the 
scene of a decisive battle between the French 
and English. The Hudson here has a drop 
of 200 ft. There is a concrete bridge across 
the rivef which is noted for its architectural 
beauty. From this bridge spiral stairs lead 
down to Cooper's Cave, made famous by 
James Fenimore Cooper in his novel "The 
Last of The Mohicans." A splendid view may 
be had from this bridge of .the falls from 



GLENS FALLS, N. Y. 

which this city derived its name. 

Other nearby points of historic interest are 
"Bloody Pond," which derived its name from 
the fact that bodies of wounded soldiers, dur- 
ing the French and Indian wars, were thrown 
into the water; Fort William Henry, Fort 
Schuyler, Fort Ticonderoga, Crown Point, 
Lake George and Mt. McGregor. 

Glens Falls is the home of many paper 
mills and of the Glens Falls Insurance Co., 
one of the oldest organizations in the insur- 
ance business. 



Gift and Tea Shop 

Take elevator to 3rd floor of Insurance Bldg. 

GLENS FALLS NEW YORK 



Midway between Saratoga & Lake George 

NOONDAY LUNCHEONS 
AND AFTERNOON TEA 
Special Room for Private Parties 

Open All the Year 



Fitzgerald's Restaurant 
and Grill street hill 

GLENS FALLS - N. Y. 



The only first-class restaurant 
and grill in Glen Falls 

Sea Foods a Specialty 



Bissell s Garage 

^,ENS FALLS N. Y. 



Top of Glen St. Hill 
OPEN ALL NIGHT 

Complete Machine Shop 
Vulcanizing and Welding Plants 
OVERLAND, WILLYS KNIGHT CARS v 
— ; ■ "iTW- 



Section Page 313 Route 381 

17.8 10.4 South Glens Falls, irregular 4-corners; turn left on Main 
St. with trolley. Cross long concrete bridge over Hudson 
river 18.3. 

18.7 0.9 Glens Palls, Glen, Ridge & Warren Sts. 
Keep ahead with trolley on Glen St. 



HOTEL MADDEN ~MER£ZZiZZlT 

GLENS FALLS N. Y. R.te. $3.50 u P w.rd. 



Sisson's Garage machinbjhop 

LAKE GEORGE, N. Y. *="" Line of Tires and Accessories 
Opposite Fort William Henry Hotel on Main Highway Service Car—All Night Service 

NEW YORK— MONTREAL Telephone 50 H. W. SISSON, Prop. 



flO 1 ElLf JM AJxiOlN The Hotel That Gives Value" for 

Your Money 

Rooms Single or en Suite 
With or Without Private B«th 



Directly on the Lake Front. Also State 
Road from Lake George Village to Bolton 



Capacity 300 Guests. White Service. 

76 Miles from Albany 

OPEN JUNE TO OCTOBER 

ADJOINING NEW COUNTRY 
AND YACHT CLUB 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

JOSEPH H. MARVEL 



Rockwell House 

Glens Falls, New York 

EUROPEAN PLAN 
$2.00 and Up. 

Garage in Connection 

B. W. FREEMAN, Pre*. 
J. I* WEAVES, Mgr. 

Abe Edftwtte' Cbb, Afexsoan* Bay, New York 



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toute 381 Page £14 Saratoga Springs 

1.9 0.'2 Fork, soldiers' monument in center. Bear left with trolley. 
Thru French Mountain 24.0. Caution for curves along ravine. 
1.9 8.0 Fork; bear right — sign "Lake George." 



NEW ADIRONDACK GARAGE ^S',^,^ 

WARRENSBURG NEW YORK Main Street. Ftoi* 140 J. 



GRAND ARMY HOUSE 27 rooms ^Z-Soo pe ,<w 

WARRENSBURG NEW YORK kenovan bros. p,o P ™ 



l?^*»*-% itr^\^/l T ■*■*#"* Open June 1st to November 1st 

A 1 Cril W OOU Hill On Direct Route between New York and Canada 

A Homelike, Attractive, American Plan Hotel 

Lake George, New York j. Sutherland stuart, Manager 



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Saratoga Springs Sec. Page 315 Route 381 

28.4 1.5 Lake George,* 4-corners, court house on right. Keep ahead 
on Canada St. 

Steamers leave here for Sabbath Day Point, or can be taken at 
Marion and Bolton Landing. s 

28.6 0.2 Fork; keep left. 

Right is Route 390 to Ellzabethtown via Tlconderoga. 

34.4 5.8 Warrensburg, 5-corners at water-trough. Straight thru. 
Pass Tripp Lake on right 424. 

French under Baron Dicskan on September 8, 
1755. Two regattas are held annually dur- 
ing the month of August. The lake offers 
excellent fishing. Trout, salmon, pickerel 
and perch abound in large numbers. Bolton 
road, known as "Millionaires Row," begins at 
the village of Lake George, continuing along 
the west shore as far as Bolton Landing. 
Beautiful views of the surrounding country 
may be had along this route. 



•Lake George, N. Y. (alt. 320 ft.), a popular 
summer resort. The lake is 32 miles long 
and has been the scene of many thrilling his- 
toric events. West of the railroad station, 
near Lake George village, are the ruins of 
ancient forts and there also stands the monu- 
ment erected in 1903 %o commemorate the 
battle of Lake George, in which General John- 
son with his army of 2,200 defeated the 



? S 



SCHROON RIVER 



N. Y. 



ATquiet, comfortable place 
tojrest before [com tinuing 
your trip. 



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Section Page 317 Route 381 

left across iron bridge 82.5. Thru Underwood 85.1. 

Sharp left at 86.5 is Note (a) to Keene via St. Huberts and Keene 
Valley. 

Thru New Russia 92.5. 

96.6 22.2 ELIZABETHTOWN, at hotels. 

Note (a) Route 381— Mileage 86.5 to Keene, N. Y.— 14.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Keene VaUey. This is a narrow winding, dirt, mountain road to Keene Valley, 
mearly all downgrade. Extreme caution should be used. 

A longer but better way to Keene Valley and St. Huberts is via Route 381 to Eliza - 
bethtown, combined with Route 438 to Keene and Note (a) on Route 441. 
0.0 0.0 Left-hand road; turn sharp left on narrow gravel. 
0.3 0.3 End of road; turn right. 
6.6 6.3 Right-hand road; turn right across 2 bridges. 

6.2 0.6 St. Huberts. Straight through. 

6.3 0.1 End of road; bear right. 

9.4 3.1 Keene Valley, 4-corners. Straight through. 
12.1 2.7 Right-hand road; turn right across bridges. 

12.7 0.6 Left-hand diagonal road; turn left. 
14.6 1.9 KEENE, 3-corners at Owl's Head Inn. 

Right is Route 438 to Plattsburg. 



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Route 382 



Page 318 



Saratoga Springs 



Route 382— Saratoga Springs to Lake George, N. Y. 

—32.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Corinth and Luzerne. Macadam roads all the way. 
A pretty drive over rolling farming country and thru the Adriondacks. 
Route 381 offers an excellent option via Glens Falls. 
.-MILEAGE-^ 

TotaJ BeteM? For this and other exits see City Map, page 310. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 SARATOGA SPRINGS, Broadway & Church St., P. O. on 
right. Go west on Church St. Cross RRs 0.1-0.4. Caution for 
RR 3.3. Thru Greenfield Center 5.3. 
7.1 7.1 Fork; bear left under RR. 

10.2 3.1 S. Corinth, end of road at store. Bear right upgrade. 
Cross RRs 12.3-13.9. 

14.4 4.2 Corinth,* end of road at monument, store on right. Turn 
left along shore of Hudson river thru valley. Cross iron 
bridge over Sacandaga river 19.5, bearing left just beyond. 

19.7 5.3 4-corners ; turn right. Thru Hadley 20.1, crossing iron bridge 
over Hudson river just beyond. 

20.2 0.5 Luzerne,* irregular 4-corners, P. O. on left. Turn left. 



•Corinth, N. Y. (pop. 2£58, alt. 600 ft.), lies 
at the gateway of a chain of three lakes, viz., 
Hunt, Jenny and Efner, which are popular 
summer resorts, dotted with camps for boys 
and girls. Corinth was first called "Jessups 
Landing." This section thruout was the 
well-known Kay-ad-er-ros-se-ra hunting 
ground of the Mohawk nation. A work of art 
of the red men still remains, i. e., stone steps 
leading down a high embankment to the 
river. These steps were built and used by 
the Indians that they might gain quick ac- 
cess to the river. Above the falls on the 
Hudson there is a stretch of smooth water 
five miles long and navigable for small craft. 
The great falls with the gorge above them 
are very picturesque. Corinth is the home 
of ijjit largest plant of the International Paper 
company, employing over 700 men. The 



Cluett-Peabody shirt factory is also located 
here. Among its distinguished citizens was 
' John Perqua, a Hessian soldier in the revo- 
lution, who deserted the ranks and entered 
the American army. Daniel Bordman built 
a grist mill here in 1792 and in 1800 others 
erected lumber mills. 

•Luzerne, N..Y. (pop. 2,000, alt. 642 ft.), 
is a summer resort lying in a lovely valley 
between the Kayderosseras and Luzerne 
ranges of the Adirondacks. It was named 
after Chevalier de la Luzerne, a special envoy 
of Louis XVI to America during the revo- 
lutionary war. The lake of this name is often 
referred to as "A Pearl set in Emeralds." 
There are many picturesque drives and 
walks around the lake. A short distance west 
of the Hudson are Hunt, Jenny and Efner 
lakes, where good fishing is found. 



Scott* S Garage Bu * clc » Overland. Hupp and Ford Servic© 

~ A ■ Station. Everready Storage Battery Station. 

Cowles & BullU. Prop. Michelin, Goodyear, Miller Tires and Tubes. 

CORINTH, NEW YORK Gas and Oil. FiratlClass Machine Shop. 



YE WAYSIDE INN 

LAKE LUZERNE, NEW YORK 

The Scenic Route Saratoga to Lake 
George. The House of Comfort for the 
Tourist. We will please you. 

Geo. W. La Salle. 



In the Adirondack Pr< 

Rockwell B 

LUZERNE, NEW YORK 

Most modern hotel in Luzerne. 
Large airy rooms. American & 
European plans. All outdoor 
sports. Fish and chicken dinners 
:i specialty. New dining room. 
uls at all hours. Phone. 

AGE D. A. Hart, Prop. 




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Section Page 319 Route 383 

20.4 0.2 3-corners, factory on left; bear right upgrade. 

20.6 0.2 End of road; turn left. Follow winding macadam road thru 

woods and mountains. 
30.8 10.2 Fork, just beyond trolley underpass; bear left onto Canada 

St. 
32.3 1.5 LAKE GEORGE,* court house on right. 

Straight ahead is Route 381 to Elizabethtown and Route 390 to 
Ticonderoga and Elizabethtown. 

Route 383 — Chestertown to Long Lake and Saranac Lake, 

N.Y.— 110.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via North Creek, Newcomb, Long Lake," T upper Lake and Upper Saranac. Macadam 
road all the way except 9 miles of gravel above Long Lake. 

Thru a sparsely settled, wooded country where good hunting and fishing will be 
^-MILEAGE-> found. 

,. *_.'5iJ^ no * Connects at Tupper Lake with Route 437 to Potsdam and at 105.8 

ifiigJ™" with Route 431 to Malone ' 

0.0 0.0 CHESTERTOWN, irregular 4-corners at hotel. Go west on 

main road. 
0.3 0.3 Right-hand road beyond iron bridge ; turn right on macadam. 
4.0 3.7 3-corners ; bear slightly left. 

Cross long wooden bridge and RR 5.7, and at 
5.8 1.8 Riparius, end of road, turn right on winding road. 
9.5 3.7 Wevertown, 4-corners, at hotel. Turn right. 

14.7 5.2 North Creek, right-hand road. Turn right. 

Straight ahead Is Route 384 to Indian Lake and Long Lake. 

Cross RR and long iron bridge 15.0. 

22.2 7.5 Minerva, P. O. on right. 

Straight thru. 
24.1 1.9 Fork; bear right upgrade — caution for curves. 

At mileage 35.1 is the bronze tablet showing the spot where Theodore 
Roosevelt was notified of the death of Wm. McKinley and the result- 
ing^ presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. 

41.3 17.2 Newcomb. Straight thru across bridge. 

55.1 13.8 Long Lake, right-hand road in village. Turn right. Cross 

iron bridge over Long -lake 55.7. Avoid right-hand road 56.3. 

56.4 1.3 Fork; bear right. Avoid right-hand road 56J3. 
65.9 9.5 Fork; bear right. Thru Moody 78.0. 

80.8 14.9 End of road ; turn left onto Wawbeck Ave. 
81.0 0.2 4-corners; turn right onto Main St. 

81.2 0.2 Tupper Lake, Main & Mill St. Bear right on Main St. 

Left on Mill St. is Route 437 to Potsdam and Route 436 to Water- 
town. 

89.0 7.8 Wawbeck. Left-hand road; turn left. Bear left at Upper 
Saranac 97.4. Avoid right-hand road 99.1. Thru Lake Clear 
100.7. Cross RR 102.1. 
105.8 16.8 End of road; turn right. 

Left at 105.8 is Route 431 to Malone. 

--Cafafrias* I 3l/« O.i+w Man and Dnlnte e\* In + axae* nc<ra OKt 



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Routes 384-385 Page 320 Saratoga Springs 

Route 384 — Chestertown to Long Lake, N. Y: — 55.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Going: via the lower route. Alternating: stretches of macadam, dirt and gravel. 

Thru a hilly, wooded country. 

Connects at Indian Lake Village wtih cross route to Speculator, making good con- 
nection for the south and southwest [See Route 486, Note (a)] but not as good as 
/ ~ MI1 "I&25~ > Route 383 which is all macadam. Connection may be made from Deer- 
Ta**i S22SX? land to Raauette Lake and Eagle Bay [See Note (b) Route 486] and at 
MitMte p2!5> Long Lake with Route 383 to Tupper Lake and Saranac Lake. 

0.0 0.0 CHESTERTOWN, irregular 4-corners at hotel. Go west 

on main road. 
0.3 0.3 Right-hand road beyond bridge; turn right with macadam. 
4.0 3.7 3-corners, bear slightly left on macadam. 

Gross long wooden bridge and RR 5.6. 
5.7 1.7 Riparius, end of road just beyond. Turn right. 
9.5 3.8 Wevertown, 4-corners at hotel. Turn right on macadam. 

14.7 5.2 North Creek. Straight thru. Caution for culverts. 
19.9 5.2 North River. Fqrk beyond iron bridge ; bear right 

32.8 12.9 Indian Lake Village, P. O. on right. Straight thru. 

Left is connection to Speculator. See Route 486, Note (a). 

Cross iron bridge over Cedar river 34.6. 

84.9 2.1 End of road, turn right on gravel — winding and hilly — cau- 

tion for sharp right curve downgrade 38.0. Cross iron bridge 
41.5. Caution for sharp right curve 42.5. 
43.6 8.7 Fork beyond iron bridge ; bear right. 
Left leads to Eagle Lake. 

45.1 1.5 Fork; keep right. 

45.5 0.4 Blue Mountain Lake.* Straight thru — caution for curves. 

52.2 6.7 Deerland, end of road on shore of Long Lake. Turn right on 

macadam. 

Left at 52.2 is Note (b) on Route 486 to Raquette Lake and Eagle 
Bay. 

66.2 3.0 LONG LAKE (village). 

Straight ahead is Route 484 to Chestertown. 

Route 385 — Chestertown to Hague, N. Y. — 21.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
-MILEAGE-^ via Horicon and Graphite. First 17 miles macadam; balance narrow 

r t.i Si*? 1 ** dirt and gravel (probably under construction during- 1920). 
« iriemge Pointo -^ very Picturesque trip thru a hilly wooded and farming section. 

0.0 0.0 CHESTERTOWN, irregular 4-corners at hotel. Go northeast. 

*Blue Mountain Lake, N. Y. (pop.* 200, alt. summit of Blue mountain (elevation 4,000 ft.). 

1,805 ft.), is a summer resort located on the From the top there is a view of thirty- three 

lake of the same name. This lake, noted for bodies of water and the highest peaks of the 

its beauty, is surrounded by high and densely Adirondacks may be seen. There is fishing in 

wooded mountains. One of the famed moun- the lakes and mountain streams and hunting 

tain climbs of the Adirondacks is that to the in season. 



PnttOTQ f nttaoPQ & fan-irc 0M EAST SH0RE 0F "** 

1 UllCI 5 IsUUdgCoOtlsailijJd Stop and see one of Adirondack's finest spots 

B. C. Potter, Prop. Vegetables from our own garden. 

Blue Mountain Lake. N. Y. Rates: $4.50 per day; $25.00 per week. 

GARAGE OPEN FROM JUNE TO OCTOBER 



nr i— i ic i— i cnpcc — formerly — 

I nc IlCL/VJCO duryea camp 

EXCLUSIVELY LOCATED ON SHORE OF BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE, 
I MILES FROM VILLAGE. ACCESSIBLE BY GOOD ROAD. BOATING, 
FISHING, HUNTING. EVERY ACCOMMODATION FOR TOURISTS 

BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE, N. Y. w £.££ EY 



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Section Page 321 Routes 386-388-390 

0.2 0.2 Right-hand road, turn right upgrade. Cross two long iron 

bridges 2.0-2.2, passing lake on left 3.1. 
8.6 3.4 Fork; bear left upgrade. 
4.4 0.8 Horicon, fork, flag pole in center. Bear left. 

6.4 1.0 Fork, bear right on winding macadam along Brant lake. 

Left-Land road 10.3 leads around shore of Brant lake. 

Follow winding road between mountains. 

13.4 8.0 Fork; bear right. 

17.5 4.1 Graphite, diagonal 4-corners. Turn right. 

2 1.2 3.7 HAGUE, end of road at monument. 

Left Is Route 890 to Tlconderoga and Ellzabethtown. 

Route 386 — Schroon Lake to Ticonderoga, N. Y. — 21.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Paradox. State macadam to Paradox; balance gravelly dirt, narrow in places. 
~* ,L DUb£a« Route winds thru a hilly wooded section, passing Paradox and 

Total Between Eagle lakes. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 SCHROON LAKE, at stores. Go north on main thorofare, 
crossing small concrete bridge 2.3. 

2.5 2.5 Right-hand road; turn right — sign "Ticonderoga." 

Straight ahead is Route 381 to Ellzabethtown. 

Pass Paradox lake on left 4.0. 
8.4 5.9 Paradox, right-hand road. Turn right. Cross causeway 11.8. 

at western edge of Eagle lake. Thru Chilson 15.0. 
16.7 8.8 Fork; bear right. 
20.0 3.8 End of road; bear right. 

Left is Rdute 390 to Westport. 

20.4 0.4 4-corners at stone watering trough; turn left on Exchange St. 

21.0 0.6 TICONDEROGA, Main & Exchange Sts. 

Route 388— Schroon Lake to Port Henry, N. Y.— 27.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
^-NILEA8E-> Via Schroon River. Narrow gravel and gravelly dirt roads to north 

v »-i SfiSS? of Schroon River; balance macadam. A very pretty trip, thru woods 
Ml \h£— Potato practically all the way. 

0.0 0.0 SCHROON LAKE, church on right. Go north. Avoid right- 
hand diagonal road 2.5. 

9.2 9.2 Schroon River, at store. Bear slightly left. 
11.7 2.5 Caution— right-hand road, wooden church on far right; turn 
right. 

14.5 2.8 Left-hand road; turn left with travel. Avoid right-hand 

diagonal road 21.2. 

28.1 8.6 Fork; keep left. 

24.4 1.3 Moriah Center at stores. Straight thru. 
25.9 1.5 End of road; bear left, coming onto Broad St. 

27.3 1.4 PORT HENRY,* at band stand. 

Route 390 — Lake George to Elizabethtown, N. Y. — 59.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Bolton, boat to Sabbath Day Point, Hague. Ticonderoga, Crown Point, Port 
Henry and Westport. Macadam to Bolton; boat (which runs but twice a day) to Sab- 
bath Day Point; gravel from Sabbath Day ^»oint to Ticonderoga; macadam to Westport; 
gravel to Elizabethtown. 

A very pretty trip along shore of Lake George and Lake Champlain. Connects at 
Ticonderoga, Crown Point and Port Henry with ferries to New England points. Boats 
may be taken at Lake George or Marion. Boat leaves Lake George 10:00 A. M. daily; 

_mLEAOE-^ 4:00 P. M. daily (except Sundays). 

t-*»i £K?" ,, A Sf°°d option is Route 381 to Chestertown, Schroon Lake and con- 

itm smmmm nections to lake points. 



0.0 0.0 LAKE GEORGE, 4-corners, court house on right. Go north 
across concrete bridge 0.1. 

•Port Henry, N. Y. (pop. 2,266, alt. 120 ft.). iron ore mined in this vicinity. When 

An ancient village on a mountain slope over- ■ gation is open there is a ferry crossi 

looking Lake Champlain, and a terminal of wagga bay from Port Henry to ti 

th* barge canal. It is a shipping point for memorial lighthouse on. Crown Point 



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loute 390 Page 322 Saratoga Springs 

0.4 0.4 Fork; bear right. Thru Diamond Point 4.1. Thru Marion 5.7. 
8.2 7.8 Bolton, 4-corners, P. 0. on left. Straight thru. 

9.6 1.4 Right-hand road; turn right. 

Straight ahead is poor road over Tongue Mountain, steep and 
dangerous. 

9.8 0.2 Bolton Landing— boat to Sabbath Day Point. 

Car seating 2 persons $2.00; car seating more than 2 persons $3.00; 
fare each passenger 75c. 11 A. M. daily, except Sunday. 5:15 P. M. 

Landing at Sabbath Day Point, run straight ahead. 

9.9 0.1 3-corners; bear right past Silver Bay, P. O. on left 12.0. 

5.7 5.8 Hague, 3-corners at monument. Bear right across iron bridge. 
!4.7 9.0 Ticonderoga, 4-corners at stone water trough in western edge 

of town. Turn left on macadam. 

Straight ahead before this turn leads to center of Ticonderoga, Old 
Fort Ticonderoga; also to ferries for Montcalm and Larrabee Point. 

5.1 0.4 Fork; bear right. 

Left is Route 394 to Schroon Lake via Paradox. 

7.8 2.7 Fork; bear right on macadam. 
2.6 4.8 End of road; turn left. 

Right leads to Crown Point Ferry and is Note (b) to Mlddlebury, Vt. 



E. C. HENRY H. W. HENRY 

HENRY'S GARAGE 

Port Henry, New York 

Agency for Dodge Brothers Motor Cars 

Machine Shop.- Storage Capacity 150 Cars. Full Line of Parts and Supplies. 
Tourist Trade Solicited. CHURCH STREET. PHONE 46- W 



THE NEW LEE HOUSE ™ 7 HENRY > N - Y - 

On Lake Cham plain and Bullwagga Bay 

Large and well appointed hotel. 75 rooms, 
50 with bath. Elevator service. Electric 
lights and telephone in all rooms. Special 
attention given to motorists. Fireproof 
garage and machine shop in Connection. 
Rates $3.50 & up. Telephone 137 & 16-L. 

J. E. McNULTY, Prop. 



WESTPORT INN SSftSSE' 

A Delightful Location on Lake Champlain. Golf, Fishing, Sailing, etc Garage 



LAKE FRONT-MAIN BUILDING 



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Page 323 



Route 390 



Section 

88.8 0.7 Crown Point,* 4-corners at water trough. Turn right. 

88.9 0.6 Fork; sign 'Tort Henry"; bear left. Follow winding hilly 

road. Go under RR 40.1. 

40.6 6.7 Port Henry,* band stand in 8-corners. 

Bear slightly right, downgrade. 
40.9 0.8 Fork; bear left, upgrade. 

Right leads to ferry for Chimney Point, and is Note (c) to Vergennes. 

Follow macadam along shore of Lake Champlain. Avoid left- 
hand road at cemetery 44.9, crossing RR 45.4. 

50.7 9.8 Westport, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

51.0 0.3 Fork beyond small bridge; bear left, upgrade. 

Right is Route 395 to Piattsburg. 

Go under RR at sta. 51.6. 
59.5 8.5 4-corners at stotie water trough; turn left, upgrade. 

59.8 0.3 ELIZABETHTOWN, at hotels. 

Note (a) Route 390— Ticonderoga, N. Y„ to Middlebury, Vt.— 20.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Larrabee Point ferry, West Cornwall and Cornwall. All gravel. Thru a hiliy 
farming country. A good connection from Lake Champlain points to central Vermont 
Ferry charges, 60c to $1.00. Ferry runs on signal. 
0.0 0.0 TICONDEROGA, N. Y. v Main & Exchange Sts. 60 north on Main St. Cross 
iron bridge 0.1. 
0.2 End of street; turn right. 
1.1 FOrk; bear left. 

Right fork leads to the ruins of Ft. Ticonderoga. 
Cross RR. 1.9. 
0.8 Ticonderoga- Larrabee Point Ferry. From ferry landing bear left and right up 
slight grade. 

1.3 End of road; turn left. 
0.1 Right-hand road; turn right. 
1.5 4-corners, sign "Shorebam;" turn left. 
1.1 4-corners; turn right, upgrade. Pass cemetery on left 6.2. 

1.4 Shoreham, Vt., end of road, large wooden church ahead. Turn left. 



0.2 
LI 



2.1 

3.4 
3.6 
6.0 
6.1 
7.6 



•Crown Point, N. Y. (pop. 2,000, alt. 126 ft.). 
Situated on the shores of Lake Champlain 
midway between Ticonderoga and Fort 
Henry. The state road passes directly thru 
the village. In former years it was noted 
for its rich iron ore mines and large quanti- 
ties of lumber. Recent years have been de- 
voted to agricultural pursuits resulting in 
producing one of the largest and most suc- 
cessful creameries in northern New York. 
The village has a beautiful park and soldiers' 
monument erected to the memory of the 
members of the 5th N. Y. cavalry who lost 
their lives in the civil war. 

The m town derives its name from the 
"Point" six miles distant, where is located 

.the ruins of the two forts— Fort St. Frederic, 
built by the French, 1731-1734-1742, and the 
English fortress, built by Lord Sir Jeffrey 
Amherst, 17S9 and 1770. On this "point" is 
located the state park, the Crown Point res- 
ervation and the Champlain memorial built 
by the Tercentenary Commission at a cost of 
$97,000. Inside this reservation are the ruins 
of the two forts, the walls of which have 
been and are being repaired and preserved by 
the state of New York at great expense. 
The grounds have been beautified and a sub- 
stantial building has been erected for the 
comfort and convenience of the thousands of 

^tourists who visit the park during the season. 
Historical writers allude to this "point" 



feated a large war party of Iroquois Indians 
the morning of the 30th of July, 1609. 

The Fort St. Frederic, built in 1731, and 
enlarged in 1742, was military base and head- 
quarters of the French armies during the 
French and Indian wars, 1754-1759, and was 
destroyed by order of Montcalm in Septem- 
ber, 1758. The ruined fort was captured by 
Amherst July 1, 1759. Fort Crown Point was 
started in August the same summer and 
was abandoned in September, 1770, after it 
had been worked on for eleven years at an 
expenditure of two million pounds. 

To Reach the State Park-Crown Point 
Reservation: 

Traveling north leave the state road at 
Indian ridge just north of the village and 
follow the gravel road, keeping to the right 
until you reach the reservation; distance 6 
miles. 

Traveling south leave the state road at 
the head of the bay, 4 miles from Port Henry, 
turning to the left keep to the left and follow 
the gravel road until you reach the reserva- 
tion; distance from state road 4 miles. 

A steam ferry crosses the lake from the 
park every two hours during the day. 

•Port Henry, N. Y. (pop. 2,266, alt. 120 ft.). 
An ancient village on a mountain slope over- 
looking Lake Champlain, and a terminal ef 
the barge canal. It is a shipping point for 



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Route 391 



Page 324 



Saratoga Springs 



8.0 0.5 Right-hand road, sign "Middlebury;" turn right. 
11.8 8.8 Bind of road; bear right. 

12.7 1.4 End of road; bear left with travel. Thru West Cornwall 13.9. 
14.0 1.3 Left-hand diagonal road, bear left down grade. 

15.7 1.7 Cornwall, end of road, monument on left. Bear left. 

17.2 1.5 Irregular 4-corners; bear right. Avoid left-hand diagonal road at college build- 
ings 19.5. Now on So. Main St. 

19.8 2.6 End of road; bear left, still on Mairt St. 

20.0 0.2 Right-hand street, fountain on far right; turn right over RR. bridge onto 

Merchant's Row. 

20.1 0.1 MIDDLEBURY, Merchant's Row, Pleasant and Washington Sts., park ahead. 

Left on Washington St. is Route 399 to Burlington. 



Note (b) Route 390— Crown Point, N. Y„ to Middlebnry, Vt.— 15.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Bridgeport and Crown Point ferry (sailboat). 10.8 miles gravel; 5 miles clay. 
Ferry charges 50c, 75c, $1.00. Ferry runs on signal. 

Better way Is via Ticonderoga and Note (a) Route 390 to Middlebury. 
0.0 0.0 CROWN POINT, N. Y.. 4-corners. P. O. ahead on left. Go east on macadam. 
Avoid right-hand road 0.7. Cross RR. 0.8. 
1.1 Crown Point Ferry across Lake Champlaln. 

Bear right and left upgrade from ferry landing, to first 
0.2 Right-hand road; turn right Thru W. Brldport, Vt., 1.6. 
4.0 End of road; turn left. 
1.5 Right-hand road; turn right with travel. 
0.2 End of road, turn right. 

0.1 Brldport, end of road, store ahead. Turn left. 
0.2 Right-hand road; turn right. 
1.4 3-corners; turn left with travel. 
1.9 3 -corners, cemetery on left; bear right 
0.2 Left-hand road beyond iron bridge; turn left Bear left at water-trough 15.6 

onto Main St. 
4.9 Merchants Row, fountain ahead on right. Turn right. 
0.1 MIDDLEBURY, VT., Merchants Row & Pleasant St. 



1.1 

1.8 
5.3 
6.8 
7.0 
7.1 
7.8 
8.7 
10.6 
10.8 



15.7 
15.8 



Note (c) Route 390 — Port Henry, N. Y., to Vergennes, Vt.— 15.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Chimney Point ferry and Addison. Gravel all the way. This is a good con- 
nection from Lake Champlaln points to northern Vermont 

Ferry leaves every hour 7:30 to 6:80 P. M. Rates, 65c; no charge for passengers. 
0.0 6.0 PORT HENRY, N. Y., 3-corners at band-stand. Go northeast downgrade. 
0.8 0.3 Fork; bear right Cross RR. 0.4. 

0.2 Port Henry — Chimney Point Ferry. Straight out from ferry landing passing 

P. O. on right. Curve right with road, away from lake 0.6. 
0.3 Fork; bear left with travel. 

2.1 Right-hand diagonal road — sign "Vergennes;" bear right. 

1.2 End of road, wooden church on left; turn left. 
1.1 Right-hand road — sign "Addison;" turn right. 
3.8 Addison, Vt. f end of road, wooden school on right; turn left, cross two iron 

bridges 14.9. 
6.1 VERGENNES, 4-corners, park on far left. 

Straight ahead is Route 399 to Burlington. 



0.6 

0.8 
2,9 
4.1 
5.2 
9.0 

15.1 



Route 391 — Ticonderoga, N. Y,, to Manchester, Vt.— 58J m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Montcalm auto ferry, Orwell, Pair Haven, Poultney, No. Pawlet and Pawlet. 
Dirt and some clay from ferry to Orwell (7.6 miles), bad when wet; graded gravelly dirt 
to Fairhaven; gravel to No. Pawlet; balance macadam. 

A good connection to Manchester from west side of Lake Champlaln. 
,-NILEAGE-n Route 429 to Rutland combined with Route 460 to Manchester offers 

t-*.i PiJ?* 00 * a longer option. 
Mite!*! > RintJ For °P tion t0 Orwell via Larrabee Point ferry see Note (a) Route 429. 

0.0 0.0 TICONDEROGA, Exchange & Main Sts. Go east on Exchange 

St. 
0.4 0.4 Fork, just beyond switch ; bear right. Cross RR 1.4. 
2.0 1.6 Montcalm, N. Y., left-hand road. Turn left across RR and 

take Montcalm Auto ferry across Lake Champlain. 

Perry runs on signal from opening of navigation until June 15. 
7 A. M. to 6 P. M. From June 15 to close of navigation, daylight 
until dark. Rates: Car and passengers 60c to 11.25, according to 
size of car. 

From ferry landing, keep ahead upgrade. Caution for sharp 
right turn downgrade 2.5. Avoid -left-hand road 7.3. 



I 



SOCONY 

REG. U.S. PAT. OFF 

MOTOR GASOLINE 



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Section Page 325 Route 394 

7.6 5.6 Orwell, Vt.,* 4-corners at outskirts. Turn right. 

Straight ahead leads to center of town. 

Avoid right-hand diagonal road 8.0. Thru 4-corners 22.6., 
coming along park, bearing left at far side of same. 

22.8 15.2 Fair Haven, Vt., end of road. Turn right. Avoid right-hand 

diagonal road just beyond bridge 23.0. 

Diagonally right at 23.0 is Route 455 to Glens Falls. 

Cross RR 23.1. 

24.9 2.1 Right-hand road; turn right across bridge. 

27.7 2.8 Hampton, N. Y., left-hand road. Turn left across bridge. 

28.0 QJ* Right-hand diagonal road; bear right with trolley. 

28.5 0.5 Left-hand street, monument on right; turn left with branch 

trolley. Cross RR at sta. 28.6. 

Straight ahead at 28.5 is Route 468 to Troy and Albany. 

28.8 0.3 Poijltney,* Vt., 4-corners, town hall on right. Turn right. 

28.9 0.1 4 T corners at water trough ; turn left. 

29.1 0.2 Right-hand road; turn right. Thru covered wooden bridge 

29.2. 
30.3 1.2 Fork; bear right. Avoid left-hand diagonal road 34.6. Turn 

right across iron bridge over Lake St. Catherine 34.7. 
34.9 4.6 Irregular 4-corners, school on far right; turn left upgrade. 
36.9 2.0 Wells at stores. Straight thru across bridge. 
39-3 2.4 No. Pawlet, 8-corners, at top of grade. Bear left and follow 

Route 396 from mileage 32.1 balance of the way (19.4 miles) 

to Manchester. 

Route 394 — Ticonderoga to Schroon Lake, N. Y, — 21.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Paradox. Gravelly dirt to Paradox, narrow in places; balance macadam. 
^ W,L W«SSioe Road winds thru a hilly wooded section, passing Eagle and Paradox 

Total Between lakes. 

Mlleai^Polnts Best connection from Ticonderoga to main route south. 

0.0 0.0 TICONDEROGA, Main & Exchange Sts. Go west on Exchange 
St., crossing concrete bridge 0.2. 

0.6 0.6 4-corners at stone watering trough; turn right. 

1.0 0.4 Left-hand road, turn left. 

1.5 0.5 Fork; bear left. Thru Chilson 6.0. Cross causeway 9.5. Fol- 
low winding road, using caution at turns. 

12.6 11.1 Paradox, end of road. Turn left past P. O. (on left) and 

Paradox lake (on right — 13.2). 
18.5 5.9 End of road, turn left — sign "Schroon Lake." 

Right is Route 381 to Elizabethtown. 

21.0 2.5 SCHROON LAKE. 

Points of Interest, page 316. 

Straight ahead is Route 421 to Lake George. 

•Orwell, Vt. (pop, 942, alt. 385 ft.), was Champlain at the Montcalm ferry. Part of 

originally part of the Ticonderoga military Benedict Arnold's fleet, with which he fought 

works, laid out by Thaddeus Kosciusko, the the British late in 1776, was built here, 

famous Polish officer and engineer who fought *Poultney, Vt. (pop. 3,644, alt. 430 ft.). 

with the colonies during the revolution. Bordered on south by Lake St. Catherine, 

Mount Independence, on the Vermont side, popular summer resort. Ethan Allen lived 

was christened July 28, 1776, after news of here in 1773; his brother, Huber Allen, was 

the Declaration of Independence reached here the first town clerk. Another member of the 

and was read to the troops by Colonel (after- family, Mai. Ebenezer Allen, with his Ran- 

ward General) St. Clair. Remains of the old gers, captured Mount Defiance from the Brit- 

breastworks can still be seen on the mount; ish late in 1777. 

a fine granite monument has been erected Horace Greeley learned his trade as printer 

there by the Hands Cove Chapter D. A. R. in the office of the "Northern Spectator," of 

The works at Orwell, completed under direc- which Amos Bliss was then editor and pro- 

tion of Colonel (afterwards General) Wayne, prietor. In 1826, when about 15 years eld, he 

were connected with Ticonderoga by a float- took a position as "devil," remaining in the 

ing bridge 400 yards long. The location of office four years and two months, 

the Mt. Independence works and the restored Troy Conference academy, located hei 

fortifications of the Ticonderoga works can established in 1834; its certificate- 

be seen from the waterside in crossing Lake any New England college. 



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Routes 395-396 Page 326 Saratoga Springs 

Route 395 — Westport to Keeseville, N. Y.— 28,3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Wellsboro. Twenty-four miles dirt road, narrow and winding, along shore of 
4~MILEAGE-> Lake Champlain; last 4 miles macadam. 

Dlstanes i n W et weather, follow Route 390 to Elizabeth town and 458 to 

28&flSff Plattsburg. 

0.0 0.0 WESTPORT, 4-corners. Go north. 

0.2 0.2 End of road; turn left across iron bridge, bearing right at 

fork beyond. 

0.6 0.4 Fork; bear right, following poles. 

1.2 0.6 Fork, bear right. 

3.4 2.2 School in fork; bear right on narrow road — rolling. 

5.4 2.0 Fork, bear right. 

10.8 5.4 Essex. Straight thru. 

15.4 4.6 End of road, turn right into 

15.7 0.3 Willsboro.* Left-hand road, turn left. 

15.9 0.2 End of road, turn right upgrade. Cross RR 16.2. 

16.5 0.6 Fork; bear left with poles, across RR 17.0. 

18.8 2.3 Fork; bear right on sandy road. 

28.3 9.5 KEESEVILLE, Front & Main Sts. End of road. 

Left on Front St. is Route 439 to Plattsbura. 

Left across bridge and next right is Route 438 to Plattsbura* 

Route 396— Glens Falls, N. Y., to Manchester, Vt.— 51.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
.-MILEAGE-^ Via Hudson Falls, Comstock, Middle Granville, Granville, Pawlet and 

t-*-i MS 11 ** Dorset. Twenty- two miles macadam; 26.0 miles gravel; 3 miles graded 
M Ikao* PoTJST dirt - Tnru a nU1 y farming country. 

0.0 0.0 GLENS FALLS. See Route 397 for directions to 

16.8 16.8 Comstock, sta. on left. Turn right across iron bridge. 

Pass Great Meadows prison on right 17.3. 

20.3 3.5 Right-hand road ; turn right on macadam. Thru W. Granville 

21.4 and North Granville 22.6. 

23.4 3.1 Truthville, 3-corners. Bear right. Avoid right-hand road 24.0. 
25.7 2.3 Fork; bear right. Bear left 25.8. 

26.1 0.4 Middle Granville, 5-corners, P. O. on left. Turn sharp right 

around store across iron bridge. Cross RR 27.7. 
28.3 2.2 Granville,* N. Y., end of road at store. Jog right and left. 
28.7 0.4 Left-hand road at RR; turn left. 

28.9 0.2 4-corners ; turn left. Pass slate quarries on right 29.6. 

31.5 2.6 End of road; turn right. 

82.1 0.6 No. Pawlet, Vt., 3-corners. Bear right. 

85.6 3.5 Pawlet,* irregular 4-corners at bandstand, just beyond small 

•Willsboro, N. Y. (pop. 2,000, alt. 231 ft.), Tompkins for troops, 
named for William Gilliland, a New York *Granville, N. Y. (pop. 5,000," alt. 416 ft.), is 
City merchant, who with his family and a the shipping point for the Vermont sea green 
few others secured from colony of New York, roofing slate, which is produced just over 
soldiers' claims to large tract of land on the line in Vermont. .Upon entering Gran- 
west side of Lake Champlain between Boquet ville from the south the masts that support 
river and Split Rock, and attempted in 1765-66 the cableways are conspicuous. These are 
to found a baronial estate. The Gilliland the only quarries of their kind in the world 
homestead, a log house, was first dwelling and the product is the only material nature 
erected by civilized men between Crown seems to have provided for roofing purposes 
Point and the Canadian line; travelers that can be used indefinitely in its natural 
through the Champlain valley between Al- state. Lake St. Catherine, four miles from 
bany and Montreal were often entertained Granville via Wells and Poultney, Vt., over 
here. Other settlements followed, and the gravel road, is a very picturesque and at- 
name of the tract, originally Milltown, was tractive spot. 

changed to Willsboro. On approach of Bur- *Pawlet, Vt. (pop. 1,990, alt. 530 ft.). Points 

goyne's army, 1777, the Gilliland family fled of local interest include the Congregational 

to Albany. Burgoyne camped at the falls of church, organized August 8, 1781, and M. E. 

the Boquet, near Willsboro, where he had a church, organized 1826. Several houses more 

conference with representative of the Iro- than a hundred years old are still occupied 

•iois. Upon the declaration of the war of and in a good state of preservation. Mettowee 
2, a company from Willsboro was the first river, starting in Dorset, flows through Paw- 
report at Plattsburg for service in the let. Haystack mountain, north of the vil- 
aorth, in response to the call of Governor lage, has an altitude of 1,960 feet. 



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Google 



Section Page 327 Routes 397-398 

bridge. Turn right (not sharp right), keeping to right of 
green. Thru No. Rupert 39.6. 

Left^at 35.6 is Route 314 to Rutland. 

42.0 6.4 East Rupert, left-hand road. Turn left. 
43.9 1.9 Dorset^ Straight thru. Cross RR 45.7. 

Thru & Dorset 46.4. Cross RR 46.6. 
47.8 3.9 Fork; bear right. 

50.2 2.4 Manchester Center, 3-corners, church on left. Bear right. 

51.4 1.2 4-corners at library; turn left onto Main St. 

51.5 0.1 MANCHESTER,* monument on left. 

Route 397— Glens Falls, N. Y., to Rutland, Vt— 50.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Whitehall and Fair Haven. Macadam to Whitehall; balance gravel. Excellent 
views, thru hilly farming country. 

At Castleton Corners an interesting side -trip may be taken to Lake Bomoseen. 

Toui SiSXXn For this and other exits see Gity Map, page 312. 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 GLENS FALLS, Glen, Ridge & Warren Sts. Go east on War- 
ren St. with trolley. Cross RR 1.2, following along canal. 

3.2 3.2 Hudson Falls, Park Ave. & Main St., park on right. 
Meeting trolley, turn left on Main St. 

3.6 0.4 Fork, water trough in center; bear right, leaving trolley. 

Thru Kingsbury 7.9. Thru Fort Ann 12.7. Cross RR 14.7. 
16.8 13.2 Comstock. Station on left, straight thru. 

Right at Comstock is Route 396 to Manchester. 

17.8 1.0 End of road ; turn left across RR. Cross RR 23.4 onto Main St 

23.9 6.1 Whitehall, N. Y„ Main & Williams Sts. Turn right across 

canal bridge, bearing right beyond. 
24.4 0.5 Left-hand street; turn left onto Poultney St. 

25.3 0.9 Fork; bear right across RR— sign "Rutland." 

28.2 2.9 Prominent 4-corners, brick church on left; turn left upgrade. 

80.4 2.2 Right-hand road; turn right upgrade. 

31.0 0.6 End of road, turn left. Cross wooden bridge over Poultney 

river at state line 32.5. Cross RR 33.5. 
34.4 3.4 Fair Haven, Vt., park on left. Keep to right of cannon in 

open square, and follow Route 316 from mileage 80.3 balance 

of way (16.1 miles) to Rutland. 

Route 398 — Castleton Corners to Middlebury, Vt. — 29.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Lake Bomoseen, Sudbury and Cornwall. Alternating: stretches of gravel and 
dirt with 4 miles macadam. Thru good farming: country, hilly and rolling, passing 

^-NILEAGE-^ numerous lakes. 

▼ *.i SSX02? Route 316 to Rutland combined with Route 399 to Middlebury offers 

M Hesse Point? a lon * er and better option. 

0.0 0.0 CASTLETON CORNERS (Bomoseen P. O.), 4-corners, water- 
trough on right. Go north (a left turn if coming from Albany 

•Dorset, Vt. (pop. 1,472, alt. 940 ft.). The notable by frequent visit* In former ▼*«e« 

first convention to declare Vermont, .which of Mrs. Abraham Linceln and Mrs. U. S 

had been for many years and was still the Grant - Robert T. Lincoln, son of Abraham 

subject of dispute between New York and Lincoln, and president of the Pullman Co., 

New Hampshire, "a free and independent has a home herc ' " h T "J"* otheT ^ era ? nM 
A ^ •• t u i_ t i aj **»* °» prominence. Mount Equinox, near by, rises 

8ta I C ' I? 8 , ^, erC I"* * ^ , to * height of 3^16 ft. 

The chief industry of this town is marble First 8ession of Vermont legislature was 
quarrying and finishing. Dorset marble was held at Manchester in 1788. In 1777 the 
used extensively in the New York public "Council of Safety" met here, and Ira Allen 
library, the Harvard medical school and propounded the plan of confiscating the prop- 
other buildings of note. Brown hematite iron erty of Tories to pay Vermont's share of the 
ore exists in considerable quantities. Dorset cost of the revolution. 

mountain, which extends north and south Points of particular interest include a "rock- 
thru the town, reaches an elevation of 3,148 ing stone" weighing 35 tons, and a "dis« 
feet. appearing stream," the outlet to which has 

'Manchester, Vt. (pop. 2,100, alt. 1,000 ft.), never been traced. Has one of the best and 

is a summer residence and resort town, mad* most widely known golf links in the U. S 



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Route 399 



Page 328 



Saratoga Springs 



7.0 



13.9 
15.2 



or Glens Falls). Pass Lake Bomoseen 2.5. 
7.0 Hubbardton,* .church on left. Straight thru. Pass Lake 
Bebee on left 9.2. Pass Lake Hortonia on left 10.7. 

Left at 13.2 is Route 401 to Tlconderoga. 

6.9 Sudbury,* church on right. Straight thru. 

1.3 Left-hand diagonal road ; turn left. Cross RR 18.2. 

Straight ahead at 15.2 is Route 429 to Brandon. 

Thru Whiting 18.5. 

25.5 10.3 Cornwall, library and park on left. Straight thru. 
26.7 1.2 Irregular 4-corners; turn right. 

29.6 2.9 Right-hand street, park on right; turn right onto Merchants 

row. 

29.7 0.1 MIDDLEBURY,* Merchants row & Pleasant St. at monument. 



Route 399— Rutland to Burlington, Vt.— 68,2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Pittsford, Brandon, Salisbury, Middlebury, Vergennes and Shelburne. All state 



gravel. Thru a hilly farming country, following a valley practically all the way. 

Connects at Brandon with Route 401 to Ticonderoga. 
^-MILEAGE-. 
Distance 
Total Between 
Mileage Points 

0.0 
0.2 

2.4 

7.5 

8.6 

16.1 



For this and other exits see City Map, page 274. 



0.0 RUTLAND, Center & Wales St. Go east on Center St. 

0.2 North Main St. ; meeting trolley, turn left. 

2.2 Fork, wooden school on far left; bear left. 

5.1 Pittsford Mills, fork beyond covered bridge; bear right. 

1.1 Pittsford,* end of road; bear right. 

7.5 Brandon,* Park & Franklin Sts., Soldiers' monument on right. 



•Hubbardton, Vt. (pop. 445), was the scene 
of the revolutionary battle of Hubbardton, 
July 7, 1777, between advancing British and 
rear guard of Gen. St. Clair's retreating army 
under Col. Seth Warner. British were at 
first defeated, but Hessian reinforcementi 
turned tide of battle. A monument, erected 
in 1859, shows location of the engagement 

•Sudbury, Vt. (pop. 415, alt. 380 ft.), is a 
small village of one shaded road along a 
ridge of hills overlooking the Chan? plain val- 
ley. The Crown Point road, built by General 
Amherst before the revolution, passes thru 
the town and over the valley to Ticonderoga, 
the country made famous by Ethan Allen and 
his Green Mountain boys. The fertility of 
the Champlain valley makes this an excellent 
dairy section. 

Hyde Manor, one mile south of the village, 
is on the old Post road between Albany and 
Montreal. The hills, valleys and lakes of this 
section offer the same charm now that they 
did in the stage-coach days, and for five gen- 
erations, since 1801, the manor has given the 
same hospitality. On the hills back of the 
manor geologists have located many inter- 
esting marks of the glacial period. 

•Middlebury. Vt. (pop. 2,848, alt. 266 ft.), 
was practically destroyed by Tories and In- 
dians during the revolution, but gradually 
rebuilt and organized in 1786. 

Middlebury college, established in 1800, is 

beautifully situated on an elevation to the 

west of the town. During the last twenty 

years it has enjoyed marked prosperity. 

Since its centennial in 1900 seven large marble 

buildings, costing $550,000, have been erected 

f r general uses, and a half million dollars 

' to the endowment. The special modern 

ehools of French and Spanish con- 

the college during the summer 



months have won an international reputa- 
tion. Emma Willard, founder of the Emma 
Willard school at Troy, N. Y., began her work 
for the higher education of women in a house 
on Main St., opposite the college campus. 

Marble was discovered here in 1802. Several 
Middlebury citizens have been notable in- 
ventors. The circular saw was invented by 
Jeremiah Hall; the process of welding cast 
steel was the joint invention of Josiah 
Nichols, Daniel Petibone and Ezekiel Chap- 
man. The U. S. Government Morgan horse 
farm is conducted two miles north of the 
village on Seymour St. 

•Pittsford, Vt. (pop. about 2,700, alt. 370 ft.). 
Principal industries are marble quarrying and 
cutting, and wooden bo* manufacturing. Lo- 
cation Vermont sanitarium. 

•Brandon, Vt. (pop. 2,800, alt. 500 ft.), was 
settled in 1772 and known as Neshobe. Aban- 
donment of towns further north made it the 
frontier during the revolution; in 1777 Indians 
attacked the place, killing two men and tak- 
ing a number of prisoners. 

The cottage in which Stephen A. Douglas, 
U. S. Senator for Illinois, was born is a point 
of interest. It is now owned by the Lake 
Dunmore Chapter, D. A. R., and used as its 
headquarters. Nearby a monument to his 
memory, the gift of Albert G. Farr of Chi- 
cago, a native and summer resident of Bran- 
don, was dedicated on the 100th anniversary 
of his birth, April 23, 1913. Thomas Daven- 
port, the noted' electrical inventor, lived here 
several years; a memorial tablet has been 
erected on the site of the shop where he made 
his experiments. 

Among dther points of interest are caves 
and a "frozen well," in which ice remains 
almost perpetually. Brandon has recently 
acquired a large electric power plant. 



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Google 



Section Page 329 Route 399 

Bear left onto Park St. Bearing right onto Main St. 
Fork of 3 roads, monument ahead; take right-hand road. 

Straight ahead at 16.6 is Route 401 to Tlconderoga. 

Fork — sign "Middlebury" ; bear right. < 
Salisbury, left-hand road beyond iron bridge. Turn left, up- 
grade. 

Right at Salisbury leads to Lake Dun more, rejoining this route 
at 26.0. 

Right-hand diagonal road; bear right upgrade. Avoid right- 
hand road 26.0. 

Right at 26.0 goes to Lake Dunmore. 

Fork beyond iron bridge ; bear right. 

End of road; bear left across small concrete bridge. Bear 
right onto Court St. 32.2. 

Cross St.; turn left, curving right with street 82.8. 
Middlebury,* Pleasant St. & Merchant's row, Soldiers' monu- 
ment on left. Straight thru. Thru Brookville 36.6. Cross RR 
at Newhaven Junction Sta. 40.9. 
Diagonal 4-corners; turn right onto Green St. 
Vergennes,* Main & Green Sts., park on far right. Turn right. 
Curve right under RR 46.7, bearing left just beyond. 
Ferrisburg,* 4-corners, church on far right. Straight thru. 
No. Ferrisburg, 4-corners. Straight thru. 
Fork; bear right along foot of hill. 
Fork; bear left, upgrade, with travel. 
Shelburne,* flag-pole in green on right. Straight thru. 
Fork beyond covered bridge; bear left, coming onto So. Main 
St. 



16.6 


0.5 


17.4 
23.5 


0.8 
6.1 


23.9 


0.4 


28.6 
29.2 


4.7 
0.6 


32.7 
33.0 


3.5 
0.3 


45.5 
45.7 


12.5 
0.2 


48.4 
52.4 
56.1 
56.7 
61.4 
61.9 


2.7 
4.0 
3.7 
0.6 
4.7 
0.5 



•Middlebury, Vt. (pop. 2,848, a It. 266 ft.), 
was practically destroyed by Tories and In- 
dians during the resolution, but gradually 
rebuilt and organized in 1786. 

Middlebury college, established in 1800, is 
beautifully situated on an elevation to the 
west of the town. During the last twenty 
years it has enjoyed marked prosperity. Since 
its centennial in 1900 seven large marble build- 
ings, costing $550,000, have been erected for 
general uses, and a half million dollars added 
to the endowment. The special modern lan- 
guage schools of French and Spanish con- 
ducted by the college during the summer 
months have won an international reputation. 
Emma Willard, founder of the Emma Willard 
school at Troy, N. Y., began her work for 
the higher education of women in a house 
on Main St., opposite the college campus. 

Marble was discovered here in 1802. Several 
Middlebury citizens have been notable in- 
ventors. The circular saw was invented by 
Jeremiah Hall; the process of welding cast 
steel was the joint invention of Josiah Nich- 
ols, Daniel Petibone and Ezekiel dhapman. 
man. The U. S. Government Morgan horse 
farm is conducted two miles north of the 
village on Seymour St. 

•Vergennes, Vt. (pop. 1,609, alt. 176 ft.), 
Is the oldest incorporated city in the state 
and third oldest in New England. It was 
named in honor of Count de Vergennes, 
French Minister of Foreign Affairs during the 
revolution; the name is said to have been 
suggested to Ethan Allen by the French con- 
sul in New York as a compliment to the 
•tatesman who had rendered great aid to 
the colonies in the struggle for independence. 
in 1813 tlie fleet on Lake Champlain, which 



•topped the British invasion from Canada, 
was fitted out here; site of shipyard now 
marked by D. A. R. tablet. Vermont in- 
dustrial school now stands on former site 
of U. S. arsenal. Bixby memorial free 
library, built 1912, one of finest in the state, 
commands fine view of Lake Champlain and 
the Adirondacks. It was the gift of William 
G. Bixby, a native of the place, who came 
back to spend his last days after having 
accumulated wealth in the west. He lef* 
sufficient endowment for the ample main- 
tenance of the library. 

♦Ferrisburg, Vt. (pop. 1,600, alt. 176 ft.). 
Location was abandoned by early settlers 
during the Revolutionary war, and per- 
manent settlement made in 1784. Organized 
as a town 1786. Quakers were among the 
early settlers. Name was probably taken 
^from Benjamin and David Ferris, who made 
the original town survey. 

During the Revolution, garrison at Fort 
Cassin, at the foot of Otter creek, drove off 
a British fleet which was attempting to reach 
Vergennes, where an American fleet was be- 
ing built. The secon successful steamboat, 
next after Robert Fulton's "Clermont," was 
the "Vermont," built by Winns Bros, at 
Bason Harbor. Ferrisburg is the birthplace 
of the late Rowland Robinson, well known 
dialect writer, and Charles N. Wicker, the 
New York banker. 

♦Shelburne, Vt. (pop. 1,097, alt. 250 to 400 
ft.). Settlement here was attacked by In- 
dians and Tories in 1778. During the winter 
of 1812-13 Commodore McDonough's Lake 
Champlain fleet anchored in the bay. The 
Webb farms, comprising about 4,000 a- 
the property and summer home of D 
Seward Webb of New York, are located 



^ 



Routes 400-401 ' Page 330 Saratoga Springs 

67.4 §,5 Left-hand street ; turn left onto St. Paul St., away from trolley. 

Burlington City Map and Points of Interest, page 368. 

68.2 0.8 BURLINGTON, St. Paul & Main Sts., park on far right 

Route 400— Burlington, Vt, to Malone, N. Y.— 108.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Isle La Motte, Chazy ferry, Chazy, West Chazy and Mooers. Gravel roads to 
'"~ MII "£fi£ E "~ > Chazy ferry; macadam to Malone; thru the islands of Lake Champlain 
Tafai b$£E! to Cnaz y ferry, then thru a hilly farming country to Malone. 
Ml leas* pJuS Best connection from Burlington to northern New York points. 

0.0 0.0 BURLINGTON. See Route 402 for directions to West Chazy, 

58.4 miles, where set odometer at 0.0. 
0.0 0.0 West Chazy, 4-corners at stores. Turn right. Thru Sciota 

5.8. Cross RR 10.4. 
10.7 10.7 Mooers, right-hand road at stores. Straight thru. 
13.7 8.0 Mooers Forks. End of road; turn left across bridge over 

Big Chazy river and immediately right. Cross RR 14.0. Thru 

EUenburg Depot 22.7. 
25.4 11.7 EUenburg Center, 3-corners. Bear right. Cross iron bridge 

34.4. Turn right under RR 36.5. Cross concrete bridge 37.7. 
38.1 12.7 Chateaugay, 4-corners. Straight thru. Avoid left-hand road 

38.7. Thru outskirts of Burke 43.1. Cross RR 47.1-49.3 onto 

Elm St. Cross RR at sta. 50.3. 

Malone City Map and Points of Interest, page 383. 

50.4 12.3 MALONE, Main & Elm Sts., at square and monument. 

Route 401— Rutland, Vt., to Ticonderoga, N. Y.— 374 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Brandon, Sudbury, Orwell and Montcalm auto ferry. State gravel to Brandon; 
balance dirt and gravel with some clay. 

Thru hilly country and past many abandoned farms. 

Either the Larrabee Point or Montclam ferry may be taken to Ticonderoga. For 
Larrabee Point ferry, see Note (a). 

Route 458 to Castleton Corners combined with Route 398 to Sudbury offers an option. 

A longer but all gravel option is via Route 399 to Middlebury and Note (c) Route 450 
to Ticonderoga. 

/— MILEAGE-^ Ferry runs on signal from opening of navigation until June 15th, 7 

Tutsi £!*££!? a - m - to 6 P- m * Fr <> m June 15th to close of navigation, daylight until 
M I taw Points -dark. Rates: Car and passenger, 50c to $1.25, according to size of car. 

0.0 0.0 RUTLAND, Center & Wales Sts. See Route 399 for direc- 
tions to Brandon, 10.1 miles, where set odometer at 0.0. 

0.0 0.0 Brandon, Park & Franklin Sts., monument on right. Go north 
on Park St. (a left turn coming from Rutland). 

0.1 0.1 End of street, park on left; bear right onto Center St. Pass 
P. O. on right 0.2. Now on Main St. 

0.5 0.4 Fork of 3 roads, park on left and right ; take middle road. 

Right-hand road is Route 399 to Burlington. 

1.6 1.1 3-corners; bear left, upgrade over RR bridge, curving right 

immediately beyond. 
4.1 2.5 End of road beyond covered wooden bridge ; turn right, curv- 

Twin Boys 

Twin-screw. Electric 

Light. 10 Knots. 

Gas Engines. 

Capacity 15 Touring Cars. 

Chazy Landing, N. Y. 



/£) SOCONY 

"Jolorine, 



MOTOR 
OILS 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Section 



Page 331 



Route 401 



ing left upgrade just beyond. 

6.2 2.1 Left-hand road, sign "Sudbury" ; turn left, upgrade. 

8.2 2.0 Sudbury,* wooden church on left. Keep ahead, downgrade. 

8.4 0.2 Right-hand road, stone school on right; turn right, down- 
grade. 

Straight ahead before this turn is Route 453 to Cattleton Corners 
via Lake Bomoseen. 

10.4 2.0 End of road ; turn right. ' 
10.6 0.2 End of road at small green; turn left. 

13.4 2.8 Orwell, Vt.,* 4-corners. Straight thru. Avoici right-hand 
road 14.0. 

Right at 14.0 is Note (a) to Ticonderoga via Larrabee Point Ferry. 

14.6 1.2 Fork; bear right. Caution — sharp curve upgrade 18.8. De- 
scend grade to 

19.2 4.6 Montcalm Ferry — across Lake Champlain. From Ferry land- 

ing keep ahead, crossing Hit. 

19.3 0.1 Montcalm. End of road. Turn right. Cross 19.9. Bear left 

20.0 onto Exchange St. 
21.3 2.0 TICONDEROGA, N. Y.* Main & Exchange Sts. 

Note (a) Route 401— Orwell, Vt., to Ticonderoga, N. Y. — 9.1 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Larrabee Point Ferry across Lake Champlain. Principally dirt road, 1 mile 
longer than regular route. 

Ferry runs on signal 8 a. m. to 7 p. m. Sundays from June 1st to October 1st, 7 a. m. 
till dark. Rates, car and passengers (including war tax), runabouts, 55c to 80c (ac- 
cording to size); touring cars, 80c and $1.10. 
0.0 0.0 ORWELL, VT., 4-corners. Go east. 

0.6 0.6 Right-hand road at large sign; turn right. Cross iron bridge and RR 2.3. 
2.4 1.8 Fork at top of grade; bear left with travel. 

3.6 1.2 End of road; bear right. # 

4.7 1.1 End of road at shore of Lake Champlain; turn right. Cross RR and wooden 

bridge 5.6. 
6.2 1.5 End of road; turn left. . 

7.0 0.8 Larrabee Point-Tlconderoga auto ferry. Straight out from ferry landing. 

Cross RR 8.1. * . _. _. 

Left-hand road before RR leads to ruins of Fort Ticonderoga. 
8.9 1.9 Left-hand road; turn left across iron bridge onto Main St. 

9.1 0.2 TICONDEROGA, N. Y., Main & Exchange Sts. 



•Sudbury, Vt. (pop. 415, alt. 380 ft.), is a 
small village of one shaded road along a 
ridge of hills overlooking the Champlain val- 
ley. The Crown Point road, built by General 
Amherst before the revolution, passes thru 
the town and over the valley to Ticonderoga, 
the country made famous by Ethan Allen and 
his Green Mountain boys. The fertility of 
the Champlain valley makes this an excellent 
dairy section. 

Hyde Manor, one mile south of the village, 
is on the old Post road between Albany and 
Montreal. The hills, valleys and lakes of this 
section offer the same charm now that they 
did in the stage coach days, and for five gen- 
erations, since 1801, the manor has given the 
same hospitality. On the hills back of the 
manor geologists have located many interest- 
ing marks of the glacial period. 

♦Orwell, Vt. (pop. 942, alt. 383 ft.), was 
originally part of the Ticonderoga military 
works, laid out by Thaddeus Kosciusko, the 
famous Polish officer and engineer who fought 
with the colonies during the revolution. 
Mount Independence, on the Vermont side, 
was christened July 28, 1776, after news of 
the Declaration of Independence reached here 
and was read to the troops by Colonel (after- 
ward General) St. Clair. Remains of the old 



breastworks can still be seen on the Mount; 
a fine granite monument has been erected 
there by the Hands Cove Chapter D. A. R. 
The works at Orwell, completed under direc- 
tion of Colonel (afterwards General) Wayne, 
were connected with Ticonderoga by a float- 
ing bridge 400 yards long. The location of 
the Mt. Independence Works and the re- 
stored fortifications of the Ticonderoga works 
can be seen from the waterside in crossing 
Lake Champlain at the Montcalm ferry. Part 
of Benedict Arnold's fleet, with which he 
fought the British late in 1776, was built here. 
*Ticonderoga, N. Y. (pop. 3,000, alt. 277 ft.). 
Here is the outlet of Lake George, which falls 
150 feet in \y 2 miles and affords excellent 
water power. This town figured prominently 
during the colonial and revolutionary periods. 
The French erected a fort here in 1755 and 
called it Fort Carrillon. In 1759 Lord Amherst 
forced the French to evacuate it, and the 
English after coming into this fortress 
strengthened and enlarged it at heavy ex- 
pense. In 1775 it was taken from the English 
under Colonel Ethan Allen and two years 
later it was recaptured by General Burgoyne. 
After the war it became a picturesque ruin, 
but since has been rebuilt and is located on 
a high bluff about two miles south of the 
town. 



,For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



Route 402 



Page 332 



Saratoga Springs 



Route 402— Burlington, Vt., to Plattsburg, N. Y.— 68.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. ~ 

Via Grand Isle, Hero Islands, Isle La Motte and Chazy Landing ferry. Gravel to 
Chazy Landing ferry and macadam balance of way. 

This is a very pretty trip, following the shore of Lake Champlain and crossing- the 
Hero Islands, which are connected by narrow causeways, on which caution should be 
used for approaching vehicles. 

Both may be taken from Burlington to Plattsburg. (See time table in back of book.) 

Connects at mileage 25.4 with Route 404 to Plattsburg via Cumberland head, and at 
Chazy with Route 447 to Montreal. 
,-MILEAGE-s 

Total BrtSSn* F( > r tn *s and other exits see City Map, page 368. 

tUleaw Points 

0.0 0.0 BURLINGTON, St. Paul & Main Sts., park on right. Go north 

on St. Paul St. 
0.4 0.4 End of street, large brick school on left; turn left onto Pearl 

St. 
0.6 0.2 End of street at park; turn right onto Battery St. 
0.8 0.2 4-corners, end of park; turn left onto North Ave. 

2.7 1.9 Fork, where trolley leaves to right; keep left. 

3.8 1.1 Right-harid diagonal road, water trough on far right; bear 

right. Thru covered bridge 4.2. 

5.3 1.5 4-corners ; turn left with travel. 

5.5 0.2 Right-hand road; turn right with travel. 

6.4 0.9 End of road; turn right along shore of Mallett bay. 
8.8 1.9 Fork; bear left with travel. 

14.2 5.9 Left-hand road, sign "So. Hero" ; turn left. Pass cemetery on 

right 15.9. 
18.1 3.9 End of road; turn left across long narrow causeway. 

22.8 4.2 Left-hand road; turn left with travel. 

23.3 1.0 South Hero, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

23.9 0.6 End of road beyond RR; turn right. Cross RR 25.4. 

Left at 25.4 is Route 404 to Plattsburg via Cumberland Head ferry. 

29.7 5.8 Grand Isle, 4-corners. Straight thru. 

Cross iron bridge on narrow causeway 32.8. 

36.5 6.8 North Hero, wooden school on right. Keep ahead. 
36.7 0.2 Fork; bear right along shore of lake. 

40.1 3.4 Left-hand road — sign "West Chazy"; turn left. 

42.2 2.1 Left-hand road ; turn left across long iron bridge. 

42.4 0.2 End of road ; turn right. 

42.6 0.2 Left-hand road at large sign; turn left. 

Straight ahead is Route 403 to Routes Point. 

Cross RR at Isle La Motte Sta. 42.9. 



For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



SDCDNY 



REG. U.S. PAT. OFF 



MOTOR GASOLINE 



Twin Boys 

Twin-screw. Electric 

Light. 10 Knots. 

Gas Engines. 

Capacity 15 Touring Cars. 

hazy Landing, N. Y. 



Goog 



Digitized by 



Section Page 333 Route 403 

43.9 1.8 End of road on shore of lake; turn right. 
45.3 1.4 3-corners, on shore of lake; bear left across narrow causeway. 
Cross iron bridge 45.7 (25c toll). 

48.2 2.9 Isle La Motte,* 4-corners, P. 0. on left, turn right. 
49.1 0.9 Isle La Motte-Chazy Landing ferry. 

Boat runs on signal. Fare, car and driver, $1.00; passengers, 25c; 
children free. Maximum charge, $2.00. 

Straight out from ferry landing, turning left 49.2. 

49.3 0.2 Right-hand road; turn right on macadam. 

52.1 2.8 Chazy, N. Y., end of road, library ahead. Turn left. 

Right is Route 447 to Montreal. 

52.2 0.1 Fork at sign ; bear right. 

52.9 0.7 Fork, signs in center; bear right on macadam. 

57.7 4.8 4-corners ; turn right. Cross RR 58.2. 

58.4 0.7 West Chazy, 4-corners. Turn left. 

Right is Route 446 to M alone. 

62.1 3.7 Beekmantown, 4-corners. Turn left. Thru East Beekman- 
tawn 64.0. 

67.3 5.2 End of road ; turn left and next right on macadam. 

Plattsburg City Map and Points of Interest, page 358. 

67.5 0.2 Bailey Ave; turn left. 

67.8 0.3 Montcalm Ave.; meeting trolley, turn right. 
68.1 0.3 Elm St.; turn left. 

68.5 0.4 Margaret St. ; meeting trolley, turn right. 
68.7 0.2 PLATTSBURG, Margaret & Bridge Sts. 

Route 403— Burlington, Vt., to Rouses Point, N. Y.— 54.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via South Hero, North Hero, Grand Isle, Alburg and ferry to Rouses Point. 
Qravel roads. 

,-MILEAGE-s Route 402 to Chazy combined with Route 447 to Rouses Point forms a 

Tot«i SUSHSf good, although somewhat longer option. 
Mileage Point* Ferry charges $1.00 per car and driver, and 15c for each passenger. 

0.0 0.0 BURLINGTON. See Route 402 for directions to 

42.4 42.4 End of road ; turn right along shore of lake. Avoid left-hand 

road at large sign 42.6. 

Left at 42.6 is Route 402 to Plattsburg, connecting at Chazy with 
Route 447 to Montreal. 

47.6 5.2 Alburg Center, end of road. Turn left. 

49.6 2.0 Right-hand road on shore of lake; turn right. 

50.4 0.8 Alburg, Vt.,* custom house and sta. on left. Straight thru 

across RR. 
51.4 1.0 Left-hand road at ferry sign; turn left. Cross RR 53.6. 

*Isle La Motte, Vt., was the first place in lake surrounding it (Champlain) have been 
the state settled by white men. The French the scene of many historic events. The en- 
landed here at Sandy Point in 1666 and built trance to the lake was guarded against the 
Fort Ste. Anne, now marked by a shrine of British in 1776 by Benedict Arnold witTT his 
Ste. Anne. The present enclosure on the flagship, the Royal Savage, and the fleet with 
shore surrounded by a hedge and the four- which he fought the battle of Valcour. Com- 
teen stations of the cross, indicates the sites modore McDonough and his fleet, which 
of the old houses built within the old fortifi- fought the battle of Cumberland Bay on Sept. 
cations. Sieur de la Motte was the captain 11* 1814, anchored off the north end of Isla 
of the early fort, — hence the name of the La Motte all that summer. 
island. Shortly after the fort was built, a "Alburg, Vt. (pop. 1311, alt. from 100 to 200 
party of men went from it in search of game. ft.), Is located on a peninsula from the Cana* 
They crossed the lake in a westerly direction dian mainland jutting into lake Champlain; 
and were surprised by the Mohawk Indians, it was originally known as Point Algonquin, 
who took some of the white men prisoners Windmill Point, on which is a lighthouse, de- 
and killed Captain de Traversy and Sieur de rived its name from a large gristmill which 
Chazy. The place where they were killed has in the early days of settlement was operated 
since been known as Chazy Landing. The by a windmill. From the "Point," Fort 
village of Chazy and Chazy river have also Montgomery, on the New York state side, 
been named for this same victim of tRe red can be plainly seen. 

men, Champlain with two French com- Alburg is the center of a fruit growing 

panions and a number of Algonquin Indians community, noted for numerous springs and 

camped on this island for a few days in 1609 as a summer resort; large apiary, owner by 

and then proceeded on their way. From the A. W. Darby, produces thousands of pound. 

first days of its settlement the island and the of honey a year. 

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Routes 404-405 Page 334 Saratoga Springs 

53.9 2.5 Rouses Point ferry. From ferry landing keep ahead to Main 
St., where turn right. 

Left on Main St. is Route 913 to Malone. 

54.0 0.1 ROUSES POINT, N. Y., custom house on left. 

Straight ahead is Route 447 to Montreal. 

Route 404— Burlington, Vt., to Plattsburg, N. Y.— 34.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via South Hero and Cumberland Head ferry. First 28 miles gravel to ferry; then 4 
miles dirt road; last 2 miles macadam. 

Thru a farming country. Traverses South Hero Island along shore of Lake Cham- 
plain and crosses Lake Champlain by ferry. 

Ferry runs on signal; charges, $1.00 to $2.00 car and driver; 25c each passenger; time 
^-MILEAGE-. 20 minutes. 

_#«i Pif?"* Route 402 offers a longer but more scenic option via Chazy Landing 

Mltage FWeta ferry. This option is 35 miles longer but is all gravel and macadam. 

0.0 0.0 BURLINGTON. See Route 402 for directions to South Hero, 

23.3 miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 
0.0 0.0 South Hero, Vt., 4-corners. Straight thru. Cross RR 0.4. 
0.6 0.6 End of road; turn right. 
2.1 1.5 Left-hand road at RR; turn left. 
2.8 0.7 Fork at school ; bear right. 
3.5 0.7 End of road ; turn right. 
5.0 1.5 Left-hand road; turn left. 
5.3 0.3 Cumberland Head Ferry across Lake Champlain. 

Leaving ferry, keep straight ahead. 
9.3 4.0 4-corners; turn left onto concrete. Cross RR 10.8 — now on 

Margaret St. 

Plattsburg City Map and Points of Interest, page 358. 

11.4 2.1 PLATTSBURG, N. Y., Margaret & Bridge Sts. 

Route 405— Saratoga Springs, N. Y., to Pittsfield, Mass.— 

772 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Schuylerville, Greenwich, Cambridge, Hooslck Falls. N. Petersburg, Pownal 
and WiUiamstown. About one-half macadam; balance gravel. 

Thru a hilly farming coimtry. 

Route 408 to Albany combined with Route 306 to Pittsfield offers an all macadam 
option. 
,-MILEAGE-^ 

Total SatwM? For this and other exits see City Map, page 310. 

Mileage Point* 

0.0 0.0 SARATOGA SPRINGS, Lake Ave. & Broadway. Go east on 
Lake Ave. Avoid right-hand macadam road 2.1. Cross iron 
bridge in Grangersville 8.7. Cross RR 10.8. 
11.0 11.0 Prominent 4-corners; turn right onto Broad St. 
11.3 0.3 Schuylerville, Broad & Ferry Sts. Turn left onto Ferry St. 

Points of Interest, page 373. 

Cross two long iron bridges over Hudson river 11.5. 
11.8 0.5 Left-hand road at end of bridge; turn left up winding grade. 
15.2 3.4 Fork, store on left; bear right with trolley. Thru diagonal 

4-corners at church 17.4. 

17.8 2.6 Greenwich, 5-corners, store on right. Turn left away from 

trolley. 

17.9 0.1 3-corners, beyond concrete bridge; bear right over RR bridge. 
18.6 0.7 Fork; bear right with poles. 

19.6 1.0 Left-hand road; turn left. 



Twin Boys 

Twin-screw. Electric 

TJgrht. 10 Knots. 

Gas Engines. 

15 Touring Cars. 

ending, N. Y. 



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Section Page 335 Route 405 

23.5 3.9 End of road, school on right; turn left downgrade. Thru 
Coila 24.9. 

25.3 1.8 4-corners; turn left. 
25.5 0.2 End of road; turn left. 

26.2 0.7 Cambridge, 4-corners at hotel. Keep ahead across RR. 
26.8 0.6 4-corners at hotel; turn right. 

Straight ahead before this turn Is Route 312 to Manchester. 
Left at this turn is Route 316 to Rutland. 

27.5 0.7 Left-hand diagonal road; bear left on macadam. 
31.5 4.0 Fork; bear left. 

34.4 2.9 End of road ; turn right across small bridge. 

34.8 0.4 North Hoosick, right-hand road at store. Meeting trolley, 
turn right under RR. Bear right with trolley at end of iron 
bridge 34.9. Avoid left-hand road where trolley leaves 36.7. 

36.8 2.0 End of road; meeting trolley, turn right onto Classic St. 

36.9 0.1 Hoosick Falls,* Classic & Main Sts., bank ahead on left. Turn 

left with trolley onto Main St. 

37.3 0.4 Right-hand street, just beyond large brick school ; turn right 

onto Williard St. 

87.4 0.1 End of street; jog right and next left onto River St. Cross 

RR 37.5. 
37.8 0.4 Left-hand road, beyond RR and iron bridge; turn left along 

stream. Avoid left-hand road 40.7. , 

Left at 40.7 is Route 309 to Bennington. 

41.4 3.6 Left-hand road at small grass plot; turn sharp left. 

43.7 2.3 N. Petersburg, N. Y., irregular 4-corners, store on left. Turn 

left. Cross RRs 43.8-46.5-46.8. 

47.3 3.6 N. Pownal, Vt., fork, beyond small iron bridge. Bear right. 

48.8 1.5 End of road; turn right across bridge. 

50.4 1.6 Pownal,* Vt., 4-corners, wooden church ahead on left. Turn 

right away from trolley. Thru covered wooden bridge 51.7. 
54.4 4.0 Fork; bear right. 

54.9 0.5 End of road; turn left. 

55.0 0.1 Irregular 4-corners; bear right onto North St. 

55.2 0.2 Williamstown,* Mass., North & Main Sts., park on right. 

Turn left and follow Route 462 from mileage 36.5 balance of 

the way (22.0 miles) to Pittsfield. 

•Hoosick Falls, N. Y. (pop. 6,000, alt. 433 ft.), "Snow Hole," a cave of perpetual snow and 
is noted for its great industry, the Walter A. »ce. 

Wood Mowing ft Reaping Machine Co., which *Williametown. Mass. (pop. 3,981, alt. 604 

originated here in 1852. In 1876, at the centen- ft ;>' *™ u ? »•■* Fort Massachusetts, one 

of the frontier defenses of the state, built 



nial exhibition, Mr. Wood took the highest 
awards for his harvesters. The total number 



by the colony in 1745. The builder of that 
fort. Col. Ephraim Williams, lost his life 

of gold medals and other important prises in thc expedition against Crown Point, 

taken by him in competition with all the Qn thc main 8trectf w hich is more like 

various makes of reapers, mowers and bind- a long narrow park, are the principal build- 

ers in the world now exceed 1,200. A visit to ings of Williams college, one of the most 

the Wood . plant would no doubt prove of famous of the smaller New England insti- 

much interest. The Hoosick river, which sup- tutions, and the village churches. Thomp- 

plies valuable water power, runs thru the son memorial chapel is considered by archi- 

village in a serpentine manner, giving it a tectural authorities one of the most beauti- 

picturesque appearance from the hills. ful churches in this country. Grace Hall 

'Pownal, Vt. (pop. 1,900, alt. 500-1,000 ft.), auditorium, costing over a million dollars, 

was the first permanent settlement in Ver- is another building of note. The college ob- 

mont, settled in 1724 by people from New servatory is said to be the oldest one in 

York, among whom were the Westinghouse, the United States. 

Fiske and Hogle families. George Westing- In Mission park is the famous Haystack 

house, of electrical and manufacturing fame, monument, marking the birthplace of for- 

is a descendant, and James Fiske, Jr., the eign missions, a spot visited by tourists from 

financier, was born here. Points of interest all over the world. A tablet on Main St., 

are the Gregor Rocks, a sheer cliff several near the western edge of the village, marks 

hundred feet high, with historic legends; and the site of Fort Hoosac. 



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Routes 406-408 Page 336 Saratoga Springs 

Route 406 — Saratoga Springs, N. Y., to Manchester, Vt. — 

50.5 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

*~ Distance Via Schuylerville, Greenwich, Cambridge and Arlington. Macadam 

Total Between and gravel to Cambridge; balance gravel with some dirt. 
Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 SARATOGA SPRINGS. See Route 405 for directions to Cam- 
bridge, 26.2 miles, where reset odometer to 0.0. 
0.0 0.0 Cambridge, N. Y., 4-coraers. Straight thru. 
0.8 0.8 Irregular 4-corners — sign "Manchester" ; turn left. 

2.2 1.4 Fork, small wooden school on left; bear right. Avoid right- 

hand road 7.1. Thru covered bridge 8.2. 

8.3 6.1 End of road; turn right on narrow winding road along foot 

of mountain. Avoid left-hand road beyond small bridge 9.5. 
16.2 7.9 Arlington,* Vt., end of road, cemetery on right. Turn left. 
Thru covered bridge 17.1. 

18.2 2.0 End of road, beyond wooden bridge; turn right. 

24.3 6.1 MANCHESTER,* monument in green on right. 

Route 408 — Saratoga Springs to Albany, N. Y, — 38.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Mechanicsville, Waterford and Latham. Macadam, brick and concrete roads. 
Thru rolling farming country coming into a congested manufacturing district around 
Mechanicsville. Part of the route runs along the upper Hudson river. 

This route is longer and covers more congested territory than Route 410 via 
Schenectady. 

^" Dittanoo For this and other exits see City Map, page 310. 

Total Between " r ° 

Mileage Points 

0.0 0.0 SARATOGA SPRINGS, Broadway & Church St. at town hall. 

Go south on Broadway. Avoid right-hand diagonal street 0.5. 

Thru Malta 8.1. 
9.7 9.7 Fork; bear left with macadam. Thru Maltaville 10.0, passing 

Round lake on right. Cross RR at Willow Glen 13,9, coming 

onto Saratoga Ave. Cross RR 15.8. 
16.0 6.3 Mechanicsville,* Saratoga Ave. & Main St. Meeting trolley, 

turn right onto Main St. 
17.5 1.5 End of street; bear left with trolley, bearing right along bank 

of Hudson river. Cross RR 24.2 — now on 3rd St. 

•Arlington, Vt. (pop. 1307, alt. 689 ft.), is so Points of particular . interest include a 
situated, by reason of a break or gorge in "rocking stone" weighing 35 tons and a 
the mountains, that it has sunlight for al- "disappearing stream," the outlet to which 
most an hour later than points half a mile has ncvcr becn traccd - Ha8 one of the best 
north or south. There is fine trout fishing « d g most wideI r known * olf ««*• in the 
in the Battenkill river, which flows thru the ; MechanlcsviUe> N . Y . (pop . 10f00 0, alt. 61 
town. Ethan Allen lived in Arlington for ft }> , ay8 daim tQ the largest book paper miM 
several years; his first wife and two children in thc worM ImnW se p n es of wood, con- 
are buried here. taining thousands of cords, may be seen on 
'Manchester, Vt. (pop. 2,100, alt. 1,000 ft.), both sides of Main street, near the mill; also 
is a summer residence and resort town, made visible from Saratoga avenue en route to 
notable by frequent visits itf former years Saratoga Springs. The waste from this pulp 
of Mrs. Abraham Lincoln and Mrs. U. S. mill is utilized by other plants in the town 
Grant. Robert T. Lincoln, son of Abraham to make acetone, which is used to varnish 
Lincoln and president of the Pullman Co., airplane wings, alcohol and land plaster, 
has a home here, as have many other per- Just south of the city is the plant of the 
sons of prominence. Mount Equinox, near by, Adirondack electric power corporation, the 
rises to a height of 3,816 ft. concrete storage dam of which' is said to be 
First session of Vermont legislature was the first of its kind (concrete) built in the 
at Manchester in 1788. In 1777 the northern states. 

-if Safety" met here, and Ira Allen Col. Ellsworth, the first officer killed in the 

the plan of confiscating the prop- civil war, lies buried in Mechanicsville. A 

ies to pay Vermont's share of the monument dedicated to his memory may be 

revolution. seen upon entering the city from the south. 

_ = — —-=. 



Section 



Page 337 



Route 408 



24:7 

24.9 

25.0 

26.6 
26.7 



27.0 



27.3 
27.4 

28.4 
28.8 
80.0 
31.0 



7.2 Waterford,* 3rd & Broad Sts., meeting trolley. Turn right 
onto Broad St. 

0.2 Fork, just beyond canal; bear left with trolley onto Sara- 
toga Ave. 

0.1 Fork; bear left with trolley across iron bridge— still on Sara- 
toga Ave. Gross long iron bridge over Mohawk river 26 2. 

1.6 Ontario St.; meeting trolley, turn right upgrade, crossing RR 

0.1 Cohoes,* Ontario & Ramsen Sts., bank on right. 

Keep ahead on Ontario St., leaving trolley. Thru irregular 
4-corners just beyond small iron bridge 26.8, keeping ahead on 
Ontario St. Turn left with street 26.9. 

0.3 Right-hand street; turn right across iron bridge and at end 
of street just beyond Rlfc underpass, turn left upgrade. Turn 
right with street at sta. onto Younglove Ave. 27.1. 

0.8 End of street at sign ; turn left one block. 

0.1 End of street; meeting trolley, turn right onto Columbia St., 
passing monument on right. Trolley leaves to right 27.6. 

1.0 3-corners ; bear left. 

0.4 Right-hand road; bear right upgrade. 

1.2 End of road ; turn left with concrete. 

1.0 Latham, 4-corners, brick power house on far right. 

Left is Route 312 to Troy. 



•Waterford, N. Y. (pop. 3,500, alt. 90 ft.), the 
oldest village in New York, is situated where 
the Hudson and Mohawk rivers unite. Its 
Dutch origin is still easily traceable in the 
older houses with their little stoops built 
close to the sidewalks. Just south of the 
town are the old earthworks, evidences ot 
revolutionary activity. The building that is 
now Masonic hall has been honored by La- 
fayette as an over-night guest during one 
of his trips thru the town. Waterford is the 
eastern terminal of the barge canal, whose 



five huge locks here lift boats to a greater 
height in a shorter distance than any other 
locks in the world. 

•Cohoes, N. Y. (pop. 25,000, alt. 94 ft.), is 
one of the largest knit goods centers in the 
United States and lays claim to having the 
largest knit mill in the country, 1,100 ft. long. 
Cohoes falls, on the Mohawk river, and the 
old Van Schoeck mansion, which was used 
as General Schuyler's headquarters during 
the revolutionary war, are local interesting 
points. 



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Route 410 Page 338 Saratoga Springs 

Straight thru across trolley. Thru Newtonville 32.6. Thru 
Loudonville 34.1. 
36.1 5.1 4-corners; turn right — sign "Albany" over RR bridges 36.6. 

Albany City Map, page 260; Points of Interest, page 259. 

37.0 0.9 End of road; turn left. 

37.1 0.1 Right-hand road; turn right on Northern Blvd. 

87.8 0.7 4-corners, meeting trolley; turn left on Washington Ave. 
38.4 0.6 End of avenue, state capitol on right; turn right and imme- 
diately left with trolley on State St. 

88.7 0.3 ALBANY, State St. & Broadway, P. O. ahead on left 

For enlarged map of Congested Business District, see page 259. 

Route 410— Saratoga Springs to Albany, N. Y. — 37.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ballston Spa, Burnt Hills and Schenectady. Asphalt, brick, concrete and 
macadam all the way. Thru a fine farming section. 

Note (a) offers a connection to Scotia for west bound travel. 
Route 408 offers a good but somewhat longer option via Cohoes. 

,-MILEAGE-. 

T»t«i Betw«e? For *^^ s an( * other exits see City Map, page 310. 

Ml lease Points 

0.0 0.0 SARATOGA SPRINGS, Broadway, Lake Ave. & Church St., 

P. O. on right. Go south on Broadway. 
0.5 0.5 5-corners; bear diagonally right onto Ballston Ave. Cross RR 

and trolley 2.U. 
2.2 1.7 Left-hand road beyond stone bridge; turn left with travel. 

Turn left over Rft bridge 4.6 and right immediately beyond. 

6.2 4.0 3-corners; turn right across trolley. 

6.3 0.1 End of road; turn left across iron bridge onto Milton Ave. 

6.8 0.5 Ballston Spa,.* Front St. & Milton Ave. Turn right with trol- 

ley onto Front St. one block. 

6.9 0.1 Low St., monument on left; turn left across RR. 

7.0 0.1 End of road, brick church* on right; turn left and imme- 
diately right onto Church Ave. Thru diagonal 4-corners 7.8. 

13.6 6.6 Ballston Lake, right-hand road, store on far right. Turn 
right upgrade. 

14.6 1.0 Burnt Hills, 4-corners, P. O. on far left. Turn left. 

15.8 1.2 End of road; turn left across iron bridge. 

19.8 4.0 Fork; bear left. 

Right fork is Note (a) to 8cotla. 

Cross RRs 20.4^-20.7. 

20.9 1.1 8-corners; bear right. 

21.3 0.4 End of road, just beyond long iron bridge over Mohawk 
river; turn right. 

22.0 0.7 End of road just beyond RR, meeting trolley, turn left onto 

Nott St., along American Locomotive Works. 

Schenectady City Map and Points of Interest, page 458. 

22.1 0.1 Seward place, 2nd street beyond RR underpass; turn right. 
22.6 0.5 Union St. ; turn left one short block, then right onto Nott ter- 
race, joining trolley. 

Straight ahead on Union St. is Route 687 to Troy. 

23.0 0.4 Schenectady, Nott Terrace & State St., park on far right. 

Meeting cross-trolley, turn sharp left onto State St. along 

♦Ballston Spa, N. Y. (pop. 4,500, alt, 320 ft.), at that time the largest in the country. This 

the county teat of Saratoga county, was in- hotel, which entertained Webster, Clay, Cal- 

corporated in 1807. The first hotel, built in noun, Van Buren, Irving and Cooper, was a 

1787, is still standing though now used as a popular resort until 1887, when it was torn 

private home. Immediately back of the hotel down. 

is "Mohican Hill," made famous by Cooper's Among distinguished citizens of Ballston 
••Last of the Mohicans." In front of the Spa were Hon. John W. Taylor, speaker of 
hotel is the famous "Iron Spring," visited by the U. S. house of representatives in 1825, 
Sir William Johnson in 1767 and later by the only person ever elected speaker from the 
Washington and Lafayette. Ballston was the state of New York; General Abner Double- 
first "watering place" in the United States, day, father of baseball, and Timothy Bailey, 

id the Sans Souci hotel, built in 1803, was inventor of the knitting machine. 



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Section Fage 339 Routes 412-413 

armory. Thru Woodlawn 25.9. Same thorofare becomes 
Central Ave. 

Albany City, Map, page 260; Points of Interest, page 259. 

37.4 14.4 End of street; meeting cross-trolley, turn right and imme- 
diately left onto State St. 

37.7 0.8 ALBANY, State St. & Broadway, P. 0. on far left. 

For enlarged map of Congested Business "District, see page 259. 

Note (a) Route 410 — Connection to Route to Scotia — 2.0 m. 
Reverse Note (b) Route 585. 
Macadam road; a connection from Saratoga to route west. 

19.8 19.8 Fork; keep right. 

Left is Route 410 to Albany. 
Caution, trolley crossing under RR. bridge. 
Same thorofare becomes Ballston Ave. 
21.8 2.0 Scotia, Ballston and Mohawk Aves. at stores. 

Sharp right on Mohawk Ave. is Route 824 to Utlca. 

Route 412 — Saratoga Springs to Amsterdam, N. Y. — 26.8 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ballston Spa, Scotts Church and Manny's Corners. All macadam, except 8.7 
miles of dirt road, which may be under construction in 1921. 

A short cut from Saratoga to points west of Amsterdam, but not as good as Route 410 
to Scotia, combined with Route 324 to Amsterdam. 
^-MILEAGE-, 

Tetsl BrtwtM ^ or ^is an( * °ther exits see City Map, page 310. 

MIlMtt P«lntt 

0.0 0.0 SARATOGA SPRINGS, Broadway & Lake St., bank on right. 

Go south on Broadway. 
0.5 0.5 5-corners; bear right on Ballston Ave. 

2.0 1.5 End of avenue; turn right across trolley and RR. 

2.2 0.2 Left-hand road, beyond small stone bridge; turn left with 

travel. Go over RR bridge 4.6 — now on Saratoga Ave. Bear 
right across trolley 6.2. 

6.3 4.1 End of avenue; turn left across iron bridge onto Milton Ave. 
6.8 0.5 Ballston Spa, Front St. & Milton Ave. 

Points of Interest, opposite page. 

Turn right with trolley onto Front St. 

7.1 0.8 Fork, beyond RR underpass; bear left with trolley. 

7.2 0.1 4-corners; turn right, leaving trolley. 

16.7 9.5 Scotts Church, 4-corners, cemetery on right. Straight thru. 

Right at this 4-corners is Route 413 to Gloversvllle and Route 414 to 
Northvllle. 

19.6 2.9 End of road; turn left with poles. 

19.7 0.1 Right-hand road; turn right away from poles. 
21.2 1.5 End of road; turn left. 

22.1 0.9 Right-hand road; turn right with poles. Thru Manny's Cor- 
ners 24.0. 

Amsterdam City Map and Points of interest, page 281. 

25.8 3.7 4-corners, beyond RR crossing; turn right onto Church St. 

26.7 0.9 Main St.; meeting trolley, turn right. 

26.8 0.1 AMSTERDAM, Main & Market Sts. 

Route 413 — Saratoga Springs to Gloversville, N. Y. — 41.0 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

,— MILEAQE-^. 4l '* 

DtettsM Via Ballston Spa, Galway and Vans MlUs. Macadam to Scotts 

Tstal Bet*** Church, then dirt to Perth; balance macadam. Over rolling' country, 
micas* Pelstt 

0,0 0.0 SARATOGA SPRINGS. See Route 412 for directions to 



^ead the Editor's oAdince On 

WHAT TO TAKE ON THE TOUR 6c HOW TO PREPARE FOR IT 

—found in the front of this volume — 

A careful analysis that will help to insure the maximum pleasure from your trips. We 

recommend the articles illustrated as reliable products. 



Route 414 



Page 340 Saratoga Springs Sec. 



16.7 X6. 
19.9 3. 
23.5 3. 


24.0 
26.7 
28.9 
30.4 
.31.5 



2 
2 
1. 
1. 



38.5 7.0 



39.8 1.3 



41.0 1.2 



7 Scotts Church, 4-corners ; turj} right— sign "Galway." 
,2 Galway, 4-corners. Turn left— sign ''Gloversville." 

6 End of road; turn right, bearing left downgrade at fork 
immediately beyond. Pass ponds 0131 left and right 23.6. 

.5 Left-hand road ; turn left. 

7 Fork; beyond bridge; bear right. Thru Hills Corners 27.8. 
i.2 Perth, 4-corners. ' Turn right. 
5 Fork, bear left. Cross RR 31.3. 
1 Vails Mills. Left-hand road, turn left. Cross RR 32.0. 

Gloversvllle City Map, page 285; Points of interest, page 284. 

Right-hand road, turn right — sign "Gloversville." Cross RR 

and double trolley 39.5; — coming onto Harrison $t. 

End of street; meeting trolley, turn right on S. Main St. 

Cross RR and trolley 40.4. 

GLOVERSVILLE, Main & Fulton Sts. 



Route 414— Saratoga Springs to Northville, N. Y.— 37.7 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Ballston Spa and Galway. With connection for Sacandaga Park. Macadam to 
Scotts Church, balance sand and dirt. Thru a hilly farming section. The shortest 

,-MlLEAGE-^ way between the above terminals. 

T . . JifJ* 1100 Route 410 to Scotia combined with Route 324 to Amsterdam and 

Mi taw Points Route 326 to Northville offers an all macadam option. 

0.0 0.0 SARATOGA SPRINGS. See Route 412 for directions to 
i&7 16.7 Scotts Church, 4-corners. Turn right. 
19.8 3.1 Galway, 4-corners at park. Straight thru. 

0.4 Fork, bear left. 

3.1 End .of road at church ; turn left. 

0.5 End of road at school; turn right. 

0.5 4-corners; turn left — sign "Northville." 

1.7 Hagedorn's Mills, end of road. Turn right across iron 
bridge. Thru Northampton* 31.5. 

6.0 Left-hand road; turn left. Thru 4-corners 34.3. 

5.7 NORTHVILLE, flag pole on left. 

Straight ahead is Route 326 to Speculator. 

For Sacandaga Park turn left on macadam across long iron bridge. 

At 4-corners 38.2, turn left with macadam to Sacandaga Park 38.6. 



20.2 
23.3 
23.8 
24.8 
26.0 

32.0 
37.7 



♦Northampton, N. Y. (pop. 500), is situated 
iin a picturesque wooded valley near con- 
fluence of Sacandaga river and Vly creek. 
It is the location of the celebrated "Fish 
,'House," a two- room block-house erected about 
J1760 by Sir Wm. Johnson, commissioner of 
Undian affairs for England prior to the revo- 
lution, and used by him when hunting or 
Ashing in the Sacandaga. This building 
stands on the grounds now owned by Lucy 
Sinclair, River street, east side of highway. 
The Fish House hotel, built by .Hon. John 
Fay in 1805, is still in use. Old Shew farm, 
given by Johnson to Godfrey Shew, located 
on north side of highway between the two 



villages, Fish House and Fayville, was first 
cleared land in Sacandaga valley; old spring 
still furnishes ample supply for the present 
owner. 

The Shew family were taken prisoners by 
Tories and Indians June 2, 1778; the father 
and two sons were taken to Canada, thence 
to Halifax, and exchanged in Boston, except 
John Shew, who was taken farther back into 
Canada by the Indians, but later escaped 
and returned home. House and barns were 
burned by Indians or Tories at this time. 
Mrs. Shew and small children were allowed 
to go to Johnstown, a distance of 18 miles, 
through the woods. 



For List of Desirable See the General Index of Towns, 
ACCOMMODATIONS— alphabetically arranged, back of book 



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Elizabethtown Section Page 341 Route 421 

Elizabethtown Section 

POINTS OF INTEREST, ELIZABETHTOWN, N. Y. 

Elizabethtown, N. Y. (pop. 1,200, alt. 600 ft.). county seat of Essex county for more than a 

A popular resort near the west shore of lake century and is noted for its picturesque 

Champlain. In 1789 Captain Piatt Rogers cut mountain scenery. Nearby . are Wood Hill 

a road thru from the south to the north, re- (1,240 ft.), Green Hill (1,400 ft.), Mt. Cobble 

ceiving therefor a patent of land still referred (1,700 ft.), Mt. Noble (2,900 ft.). Other points 

to as "Rogers Patent." Elizabethtown was of interest are Silver Cascade, Rice's Falls, 

settled in 1791 and up to and some time later Beulah Land and Hurricane mountain, which 

than 1800 this town was inhabited by more towers 3,687 ft. The old state arsenal is now 

Indians than white men. It has been the a hotel. 

Route 421 — Elizabethtown to Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

—96.6 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Chestertown, Lake George and Glens Falls. Macadam all the way. The 
shortest and best way between Elizabethtown and Saratoga Springs. A very pretty 
drive thru the Adirondacks, passing Schroon lake and several other small lakes. The 
road is winding and rolling thru the woods. 

Route 429 via Tlconderoga furnishes an option from Elizabethtown to Lake George 
^-MILEAGE-^ This is more scenic tho longer and with less favorable road conditions 
•■•-♦.■ SiJlfJl^ and necessitates using a steamer from Sabbath Day Point or route from 
if ilea* Points Ticonderoga to Schroon Lake. 

0.0 0.0 ELIZABETHTOWN, at hotels. Go south with macadam, 
crossing iron bridge 2.0 — fine views of mountains. Thru 
New Russia 4.1. Thru Underwood 11.&. 

22.2 22.2 Schroon River, P. 0. on left; straight ahead. 

Right at 22.4 is Note (a) to Long Lake. 

22.6 0.4 Fork, bear left. Cross iron bridge 26.9. 

Left-hand road 28.5 is Route 386 to Tlconderoga via Paradox ana 
Pyramid Lakes. 

31.5 8.9 Schroon Lake,* church on left. Keep ahead. 

37.3 5.8 Taylors-on-Schroon. Keep ahead on a winding road up and 

down hill, thru woods. 
41.1 3.8 Pottersville, end of road at stores. Bear left 

Pass Echo lake on right 42.1. Along shore of Loon lake 44.1. 
46.1 5.0 Loon Lake Village, end of road. Turn left across causeway 

over arm of I. "on lake. 

Right be/on- this turn is Route 383 to Long Lake via Newcomb. 

50.0 3.9 Fork, church in center; keep right. 

50.1 0.1 Chestertown, irregular 4-corners. Turn right. 

Left before this turn is Route 385 to Hague. 

Pass Tripp Lake on left 53.9. 

62.3 12.2 Warrensburg, 5-corners, water trough and P. O. on right. 
Straight thru, joining trolley. Follow winding road on 
steady downgrade. Same thorofare becomes Canada St. 

68.5 6.2 Lake George,* court house on left. Straight thru. 

70.0 1.5 Fork, bear left. 

Right is Route 422 to Saratoga Springs via Luzerne. 

Follow winding macadam, using caution for curves along 
ravine. Thru French Mountain 72.6. Join trolley from left 

•Schroon Lake, N. Y. (pop. 1,225, alt. 912 ft.). and has been the scene of many thrilling his- 

The lake itself is long, narrow and pictur- toric events. West of the railroad station, 

esque; in valley to west of Kayaderossera n «*r Lake George village, are the ruins of 

range; name given to mountain, lake and ancient forts and there also stands the monu- 



river by early French settlers at Crown Point 



ment erected in 1903 to commemorate the 

. , , ,, . _ . . , , battle of Lake George, in which General John- 

,n honor of Madam Scarron, widow of cele- m wM| w§ afmy of ^ dcfcated ^ 

brated French dramatist and novelist. Paul French undcr Baron Dieskan on September 

Scarron. It appeared as "Scarron" in some 8f 1755 Two regattas are held annually dur- 

of the early maps; subsequently changed to j ng the month of August. The lake offers 

Schroon. Besides Taylors-on-Schroon, South excellent fishing. Trout, salmon, pickerel and 

Schroon and Schroon Lake, there are settle- perch abound in large numbers. Bolton road, 

merits and camps on both sides. Lake is fed known as "Millionaires' Row," begins at the 

by Schroon river, along which are Schroon village of Lake George, continuing along the 

falls and farther notth. Schroon River village. west shore as far as Bolton Landing. Beau- 

*Lake George, N. Y- {alt. 320 ft.), a popular tiful views of the surrounding country ma- 

summer resort. The lake is 32 miles long had along this route. 

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Elizabethtown Section Page 343 Route 422 

76.2— coming onto Glen St. 

Glens Fails City Map and Points of Interest, page 312. 

77.9 7.9 Glens Falls, Glen Ridge, Warren & Main Sts. 

Straight ahead with trolley on Main St.\ Cross long concrete 
bridge over Hudson river 78.2. 

78.8 0.9 South Glens Falls, irregular 4-corners. Turn right on Sara- 

toga Ave. with trolley. 

79.4 0.6 Fork, bear right. Thru Wilton 89.2. Cross RR 98.7. 

95.5 16.1 Right-hand road; turn right on Maple Ave. Cross RR 96.1. 

Saratoga Springs City Map and Points of Interest, page 310. 

96.3 0.8 Right-hand road; turn right on Van Dam St. 

96.4 0.1 4-corners, turn left on Broadway. 

96.6 0.2 SARATOGA SPRINGS, Broadway, Church St. ft Lake Ave. 

Note (a) Route 421 — Schroon River to Long Lake— 38.2 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
Via Blue Ridge — gravel and macadam. 
0.0 0.0 SCHROON RIVER, at P. O. Start south on main road. 
0.4 0.4 Right-hand road; turn right. 

2.4 2.0 Blue Ridge, straight thru. 

17.6 15.2 Tahawus, curve left. Cross Hudson river 22.6. 
24.4 6.8 Newcomb, straight thru. 

38.2 13.8 LONG LAKE. 

Straight ahead is Route 383 to Chestertown. 

Route 422 — Lake George to Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

—32.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Luzerne and Corinth. Macadam roads all the way. 
^-MILEAGC-^ A pretty drive thru the Adirondacks and over rolling farming 

Distance country. 
ftHtoaoe^oTnts 1 Route 421 offers an excellent option via Glens Falls. 

0.0 0.0 LAKE GEORGE, court house on left. Go south with trolley 
on Canada St. ' 

1.5 1.5 Fork; bear right under trolley thru Adirondacks. 

11.7 10.2 Right-hand road at small bridge; turn right downgrade. 

11.9 0.2 3-corners, factory in center; bear left. 

12.1 0.2 Luzerne,* irregular 4-corners, P. O. on right. Turn right. 

Cross iron bridge over Hudson river 12.2, going thru Hadley 
just beyond. 
12.6 0.5 4-corners, sign on right; turn left. 

' Straight ahead is Route 424 to Northville. 

17.9 5.3 Corinth,* right-hand road at monument. Turn right. 
Avoid right-hand diagonal road 18.1. 

18.2 0.3 Fork; bear left. Cross RRs 18.4-20.0. 

22.1 3.9 S. Corinth, left-hand diagonal road at store. Bear left. 

25.2 3.1 End of road, just beyond RR underpass; bear right. Thru 

Greenfield Center 27.0. Caution for RR 29.0. Same thoro- 
fare becomes Church St. 

Saratoga Springs City Map and Points of Interest, page 310. 

"Luzerne, N. Y. (pop. 2,000, alt. 642 ft.), of the Mohawk nation. A work of art of the 
is a summer resort lying in a lovely valley red men still remains, i. e., stone steps lead- 
between the Kayderosseras and Luzerne ing down a high embankment to the river, 
ranges of the Adirondacks. It was named These steps were built and used by the In- 
after Chevalier de la Luzerne, a special envoy dians that they might gain quick access to 
of Louis XVI to America during the revo- the river. Above the falls on the Hudson 
lutionary war. Tne lake of this name is often river there is a stretch of smooth water five 
referred to as "A Pearl set in Emeralds." miles long and navigable for small craft. The 
There are many picturesque drives and walks great falls with the gorge above them are 
around the lake. A short distance west of very picturesque. Corinth is the home of 
the Hudson are Hunt, Jenny and Efner lakes, the largest plant of the International Paper 
where good fishing is found. company, employing over 700 men. The 

♦Corinth, N. Y. (pop. 2,858, alt. 600 ft.), lies Cluett-Peabody shirt factory is also located 

at the gateway of a chain of three lakes, viz., here. Among its distinguished citizens was 

Hunt, Jenny and Efner, which are popular John Perqua, a Hessian soldier in the revo- 

summer resorts, dotted with camps for boys lution, who deserted the ranks and entered 

and girls. Corinth was first called "Jessups the American army. Daniel Bordman built 

Landing/' This section thruout was the well- a grist mill here in 1792 and in 1800 oth' 

known Kay-ad-er-os-se-ra hunting ground erected lumber mills. 

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Elizabethtown Section Page 345 

18.9 



Route 426 



9.8 End of road, bear right upgrade. 

Sharp left leads to ferry for Chimney Point and is Note (c) Route 
390 to Vergennes. 

19.2 0.3 Port Henry,* band stand in 3-corners. Bear left. 

Right is Route 427 to Schroon Lake. 

19.5 0.3 Fork, keep right under RR. 

21.2 1.7 Fork; bear left on winding road. 

26.5 5.3 Crown Point,* 4-corners at water trough. Turn left. 



♦Port Henry, N. Y. (pop. 2,266V alt. 120 ft.). 
An ancient village on a mountain slope over- 
looking Lake Champlain, and a terminal of 
the barge canal. It is a shipping point for 
iron ore mined in this vicinity. When navi- 
gation is open there is a ferry crossing Bul- 
wagga bay from Port Henry to the state 
memorial lighthouse on Crown Point. 

•Crown Point, N. Y. (pop. 2,000, alt. 126 ft.). 
Situated on the shores of Lake Champlain 
midway between Ticonderoga and Port 
Henry. The state road passes directly thru 
the village. In former years it was noted 
for its rich iron ore mines and large quanti- 
ties of lumber. Recent years have been de- 
voted to agricultural pursuits resulting in 
producing one of the largest and most suc- 
cessful creameries in northern New York. 
The village has a beautiful park and soldiers' 
monument erected to the memory of the 
members of the 5th N. Y. cavalry who lost 
their lives in the civil war. 

The town derives its name from the 
"Point" six miles distant, where is located 
the ruins of the two forts — Fort St. Frederic, 
built by the French, 1731-1734-1742, and the 
English fortress, built by Lord Sir Jeffrey 
Amherst, 1759 and 1770. On this "point" is 
located the state park, the Crown Point res- 
ervation and the Champlain memorial built 
by the Tercentenary Commission at a cost of 
$97,000. Inside this reservation are the ruins 
of the two forts, the walls of which have 
been and are being repaired and preserved by 
the state of New York at great expense. 
The grounds have been beautified and a sub- 



stantial building has been erected for the 
comfort and convenience of the thousands of 
tourists who visit the park during the season. 

Historical writers allude to this "point" 
as the "key to America." It was here that 
Samuel De Champlain, the, discoverer of the 
lake, with his Indian allies, the Algonquins 
and the Hurons, landed and fought and de- 
feated a large war party of Iroquois Indians 
the morning of the 30th of July, .1009. 

The Fort St. Frederic, built in 1731, and 
enlarged in 1742, was military base and head- 
quarters of the .French armies during the 
French and Indian wars, 1754-1759, and was 
destroyed by order of Montcalm in Septem- 
ber, 1758. The ruined fort was captured by 
Amherst July 1, 1759. Fort Crown Point wap 
started in August the same summer and was 
abandoned in September, 1770, after it had 
been worked on for eleven years at an ex- 
penditure of two million pounds. 

To Reach the State Park-Crown Point 
Reservation: 

Traveling north leave the state road at 
Indian ridge just north of the village and 
follow the gravel road, keeping to the right 
until you reach the reservation; distance 6 
miles. 

Traveling south leave the state road at the 
head of the bay, 4 miles from Port Henry, 
turning to the left keep to the left and follow 
. the gravel road until you reach the reserva- 
tion; distance from state road 4 miles. 

A steam ferry crosses the lake from the 
park every two hours during the day. 



1787 



FOLLOW THE WHITE BANDED POLES FOB 



1021 



LARRABEE'S POINT AUTO FERRY 

TICONDEROGA NEW YORK 

Shortest Lake Champlain Ferry — 8 minutes— Connecting Ticonderoga with the White 

and Green Mountains. The ONLY Ferry having an All Gravel Road on the Vermont 

Side South of Burlington. 



-) 




Torf Ticonderoga. 

WeitZarrcckt O 



Fort Ticonderoga 

Built by the French 1755 

Captured by the British .... 1759 
Captured by the Americans .1775 
Captured by the British .... 1777 
Surrendered to Americans . . 1777 

Fort and Museum are open to the"public 
from May 1st to October 31st 



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toute 426 Page 346 Elizabethtown Section 

7.2 0.7 Right-hand road, turn right. 

Straight ahead at 27.2 is Note (b) on Route 390 to Middlebury, Vt. 

3.8 6.6 Fork; bear right. 

5.1 1.3 Ticonderoga,* 4-corners, at water trough (outskirts of town). 
Turn right. 

Left leads into center of Ticonderoga 0.5 m., connecting there with 
Route 429 to Rutland. 

Ticonderoga, N. Y. (pop. 3,000, alt. 277 ft.). English after coming into this fortress 

ere is the outlet of Lake George, which falls strengthened and enlarged it at heavy ex- 

[> feet in 1J4 miles and affords excellent P e " e - *» ™\ ** *" ta A k f cn ^om the English 

* mr. . £ . it under Colonel Ethan Allen and two years 

ater power. This town figured prominently , A .,. * j . ~ t« 

... . . . . , later it was recaptured by General Burgoyne. 

inng the colonial and revolutionary periods. Aftcr the war - t bccame a picturesquc ruillf 

ie French erected a fort here in 1755 and but since has becn rcbuilt and ig locatc d C n 
lied it Fort Carrillon. In 1759 Lord Amherst * high bluff about two miles south of the 
reed the French to evacuate it, and the town. 



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Elizabethtown Section Page 347 Routes 427-429 

44.1 9.0 Hague, monument in 3-corners ; bear left. 

Right is Route 430 to Chestertown. 

Pass Silver Bay P. O. on right 47.8. 
49.9 5.8 Sabbath Day Point. Turn sharp left. 

Right is poor road over Tongue Mountain — very steep and dan- 
gerous. 

50.0 0.1 Boat-landing for Bolton (or Lake George). 

Bolton Landing. Straight out from landing to 

50.2 0.2 End of road; turn left past Bolton P. O. on right 51.8. 

Thru Marion 54.3. Tfcru Diamond Point 55.9. 
59.8 9.6 LAKE GEORGE,* 4-corners, court house on left. 

Route 427— Port Henry to Schroon Lake, N. Y.— 27.3 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 
s-MILEAGE-s Via Schroon River. Macadam to north of Schroon River; balance 

▼.*-■ Sii&J 1 ^ narrow gravel and gravelly dirt roads. A very pretty trip, thru woods 
MuStt pIRS practically all the way. 

0.0 0.0 PORT HENRY, at band stand. Go west on Broad St. upgrade. 

1.4 1.4 Right-hand diagonal road; bear right. 

2.9 1.5 Moriah Center at stores. Straight thru. 

12.8 9.9 End of road; turn right with travel. 

15.6 2 8 End of road, wooden church on right; turn left. 

18.1 2.5 Schroon River, store on left. Straight thru. 
18.5 0.4 3-corners; bear left upgrade. 

27.3 8.8 SCHROON LAKE, church on left. 

Right is Note (a) on Route 421 to Newcomb. 
Straight ahead is Route 421 to Saratoga Springs. 

Route 429— Ticonderoga, N. Y., to Rutland, Vt.— 37.4 m. 

For Accommodations see Index of Towns, Back of Book. 

Via Montcalm Ferry, Orwell and Brandon. First 2 miles macadam; then dirt and 
gravel with some clay to Brandon; balance gravel. 

Thru hilly country and past many abandoned farms. 

From Sudbury, Route 453 to Castleton combined with Route 316 offers an option. 

Either the Latrabee Point or Montcalm ferry may be taken from Ticonderoga. For 
Larrabee Point Ferry, see Note (a). 

<— MILEAOE-> Ferry runs on signal from opening of navigation until June 15, 7 a. m. 

Tatai SISSl? to 6 P- m - From June 15 to close of navigation, daylight until dark. 
M I lea* Points Rates: Car and passengers, 50c to $1.25, according to size of car. 

0.0 0.0 TICONDEROGA, N. Y., Main & Exchange Sts. Go east on 
Exchange St. 

0.4 0.4 Fork beyond switch ; bear right. Cross RR 1.4. 

2.0 1.6 Montcalm. Turn left across RR to Ferry — across Lake Cham- 
plain. 

From Ferry landing ascend grade. Caution for right curves 
2.5. 

Right at 7.6 is Route 391 to Fairhaven and Manchester. 

•Lake George, N. Y. (alt. 320 ft.), a popular under Baron Dieskan on September 8, 1755. 

summer resort, The lake is 32 miles long Two regattas are held annually during the 

and has been the scene of many thrilling his- month of August. The lake offers excellent 

toric events. West of the railroad station, fi » hin *\ T t rout * 8almon ' I**" 1 a ° d P erch 

near Lake George village, are the ruins of *^™^™^™*"J^*™ 

^ . . as "Millionaires' Row," begins at the village 

ancient forts and there also stands the monu- of Lakc ^^ continuing along thc wc8t 

ment erected in 1903 to commemorate the 8horc as far as Bolton Lading. Beautiful 

battle of Lake George, in which General John- v i C ws of the surrounding country may be 

son with his army of 2,200 defeated the French had along this route. 



HIAWATHA HOUSE overlooking lake george 

Mrs. Albert McCabe, Proprietor Good Home Cooking 

Sabbath Day Point New York tourists' patronage solicited 



Sabbath JDaV Point HoUSe Boats carrying autos leave for Bolton or 

-. _ t J Lake George, 8:25 a.m. and 2:15 p.m. 

Open June 1st to October 1st From Bolton Landing for Sabbath Day 

Sabbath Day Point New York Polnt 10:5 ° am - and 8:80 pm * 



OO 



gtF 



Route 429 Page 348 Elizabethtown Section 

7.9 5.9 Orwell, Vt.,* 4-corners. Straight thru upgrade. 

10.7 2.8 Right-hand road at small green; turn right. 

10.9 0.2 Left-hand road— sign "Brandon"; turn left. 

12.9 2.0 End of road, stone school on left ; turn left. 

Right Is Route 463 to Castieton Corners. 

13.1 0.2 Sudbury,* wooden church on right. Straight thru. 

14.6 1.5 Fork; bear right with travel and poles. 

15.1 0.5 End of road; turn right. 

17.2* 2.1 Left-hand road; turn left thr* covered wooden bridge. 

19.7 k 2.5 Fork beyond RR bridge; bear right. 

20.7 1.0 Prominent 4-corners; keep straight ahead between park and 
monument onto Main St. 

Left at monument is Route 399 to Burlington. 

Avoid left-hand road at stone bridge 21.0. Now on Center St. 

21.